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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1966

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Array Is
Batman
THE UBYSSEY
Mickey
Mouse ?
Vol.  XLVIII, No. 61
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1966
CA 4-3916
New brief
recognizes
students
By ANNE BALF
Students should have much
more voice in the administration of their university, according to a report on Canadian university government.
The bulk of the report, released in Ottawa this week,
will not be available to the
public.
It deals with the operation
of the Senate, Board of Governors, and Faculty Associations and their relationships.
Only three pages of the 97-
page report are concerned with
the relationship of students to
university government.
• •      •
President John  B.  Macdonald has the only copy of the
report at UBC.
He has made the section on
student involvement available
to The Ubyssey.
The report was drawn up
by the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
and the Canadian Association
of University Teachers.
The report recommends students elect a rector to represent their interests on the
Board of Governors.
The Rector would not be a
student, but would be easily
accessible to students for consultation.
The Rector could be either
a well-established figure or a
lesser-known younger man, but
he should participate conscientiously and have the student interest at heart, said the
report.
• *      *
The report also recommends
joint student-faculty committees for each department to discuss academic matters with
equal numbers of student and
faculty members.
The committees would meet
at least once a year to discuss
courses, lectures, seminars,
labs, library facilities, and
quality of teaching.
The report makes no definite recommendations on student representation on the
Senate.
"There will undoubtedly be
times when it will prove embarrassing to have students
present while faculty and administration are washing the
university's dirty linen in the
Senate or on its committees.
"But it is better for the stu-
dens to learn of these unpleasantnesses firsthand," the
report says.
• *      •
The report also suggests a
revision of the role of the
Senate.
It recommends that the Senate should become a purely
academic body.
It also recommends that the
Senate elect three of its members to the Board of Governors.
The $50,000, 30,000-word
report was the result of a two-
year study of 35 Canadian universities   and  colleges.
—  dennis  qans  photo
MUSSOC'S BATMAN
. . . Mussoc's pres batmatizes campus
Defender of truth
startles students
Batman was here Wednesday.
And, of course, in his never-ending struggle for justice
he again triumphed over evil.
The popular defender of truth first appeared at a
UBC Musical Society general meeting where he startled
members by swinging down from the rafters on his Bat-
rope.
Later during a quick swoop around campus, his visit
to the Ubyssey office was cut short when he learned of an
army of fraternity types massing on the North Brock stairs.
Rather than face the pack, Batman dramatically lept
through a tiny window, and fled to a Brock Extension
office.
Later Batman, unmasked, was found to have a distinct
resemblance to Mussoc president Steve Chitty.
SUB vote
signatures
collected
Br BERT HILL
Charlie Boylan, AMS first vice president elect, has collected enough signatures to force a student referendum on
the student union building.
The referendum would ask
students if they want to delay
the project for one year to
evaluate it and alternatives.
The petition also calls for a
delay on the calling of tenders
until after the referendum.
Boylan said Wednesday he
had collected about 600 signatures, 100 more than necessary,
to force a referendum.
"I would like to get about
1,000 signatures to show the
student concern on this issue.
The list will be presented to the
new AMS council in (May after
the general meeting," said Boylan.
The general meeting is
March 24.
"I feel it is essential that the
students have one last chance
to decide on SUB after a good,
fair debate."
Boylan said he had heard
varying figures about the cost
of delaying or stopping the project.
"But I think it would foe
better to spend the money
rather than mortgage the students' future for 15 years," he
said.
AMS treasurer Mike Sommers said 45 per cent of the
architect's contract will have
been paid by May 1.
The architect is now on the
working drawings or final
plans which will be submitted
to the various clubs for study.
Sommers said he would have
a statement of exact costs of
delaying for one year and complete stopping of the project
ready today.
ONLY TWO REASONS
Tanks for the memories
Engineers tank people for
only two reasons.
Because they like them or
because they don't like them.
The red mass decided Wednesday they liked AMS president-elect Peter Braund and
first vice-president elect Charlie Boylan — so they tanked
them.
They also decided they
didn't like outgoing student
union building chairman
Roger McAfee — so they
tanked him.
McAfee, Braund and Boylan
had presented their respective
views on SUB to the red
jackets.
CHARLIE BOYLAN
. . affectionate move
The engineers in turn expressed their sentiments in
the usual aquatic way.
Explaining why McAfee
was dunked, first-year
engineering president Graham Percy said engineers are
against construction of SUB.
"We think all buildings
should be equipped with a
common room. AMS money
should not be wasted on
another playpen for arts
types."
Another EUS member explained, Braund and Boylan
were tanked to initiate them
into their new positions on
council, "as a sign of affection."
UBC grant
announced
next week
How much money UBC will
get from the B.C. government
next term will be announced
in 10 days, The Ubyssey learned Wednesday.
Provincial education director S. N. F. Chant, chairman
of the university advisory committee, said the committee has
almost finished its report.
The committee, made up of
four government representatives and a representative from
each university, decides the
breakdown of the government
university grant between UBC,
Simon Fraser Academy, and
Victoria College.
UBC president John Macdonald said last month if the
committee divides the grant
"equitably" there will be no
fee increase next year.
B.C. premier W. A. C. Bennett said in the legislature
Tuesday he doesn't "think
there will be a fee increase
this year."
But he refused to say categorically there would be no
tee increase.
Bennett also refused to say
how much the universities'
combined requests exceeded
the government grant.
Liberal and NDP members
objected that they couldn't tell
whether the government grant
was fair unless they knew how
much the universities had requested and why.
Said Gordon Dowding (NDP-
Burnaby): "It's a breach of
every rule of Parliament that
you come before the house and
ask it to spend $25 million and
not justify that expense. You
are cloaking the basic justification  of this expenditure."
Education minister Les Peterson had earlier announced
the value of bursaries would
be boosted by $50,000 and the
one-third tuition fee grant will
be extended to another 1,000
students.
MARRIED
HOUSING BRIEF
(SEE PAGE 3) Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 17, 1966
— powell hargrave photo
HALT! DEMANDS Alpha Tau Omega  goalie as Fiji-driven lacross ball flies towards him
in   inter-murals  field   lacross  game.   Ball   kept coming anyway to help the Fijis win 4-0.
AMS APPOINTS
SEVEN CHAIRMEN
Brock officials named
The AMS is in the midst of
its annual appointments to its
bureaucracy chairmanships.
Third year philosophy and
sociology student Daphne Kelgard has been appointed local
chairman for the Canadian
Union of Students. She served
on the committee this year as
co-ordinator of international
affairs.
Peter Ramsay, commerce
III, was appointed head of Canadian University Service Overseas Monday
Third year economics and
political science student David
Hoye was appointed chairman
of the World University Service Committee. He has been
in WUSC for three years, serving the last one as scholarship
chairman.
The chairmanship of the
intramural committee was
awarded to Gordon Cameron,
phys. ed. III.
Second year philosophy and
political science student Brian
Plummer was appointed head
of special events.
Plumber was special events
vice-chairman this year. He
said   he   "plans   to   bring   the
best special events to the most
people at the lowest price."
Third year home economics
student Heather Douglas has
been   appointed  chairman   of
the   high    school    conference
committee.
The frosh orientation chairman for 1966-67 is Jack Shaffer, arts III.
R-squad member blasts
UBC students tor apathy
UBC students have become apathetic towards radar
traps.
H. Michael Williams, charter member of the R-squad
reported: indignately that only two out of 17 passing motorists flashed their lights to warn of a radar trap on Marine
Drive near Totem Park.
The R-squad was set up in 1961 to warn university
motorists of sneaky RCMP radar traps.
Two members from The Ubyssey photo department
stormed out in an ancient Austin to find the trap, but
failed.
CUS sponsors
seminar trip
Anxious about your identity?
The topic of the annual Canadian Union of Students seminar, to be held at the University of Waterloo Aug. 28 to
Sept. 4, is Identity and Anxiety: Crisis in a student generation.
Delegates will hear lectures
and discuss the causes of problems of student identity, mental health and their effects.
The cost of sending the eight
UBC delegates to Waterloo,
Ontario will be born by CUS.
Deadline for applications,
which are available in the
AMS and CUS offices in Brock,
is March 24.
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12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
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Evenings    —    Students 50c    Adults 75c
Skate Rental 35c per pair — Skate Sharpening 35c pair
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
Your chance
to be heroic
If you've got lots of time
and a foolhardy spirit, you
need The Ubyssey.
Applications are now being
received in the North Brock
offices for all positions on the
1966-67   editorial  board.
Cut-off date is next Monday,
leaving the weekend to brood
about it all.
For those who aren't quite
sure what an application is or
what the open positions are,
see The Ubyssey's office bulletin board.
We  are  listed  in   "BIRDCALLS"
under "FLORISTS"
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TEACHERS  WANTED
School District No. 4
Windermere
Applications are invited from teachers wishing to teach
in the Windermere region for the coming year, 1966-1967.
Vacancies will occur in the Primary. Intermediate, and
Secondary fields.
Specialists are required in the Secondary Schools for:
Home Economics
Girls, Counselling
The Windermere School District, in the southern portion
of the Columbia Valley, offers very pleasant living and
fine recreation opportunities. The schools are modern and
well-equipped.
Salaries:       EB $4400-$6725
EA $4930-$7380 PB $6150-$955O
PE $56MK$8410 PA $6570-$10,395
PC $5460-$8260 PA (Masters) $6720-$10,545
Please apply to:
E. E. LEWIS,
District Superintendent of Schools,
Box 580, Kimberley, B.C.
Interviews may be arranged during March 14th-19th at
the office of Student Services, U.B.C. or the Devonshire
Hotel, Vancouver. Thursday, March  17,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
END  AGREEMENT
— powell hargrave photo
WHY ARE SOME girls in this picture wearing hats? Because they are "guys" in an all-
girl square dancing class. The hats are so the girls can tell the difference.
Faculty association calls
for far-out residences
By SUE GRANSBY
The university endowment
lands Should be opened up for
future residence development,
a faculty association brief
recommends to the board of
governors.
The brief, presented to the
board March 1, is a result of
the proposal for planned faculty-married student residences near Acadia Camp.
The brief says: "Despite repeated rumors and representations over the past 17 years,
there has been no significant
action on the opening up of
the endowment lands, and
there may well be further
delays.
"Meanwhile the university's
housing needs are urgent and
can only be met by projects on
campus land.
"If and when the development   of  the   lands   is   imple
mented, the (faculty) association plans to encourage development of several housing
schemes."
The brief also says one of
the projects would toe for faculty and use of this project
would leave the planned faculty-student residences to students alone.
"Their (married students')
need for additional housing is
almost unlimited," the brief
says.
The brief, based on the results of a faculty survey, also
suggests plans for the new residence.
It sugests 50 apartments for
new faculty members with 100
apartments for student families.
The faculty association
wants it to be built on 15 acres
of land: adjacent to Acadia
Camp, part of 35 acres reserved for future housing.
General meeting votes
on revised constitution
Constitutional revision will make up the bulk of the
AMS general meeting to be held noon March 24.
The meeting in the armoury,
open to all students, will discuss 22 revisions — 11 controversial and 11 non-controversial.
If all the revisions are
passed:
• There would be no frosh
president on council next year.
• The AMS president
would receive a salary or honorarium for a full twelvemonth year.
• The student council
would be able to call for a
referendum.
• A referendum would
have to present a "yes" or
"no" alternative with no possibility of ambiguity.
• Student court would be
able to add separate and alternate questions to any referendum initiated by petition.
• No referendum could be
binding unless 15 per cent of
the active members vote and
there is a two-thirds majority
except in the case of an AMS
fee-change referendum,  which
requires a  20 per   cent  vote.
Constitutional revisions
chairman Garth Brown will
present his own ideas for revision which would institute
proportional faculty representation.
Apart from revisions, the
agenda will consist of reports
from the treasurer and president, the appointment of the
auditors, and the presentation
of Honorary Activities Awards.
A quorum of 1,600 students,
10 per cent of the student
body, is required.
Faculty housing is needed
for more than 100 new faculty
members, who are appointed
each year. Rental accommodation is difficult to find for
those with families.
The brief points out lack of
adequate housing as a serious
factor in recruiting and retaining staff.
The apartments will be offered to new appointees to faculty
and research positions who will
pay higher rent than students
for similar accommodation.
The brief also contains results of the questionnaire on
which it is based.
The survey was conducted in
December, 1965 on faculty
members appointed in 1964-65.
Of the 110 persons who returned  questionnaires:
• Ninety-four per cent are
from outside B.C.
• Ninety per cent are married and 66 per cent have children.
• Approximately 50 per cent
of the newcomers were left to
their own resources in finding
accommodation.
• Fifty-eight per cent went
to the UBC Housing Office for
help and only nine per cent
found enough help there.
• Thirty per cent asked
their department for help and
only 37 per cent of these found
this aid sufficient.
• Twenty-five per cent are
still not satisfied. They either
live too far from UBC or the
size of their accommodation is
inadequate.
• Eighty per cent are interested in living in apartments
such as those proposed on campus land.
The faculty association is
awaiting approval of the brief
from the board of governors.
UBC dance club sponsors
amateur competition here
Saturday is blue and gold day for UBC's dance club.
The club's annual Blue and Gold dance competition
takes place at 8 p.m. at Vancouver Tech. High School auditorium.
Amateur dancers from B.C. and Washington will try
for prizes in several ballroom dancing categories.
Music union offer
rejected by AMS
By ANNE BALF
Campus organizations may soon be able to have only
non-union bands at their dances.
Student council Monday
night approved a letter terminating the agreement between
the AMS and the Musician's
Mutual Protective Union.
A union spokesman told The
Ubyssey Wednesday that if the
AMS had no agreement with
the union, it would not be
able to hire union musicians.
"If a union band does accept
a job for the AiMS, it will be
in trouble with the union," the
spokesman said.
She would not specify what
kind of trouble.
The agreement, made in
1958, provided a wage scale
and required that stand-by
bands be hired for all dances.
The union wanted the AMS
to sign a new agreement with
a revised wage scale and stricter provisions.
They were negotiating a similar agreement with Simon
Fraser.
But UBC and SFA councils
decided, in consultation with
their solicitors, they would not
benefit by the new agreement
and would be better off without one.
President-elect Peter Braund
explained organizations could
avoid possible blacklisting by
the union either toy renting a
hall and band in a package deal
or by hiring the band in the
name of an individual.
PETER   BRAUND
. . . explains all
Special events chairman
Dave Lui protested that the
lack of a union agreement
would make it difficult for his
committee to get name musicians.
Garth Brown urged council
to investigate possible consequences before sending the letter.
Amid protests of guests and
incoming first vice-president
Charlie Boylan, council approved the letter.
Boylan cast the only dissenting vote.
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SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 33
CHILLIWACK
Invites well-qualified teachers to visit its booth on Trustee
Day and to consult with its interviewing team in Hut M-4
on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, March 16th, 17th
and 18th. Appointment lists are posted in the Personnel
Office.
Secondary Vacancies:
A specialist needed in each of the following fields:
Commerce, Library, French, Home Economics, Occupational, English, Social Studies, Mathematics, and
Science.
Elementary Vacancies:
A few teachers required in the following categories:
Primary, Intermediate, Slow Learners, Relieving.
Direct application may be made to:
Dr. J.  I. Macdougall,
District Superintendent of Schools,
235 Yale Road East,
Chilliwack,   B.C.
Phone: 792-1321. mnrsstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those" of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loo. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1966
"The responsibility ot the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
Arts rats
The artsman is a strange animal who looks complacent
but could yet kill the AMS.
Right now, 3,500 of him are represented by one man on
council — who was elected by only 200 voters this spring.
The argument is, arts is too diversified academically
to ever be a functioning undergrad society as engineering and
science are.
And so, the move to remove arts from council, to be
voted on at this Friday's arts general meeting, gets little
more than a ho-hum from the rest of the AMS mill.
The very diversification of arts, though, is the reason
much of the AMS operates.
The October march was mostly artsmen.
Clubs are mainly artsmen, catering to those diverse
interests. The Buchanan and Angus polls are the biggest on
campus, where artsmen vote.
And unless some way is found to accurately represent
these people, whose orientation is more to the university as a
whole than to their own small faculty, the AMS is in serious
trouble.
Those same 3,500 could dominate any referendum proposed, could set up a viable, parallel, separate structure to
the AMS, could even sink the whole ship if the need arose.
Maybe the way to solve the problem would be to adopt
part of Garth Brown's tabled constitutional revision for
proportional representation, and realize that arts is a unique
faculty with special problems.
Retain the present structure for other undergrad
societies, which claim to be satisfied with it, and elect three
student councillors from arts.
If artsmen have a chance to elect more voices than
those who care to bother with operating an undergrad society,
it's likely a lot more than 200 will vote.
And it's likely some valuable opinions previously unheard by council will be represented.
—K.
Slated
There seems to be little doubt now that sometime within
the next year the AMS will begin constructively to approach
the problem of providing student co-operative housing.
And it could well be action to match that grad student-
faculty housing structure announced last week. This complex,
albeit non-co-operative, does demonstrate that despite the
announced five-year scheme of the university administration,
priorities have been stretched to include the desperately
needed housing.
Besides this priority-rearrangement, the new 125-unit
complex is significant with regard to student housing for a
number of other reasons.
For one thing, faculty representative Fritz Bowers' comments on the ultimate doom of Acadia Camp is the first clear
sign from any responsible official that the "temporary"
accommodation you all know and love is in fact going to go.
Bowers said ultimately the complex will spread out into
the camp site, eventually providing accommodation for three
times the 100 graduate student and 25 faculty units the new
residences will house in September 1967.
But not even a priority-Jblurred administration official
could claim that is going to be enough expansion to meet the
planned growth of the people at UBC.
And here's where the student complex-planners can
jump for joy.
Now that faculty and grad students 'are working well to
build a residence within the university residence system,
and since it is obvious even the triple expansion of the new
Acadia complex is not going to meet needs, bringing faculty
and grad students into any student co-operative complex
should be both highly beneficial to the project and easy to
effect.
And there is something about that "within the university
residence system" phrase which suggests they may even be
keen about the new co-operative.
LETTERS TO THE
Armory  dance   disgraceful
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I wish to comment on the
dance held in the armory
last Friday night.
This dance was certainly a
poor advertisement for the
social aspects of UBC life. If
am sure that any stranger to
the campus that night would
have been appalled at the
disgraceful behavior of certain individuals who had to
be restrained by police dogs.
It is sad that such a drastic measure had to be taken
to control the rowdy actions
of a few young people.
They are supposed to be
capable of higher academic
achievements but apparently
they have not yet learned
how to conduct themselves as
mature, responsible adults at
social functions.
BRONSON   LITTLE
Prebindery
Main Library
'DISAGREE WITH REPLY'
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
Re: Letters to the Editor
published Feb. 25 and Mar.
8.
I agree with Mr. Josseron's
criticisms (except for his silly
statement that Canadians live
in constant fear of the police), but disagree with Mr.
Watson's angry  reply.
Mr. Watson should stop
seeing "ethical-social" (sic)
and "socio-economic" spheres,
and start seeing facts.
Vancouver is culturally
barren compared to any
European city of like population.
Almost every effort at culture is submerged in the
morass of public indifference.
Tenth Avenue, in the heart
of a student district, wants
any place, such as a coffeehouse, meant specifically for
students.
Disregarding   residence
IN THE EAR
rules, let's turn now to Mr.
Watson's drinking laws which
are too sacrosanct to be criticized: no singing in the pub,
no standing up with a beer
in your hand, and so forth.
Enlightened?
Instead of practising adolescent prohibition, European
countries instill an appreciation for alcohol as essential
to even living; they consequently see much less drunk-
eness.
These insane laws of ours
are perpetuated by puritanical lobbyists, and governments, supported by the hotel-
owners, who want customers
to do nothing but drink.
Perhaps some frosty Friday the government might
suddenly realize that educated people just may be as
much an asset to the country
as Black Ball ferries and Gag-
lardi's highways.
The universities would then
no longer be obliged to pander to philanthropic capitalists for treacle.
Witness the so-called gratuitous charities of the American Robber Barony.
As a further example, Mr.
H. R. MacMillan somehow
manages to give millions to
UBC on one hand, and pollute
the Alberni valley on the
other.
To cite yet another example, a friend awarded a
Ford Foundation scholarship
to the Toronto Conservatory,
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News   Ron Riter
Associate _ George Reamsbottom
City  Al Donald
Photo    _-_  Norm Bstts
Sports Ed Clark
Ats't News Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ais't City      _. .   _      Danny Stoffman
Page Friday      — John Kslsey
Managing  Ian Cameron
Feature*     Mike Bolton
CUP    .  Don Hall
was requested by the corporation to pose with a local
Prince George dealer for an
advertisement.
Mr. Watson neglected to
mention that our foreign
"guests" happen to be students with the same rights,
including that of speech, as
we Canadian students exercise.
RON WILLSON
Arts II
'DISGUSTED AT REDS'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
After reading about the
UBC Engineers' stunt at
Simon Fraser in Friday's
Ubyssey, I was thoroughly
disgusted.
It was a mistake for the
red horde to think that their
"mastery of strategy" (translation: safety in numbers)
would meet with no resistance
(actually I find the recipients
quite worthy of the hurled
missiles).
Perhaps Stevenson was a
bit presumptuous in his interpretation of the comment
made by the SFA faculty on
the incident.
It was my impression that
a certain level of intelligence
was required for entrance
into the faculty. Either this
quality is non-existent in
their ranks, or, more hopefully, is for the present merely   dormant.
THOROUGHLY
DISGUSTED
Guido Botto came on crutches
Wednesday to become the year's
highest scorer for intrepidness or
Intrepidity or something. In among
the editors and student councillors and Batman, the front line
shock troops (esoteric joke)
worked. They were: Val (I'm
tired) Zuker, Anne (I'm tired
too) Balf, good ole Pat Why-
dontichangemyname, Stu Gray,
Joan Pogarty, Sue Gransby, both
Hills, one Good, Fearon Whitney
and Carol Wilson who's working
on the rim so we don't mention
her   name.
'i f>«'
{■%
BY IAN CAMERON
It's all done with eggs!
I met an old friend the
other day.
Or rather, I remet an old
friend. And he isn't really
old, he's really only about
25, but I've known him for a
long time.
So anyway, he got married
some time ago, and I haven't
seen him since.
And in his bachelor days
this guy was
a real fashion
plate, so I fig-
ured that
since he was
married h e
should look
great.
But he was
a mess. Cameron
Shirt unironed, suit
wrinkled, tie creased. So I
asked  him   what  the  matter
was, thinking it must be pretty bad being married. And
then he told me.
His wife's pregnant. And
the way he said it was pathetic.
His voice was hollow, his
head was hung, and his eyes
had a beaten look.
So I was taken aback.
"Don't you want The Kid?"
I asked.
"Oh, sure. But my wife is
having troubles, and so I
have to do all the housekeeping and everything."
And at this moment I got
the great idea. Why don't
women lay eggs?
Think of the advantages.
No more nine months of
agony. No more worries about
when it's going to happen.
No troubles about not having enough money. You could
just freeze the egg until you
were financially secure, and
then put it in the incubator.
If you didn't want the
child, you could accidentally
drop the egg. No more illegitimacy problems.
No more husbands pacing
the floor. Have you ever seen
a rooster pacing the floor?
Of course not. Have you ever
heard of a hen having a Caesarian? Never.
If science is really interested in aiding mankind and
in solving the population
problem, the boys in the
white coats could get to work
on this.
And as far as the food situation in India is concerned,
welllll  .... Thursday, March  17,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
NEW PROGRAM
INTRODUCED
Senate approves changes
— powell hargrave photo
CHANGE OF PACE will come to Wesbrook Crescent when
the new Student Lutheran Center is completed. Centre is
located on the corner of Wesbrook and University Boulevard, just down the street from frat row.
GOLDEN PRAIRIES
Victoria students
get cash support
SASKATOON (CUP)—The University of Saskatchewan
students expressed their solidarity with Victoria College students Tuesday night as they voted to send $100 in support
of Victoria's drive for funds.
The   Victoria   students   pro-
. VICTORIA (CUP) — Dr.
Malcolm Taylor has announced
that the Senate has approved
important basic changes in
the B.A., B.Sc, and B.Ed.
(Secondary) degree programs.
Taylor' said that the new
programs were being introduced after more than two
years of detailed study of
general trends in higher education.
The principal changes
brought about in the new programs for the B.A. and B.Sc.
are as follows:
A new Major Program
where a minimum of five senior courses is required in the
area of concentration. The
program permits the student
to proceed to graduate work
if sufficient high standing is
obtained, or to a professional
or business career;
A new General Program is
primarily designed to provide
breadth of education. The student may choose courses giving a toroad perspective in the
humanities, sciences and social
sciences, leading to professional or graduate studies, depending upon the competence
demonstrated;
The Honours Program remains largely unchanged;
The science requirement has
been dropped from the B.A.
program and the language requirement from the B.Sc;
10%  Discount on
Corsages & Wedding
Bouquets
CASH  and  CARRY
Vogue Flower Shop
2197  W.   Broadway 736-7344
tested a fee increase in January.
To draw attention to their
fight for universal accessibility
and the maintenance of the
present fee level they withheld a part of their fees.
The procedure was apparently successful in drawing attention to their fight, and as
a result it appears that there
will be no fee increase in
British Columbia next year.
However, a number of the
students were assessed fines
for paying their fees late. As
a result, the Committee of 56
was set up to draw attention
to their plight and to approach
students, faculty members,
business and labor organizations across Canada to raise
the $7,000 necessary to help
pay these fines.
Since the stand of the Saskatchewan students in the past
has been to support universal
accessibility (though not free
tuition) the SRC felt they
owed it to their principles to
support the Victoria stand.
Consequently the $100 grant.
It was noted that Saskatchewan's delegation at last
year's CUS conference had
voted in favor of the universal accessibility clause. Several members of the SRC were
dubious about setting a precedent. Similar demands could
be expected from similar
fights.
It was also pointed out that
U of S students could be involved in such a situation next
year if the present fees are
increased, as rumor suggests
they may be.
csn NEWS
GRAD STUDENT
Curling and Social Evening
Saturday, March 26
Curling: 7:15 p.m. Winter Sports Centre
Social: 9:45 p.m. G.S.C.  Lower Lounge
DANCING AND REFRESHMENTS
NO CURLING EXPERIENCE NECESSARY.
Cost $1.25 person
Tickets: G.S.C. Office
The proposed changes in the
B.Ed, program are as follows:
• total number of courses
required reduced.
e wider choice in choosing electives.
• greater depth for concentrated studies in
teaching areas.
• practice teaching re
quired in each of the
five years.
Students entering University
next year will follow the new
program of study; registered
students may continue with
the present curriculum or reregister under the new one if
feasible and to the student's-
advantage.
SPECIAL     EVENTS
PRESENTS
STAUGHTON LYND
Prof. Lynd is a conscientious objector and a Quaker
pacifist. He achieved National prominence when he and
two other Americans flew to Hanoi on their own peace
mission.
Friday ~ 12:30 — Auditorium 35c
Take a Good Look
at what any school district in British Columbia has to
offer.
THEN CONSIDER
LANGLEY
Teachers enjoy working at Langley because:
1. the Fraser Valley has a mild climate.
2. they appreciate living in a growing community,
only a short drive from Vancouver and Bellingham.
3. they are supported by an interested Board of
School Trustees.
4. they are supported by a. community which recognizes the need to educate its youth.
We are interested in your academic record, your certification and what you as an individual wilt bring to our district.
Address enquiries to Harold D. Stafford, District Superintendent of Schools, Box 40, Murrayville, B.C.
ARTS U.S.
GENERAL MEETING
Noon — Friday, March 18th
Buck 106 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 17, 1966
LACK AIMS
Manitoba student
wants board seat
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Eli
cal student at the University
on the Board of Governors.
Weisstub says that he is running for the position "mainly because I am concerned
about the lack of direction in
this University."
He attributes this to the lack
of communication among the
groups which are most affected
by the Board's legislation, and
the strict secrecy which has become the policy of the Board.
Weisstub, who is eligible for
the position as a member of
the alumni, says that the Board
needs a stimulus. He believes
that a student member could
provide this stimulus.
He feels that his role in this
position would be two-fold: to
suggest publication of plans
which he feels would be beneficial to the university's image;
and to initiate discussion of
projects overlooked by the
Board.
He explained that the secrecy of the Board on all levels
of discussion is detrimental to
the university's image. He
cited the example of the Hall
and Klass Medical reports published this year which urged
an expansion of medical
schools and discussed the need
for the development of clinical
research.
"No one knows if any expansion plans have been made, and
if they have been made the
Board refuses to publish the details. We can't hope to retain
our talented graduates this
way," he said.
He feels this secrecy also
left them with no idea of the
University's educational policy.
He referred specifically to Con-
do's letter to Harry Nolan
UMSU rep from Architecture.
Weisstub hopes to present
the students' opinions to the
Senate. He will do this by
meeting regularly with the
UMSU executive and forward-
Weisstub, a 22-year-old medi-
of Manitoba, is trying to get
Ralph to read
Iowa writers' workshop
graduate Ralph Salisbury will
read his poetry 12:30 Thursday,
Bu.   102.
Salisbury teaches creative
writing and edits Northwest
Review at University of Oregon.
Spring  Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Colored
Jackets
$7.50
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
Tuxedos
$6.50
Tails
$8.50
ing ideas which they thought
were important.
He feels that the Board of
Governors has become a rubber
stamp. "Perhaps this is the
reason they are so secretive.
It's all part of the game."
There is one major issue on
which he feels the Senate
should take a stand, whatever
that stand may be — free education.
"The increase in bursaries
shows the trend toward free
education," he said. "The
Board will have to cope with
the problem some time."
He hopes that his running
for the position and presenting
some definite issues will generate interest in the University.
UBC appoints
two med staff
The UBC faculty of medicine
has announced the names of
two new staff members.
Dr. Donald C. Graham has
been named as associate dean
and Dr. Robert Harrison has
been appointed head of surgery  department.
Graham is taking up an
entirely new position and will
do much of the administrative
work now handled by Dean
John F. MjcCreary.
He is former editor of the
Canadian Medical Journal and
several other Canadian Medical
Association publications.
Harrison, a former professor
of surgery at the University of
Alberta, will take up his UBC
appointment July 1.
From 1946 to 1951, he served
in Canada and overseas with
the Army Medical Corps before
. doing graduate work in surgery at the Toronto General
Hospital.
TEACHERS  WANTED
SCHOOL  DISTRICT  No.  3
(KIMBERLEY)
Applications are invited from teachers wishing to teach
in the Kimberley region for the coming! year, 1966-1967.
Vacancies will occur in the Primary, Intermediate, and1
Secondary fields.
Specialists are required in the secondary Schools for:
French
Home Economics
Commerce
Girl's Counselling
The flourishing stable economy of the Kimberley District
has provided a well-equipped modern school system. This
portion of the East Kootenay provides an excellent variety
of winter and summer sports — hunting, fishing, skiing,
curling, skating, golf, swimming.
Salaries:       EB $4225-$6575 PC $5200-$8050
PB $5800-$9375
PA $6200-$9885
EB $4225-$6575
EA $4700-$7200
PE $5485-$8335
Please apply to
District Superintendent of Schools,
E. E. LEWIS,
Box 580, Kimberley, B.C.
Interviews may be arranged during March 14th-19th at
the office of Student Services, U.B.C. or the Devonshire
Hotel, Vancouver.
H
Simpsons - Sears
B. Tee'Kay rocker. White, gold, blue, 7-15.
6.98
C. Denim   swinger   in   blue,   white.   7-17.
5.98
D. Slick denim topper, bone, 2 blues, gold,
S, M, and L. 7.98
E. Denim Tee*Kays, blue, navy, white,
7-17. 5.98
Simpsons-Sears Women's Sportswear (7)
Burnaby and Richmond, HE 1-2211;
Nanaimo, SK 3-4111
J Thursday, March 17, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
BALLOT DECIDES
ATHLETIC  CONTROL
MAC head supports vote
By  IAN  DONALD
UBC students have an
opportunity March 29 to
solve one of the most crucial
problems of extramural athletics.
This is the date of the referendum asking the students
whether or not they favor
the transferring of the $5
athletic fee currently levied
by the AMS to the university
administration, giving the
administration the entire responsibility of athletic financing.
As it presently stands, the
AMIS and administration
Donald is president of
the Men's Athletic Association and a Thunderbird
football player. He stresses
his personal views on the upcoming referendum.
each contribute roughly half
of the total funds available
to athletics.
The difficulty in the existing situation lies in the fact
that the AMS is a political
body that changes members
each year, and with each
year comes a council with
varying interest in athletics.
• •      •
The $5 that the AMS gives
to athletics on a per capita
basis is the lowest in Canada. It nevertheless is in
support of the largest program in Canada.
Before an increase in the
AMS grant to athletics can
be made, a referendum has
to be set to approve the increase. Whether or not the
referendum passes depends
on the ability of the politicians and on the political climate at that particular time.
On the other hand, when
the administration wants to
contribute extra funds to
athletics, it simply does so.
To cite several examples:
• •       •
When UBC withdrew from
WCIAA in 1963, an extra
$10,000 that was initially
put into the program to defray increased conference
travelling costs was left in
the Men's Athletic Committee budget to hire more administrative personnel in
the Athletic office.
In 1965 the MAC decided
to re-enter the WCIAA on a
reduced basis but again
needed extra funds to meet
travelling costs — $22,000
was given by the administration.
The AMS has not matched
this kind of financial aid to
IAN DONALD
. . . vote yes
athletics simply because they
are fettered with campus
politics, with other problems
such as SUB, student housing
and the financing of the
undergraduate societies gaining priority over athletics.
Not only is the AMS politically unable to raise more
money for athletics, but
there is some hostility in regard to the amount paid
right now.
A proposal is coming to
the AMS general meeting
on March 24 to change the
nature of the AMS grant
from non-discretionary to
discretionary.
• •      •
This would allow the council to give only what it
wished to athletics.
Presently, the AMIS is committed to the $5 per capita.
The avowed purpose of the
motion, proposed Iby a student at large, is to bolster a
starving AMS budget with
money normally given to
athletics.
Needless to say, any cut
in that amount would be disastrous to UBC sports.
Putting the $5 levy in. the
hands of the administration
would ensure that at least
this amount would be forthcoming to athletics. It would
not be subjected to the onslaughts of various student
groups from time to time.
• •      •
The major question that
arises is whether or not the
students will lose their say
in the formulation of the
athletic policy.
Both Dean Gage and President Macdonald have expressed their unwillingness
to see the elimination of stu-
IBB JOTS
£u/m- Skier
BAD  BOYS
Spring
Ski Gear
BAD BOYS MINI BLUNDERBUSSES
(as worn by your super skier)
Another Bad Boy Exclusive 9.95
Also, a few Double Breasted American Navy "P" Coats
Goat skin Water Bags — For Nighttime Soaring!
BAD BOYS
MEL & BRY
315 Seymour
If you can't fall in, at least spread the "Bad" word.
dent representation in the
running of athletics, vis-a-vis
the Men's Athletic Committee, four of whose nine members are students.
• •      •
All across Canada and in
the majority of universities
in the United States, the university administration runs
the financing of athletics.
For these reasons this proposed referendum has the
unqualified support of this
and the coming year's AMS
executive, the MAC, and the
UBC coaching staff.
• •       •
To take the giant step towards financing athletics on
a realistic and stable basis
will require your vote in
favor of the March 29 athletic referendum.
Married students organize
new university kindergarten
A group of married students in Marsburg, West Germany, have set up what they believe to be a unique institution: a university kindergarten.
Every day 30 children, ranging in age from nine
months to three years, are cared for while their parents are
at classes.
The student welfare service and the University each
made contributions, the University supplying the building.
Parents pay the  operating expenses.
Jt'tn getting warned* . •
Consultant, Mr. R. Yacht
Please   forward   more   information   on   wedding   invitations,  etc.
NAME
ADDRESS
™b card shop
Corner Robson end Burrard
»
MU 4-4011
p. a. CUCLHRDI
SPEAKS ON
WHAT IS A
CHRISTIAN?
THURSDAY NOON  BU. 106
SPONSORED  BY ASSOCIATED  FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Here are the Village Look PLAYBOYS. All suede. Putty beige. Grey.
Faded blue. All styles available in "His"—$10.95. "Hers"—$8.95.
($1 higher west of Winnipeg)
You're right when you wear playboys
Foot-watchers see more PLAYBOYS than anything.
Reason? The Village Look is big now. And PLAYBOYS
have it!
Dashing! Light! Casual! Select suede uppers look better
longer. Plantation crepe soles. Steel shanks.
$&     Ask for your PLAYBOYS at your shoe store today.
JfcL
PLAYBOYS -* HEWETSON
A Division of Shoe Corporation of Canada Limited Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 17, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Dr. Strangelove returns
Dr.    Strangelove    at    12:30,
3:30, 6 and 8:30 p.m. in Aud.
for only 50 cents.
LAW SOC
Dr. Gilbert D. Kennedy,
Deputy Attorney - General of
B.C. speaks on the Lawyer in
Government Administration
noon today in Law South.
PRE-LAW  SOC
Guest   speaker   Bob   Cruise
noon   today   in   Bu.    221    on
Don't  Take Law.
ARTS  FACULTY
Meeting at 4 p.m. in Bu. 205
to   discuss   problems   on   curriculum. For all interested students.
SUS
General meeting at noon today  in  Henn  200.  Meet your
new  executive.
CYCLING   TEAM
Anyone interested in cycling, especially those who
would like to ride and train
with the UBC cycling team
this summer, please meet in
Gym 211 at noon today.
COMM US
Important   general   meeting
noon today in Ang. 407.
WUS
Exchange students compare
college life in Germany, Japan
and USSR with life in Canada in Lower Mall at 7:30
p.m. today.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets available
at AMS office for Romeo and
Juliet ($1). Also, LMT's for
Carmen, Madame Butterfly
and Cinderella by the Metropolitan Opera Co.
SLAVONIC   CIRCLE
Chekhov's Anniversary  (un-
expurgated    Russian    version)
noon  today  in  Upper Lounge
of IH.
FULL   GOSPEL
Rev. P. A. Gaglardi speaks
at noon in Bu. 106 on What is
a   Christian
STUDENT   CHRISTIAN
MOVEMENT
Guerrilla Warfare and Christian Action—Brewster Kneen
delegate to Second All Christian Peace Assembly in Prague
at noon today in Bu. 202.
NDP
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 202.
SOCREDS
MLA   Ernie  LeCours,   rebel
with  a cause,  speaks on B.C.
Liquor   Laws   noon   today   in
Brock.
VCF
An informal meeting will
be held in Mildred Brock from
5-7 p.m. with Cliff Erickson
speaking.
BAY
STARTS TOMORROW
FATHER CAME TOO
James  Robertson  Justice
Leslie    Phillips,   Stanley    Baxter
plus
SEANCE ON A WET
AFTERNOON
Rich.   Attenborough,   Kim   Stanley
(Restricted)  students 75c
DELTA
STARTS  TOMORROW
TAMAHINE
Nancy Kwain, Dennis Price
Plus
THE ROMAN SPRING
OF MRS. STONE
Warren   Beany,  Vivien   Leigh
(adult)
EAST  ASIA  SOC
Two Japanese films noon in
Bu. 104. Everyone welcome.
AQUA  SOC
Color   film  by   J.   Y.   Cous-
teau, World Without Sun, noon
today in Ang. 104. 10 cents.
NVC
General meeting noon in Bu
224. Elections will be held.
All members please attend.
RADSOC
UBC Radio celebrates St.
Patrick's Day with an hour of
Irish music at 2:30 p.m. Requests and dedications will be
accepted   at   224-3242.
DANCE  CLUB
Ballroom dance competition
Saturday at 8 p.m. in Vancouver Technical School. Adults
$1.50, students  $1.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send to Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost fc Found
11
FOUND ADS inaerted free. Publication* office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
TAKEN FROM, PONDEROSA ON
Friday, Mar. 11, man's black umbrella with metal identification
tag. Please return or phone o74-
7118.
X_OST _ SET OF SOCIOLOGY 301
notes in red binder. Phone J. Eck-
arrtl,   26fi-!J280.     Reward.
__ufc>T — j_AiAl___ BROWN CASE
containing all my Identification.
Finder please phone Lucy, CA 4-
9009.
FOUND — LADIES' GOLD WATCH
outside gym Tuesday, March 15,
Phone AM 1-8479 after 10  p.m.
LOST — MAN'S BLACK UMBREL-
Ia, brown handle, plastic inner tip,
sentimental.     736-5241.
FOUND — WHITE GOLD CRONOS
Ladies' watch, In Bu. March 16.
Call at Publications Office, Brock
Hall.
Greetings
12
MISTRESS DAPHNE YOU ARE
now eighteen. Your red garter can
legally slide down! Thank God we
made it. Happy birthday, Daphne
Kg. From satisfied Carpool Drivers.     Brian   and   Bob   B.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707. 	
NEWMAN CENTRE
Presents:
Philippines,   Danish,
German & Irish
Dancing
Sunday,   March   20th,   2:00   p.m.
St.  Marks College Lounge
WEST   VAN  EX-GRADS   '62   to   '64
2nd    Gleneagles    knockout.    Apr.    2.
Tickets Kim's Drugs,  Park Royal.
JEES SWEETS YOU'RE 19 NOW!
We had a big surprise for you but
.    .    .    A.J.J.T.L.C.M.A.L.L.P.T.R.
DANCE BROCK MARCH 19. SAT.
'Sound Unlimited' 8:30 to 12:00
75c per person AMS cards. Great!!
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOVIET
General meeting all Arts comrades
welcome noon, Friday, March 18th
Buch.   106.	
THE EDUCATION GRAD. BAN-
quet has been cancelled. Refunds
in   Rm.   1,   Education   Building.
HARD LINES! THE HARD TIMES
Dance on March 18 has been cancelled.
Transportation
14
NEEDED! RIDE FROM 23rd & PU-
get Dr. M.W.F. 8:30-5:30. Phone
Jim   MacLean   RE   1-3925.
Travel Opportunities
16
AMS CHARTERED FLIGHT: ONE
Way London to Vancouver. Leaves
Aug. 13. Only $200. Call Ken "RE
3-8988.
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE — 1950 PLYMOUTH.
Running order. Very satisfactory.
$110. 224-6355. Leigh Brouss'on.
After 6. 	
1959   M.G.,   —   MECH.   A-l   TIRES,
body good,  263-7433.	
1957 CHEV. ENGINE, PERFECT
and 1955 Olds 88, power stearing,
power brakes. fully automatic.
Phone BR 7-8476.
FOR SALE: LADIES' STEAMER
trunk and 1958 Vauxhall Suner,
both articles in excellent coridi-
tion.    Phone RE 8-S211 after 6 p.m.
1964 FORD GAL. 500 CONVT., 390
Auto. P.S. P.B. etc. Asking $2700,
as new.    Phone 433-6072 after 6 pm
«3 STUDEBAKER LOWBOY 2
Dr. Hardtop. 1964 327 Chevy, four
speed, speed equipment and ex'tra
parts, call 224-1993. See 3922 W.
12th.
1961    MG-.A    FOR    SALE.    EXCEL-
lent   condition.   New   racing   tires.
Low   mileage    24,000.    Phone   263-
3580   after  6.
1952 MARK VII JAGUAR, 3.5 LITRE
Overhead Cams. Engine & Body
excellent, leather Walnut interior.
$400.   Robert  RE   3-8765.	
1955 PLYMOUTH HARDTOP;. Automatic, Power steering, Power
brakes; original owner; $185.00
266-6206.
Motorcycles
27
MUST SELL HONDA 300 RECENT-
ly tuned up. Best offer! Fhbne
Dave 224-0467 around supper
time.
Orchestras
35
THE   VANCOUVER   DIMENSIONS.
Now     available     for     engagements
phone  "Tom"  261-6705  "Jim"  261-
7435.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Teachers     51A
SCHOOL   DISTRICT   No.   46
(SECHELT)
This District is located on the
Sunshine Coast, about one and a half
hours from downtown Vancouver,
via the government car ferry from
Horseshoe Bay.
There are: a few vacancies anticipated for September, 1966, and inquiries are invited. Some of the
positions may include:
SECONDARY:
Maths and: Science
Occupational
Boys' Physical Education
Home Economics
Commercial  subjects
ELEMENTARY:
Kindergarten
Primary
Intermediate
Special consideration will be given
to teachers qualified in Music, Art,
Physical  Education.
Representatives will be on hand to
interview applicants on Mareh 16th,
17th and 18th, in the Office of Student Services on the U.B.C. Campus.
Anyone unable to come for interview may contact the Secretary-
Treasurer, School District No." 46
(Sechelt), Box 220,. Gibsons, B.C.,
or   telephone   886-2141   (collect).
Work Wanted
52
ATTENTION: BENNETT GOVERN -
ment: Female middle aged student
past the bloom of youth requires
summer employment to pay for
next year's fees. Would consider
Mexico or anywhere. Willing" to
play anything, but I spy. Apply
Sandra Mudswinger.
Music
63
GUITAR   INSTRUCTION   IN   FIN-
ger style,  jazz,   popular,   and  semi-
classical.   Bill   Lepine,   CA   8-8101.
FOR SALE
MISCELLANEOUS
t:
"PROMETHEUS" VOL II NO. 3—
Now available at Book Store. No.
A retrospective look at the LfBC
Teach-in & the Berkeley Student
Strike. Also authors Wayne Cannon, Wm. McCarthy, Henry Rosenthal,   Walter   Young,   R.   Riley
and   Dahren,   etc.
REVOLVER 357 MAGNUM S. & W.
Mod. 28. Fires all 38 and 357 cartridges. Like new. Ideal for targets, hunting, or defense $100. J.
Bond   Elect.   Eng.   Rm.   309.
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
GIRL WANTED SHARE SPACIOUS
West End Apt, Own bedroom, very
reasonable. Ph. 684-9648 Evenings
Apr.  1.
SENIOR GRAD STUDENT AND
mother, abstainers will give good
care and pay rent for furn. house
approx. May 15 to Aug. 31. 683-
1551.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
WANTED UNFURNISHED TWO
Bedroom Suite $90 - $100. Phone
738-0114.
PLAYHOUSE  THEATRE  CO.   PRESENTS
THE WORLD PREMIERE
UKE FATHER, LIRE FUN
by ERIC NICOL
Beloved Campus Humorist for 10 years "Jabez"
Opening March 24 - April  19
QUEEN ELIZABETH PLAYHOUSE
Be sure to see this fresh new comedy
by famed  humorist Eric Nicol
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
General Meeting
Thursday, March 24, 1966
PLACE:  Armouries
TIME: Noon hour 12:30
AGENDA:
Minutes  of General  Meeting  Last Year
Honorary Awards
President's and Treasurer's Reports
Constitutional Revisions
Others
FRANTIC!!
Moving
Across
The Street
ALL STOCK MUST GO BEFORE WE MOVE
SUITS-15
00
TIES 25c and 95c
SOCKS ALL 69c
f\ SPORT SHIRTS from $1.95
\J»^<\ goodness Sale frOlfl    $4.95
This is an
|^ honest to
goodness Sale
of last season's
Merchandise that will save you
dollars, don't miss it, come in
now! Stock up on your summer
requirements.
SUITS & $49
Press Shirts
from $2.95
50
ALL STOCK MUST GO
ABBOTTS
Broadway
Store
2906 WEST BROADWAY
Only
ONE BLOCK WEST OF MacDONALD

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