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The Ubyssey Feb 26, 1971

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Array Frat row hotel scheme 'out of the question'
By MIKE SASGES
The fiat row hotel scheme is dead.
However, the developers are still interested in gaining
title to the land leased by the first three fraternities on the
north end of Wesbrook Crescent.
"The hotel idea is out of the question," James Smith of
J. E. Smith Realty Ltd., said Thursday.
Smith is the representative of an unknown financier
who has tried over the past few months to obtain title to
land currently held by Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta
and Beta Theta Pi fraternities. The object was to build a
high-rise, luxury hotel.
Smith and his backers were hoping to gain a rich
trade that they thought would go hand in hand with the
department of a famous health sciences complex on
Wesbrook.
Smith said his backer is still interested in the land.
He would not comment on how the property would
be used if title were obtained, nor would he discuss the
reasons for why the hotel scheme has been scuttled.
But indications are that the university's board of
governors is behind Smith's disillusionment.
"The board of governors, on an unofficial level, is
opposed to the projected hotel," board chairman John
Liersch told The Ubyssey Thursday.
Liersch said that administration president Walter
Gage received a letter from Smith seeking adminstration
endorsement of the hotel land deal.
"I felt that the board of governors had to express
some opinion on the matter," Liersch said.
"I then  canvassed the other members of the board.
"We were afraid that Smith might go ahead with his
plans before our board meeting next week and pull off the
deal."
Liersch said he then sent a letter to Smith informing
him of the board's feeling. He expects the decision against
the scheme will be discussed at next week's meeting,but
that the board will remain firm.
Gage told The Ubyssey Thursday that he suggested to'
Smith that he canvass the opinions of the Alma Mater
Society, the university rate-payers assocaiton and the
alumni association.
"I knew from comments made that there was
considerable opposition on the campus to the scheme,"
Gage said.
"A copy of my reply to Smith was: sent to Mr.
Liersch," he said.
"Unless somebody can show me that the hotel is a
desirable necessity, I wouldn't feel very happy with its
construction."
HAIR IS really pretty neat stuff, when you come right down to it. Or when you focus     Visser, camera-clad, found Leslie Leatherdale and her scarf in the Point Grey wind
in on it, on a windy day with lots of sun that makes it all shiny and blowy. Dirk      and, strangely enough, decided to takea picture. Hair it is.
Presidential election voided
By MIKE SASGES
If you liked the last Alma Mater Society presidential
election, you'll love the next one.
The studend court is recommending to the Alma
Mater Society council that the presidential election of
Wednesday, Feb. 10 be annulled.
The court decided Thursday to inform the AMS that
the presidential election as conducted did not conform to
the constitution.
"In effect, this means the presidential election is
void," said chief justice Bruce Preston, Law 3.
He said that the irregularities were sufficient to have
materially affected the election, due to the closeness of
the ballot results.
'Deaf mutes' really a racket
By NORBERT RUEBSAAT
may be an "international  syndicate  of con
ls^sflein^^diawing cash out of the pockets of
What
artists
well-in teftfKSie^d'OBC "students
M^fupers of an apparently 'well organized group of
fraud^7unde£~the mrjffled guise of deaf mutes, are
smilmgjy accosfijig students on campus with wallet-sized
priine3? cards asking forp-dash donation.
y,Jhe dea4^phabegpj!>hand signals is printed on the
^thecyds.)       >;'./
C"H»ese -people afe^a1 bunch of crooks," said John
1 ejcscufive direbjro^bf the Jericho Hill School,
ijgfrrwas contacted after The Ubyssey learned of
such an ir>^^t4jr^week.
bad
Wall
"They are a well-organized international syndicate,"
he said.
"They disguise themselves as deaf mutes and
systematically con well-meaning people out of their
money. And they are rich; their members drive Cadillacs,
it's that kind of operation."
He said he had received numerous reports of the
group's activity before.
"This kind of panhandling activity is definitely not
sanctioned by any institute for the deaf in Vancouver, or
in Canada," Walsh said. "It's definitely irresponsible and
illegal."
to page 17 see:  FAKE
It is now up to council to direct another presidential
election.
The court ruled on an application from AMS
treasurer Stuart Bruce to have the presidential election
annulled because Bruce's individual rights were breached.
Bruce's counsel John Parks said: "I'm pleased to see
that the court came to the correct decision. There was
little doubt in my mind."
The next election promises to be a repeat show-down
between student senator Steve Garrod and AMS
co-ordinator Hanson Lau.
Lau, incidentally, was the AMS president-elect.
"This upcoming election will allow the students to
make a full choice as to their support for the human
government program," Garrod told The Ubyssey
Thursday.
"We feel that it is necessary for us to have the
president because most people see it as the major office
on the AMS."
Garrod promised to use the prestige of the office to
serve the real needs of the students.
"The members of next year's human government
slate have already met to discuss our program for next
year," he said.
to page 17 see: COUNCIL Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26,  1971
Apprehended revolt a fiction
says Quebec Five member
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
Our aim is revolution - by the people for the people,
said one of the Quebec Five Thursday.
"Revolution is made by the people, the majority of
people and there is nothing seditious about the majority,"
said Jacques Larue-Langlois who was accused with four
others under the War Measures Act of "seditious
conspiracy against the government of Canada."
The charge of seditious conspiracy has been quashed
against the five, who include Larue-Langlois, labor leader
Michel Chartrand, lawyer Robert Lemieux, teacher
Charles Gagnon and author Pierre Vallieres.
The Quebec Five are still charged with membership in
the now illegal Front de Liberation du Quebec.
"The aim of the revolution is to bring the power back
to the people," said Larue-Langlois to 500 people in the
SUB ballroom at noon.
He is free on bail and will return to Montreal to face
the charge of membership in the FLQ.
The revolution is not new, the events in October (the
kidnapping of Pierre Laporte and James Cross) are not the
first or the last stage. Things have been going on for 200
years, said Larue-Langlois, a Montreal producer with
Radio-Canada, the Francophone arm of the CBC.
"The proclamation of the War Measures Act
supported the fiction of the so called apprehended
insurrection," said Larue-Langlois.
The "apprehended insurrection" was revealed as
farce during the ensuing trails when even a judge who was
anti-FLQ could do nothing but quash the charges of
"seditious conspiracy," he said.
"We had been accused of conspiring to use force
against the Quebec government from January 1969 to
October 1970. In all this time I met Chartrand only ten
times and only at public meetings. We (Quebec Five)
never met until we were in jail together," said
Larue-Langlois.
The responses of the government were rendered-
possible because of the support of the population of
Canada and because of Canadian colonialism, he said..
"The English-speaking Canadians are ignorant of the
situation in Quebec and entertain subconsciously a certain
degree of racism toward Quebecois in general and the
separatists in specific," he said.
The government's responses were also made possible
by the fact that Quebec is an internal colony, he said.
In regard to the forces which the FLQ assumes to be
its enemies Larue-Langlois said the revolution would
combat these enemies on two levels — national liberation
and total liberation, overthrowing capitalism and Yankee
imperialism.
"Quebec forms a nation — it has its own territory,
people, culture, history and as such it should have
self-determination."
He said the first step is to own your country.
"The government of Quebec is a puppet of the
Canadian government and the Canadian government is a
puppet of Washington and Wall Street," said
Larue-Langlois.
"The government of Canada does not correspond to
our idea of democracy — administration of the people by
the people."
When asked if the government would be run by the
FLQ he answered, "If the FLQ were to run the
government it would be very bad and it would be equally
bad if any minority of activists were to govern a country."
He said the FLQ has to use violent and illegal means
because nothing will be affected by using the tools of the
system that the government uses to protect itself.
"The ballot-box is a farce; people think they govern
themselves because every four years they put a cross on a
paper. What kind off choice are they offered - between a
Tory and a Liberal?" he said.
One of the members of the audience asked how the
elections would be structured after the revolution.
Larue-Langlois answered that there would be no party
business which pretends to offer an alternative.
"There will be free elections which cannot be bought
by financial institutions."
The FLQ is using violent means to draw people's
attention to the goings-on in Quebec, of a government
which is run by a rich minority, he said.
Statistics tell the story: "85 per cent of Quebec's
population is urban and 60 per cent of Quebec business is
American owned and 20 per cent owned by
English-speaking Canadians," said Larue-Langlois.
Larue-Langlois said he knows there can be liberation
without struggle and no struggle without risks and
sacrifices.
"The revolution is not
made by minorities or
intellectuals or activists,
but the intellectuals can
only help the workers to
understand the oppression
that they are being
subjected to," he said.
He agreed with a
member of the audience
who said the FLQ should
widen his objective to
opposing all imperialism.
"I object to all
imperialism, including
Russian imperialism in
Eastern countries," he
said.
The meeting was sponsored by the Alma Mater
Society under the auspices of the committee to Defend
Political Prisoners in Quebec.
The committee will also hold a meeting with
Larue-Langlois in the Kitsilano high school auditorium
tonight at eight and Thursday at 8 p.m. with Jerome
Paradis who attended the sessions of the Quebec Five
sedition trials. This meeting will be held at Hillcrest New
Democratic Party Hall, 4360 Main St.
'Splendid ecology motion, but nyet'
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Canadianization si, ecology no.
Those were two of the decision made by the UBC
senate at its regular meeting Wednesday night.
A motion urging faculty "to ensure that Canadian
content and illustrative material are available to students
where appropriate to the academic objectives of courses
offered" was supported by a large majority of senators.
But a motion by geology prof Harry Warren urging
members of the university community to demonstrate by
"action after scholarly analysis rather than words" that
they are trying to establish a better environment was
defeated by an overwhelming 6-1 margin.
An amendment to the original motion which asked
administration president Walter Gage to set up a
committee to look into the possibility of recycling wastes
at UBC was also defeated.
A second amendment which asked senate to
encourage research on pollution control met a similar fate.
The opposition of some senators appeared to be
based on the assumption it is not senate's job to take
action on the pollution issue.
to page 16: see COMIC
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siHHiiiiiiiiiiiitiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiit iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiriii HiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiHiiiiiiitii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiii'itiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii? Friday, February 26,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
THE FORCES OF POLITICS and the law assembled in student court in the clubs'
lounge  in SUB  Thursday to  hear  law school hopefuls play out their Perry Mason
—John thompson photo
fantasies for over six hours. The court is not authorized to make binding decisions, so
could only recommend that the AMS presidential election be declared null and void.
Election article provokes firing motion
The Alma Mater Society council will consider a
motion to fire Ubyssey editor Nate Smith at its next
meeting.
The motion was presented to council Wednesday
night by recreation rep Peter Malcolm.
Malcolm is charging Smith with irresponsibility in
printing an article by student senator Art Smolensky on
the first slate AMS election the day before the election
was held. Council voted to table the motion to next
week's meeting because the election was still before
student court.
In the article, Smolensky gave his views on the
election and the presidential candidates.
Malcolm said the appearance of the article on the day
before the election did not allow time for adequate
rebuttal.
He said Smolensky was presidential candidate Steve
Garrod's seconder at the time he wrote the article,
although Smith had previously decided not to print
statement's from candidates' seconders.
"(Smith) has committed two real, factual breaches of
trust that stand very repugnant to the desired fairness of
the Alma Mater Society," Malcolm said.
Smith said Thursday the Smolensky article was
clearly labelled as an opinion piece which The Ubyssey had
every right to print.
"Smolensky knows the AMS as well as anyone and
we felt students would be interested in his opinions,
whatever his role in the election," Smith said.
UBC cyclists unite against sidewalks
and automobile-oriented society
If you ride a bicycle to school, or would like to, be in
SUB 205 Thursday at noon.
Gordon Bisaro, engineering 3, wants to make the
campus safe for bicycles. Bisaro, president of the
newly-organized UBC cycling club, has organized the
meeting to muster support for the cause.
"The laws governing cycling on campus are
contradictory, " Bisaro told The Ubyssey.
"Although B.C. law says that it's illegal to cycle on
sidewalks, there are signs on both Chancellor and
University that say 'cyclists must use sidewalks'," he said.
Beggars' ball benefit
to raise Yippie funds
A "community freak-out" and dance will be held
tonight in the Pender Auditorium, 337 West Pender, in aid
of the Yippie people's defense fund.
Uncle Slug, Burner Boys and assorted others will
entertain at the Beggars' Ball Benefit beginning at 8:30
p.m. Admission is $1.25.
All proceeds will go to the defense fund, which has
provided lawyers and bail money for more than 400
people over last year, according to the Yippies.
The fund is available for all kinds of legal problems,
including "directly political cases" and is advertised
through the Georgia Straight regularly.
Donations to the fund are also accepted at 254-7362.
The bicycle path on Chancellor Boulevard does not
run the full length of the boulevard, and must be shared
by cyclists and pedestrians.
"The paths are rough on bikes," said Bisaro, "If
you're riding something as delicate as a ten-speed, they'll
tear it to shreds. But when you ride on the road, the cars
are going past no slower than 35 miles per hour."
During the past five years there have been two deaths
from accidents involving cars and bikes on UBC's entrance
roads.
Bisaro wrote highways minister Wesley Black about
the matter. Black replied, in part, that "Whether we like it
or not we are an automobile-oriented society and the
department of highways is faced with that reality in this
area (UBC) as it is in all parts of the province."
Bisaro wants construction of separate bicycle paths
around the univeristy. He estimates the cost at about
$100,000.
"Sure, the article was biased, but any newspaper has a
right to present opinion pieces and let the readers decide
for themselves whether or not to accept those opinions."
Smith said similar articles have appeared in The
Ubyssey before other elections and no complaints were
ever received.
"I don't know what Malcolm's motives are, but I'm
sure most of the people supporting him wouldn't have
been the least bit upset if Smolensky had written an
article in support of Hanson Lau," he said.
"They're not concerned with the question of whether
or not the paper was biased in the election, only that it
wasn't biased toward their candidate.
"The way certain council members think, Smolensky
and I violated all that is good and holy by not supporting
Lau."
Commenting on the motion to dismiss him, Smith
said: "With only three weeks left in council's term of
office and only four weeks left in mine, the whole 'thing
could be kind of a meaningless battle between lame
ducks."
wmm&
AMS official notice
Nominations now open for presidential re-election.
Nominations close Thurs., Mar. 4,1971.
Election - Wed., Mar. 10.
Jericho bus route
to be discontinued
B.C. Hydro chairman Dr. Gordon Shrum
announced the discontinuation of the Spanish Banks
bus route Wednesday.
Shrum said the reason for its discontinuation is
that revenue taken in by the route "barely pays for
bus drivers' salaries, let alone operating expenses."
The move will take effect March 26.
The present Spanish Banks route sends buses
hourly along Spanish Banks to Fourth Avenue, and
along Alma Street to Broadway where it connects
again with Marine Drive.
Spanish Banks Property Owners Association
spokesman Ted Delmonico recommended Wednesday
that the route be expanded to encircle UBC, possibly
giving B.C. Hydro enough additional revenue to keep
the route in operation.
He said his association would be interested in
hearing if UBC students and staff would take the bus
along his proposed route, to substantiate his
recommendations to Shrum.
Interested persons can contact the SBPOA by
writing Ted or Betty Delmonico, 4422 N.W. Marine
Drive, Vancouver 8, B.C. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26, 1971
TMtltYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 26,  1971
Once and for all
Over the past two weeks. The Ubyssey has been
criticized from certain corners for its coverage of the
AMS executive elections. Now is probably as good a
time as any to set the record straight.
Much of the criticism has centred on Art
Smolensky's article "Confessions of a Politico", which
appeared on the editorial page the day before the first
slate election.
The article was printed because if there is any
non-council member who can be properly called an
expert on the AMS and its workings, that person is Art
Smolensky. For that reason, his opinion on an election
and its candidates is an important one that merits
publication.
Granted, Smolensky's article was biased in favor of
one candidate and his bias, in this case, reflected the
editorial opinion of The Ubyssey. As we have said
before, the article was clearly labelled as an opinion
piece and appeared on the editorial page.
No newspaper is worthy of the name unless it has
editorial opinions that it expresses freely. In the case of
an AMS election, which supposedly has direct meaning
to the students, we have not only the right but the
responsibility to present those editorial opinions.
It is up to the reader to evaluate our opinions,
compare them to what candidates say in their
statements (which were published in the same paper as
the Smolensky article), in the all-candidates meeting
(which was reported in the same paper) and in their
campaign material, then decide for him or herself.
Anybody who runs around suggesting that
hundreds of students voted a particlar way simply
because Art Smolensky said so is insulting the
intelligence of everyone who voted in the election.
A second major criticism has been based on our
treatment of Arts undergraduate president, Don Palmer,
former candidate for AMS treasurer.
In our Feb. 12 issue, we criticized Palmer for the
fact that an article by him appeared in UBC Reports the
same day he filed nomination papers and blamed him
for the late opening of the Buchanan poll.
Palmer claims he had no responsibility for the
Buchanan poll, which would be a distinct departure
from past procedure for AUS presidents. In a letter
elsewher on this page, an elections committee member
disputes Palmer's claim. Palmer may be telling the truth,
but for the moment our criticism of him must stand.
As for the UBC Reports article, we don't question
Palmer's claim that the article was submitted long
before he decided to run. However, even he would have
to admit that its appearance at that time looked
suspicious, to say the least.
We have also seen no evidence that Palmer
attempted to stop publication of the article after he
decided to run. Even if it was too late to stop
publication (we don't think it was, even though we
aren't familiar with the UBC Reports deadlines) it
would have been a matter of common courtesy to
inform the UBC Reports editor of the situation.
We believe we have exercised our proper right of
editorial opinion coupled with fair news coverage and
have nothing to be ashamed of or apologize for.
LETTERS
Palmer
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire  John Andersen
Managing     Bruc-t Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
John Gibbs sauntered insolently up
to the bar. "Bloody Mary, an' step on
it," he rasped.
Davie Schmidt expertly mixed the
drink and slapped it on the glossy
walnut surface. Gibbs walked cooly
back to his table, just in time to hear
Shane McCune tell John Andersen,
"... so I sez to her, I sez, 'who was
that cat I saw you with last night',"
and so on, which didn't amuse
Josephine Margolis at all. "I'm not
amused," she said.
Jennifer Alley tittered at Steve
Millard. Smith and Mike Sasges shook
their fingers. Jim Davies pinched Jinny
Ladner. Daryl Tan, Brett Garrett, John
Thompson and Dirk Visser took sepia
photos. Everyone wore wide ties and
droopy fedoras. Sandy Kass owes Pual
Knox a trip to the pub.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Don Palmer, president of the
Arts Undergraduate Society,
seems to have omitted a few facts
and forgotten a few others in the
section of his letter (Ubyssey,
Feb. 23) dealing with the recent
election of the AMS executive.
Although Mr. Palmer is correct
in stating that undergraduate
societies have no constitutional
responsibility to assist in AMS
elections, he is quite aware of the
fact that the AMS elections
committee has traditionally
depended on the societies for help
"Well, in actual fact there is no such thing as 'UBC Info', but if
there was that would be as good a place as any."
in such elections for the sole
reason that the elections
committee has no other source of
manpower to operate ten-odd
polls scattered throughout the
campus come election day. The
fact is that with some tact and a
little arm-twisting during the five
elections held since September,
considerable co-operation has
been received from most societies
in this function, with the notable
exception, however, of the Arts
Undergraduate Society.
Other groups have occasionally
let us down in certain respects,
but the AUS in particular has
consistently refused co-operation.
Surely UBC's largest
undergraduate society,
representing 6,000 students, can
organize eight-odd people to man
one poll in Buchanan building.
As for the recent first slate
AMS executive election, Mr.
Palmer personally promised the
committee that his society would
take responsibility for the
Buchanan poll in at least one of
the elections, and since, as he said,
he is the sole spokesman of the
AUS, we were naturally forced to
accept his word. He then referred
us to his secretary, who rather
unfortunately was unable to
inform us until 10:30 a.m. on the
election day that Arts would be
unable to man the poll, contrary
to our previous agreement with
him. Thus I find Palmer's
statemen unacceptable that
"someone" who volunteered to
man the poll did not do so on
behalf of the AUS.
In future if we ask his society
to man the Buchanan poll,
although it will certainly cause us
much inconvenience a simple
"no" would be much preferable
to the evasive line he handed us in
the course of the year.
DAN MULLIGAN
Elections Committee
DAVIES' RAVIES
BY JIM DAVIES
Love, computer style
The saga of the blind date began last Friday
night.
It had all been arranged through a computer —
no more taking chances with just any girl, I had
found my ideal mate.
It had to work. I had been promised the girl of
my dreams by Lulu's compu-date.
She would be a pert young campus lovely,
voluptuous yet modest, unassuming yet gregarious,
passionate but restrained. She would like shiny dill
pickles and chew rubber cement. Her nose would
have a delicate ribbon of Doris Day-like freckles and
her name would be Brigitte.
That's what I wanted and that's what I'd get.
Lulu wouldn't lie to me.
I had to prepare myself. My perfect match (and
probable spouse-to-be) would most certainly not
put up with scruffiness.
For my wardrobe, I chose that young, soft,
very popular look with (chuckle) a certain nuance
of jet-set elegance.
In other words, I doffed a paisley shirt, my
prized brocade hip-huggers, a starched pair of clean
white socks (executive length) and my best pair of
penny loafers.
I arranged my hair in the now-famous Vikings
blow wave, back-combed my sideburns and had a
quick gargle of drano — just to make sure.
Splashing on three or four handfuls of old spice
cologne, I gazed fondly upon my cherubic, yet
somehow ruggedly handsome visage in the mirror.
I was ready.
There were two choices of how I could spend
the evening with Brigitte.
First, I could purchase a fine vintage wine
(perhaps Cordon Bleu, 1937), treat the young lady
to a night at the symphony or the ballet, surprise
her with an after hours orchid corsage and sup
elegantly at some little French restaurant on a
delicacy similar to branched butterfly wings.
Or, we could take in a double-feature and grab
a bite afterwards at the White Spot.
The answer was obvious. The love of my life
would clearly have a taste for the unique and
unusual — movies and a hamburger would wow
her.
Now that my wardrobe and itinerary were
looked after, all I had to do was get over to where I
know open arms awaited me — not to mention open
legs.
I rushed outside to where my chauffeur-driven
limousine awaited. Thrusting myself in the seat with
a flourish, I admonished the driver for his shoddy
appearance and demanded he take me to Granville
and Georgia.
"Drop dead," he commented, advising me to
deposit my 25 cents in the change box.
"Damned bus drivers," I thought, "it's a shame
B.C. Hydro didn't give 'em all the axe."
Finally, I arrived at the door of my dreams,
cooly knocked, and waited.
"Thay, you're even tweether looking than the
latht one," said the limp-wristed fella that came to
the door. "Lulu, I hate you," I screamed as I
disappeared over a nearby hedge. "I'll never trust
computers again."
(Women's liberation and Gay liberation, please
address all letters of complaint to Jim Davies, c/o
The Ubyssey.) Friday,  February 26,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
Election
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I thought the handling of the
recent AMS elections by The
Ubyssey was appalling. I felt
compelled and in fact obligated to
respond to some of the innuendos
and insinuations you furthered
regarding arts undergraduate
president Don Palmer, Hanson
Lau and others.
Firstly, I might say that I was
seriously considering having my
name stand for treasurer with the
full endorsation of Don Palmer —
in fact among others it was Don
Palmer who encouraged me to
run. However. I declined for
personal reasons.
To accuse Don Palmer of
playing his cards right re UBC
Reports is just pure rubbish. From
talking with Don, it was not until
he had read that sacrosanct article
"Confessions of a Politico"
written under the pseudonym of
Senator Smolensky that Mr.
Palmer was motivated to forward
has name.
On one hand the Ubyssey
(which up to now I defended both
in public and in the finance
committee) criticized Politicos for
failing to disseminate information
to the masses while on the other,
you castigate those who endeavor
to do so. To me this spells out
hypocrisy, and shoddy journalism.
Admittedly, it appears strange
that Don's article appeared in
UBC Reports just before the
election, but few seem to
appreciate the fact that the article
was in editor Jim Banham's hands
at least three weeks before it was
published. It seems tome that The
Ubyssey rather than Don Palmer
is suspect in these allegations and
accusations regarding Mr. Palmer's
political opportunism.
Now, if I may reiterate the
points I have tried to make. I
think that the printing of the
Smolensky article was unfair
because there was no time for
rebuttal, I think your accusations
of Don Palmer's political
opportunism is without
foundation, and further I believe
that castigating individuals for
disseminating very important
information to the masses via
UBC Reports regarding the
guaranteed annual incomes to
undergraduates societies is a
flagrant   violation   or   breach   of
trust that is vested in you both by
the selection committee of The
Ubyssey editorial board, and the
students' council.
PETEINSLEY
Vice-President
External Affairs
Commerce
Undergraduate Society
Firing
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I must admit that the
"unanimous" decision on the part
of the senior colleagues of my
department not to renew my
contiact (Ubyssey Feb. 23), is a
difficult observation to counter.
However, it should be pointed out
that the decision on promotion
was a split decision and the
majority of the members have
admitted that the decision was
not based on academic
consideration. The decision not to
renew my contract may have been
"unanimous" but again two
members of the promotion
committee were sufficiently
moved to file separate reports
indicating that the decision was
not based on academic
considerations.
It is not difficult to understand
how unfair decisions can be made
if one realizes the power of the
head of a department at UBC. The
head of a department has the
power to harass anyone in his
department regardless of tenure
status. For example a tenured
member of the department of
microbiology who feels he has
been sufficiently harassed is
seriously considering early
retirement. If the department
head creates a situation and makes
it clear that support of a
promotion is a vote of no
confidence for him, then of
course the faculty
I am convinced that some
people in the microbiology
department felt they were making
a fair decision. Their decision was
based on mis-information. Once
the department members are
caught in the web of an unfair
decision, it is important for them
to rationalize that decision. Hence
it would be foolish to accept their
opinion completely on the matter. ,
One must go to the principals in
the matter and offer an open
hearing with the faculty member
so that he can defend himself
against the charges. I was never
extended that right although I
requested it several times. An
open discussion with all of the
faculty members including the
head and some neutral observers
would expose the situation as
character assassination. Such a
meeting was attempted by me
recently and although the head
was invited, he declined to attend.
Those senior colleagues who did
attend could offer no reasons for
the denial of my promotion or
contract renewal. It should be
obvious that the head cannot
tolerate a fair and open
examination of the facts. He
continues to hide a slanderous
letter which he wrote as a report
to the Personnel Services
Committee; a letter which he
refuses to show to any member of
the department.
Finally, Campbell said that the
decision was a "broadly-based"
decision.- It certainly was not
broadly-based with respect to the
consensus of all the members of
the department of microbiology.
Non-tenured faculty members,
graduate students and
undergraduate students with
whom I have had contact
supported my promotion and
renewal of contract. Their
opinions and wishes were
completely ignored by the senior
colleagues.
It is generally understood by
men of good faith that an open
hearing is a basic civil right of any
individual whose character is
under attack. Since this request
was denied in the department of
microbiology, I intend to
introduce a motion to the faculty
that such open hearings be
guaranteed to members of this
academic community if character
is used in any way to justify
denial of promotion, tenure, or
contract renewal. It is time
assistant professors and untenured
staff of the academic community
be extended those civil rights
which are the recognized rights of
all members of the public domain.
D. JOSEPH CLARK
Assistant Professor
Department of Microbiology
Support
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Ubyssey which might be more
commensurate with contemporary
engineering attitudes.
ERIC PAPSDORF
Engineering 3
Traffic
Editor, The Ubssey, Sir:
A pick-up bay for hitch-hikers
has been provided on Wesbrook
Crescent for our convienience and
safety.
Some of us have ignored this
and continue to hitch-hike along
University Boulevard, holding up
traffic, creating a dangerous
traffic situation and, in effect,
rudely butting in on those at the
proper pick-up bay.
To improve this situation, we
encourage drivers not to pick up
hitch-hikers at the village during
peak traffic flows. We also
encourage everyone to use the
pick-up bay provided.
UBC Student-Faculty
Traffic and Parking
Committee
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We wish to express our concern
about the termination of the
contract of Dr. Clark in
microbiology. The vast majority of
students with whom he has come
in contact respect him as a
teacher, as a scientist and as a
person. His continued interest in
students and his cooperative
nature make him one of the
outstanding teachers in the
department of microbiology. His
scientific achievements are well
known. We recognize his
contributions to this department
and consider the non-renewal of
his contract to be a great loss to
the department of microbiology
and a great loss to UBC.
30 Signatures
Engineers
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The problem: The irrelevance
of The Ubyssey.
To whom: The engineers.
It was with "Sisterhood" still
fresh in my mind that I returned
from mid-term break and found
myself accosted by a number of
posters of EUS presidential
candidates. The posters of one
candidate represent an extreme
degradation of women and the
sexual act. These posters are an
indication of an outdated attitude
prevalent in engineering.
Often the cry has been heard —
within engineering, anyways — for
an engineer-editor of the Ubyssey,
so one must assume that engineers
are generally interested in a
meaningful Ubyssey. I would
suggest that The Ubyssey might
fulfill this need by withholding
copies of The Ubyssey which deal
with contemporary issues and
distributing within the engineering
buildings outdated copies of The
DAL GRAUER MEMORIAL LECTURES
SIR ISAIAH BERLIN
Sir Isaiah Berlin, president of Wo If son College at Oxford
University and one of the world's leading political and historical
philosophers, will give two Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures at UBC
on Monday and Tuesday, March 1 and 2. Sir Isaiah will speak in
the Frederic Wood Theatre on March 1 at 12:30 p.m. on "The
Russian Conception of the Writer's Calling." His second lecture,
in the Totem Park Residences at 8:15 p.m. on March 2, is entitled
"Russian Obsession with History and Historicism." There is no
admission charge for either lecture.
We have built our business up on
giving our customer the utmost in
repair service (saving him money
whenever we can) but not at the
expense of a poor quality job. We
thank all our U.B.C. Customers
and friends for their patronage
over the years. We guarantee our
work but at the same time we
have reasonable rates. Most work
done same day. See you soon.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26,  1971
IDEAS AT LARGE
Following reports on the availability of teaching jobs
in B.C., Alma Mater Society education rep-elect Sandy
Kass talks about the situation.
Due to the efforts of some of our well-meaning, but
misinformed administrators, many students are being
misled into thinking that a degree from the faculty of
education is a sure-fire way to get a job.
Those who read "facts" such as those stated by Doris
Hopper in a recent UBC Reports may take for granted
that 1,005 1970 education graduates employed, out of a
class of 1,175, have taken jobs within the disciplines of
education.
However, this is not the case.
It is very easy for an outsider such as Hopper to put
together a few statistics and say "this is the situation",
but it is not so easy to admit that "the facts" are not
necessarily what's printed in black and white.
Of the 1,175 graduates, 1,005 may have found jobs
not long afterwards, but certainly only a minority found
themselves doing what they had devoted four (often five)
years to and spent at least $2,500 working towards.
In the greater Vancouver school district, over 2,000
applications were received for less than 150 teaching
positions. Many of these came from non-B.C. graduates
wishing to locate in Vancouver.
Teachers are hired by separate school boards
according to their academic standing in their last two
years of university and their willingness to teach practical
subjects such as physical education, art or music.
The B.C. Teachers Federation admits it tries to give
local graduates priority in local jobs. However, according
to the schoool board criteria it may be assumed that a
number of those hired every year are from out of the
province.
It may therefore be assumed that out of the 1,005
education grads in 1970 little more than 100 of those
could have obtained jobs in the teaching profession.
Figures at Simon Fraser University are slightly lower
but it may be expected the ratio between grads and those
obtaining teaching jobs is somewhat the same.
At present there are 22,750 teachers employed in
B.C., and currently 291 teachers are registered with the
BCTF as available for work.
However, director of student services A. F. Shirran,
disputes this figure as over half of the 291 have put
geographic limits to their employment.
(That is, if a male teacher refuses to leave his
Vancouver-employed spouse, he cannot be counted as
unemployed by the student placement office, even though
he cannot get a job in Vancouver.)
Because of increasing cuts in the provincial education
budget it is assumed even more graduate teachers will have
to look elsewhere for their source of income this year.
The majority of Lower Mainland school boards have
protested these cuts, but only Burnaby has threatened to
do anything about it.
According to Burnaby school board officials, that
district will need 21 more teachers than what the
provincial government has financed them to hire.
The board is at present attempting to discontinue
distribution of free school supplies to pupils so it can
finance the hiring of the additional teachers and hopes all
parents will co-operate in its endeavors.
The overall picture is that there is something very
wrong somewhere. The school boards need teachers, and
the teachers are available. How the two can get together,
only the provincial government knows for sure.
Until more positive directions can be taken by the
provincial ministry of education, teachers will continue to
become secretaries, and B.C. will continue to have the
highest pupil-teacher ratio in Canada.
Choquette in Europe
studying police methods
PARIS (CUP) - Quebec justice
minister Jerome Choquette and a
high-powered delegation of
officials are secretly in Europe to
study police methods with a view
to an eventual reorganization of
Quebec's police forces.
The group, including Quebec
Provincial Police director Maurice
St. Pierre (who at one time had
control of all police forces in
Quebec), Police Commission
chairman Judge Roger Gosselin,
assistant deputy minister of
justice Robert Boisvert and lawyer
Robert Demers who represented
the government during the Front
de Liberation du Quebec
negotiations, is taking a look at
police organization in France and
England.
The main object of the Quebec
study group is to find out how
Quebec's forces can be more
centralized, how citizens' rights
can be better protected and how
standards of recruitment can be
raised and the police force made
more efficient.
The government feels, on the
basis of the October crisis, that it
is important to organize police in
such a manner that there is a more
direct chain of command so that
officials know what is going on
and can coordinate efforts in a
serious manner.
The group is interested in the
centralized structure of the
French police and the clear
apportioning of tasks to different
elements of the force, such as
criminal investigation, subversive
radical activities, and others.
The Quebec group is
particularly interested in
attracting university graduates to
police ranks; it feels a higher level
of education will make the men
more equipped to deal with such
things as organized crime,
contestation, or kidnapping crises.
The group believes another
advantage      would      be      the
protection of citizens' rights
because senior officials would
have a better idea of what is going
on.
The police are inclined to use
unorthodox methods, one
spokesman said, in cases where
they feel isolated and have no
reference or help from their
qualified officers.
The group's investigation will
form the basis of a white paper
ordered by the Quebec
government in November.
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Scuttling doomed to fail
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Incredibly ridiculous puppet blorg
councillors threatened Wednesday to scuttle head puce blorg Nathan
Smith, print guru of this island republic.
Observers said the councillors were guilty of a gross obfuscation
of the issues, since Smith really has no controL
The councillors, blinded by their own egos, have apparently
attempted to impose their own elitist standards on the print freaks of
Pango-Pango. But everybody knows that firing the head puce blorg
doesn't make a god damn bit of difference.
The observers add that the councillors, as usual, are going to lose.
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WSS CHARTER FLIGHTS
for more details drop
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Notes
An M.A. thesis play called Miss Jairus by Michel de
Ghelrode will be on at the Dorothy Somerset studio at the back
of the Freddy Wood March 3-6. There will be a student
performance at 12:30 p.m. on March 4, for the price of a dollar.
The production will be directed by Larry Lilo and designed by
Astrid Janson.
In the Freddy Wood pretty soon, Oedipus Rex will reign.
The Reperatory Dance Theatre from the University of Utah
will present their first Canadian performance on March 12 and 13
in the SFU Theatre. There will be a free lecture demonstration at
12:30 p.m. on Friday March 12, in the SFU Theatre.
For Arthur Miller fans, ACT, the Actors' Contemporary
Theatre, the same people who did The Boys in the Band, and the
Fantasticks, will be presenting Miller's newest play, The Price,
during the week, they will also be showing Arthur Miller movies
such as All My Sons with Edward G., and Burt Lancaster, as well
as the Jean-Paul Sartre version of The Crucible, A View from the
Bridge, and Death of a Salesman.
The Price will be directed by John Parker who also directed
the Boys in the Band, and The Fantasticks. The cast is composed
entirely of professional Vancouver actors. The notes provided by
ACT, stress this particular point, and for good reason, since the
dispute over the Playhouse's refusal to produce the George Ryga
play and their subsequent chicken hearted presentation of plays
like the very safe Neil Simon play Plaza Suite is not dead. One of
the hoary points in the dispute is the fact that the Playhouse
under the direction of UBC's John Brockington, chose to use
New York actors for the lead parts, whereas Ryga's play would
have used local actors.
Joseph Golland plays the eighty-nine year old Solomon,
while Rae Brown plays Esther. Golland is fairly well known for
his acting at The Arts club, and his CBC work, Rae Brown has
also done work for the CBC, she stars in an upcoming
Manipulators sequence on the tube, the play will be on at 7:30
p.m., Tuesday to Saturday starting March 4. The Films will be
on at 9:30 on the same days.
Here's your chance to see Canada's best know artists. In the
Fine Arts Gallery under the library, The Loeb collection will be
on display March 2 to the 17th. The Loeb Collection is comprised
of 53 paintings by Canadian artists like group of sevener's Lawren
Harris, J. E. H. MacDonald; oldtimer's like Kreighoff and Paul
Kane, the impressionist J. W. Morrice, and the modernists,
Pellan, Riopelle and the Walking Woman man Harold Towa
This is a really fine opportunity to take a look at what
Canadian artists have done in the past. This collection is one of
the best in Canada and it covers the painting history of Canada
for a period of one hundred and twenty-five years.
The Savage God Theatre Company under the direction ot
John Juliani, has secured the rights to George Ryga's playhouse
rejected play, Captives of the Faceless Drummer.
Juliani and his company are trying to raise $10,000 so that
they can go into production by mid March. That gives him less
than four weeks to raise the necessary money.
The production will be non-profit, and the actors will be
local.
The Savage God company has done a lot of things free of
charge at the Vancouver Art Gallery, this time they need money,
it's more than a worthwhile cause, so if you can help, write
Savage God, Vancouver Art Gallery,'1145 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver 5.
Juliani will also be out at UBC with puppet shows and
other things to raise money for the production.
—Ed: TIM WILSON
—Special Ass't: Grant Dickin
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Priday, February 26, 1971 Cinema
Pontecorvo's latest movie, Burns, is a
masterpiece.
With Burn, Pontecorvo has moved away from
the documentary style he used in The Battle of
Algiers to a dramatized account' of rebellion on
Quemada, a Portuguese sugar island in the West
Indies.
The film is built around the perceptions of
Marlon Brando, who is Sir William Walker, the
British mercenary. Walker comes to Quemada to
instigate rebellion against the Portuguese so that
Britain can control the sugar trade.
Because we see the society through Brando's
eyes, we get a fine view of the reaction of the
island's upper class, desirious of control, but
hardly audacious. For example, there is a scene
where Brando helps the would-be president pull
the trigger of the gun pointed at the Portuguese
ruler.
Later on we see Walker arrange for the same
man's death for treason because he was no longer
Husbands
By PAT AUFDERHEIDE
There must be a medium - and I'm not even
asking it to be happy, just mildly sane — between
the malicious candied lies of Love Story and the
tedious, trivial truths of Husbands.
John Cassavetes in directing the film
Husbands implies that there is some nobility — or
perhaps courage - in telling it like it is. The
cinema verite technique has found its American
expression in Cassavetes' Faces and now (in color)
Husbands; and the latter film seems as strangely
unmoving in its technique as it does in content or
the characters do in interest.
The film is subtitled "a comedy about life,
death and freedom," and it would be child's play
to take issue with each of the nouns in that phrase.
But we'll sidestep the potshots to note the
importance of that subtitle: Casavetes obviously
had something in mind when he made this flick,
other than exercising her experimental mode. He
really wanted to say something meaningful about
Life, Death, and Freedom. This makes the viewing
even more painful. If Cassavetes were a
commercial boor, churning them out a* la Huston,
we could dismiss the film with disdain. If he were
an artistic prankster like Warhol, we could feel
righteously uninterested. As it is, recognizing the
artistic goodwill, we feel a sort of constipation of
the aesthetic faculty, watching, waiting, and
ultimately leaving disgruntled.
The film's central focus is a group of aging
"chums", suburban intellects and husbands. The
fourth member of the group has just died
unexpectedly. In celebration of the life of the
other three, as well as the shock of his death, they
go on a Superbender. It begins in New York,
travels the area intensively (dwelling largely in a
dingy bathroom), and then goes to London. Two
of the three seekers dispiritedly return to suburbia,
freedom in hand.
As was noted before, the style is cinema
verite, American style; that is, with a misguided
assumption that if it's ugly and petty, for instance
drunks vomiting, somehow on the cosmic level it's
Significant,    because    the    little    man    is   the
Burn
convenient for the British Sugar Company as a
ruler.
We also see Jose Dolores, played by Evaristo
Marquez, as the rebel leader. He is initially spurred
to rebellion by Walker's machinations. But then he
discovers that British control is almost as bad as
Portuguese contol, and that neither wants to help
the people of the island.
At that point he becomes dangerous to Walker
too. And must be destroyed.
Brando gives a fine performance as the
efficient employee of British ambition for sugar.
Marquez' performance is excellent. He gives a very
realistic and moving interpretation of a man who is
first driven to rebellion by the pressures of his life,
then he moves on to an understanding of what
creates the pressures.
The photography is beautiful, with scene
upon scene of physically compelling people.
Burn is on at the Coronet, which also gives
student prices.    _ SHARON
microcosm; and also that the best way to present a
realistic, i.e. sordid, issue, is au naturel, as it
happened, from the beginning to end. The
combination of these two fallacies leaves us with
an interminable (over two hours), mildly puzzling,
faintly nauseating film experience.
In the film, we watch Ben Gazzara, Peter
Falk, and Cassavetes walking, running, swimming,
talking, smoking, brooding together, in a sort of
petrified adolescence — what one irritated girl in
the film calls "silly sniggering schoolboys". And
when they start an action we get to see it from
start to finish. This kind of film-making reverts to
a primitive concept of action-on-film, and is no
better, to Rousseauian sorrow, for its
retrogression. A sample of something like, say, the
scene where each person must sing a song, or the
basketball game, would have been infinitely more
revealing than watching the whole thing. And a
little bit of that suburban psycho-analysis goes a
long way. But, caught in the pit, we plod through
the fried fuzz of a several-day blow with these
three unhappy, rather tiresome men. The quality
of the vignettes, the images, fails in every case to
compensate for the length of the incident.
It's tedious, petty, small. I'm not asking for a
reinstatement of the ennobling hero concept in
our art; but I am tired of being presented with
characters whom I would avoid with pleasure in
daily life, simply for being predictably inane. And
Cassavetes offers neither depth for interest to us in
this attempt. These men are, at best, annoying; at
worst, invisible. There is no reason for me to view
this painfully belabored, microscopically close
shot of chaos.
In providing a negative example, Cassavetes
perhaps does a service to the evolving theories of
cinema aesthetics. The acknowledgement of chaos
is not enough in the structure, or even
non-structure of a movie. The hand-held camera,
the grainy closeups of genuine city characters, the
unadulterated background noise and harsh cuts are
not enough to make beauty, or even truth, out of
sincerity. And finally, even truths, even small
rather pointless truths, cannot be seen if they are
too heavily overlaid with boredom.
Edible Festival
Utensils? Manners? Formality?
Instead of lecturing on the Fine art of Edibles
James Barber, Province theatre critic, hosted a
messy meal for Operation Kontemporary.
Ice-cream, pickles, bagles, fruit, clams, crab -
that's the generosity of Barber (who bought the
supply of food with the money he would have
received for his lecture).
"I could talk for hours about food, but the
whole idea of eating is so ludicrous that this is just
the thing to do," said Barber.
To monotone readings on all phases of eating
from an Emily Post etiquette book, people threw
food, stepped on it, played with it and even
managed to eat it.
Barber introduced 'dean of economics, health,
sciences ...' to read instead of himself because he
was suffering from indigestion.
The gourmet event took place on Tuesday in
Lasserre 104.
Barber told The Ubyssey reporter that he
knew about food and that's why the event was so
appropriate.
"I can write about it, gourmet cook and
everything," he said.
Barber said the food cost about $30.00.
Specializing in
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NOTICE OF MEETING
A.M.S. Committee
Inquiring into Tenure
Any interested student, faculty member, or member
of the community who wishes to present an opinion
on any aspect of tenure is invited to attend a
meeting of the tenure committee. Points raised at
the meeting will be considered for inclusion in the
final report of the committee.
The meeting will be held in SUB Room 212A
(behind clubs lounge) at 12:30 P.M. on Friday,
February 26. For further information, call Rob
McDiarmid 228-3973 or 434-9954.
MMM
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Friday, February 26,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 %    $?'
Can a new class
find happiness in
^tc
Who would want to establish a classical ballet company in the
most notorious cultural wasteland west of Toronto?
Ballet Horizons, that's who.
Ballet Horizons is six talented individuals who comprise
Vancouver's newest, and after the demise last week of Nobert Vesak's
Western Dance Theatre, only ballet company.
So why Vancouver, and why classical ballet instead of modern
dance?
"Well, two of our dancers are from this part of the world, and
there is so much potential for developing a ballet company in
Vancouver," says general administrator Jane Goodbody, 23. "There are
dozens of ballet schools here and literally hundreds of kids studying in
them."
"With this kind of enthusiasm, there really should be a basis for
support here."
As for the classical ballet, artistic director Morley Wiseman, 35,
has the answer..
"Classical ballet training is the best there is," he says. "Classical
ballet is the standard. If a company can work well in the classics, then it
can work well in other things."
But he points out that being a classical company does not restrict
Ballet Horizons to a narrow range of performances.
"If you perform a ballet using well-trained classical dancers, and
classical is the most disciplined technique there is, then it's a classical
ballet, even if the treatment is modern."
As a group, Ballet Horizons brings an impressive list of credits to
Vancouver.
Morley, originally from Unity, Saskatchewan, was the first dancer
to receive a Canada Council award for dance study, which took him to
England's Royal Ballet School. After graduating, he joined the National
fs$tor~
Ballet in Toronto and has appeared with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Les
Grands Ballets Canadiens and London's Festival Ballet.
As artistic director for Ballet Horizons, he has given up dancing to
concentrate on choreography, costume design and construction and set
design.
The nucleus of the company is the four dancers. Diane Bell, 21, a
New Westminster dancer, joined the Royal Winnipeg four years ago
after receiving a scholarship at the age of 16, and has since danced with
the London Festival Ballet in a variety of virtuoso roles.
Graham Goodbody, a graduate of the Royal Ballet School in
London, has danced with the Royal Opera House company there and
the Royal Winnipeg.
Paul Blakey, 21, left Victoria at 18 to dance with the Royal
Winnipeg, where he met and married English dancer Nicola Betts.
In 1969, the Blakeys were awarded Canada Council grants to
study in London and later were invited to join the Kiel Statsoper,
«iS»»a#»
l! A:ft
*\
IN*
M
\ 7'
.*<.
;Ji
A^j
*    JL
# •
SS»"™jSi
Morley the nifty tailor at work .
ZlPX
Tiitej?,
Germany, where they performed
and The Nutcracker.
Finishing off the six is Jar
than busy handling all booi
engagement bookings.
But for the present, dancinj
done at Ballet Horizons. The city
local ballet company, and getting
end result is that everybody doe
keep them busy seven days a w«
morning.
Apart from rehearsals, the d;
to make enough money to pay tt
there are hours of work on the cos
programs, miscellaneous jobs fixi
of music for rehearsals and perfc
done any way possible, including
and Morley discovered the only p
the tape recorder from the recori
studio, which apparently is acoust:
For the time being the com
sound track due to the money fac
the dancers before we pay an orch
Story: Nettie Wild and M
Photos: Paul Blakey
Judging by the outside apr.
St., it is hard to believe that a ful
de ballet of 40 is being born behir
But despite a rehearsal s
constant fear of bouncing off
production - The Nutcracker Sui
small back room which serves as i
the one and only sewing machine
production.
Morley, who has designed c
variety of ballet companies, is a 1
his costumes for some of the sok
if they had to be bought. It is-t
able to accumulate a valuable w;
the raw materials.
Jane,  operating out  of a
business end of the troupe which
of funds for such bare necessities
colorful material.
The studio itself sports exerc
pipes that dominate the cracked
propped up against the walls se* Mi
glimpses of themselves as they d
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Pridcry, February 26,  1971 cal ballet group
tingy Vancouver?
\r&J.--      %■■■,   '''"    '   V
€>
m"    I
jiiZ
II.
:st artists in Daphnis and Chloe
akam's wife, who is kept more
ing,   materials,   supplies   and
lly one of the many things to be
ancouver has yet to support any
lished takes a bit of money. The
or three jobs each, enough to
ften into the early hours of the
; also teach daily classes in order
t-and keep themselves fed. Then
5, the preparation of posters and
the studio and the preparation
ces. Whatever has to be done is
larly morning session when Paul
o record the rehearsal music on
>er was in the can adjoining the
pleasing.
will have to get by with a taped
ts Morley said, "We'd rather pay
- ~l!®!j&~'t~S'
with the somewhat less melodic honking of horns that drift up from the
street below. Indeed it must be alarming for the lonely rubbydub who,
strolling down the deserted downtown street at one in the morning,
hearing the strains of The Sugar Plum Fairy filtering down from above
as the company wraps up one of its many late night sessions.
Because of the immensity ..of The Nutcracker, forty dancers from
Canadian Dance World in New Westminster will help complete the
corps de ballet. As a special attraction, along with the four Ballet
Horizons principles, Raymond Goulet of the Royal Winnipeg will be
guest starring as Madam Bon Bon. With the four principals plus 10
Ballet Horizons students rehearsing in the smaller studio on Pender and
the corps de ballet rehearsing in New Westminster, the company won't
be working together as a whole until it starts rehearsals in Vincent
Massey Auditorium shortly before they perform on April 15 and 16.
Along with The Nutcracker, the company is working on a piece
choreographed by Morley which will also be presented on the same
program. Once their engagement at Vincent Massey is finished the six
founding members will move on to Victoria where the program will be
repeated in the McPherson Playhouse, this time using students from the
Wynne Shaw Dance Studio to fill out the corps.
While some may consider the efforts of this barely new company
a bit ambitious, they are determined to insure themselves a future by
forming a solid school of dance which will be a constant source of
artists for the company. In this fashion, both the students and the
company would benefit. Working under the same principle as the
Bolshoi and Kirov ballet companies, Ballet Horizons will give its
students exposure in its productions as well as the usual training within
the school itself.
Currently the school is operating two hours nightly during the
week and most of Saturday with a proposed summer ballet workshop
scheduled to run for six weeks starting from July 18 and ending with a
student performance. The summer school will be held at the Arts Club
Theatre.
Before The Nutcracker however, Graham and Dianne will be
giving a guest appearance with the Vivaldi Concert Dancers this
Saturday. Appearing at the Vincent Massey Auditorium, the pair will be
dancing the pas de deux from Don Quixote. Both dancers have already
appeared in front of a Vancouver audience when they guested with the
Paula Ross Dancers in September and later with Nicola and Paul in a
dance lecture demonstration in December which was put on by Ballet
Horizons.
What happens with the company after the Nutcracker is
entirely dependent on the amount of support Ballet Horizons receives
from the public. According to Jane, the members have given themselves
one year to put the company on its feet. "One year is all we can stand
financially," she said.
So once again it is up to Vancouver audiences to decide the fate
of another dance company. Let's hope the verdict is thumbs  up.
ce Bridge
ices of the studio at 434 Pender
deal ballet complete with a corps
walls.
so small that dancers are in
walls, rehearsals of their next
ire going full steam ahead. In the
ume workshop, Morley works on
ing one of the forty tutus for the
nes for television as well as for a
goldmine for Ballet Horizons as
s are worth from $500 to $ 1,000
'J* his skills the company will be
be on their own paying only for
Mike office, takes care of the
illy entails the careful allocation
,000 yards of thread and acres of
bars jammed between the water
. Full length dressing mirrors lie
isers are able to catch occasional
to the taped soundtrack along
. Diane and Nicola rehearsing.
Friday, February 26, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 -==-===^= DEBATE ^^=
"G-D
AFTER AUSCHWITZ
G-D —
The G-d of Creation,
of productivity,
of light and life,
of Moses and Jesus,
of Protestant,
Catholic and Jew.
DR. RICHARD RUBENSTEIN
M.A. Ph.D.
Harvard University
Noted    theologian    and    thinker
ordained   rabbi   who   denies   the
existence of a personal G-D
G-d,
the always present,
all powerful,
all pervading spirit.
Where    was    He    at
Auschwitz?
Where was He while
millions suffered inhumane deaths?
Where was He during
man's greatest inhumanity to man?
DR. IRVING GREENBERG
M.A. Ph.D.
Harvard University
Professor  of philosophy Yeshiva
university     fulbright    visiting
professor   of   history   Tel   Aviv,
university
The Intellectual Debate
Sponsored by B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
SUNDAY, FEB 28th, 8:30 p.m.
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1
Akiyama
Kontempory music
The only Kontemporary
music presentation in this week
of Kontemporary Operations
was on Tuesday at noon. Two
graduate composers of the
faculty of Music, Barry Truax
and Jerry Summers, played
their most recent works. I
missed the piece for Horn and
Electronic Tape but the same
idea happened in the next piece.
Sonic Landscape Truax's with
Flute (Norman Stanfield)
Piano (Barry Truax) and
Electonic Tape (guided by
Cortland Hultberg, head of the
Electronic Music Department).
Unfortunately it was difficult
to distinguish the musical ideas
because the piano and flute in
particular were almost
inaudible. Truax's piano
writing is happily pianoistic
though, and refreshing because
it is of full texture and not
sporadic tear drops of sound.
He is expressionistic — a
quality that often saves his
work by injecting atmosphere
with feeling that asks an
audience's partial participation.
(Does anyone remember his
Steppenwolf portions in last
year's Contemporary Arts
Festival? No?)
Jerry Summers proved his
musical maturity in an Elegy
for Clarinet, Cello and Tape.
He is full of ideas and not
afraid to write virtuosic
passages for the pleasure of the
onstage musician in a form that
usually produces effect only
out of grotesquerie or tedium.
But the last group of
musicians calling themselves
"Interface" and containing
Brian Hoover, bass, Craig
McCaw, sitar and guitar and
Wayne Carr, Electronic
synthesizer. Brian Hoover came
into the possession of the
synthesizer and generated the
idea of improvising electronic
music onstage, in this case in
two forms. The first was a raga
presumably created by Craig
McCaw with Brian Hoover as
the drone on stand-up bass
amplified through the
synthesizer. The second had
no distinguishable form except
for the Dier Irae plainchant
melody occurring near the
middle through to the end, and
except for a requirement from
each performer for deafening
sound. It was erotic, maybe.
An electric stand-up bass
reverberating through your seat
stirs some organs, and the
guitar playing was masterful,
but it was ugly. The group
repeated itself in Lassere and
SUB throughout the week.
Symphony
The VSO concert last
Sunday and Monday, February
21 and 22 left two audiences
joyously and vertically erect
applauding the guest
conductor, Kazuyoshi
Akiyama. And they wondered
as they wandered, perhaps,
past those portable mahogany
bars situated in the lobby at
ten foot intervals so that in
case you dribble your drink
halfway between here and
there, someone will be on hand
with a QE lobby drinkers'
dribble towel, that is, many
wondered if thirty-year old Mr.
Akiyama will be The One to
accept the care of the orchestra
for future seasons.
He is a young man,
graduating only eight years ago
from the Toho School of Music
as a conductor. He. was
appointed permanent
conductor of the Tokyo
Symphony orchestra in 1964,
left for the Osaka Philharmonic
and recently toured the USSR
with the Tokyo Ballet.
He conducts with an
Oriental attention to detail
resulting in tight satisfying
ensemble playing and with a
Music
all
over. .
b) Julie Meson
stylized yet effective approach
to vigour and frenzy which
escapes both mechanism and
Wagnerian bombast at the same
time. He seemed, sometimes,
to want to leap into the space
directly above and ahead of
him (he is a small man) and
stab the music out of the
actual persons of the orchestra.
Please cancel any images of
samurai. And yes, he gave us a
joyous concert.
The Dvorak Violin Concerto
in A minor was graced with the
sure and dramatic talents of
Masuko Ushioda (also a
graduate of the Toho School of
Music with many performing
credits in a so far short career).
It is easy to say that she moves
like a small bird straining
against her instrument, or that
she is the beautiful heroine in a
puppet show, but why add
ridiculous pictures to the
picture she creates out of a
mature understanding of what
she plays. The Symphonie
Fantiatique of Berlioz played
twice that way would not have
diminished anyone's joy in it.
It was a masterwork by
everyone concerned. To
acquaint those not familiar
with it, it is a symphony in five
movements of an artist's
fantastic fixation on his love,
whose musical theme recurs in
each movement; i) Reveries
and Passions, ii) at A Ball, iii)
In the Fields, iv) in the closing
of the March to the Scaffold,
just before his punishment for
an intense love, and v) in the
Dream of a Witches' Sabbath.
* * *
Kazuyoshi Akiyama will
return March 7 and 8 to
perform a Rossini and two
twentieth century works of
Somers and Strauss. Peter
Frankl of Hungary will play
the Mozart Piano Concerto no.
14 and Liszt's Piano Concerto
no. 2.
?<&.
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LIFE'S LIKE THAT
Millionaire John Russel was
walking down the driveway
that leads to his palatial
mansion in Muskokee. John,
who suffered from heart
condition, was enjoying the
singing of the robins and
thrushes that abound in his
park like estate. When a small I
cocker spaniel came up to him,
John, dog lover that he was,
bent down to pat the cute
animal. Unfortunately, the
spaniel was rabid, it bit John's
hand, and he died twenty-four
hours later.
—Paul Pug in Dog World.
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26,  1971 the Place
by Bill Storey
A week in music ... thoughts and
impressions...
FRIDAY . . . attended the Vancouver
Symphony's first of three "Concerts for Young
Heads." Feel that the concept of directing some
symphonic material at the young is great, and am
impressed' by the numbers of children, with or
without parents, in the audience. The first piece,
Malcolm Arnold's Tarn O'Shanter Suite, is really
well chosen. Based on Robbie Burns' poem about
a drunken farmer's encounter with a coven of
witches, it explores the capabilities of many of the
instruments for unusual and exciting sounds while
being riotously entertaining. Imagine a trombone,
for example, being played by a totally plastered
musician. Just incredible. After this fine start,
however, the evening moves progressively
downhill. The next two things turn out to be
symphonic pap. Aaron Copland's Billy the Kid
Suite is a conglomeration of orchestrated variations
on western tunes, and yes, it's as bad as it sounds.
It reminds me of the schmaltzy theme music of
great Hollywood achievements like How the West
Was Won. The Pine apple Poll Suite, symphonic
impressions of various Gilbert and Sullivan songs,
is an improvement, but not much. Feel that the
Symphony, in its attempt to appeal to younger
audiences, should try to avoid prostituting its art,
and hope for better things from the Stravinsky
ballet, A Soldier's Tale.
Stravinsky's music, in this piece played by a
small group of seven musicians on one side of the
stage, turns out to be the only worthwhile thing in
this shoddy performance. The set design is
boringly unimaginative, and the dancing of
Norbert Vesak's Western Dance Theatre is so
tediously dull as to be almost painful. Face it,
Norbert, pretending to walk while a narrator
drones on and on is just not entertaining. Vesak
almost, but not quite, breaks the monotony with
his flashy dancing as the Devil. Feel that much
more could have been done with Stravinsky's
interesting combination of atonality and lyricism,
and that the March 27th concert, in which the
Vancouver rock group Spring will perform alone
and with the orchestra, will be much more
involving.
Adjourn to the pub, and from thence, armed
with bottles of wine, to the Parlour to hear
Vancouver's new supergroup, Brahmin, and local
musician Martin Springett. Realize it's the fourth
time in a week that I've heard them, and it just
keeps getting better and better. Martin's stuff is
really beginning to catch on. He does a set backed
by members of the group, and does really exciting
things with his voice, hovering feelingly over notes
in a style reminiscent of Joni Mitchell. Brahmin's
set is just amazing. They combine an
overwhelming power with a virtuousity refreshing
in a rock group. Guitarist Edward Patterson lays
down some screaming licks which remind me
vaguely of Hendrix, but which are his alone.
Interplay between organist Robbie King and
bassist Paul Blayney leads to some involved and
mesmerizing rhythmic patternings. And drummer
Duris Maxwell  does  a  solo  which shows that
beneath that almost fanatical driving beat lurks a
pair of fast and very creative hands. Everybody
dances. Plastered, and home to bed ...
SUNDAY.. . Valentine's Day Eve, and d
back to the QE. for one of the more beautiful
musical evenings of recent days, a concert of
Baroque Chamber Music put on by the Vancouver
Society for Early Music. Am stuck once again by
the way in which this gentle music of harpsichords
and recorders soothes while exciting the listener
with its pyrotechnical complexity. The opening
piece by Vivaldi alternates between lively
spriteliness and gentle, poignant lyricism. The
Cantana by Buxtehude, a guy Bach travelled
prodigious distances to hear, almost makes religion
seem believable. Audrey Farnell sings this well,
particularly the Amen chorus. Feel that the
highlight of the concert, though, is a violin sonata
written by a guy named Biber. Biber was unique in
his practice of deliberately tuning instruments
off-key to achieve unusual musical effects (shades
of Schoenberg!) Violinist Carlo Novi's
performance in this demanding piece is inspired.
His fingering speed is almost magical. Can hardly
wait for the March 18th concert, a Baroque Violin
Recital, in which Novi will of course play a
leading role ...
FRIDAY again ... head for Gassy Jack's to
take in the opening night concert of superlative
flautist Paul Horn. Am appalled by the night-club
prices, and unimpressed by the plastic,
pseudo-psychedelic decor. Buxom waitresses in slit
dresses ply you with booze 'n things while pink
and purple lights flash discordantly on and off
distracting your attention from the music. Hoo
boy.
The music, however, is just fantastic, even
better than expected. Horn has to be one of the
most capable musicians I have ever heard. He and
his trio of guitarist, bassist, and drummer play
both old jazz standards and some of their own
stuff. Horn alternates between flute and
saxophone, and his capacity for drawing the full
potential from a note just amazes me. Somehow
he is able to get above, beneath, and around a song
while being gently unobstmsive.
Paul Horn is a star in the true sense of the
word, but avoids the star trip. He is not the star
backed by so and so, but part of a quartet. The
four (five now, with the addition of vibist Lyn
Blessing, missing the first night) play as a unit, and
are all fantastically talented. Guitarist Clive
Johnson in particular does some really original
things, at times tearing wildly into a song like a
rock guitarist. Horn's flute hovers caressingly in
the soft lyrics, and has sax powers, Coltrane-style,
through the driving songs. At one point, he plays
his flute against a recording, and the echoing result
silences and involves even the jabbering night-club
crowd. And so home to bed, feeling that I've just
had one of those musical evenings which can never
be equalled, and telling myself to be sure to write
this column so as many people as possible will get
out and hear Horn and his group. The Paul Horn
Quintet will be at Gassy Jack's, 7 Alexander Street
in Gastown, all this weekend. Don't miss them.
^S^     The University of  British Columbia
"FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
OEDIPUS THE KING
BY SOPHOCLES
Adapted and Directed by Donald Soule
MARCH 15-27
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
Thursday, March 18 - Matinee 12:30 p.m.
Monday, March 22 - 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 25 - Matinee 12:30 p.m.
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00 (available for all performances)
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207
SUPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
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March 3 - 6 —8:30 p.m.
UBC - SOMERSET STUDIO
Student Tickets - $1.00
RESERVATIONS: ROOM 207
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
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Maggie Smith
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Friday, February 26, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Love in
the OR
Part IV
By Rebecca Quirk
When we last left Major
Metropolitan General Hospital, Dr.
Lance Sterling was still on his death
bed suffering from the dread
galloping peedink X. Meanwhile,
nurse Virginia White had learned of
Lance's affair with nurse Mary
Loveheart.
At the same time. Lance's
mother, who had been trying to
force her attentions on hospital
administrator Allan G.ay, revealed
to Nurse White that Lance was not
really her son, but had been left on
her doorstep.
Lance writhed on his hospital
bed and emitted a loud, guttural
groan. He felt as though he could
no longer stand the raging fever in
his forehead, the intolerable pains
that wracked every muscle, every,
nerve, every fibre of his once
athletic body.
"Oh, fuddle duddle," Lance
groaned. For no particular reason,
he lifted his eyes to the wall
opposite his bed. Then, he saw it.
He had seen one in every room in
the hospital at least a hundred
times, but this was the first time he
had ever really noticed it — the
small bronze cross with the
tortured body of Jesus hanging on
it.
"I've never been a religious
man," he said in a barely audible
whisper. "But if you really are up
there, if there really is any of that
divine mercy left for me, please
either pull me through or let me die
quickly.
"I probably don't deserve your
consideration. I drink like a fish,
lust after every woman I see,
gamble my money away and play
golf on Sunday, but I repent dear
God, I repent. -
"I know I'm not the best man in
the world, but what have I done to
deserve this. Why me?
Lance may have been delirious,
but he thought he saw a beam of
light and heard a mysterious
booming voice from the sky that
answered him: "I don't know
Lance, you just _ piss me off
somehow."
Lance became aware of an
enticing form next to his bed. He
turned and saw nurse White,
preparing his hourly shot of
glucosulphaphenothaliphine.
"Virginia, Virginia," he sighed as
he felt the sharp sting of the
eight-inch hypodermic needle
entering his arm. Virginia chuckled.
"Well Lance, I just learned about
you and Mary Loveheart. I also just
gave you a triple dose of
glucosulphaphenothaliphine to
finish you off for good. That'll
teach you to two-time me, you
insidious, scheming scurvy
reprobate."
"Mary Loveheart?" Lance
screamed. "Oh, Virginia, please let
me explain."
"Fuck off, Lance," Virginia
replied in the sweet, vaginal voice
that was hers and hers alone as she
stormed out the door.
Meanwhile, in his plush office
with wall to wall, deep-pile
chartreuse carpeting, Allan Gay was
speaking to hard-boiled police
captain William ("billy club")
O'Flanagan.
"I'm sorry Captain," Gay was
saying, "but until we have this
galloping peedink X epidemic under
control no patients can leave the
hospital."
O'Flanagan sneered. "Look, Gay,
Luigi Lasagna Mazzorella is the
toughest Mafia chief in the country.
"H'e been under guard in this
hospital since our boys
air-conditioned him, but he comes
up for trial tomorrow and we've got
to take him out of here."
Just as. Gay began to protest.
Pops the janitor walked in to water
Gay's azaleas.
Suddenly, O'Flanagan leaped
from his chair, pounced on the
startled Pops, hurled him to the
floor and pulled his gun.
"Oh my goodness gracious me,
captain," Gay exclaimed, "what are
you doing to Pops?"
"What did you call him?"
"Pops, he's been the janitor here
for 15 yeqrs."
"Pops, my ass," O'Flanagan
replied. "This is Louis
"Lightfingers" Goldfarb, the most
wanted bank robber and second
story man in the country. We've
been looking for him ever since he
escaped from Alcatraz 15 years ago.
Shit, there's no way I ain't getting
that promotion now that I've
nabbed old Loightflngers."
■ *   * jt
Is Pops really a dangerous
criminal? Will Lance survive the
overdose of glucosulphaphenothaliphine? Will he ever get to
tell Virginia the truth about him
and nurse Loveheart? Will the Mafia
Chief stand trial? Will this nonsense
go on much longer? Don't miss the
next installment of Love in The
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Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26, 1971 Friday, February 26,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
High school students
sample universities
About 120 high school students are getting their first taste of
university life — complete with residence food — this weekend.
The students, from about 70 schools across B.C., arrived
Thursday night and are visiting UBC, Simon Fraser University, and the
B.C. Institute of Technology under the auspices of the visitations
committee.
The students — or their schoolboards — are paying their own way
for the outing, which includes residence housing and Ruth Blair's
famous chicken dinners.
If the students are still interested, they will be instructed on how
to get into higher education in the Lower Mainland, and what they and
their fellow students can expect when they get here.
"The impetus for the program came from housing," said
committee chairman Ron Downe, arts 3. "All the students helping are
residence students."
The students were to attend either a counselling seminar or a
seminar sponsored by the Education Undergraduate Society Friday
morning, as well as attending several lectures. UBC Registrar Jack
Parnall will explain registration procedures to them on Friday
afternoon.
"We hope to give the kids an understanding of registration
procedures and help them in choosing their courses," Downe said.
Saturday morning, the students will travel to BCIT and will visit
SFU in the afternoon.
They will be taken either to the Planetarium or on a tour of
Chinatown and Gastown Friday night. Saturday night lias been set aside
for a dance at Totem Park.
"We're hitting basically the same people for the same reasons as
the earlier Alma Mater Society program, but in a different way,"
Downe said.
"We think we can give them more individual attention and they
have a chance to meet more resource people this way," he said.
"We hope it will be a continuing thing."
—daryl tan photo
SAX-PLAYING MEMBER of Interface, an electronic chamber ensemble, entertained people packed into
the Lasserre building lobby Wednesday at noon. The group was participating in Operation
Kontemporary.
FOR GUYS & GALS
FOR JEANS
No. 2 Water Street Gastown
RISKY SHIFT EXP.
MONEY AWARDED TO
CHERYL MacKAY (Ind.)
DAVID MARS, IAN BOOTH,
TERRY GUNDERSON, GARRY
ALLEN (Group) Thanks
SCIENCE
i   UNDERGRADUATE  1
ELECTIONS
The  following  positions  are  open  for  the next year's £:•:
:,  council of the Science Undergraduate Society: ;•:•
President S
V .v
Vice President •:•;
4 AMS reps |
Treasurer
Academic Coordinator
Athletic Coordinator
Social Coordinator
Public Relations Officer
Publications Officer
Secretary :■:•:
• Last   year's   elections   were   a   real  farce.  This  was  due «
• mainly to' apathy on the part of you, the student body of jj
■ Science.  If you want an undergraduate society that will work w
• for you, then get out and run for office. Nomination forms are S:|
• available in the Science Undergraduate Society office in Hut ;•:•
: 0-7, behind the Education Building. Nominations close Mar. ;|:j
: 2nd. Election Mar. 9th. 8
IT'S UP TO YOU |
i GET INVOLVED!    GET INVOLVED!   GET INVOLVED! i
LOW FARE FLIGHT
TO LONDON, ' ENGLAND
Departing Vancouver June 26,1971
Returning Vancouver August 13,1971
S A LIMITED NUMBER OF SEATS AVAILABLE   S
FOR UBC FACULTY AND STUDENTS
(and immediate family) :•:]
Cost: $306.00 return
IF INTERESTED CONTACT:
Education-Extension Programs,
UBC Center for Continuing Education,
Chancellor Boulevard, Campus. 228-2181
or
Worldwide International Travel,
University Boulevard. 224-4391
*Air Canada flight has been arranged in conjunction with several
credit courses to be located in England and on the Continent,
Summer, 1971.
APPLY RIGHT AWAY Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26,  1971
People wraps up this year;
'We're all alone together'
By SANDY KASS
Psychiatrist Bennett Wong paid a return visit to
People February 15 to conclude the program's
second year of existence.
The twelve-week program sponsored by the
office of interprofessional education has improved
greatly from last year, director Sean McHugh said at
the last session.
He indicated doubts that it will be run again
next year due to financial difficulties.
Before Wong began his talk on Love and Sex,
McHugh thanked everyone who had helped
financially with the program. Among them were
administration president Walter Gage, and the
faculties of arts, science, medicine and agriculture.
Singing duo Elaine and Brenda introduced the
evening's session with Donovan's Catch The Wind.
Wong began by carrying on from where he left
off two weeks before, saying that people should feel
"responsible to themselves alone and not get messed
up With other people's hang-ups."
According to Wong, all people are essentially
alone, and thus force defenses arpund this aloneness
such as participation in group activity.
"It's like being alone in a pit with all people
running around its brink trying to avoid falling in,"
he said.
Wong told participants to revoke all existence.
Go into yourselves, close your eyes, concentrate on
the sound of your breathing, remove all thoughts
from your mind and hear only the sound of my
voice, he told the group.
Participants were told to gradually open their
eyes" but to keep everything they saw at a distance
as if part of an audience at a movie.
Gradually they were told to reach out with
their eyes and attempt to grasp everything they saw,
without physical movement.
"Reach out until you become so frustrated you
want to scream," he said.
"Then consider what it would be like if you
were to continue from that point."
Muttered groans were heard from the audience.
"But could you live all your life like that —
with nothing but momentary orgasms to keep you
going?" he asked the group.
One student summarized the talk by saying that
when a person can accept the fact that he's alone,
then he's at one with the universe and not alone any
more.
"That's right," Wong said, "We're alone
together."
Before participants split up for the last time
one student challenged Wong's knowledge of
"where it's really at".
"I only observe other people in the ideal state.
I'm not there myself," he replied.
McHugh said later that he could only deem the
program partially successful as he wasn't sure what
its aims were to begin with.
"Everyone came for a different reason and I
can only hope that some of these were fulfilled," he
said.
The Interprofessional Education Office is
presently looking for a director for next year's
program, should adequate financing be reached.
All persons interested are asked to contact the
IPE office, Wesbrook 258, for an interview.
Comic relief from AMS council
from page 2
Other senators expressed concern the motion
would interfere with "academic freedom" and was
too broadly worded although most conceded it was
"a splendid motion", as one senator put it.
Economics prof Gideon Rosenbluth warned
that senate was being used increasingly for
'theatrical purposes."
However, the motion raised the problem of the
purpose of senate, he said.
"It is the purpose of senate to govern the
academic program of this university.
"I think we should desist from passing motions
urging a particular line of conduct on the members
of this university."
After the motion was defeated, student senator
Art Smolensky said it was apparent there is
confusion among senators as to the role of the
senate and the university.
He moved a motion to have a special meeting of
senate to discuss "the philosophy and goals of the
university."
It was overwhelmingly defeated without
discussion.
The Alma Mater Society council provided a
comic relief to the senate tragedy.
Led by AMS president Tony Hodge, about 20
council members interrupted the meeting to drape a
Canadian flag over Gage.
Hodge then addressed what he called "a
grandiouse collection of some of the most verbal
men and women in Canada."
He said he hoped the intrusion would "not be
taken as the start of the revolution" but rather as
evidence of the student concern over the issue of
Canadianization.
Senate also sent to the board of governors a
motion by Smolensky recommending that
university stocks held in corporations not registered
in Canada be sold at the earliest opportunity.
The motion urged the university to buy bonds
in Canadian corporations rather than in overseas
corporations.
SUNDAY, 9:30 a.m. Study
10:30 a.m. Contemporary
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WEDNESDAY,   12:35-1   p.m.
Lenten Happening with David
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LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
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■V-» i . .. If J" 1 Friday,  February 26,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
U of T parity fight escalates
TORONTO (CUP- - Backed by administration
threats of punitive action against students, the arts and
science faculty council at the University of Toronto has
declared itself virtually in a state of siege.
The council has been the target of a series of student
disruptions since the faculty voted down a proposal for
student parity about a month ago. The vote led to an
abortive student strike attempt, and continuing
parliamentary warfare against the council from the
students.
The next council meeting will be held behind closed
doors Monday. No location has been revealed but there is
a possibility it will be moved off campus.
The closed-door decision was taken after a stormy
general meeting Feb. 19, which featured continuous
disruption by student members.
Council chairman and university provost Jack Sword
tried desperately to keep order. He ruled that one
particularly active student member could no longer
participate in council meetings.
The status of the remaining 33 students on the
1,300-member council is unclear.
University lawyers attended the meeting to advise on
whether the university could seek an injunction to halt
student disruption of the council and its committees.
Meanwhile the parity restructuring committee, set up
by students and sympathetic faculty in January, is
meeting this week to complete a preliminary draft report.
It will propose that the present 1,300-member faculty
council be replaced by a body of 100 students, 100
faculty, 27 teaching assistants and 27 administrators.
A student general meeting was held Thursday to
discuss student tactics in the face of the new hard line
shown by administrators and faculty, but no results were
available at press time.
Moratorium on hiring
MONTRhAL   (CUP) The   National
Committee for Canadianization or Canadian
Universilies is calling lor .i moraioinim on llie
hiring of non-Canadian umvorsiiv stuff until a
national policy is foimulalcd on the >ub|ect.
The NCCU. which calls itself "an
organization of academics amsciou*. ol the
need for a free and cosmopolitan climate in
which to teach and conduct research", is try ing
to "initiate and promote a complete
investigation into all aspects ot the qucilion ol
Canadian content and Canadian sraM" at
Canadian universities."
The resolution callinf! for Hie moratorium,
passed Jan. 17 in Montreal at a general meeting,
allows only two exceptions for the hiring of
non-Canadians.
I lie exceptions a:e- "Where it has been
cle.nl> deinoiiMiated in J >enatorial committee
thai no qualified Canadian citizen is available in
the field fm which the appointment is sought;
oi when the candidate holds a PhD. from a
( anadian umvcrsits."
These exceptions would be temporary
only.
Io help explain their position, the
\CCl will beholding i symposium on "the
Canadian university manpower and
Canadiani/aiion" at I ovola University in
Montreal on Mav 14 and 1\
l'he group plans lo invite "iinivcisily
presidents. provincial departments ut
education, professional organizations and the
minisiei of manpower and iinmigiaiion."
Council must ratify
decision' — Bruce
Fake deaf mutes hard to trace
due to rapid, long travel
from page One
Smile!
DEAF MUTE'S
ALPHABET
11.
(£
Any Donation
You With
•
Thank You,
DEAF MUTE
Walsh emphasized that deaf
mute persons were "not the kind
of people who would solicit in
this way.
"They want work," he said,
"Not sympathy and handouts."
Walsh's statements were
emphatically supported by
Emmett Casey, director of the
Western Institute for the Deaf.
Casey explained how these
"freeloaders" moved quietly into
an area, took in "up to $1,500 in
a week," and then "migrated like
birds" to the next city.
"They give the deaf mute
community a bad name wherever
they go," said Casey.
He said deaf people themselves
abhor this kind of panhandling
which plays on the falsely-aroused
sympathies of society.
Casey agreed with Walsh that
the syndicate was probably
international.
"These people aren't from
Canada," he said.
Walsh said that he had
previously come across people
soliciting "with the same printed
cards" in his native Scotland.
"These cards are printed
independently; they have nothing
to do with any institute for the
deaf," he said.
A spokesman for the campus
RCMP told The Ubyssey that he
had heard about similar incidents
in various detachments he had
served in.
He said there was not much the
police could do about such cases
. of   illegal   panhandling   because
"they   don't   stay   long   in  one
place."
from page One
The human government plans
to go to the federal government to
ask support for the long term
employment of students and the
development of student housing
on the endowment lands.
Lau is determined to win this
round and believes fully that he
will gain the sympathy vote to his
favor.
Lau feels that he is a threat to
the established bureaucracy of the
AMS and, by consequence, was
attacked by that bureaucracy.
"I find it very significant that
the AMS bureaucracy challenged
the results of the election," he
said.
When asked to what person or
persons he was referring Lau
said without hesitation, "Stuart
Bruce."
Lau said that Bruce, as AMS
treasurer, was one of the truly
great representatives of that
bureaucracy.
"In the past, all people elected
with irregularities such as
Christine Krawczyk (who last
summer was acting vice-president
due to ineligibility) did not have
their election voided," he said.
"They weren't any threat to
the established people. 'I am since
ESCAPE into the
Underwater World of
SCUBA DIVING
GREG KOCHER UNDERWATER SPORTS
All Equipment Supplied - $40 NAUI & Navy Certification
4 Week Course — on Campus Phone
Next Course Starts: Tues., March 2nd at 7:30 733-5809
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN FOR
EXECUTIVE POSITIONS FOR
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
1971 - 1972
All Full Time Women Students
Eligible for Off ices of:
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
MEMBER-AT-LARGE
Nomination Forms available at
Memorial Gym
the Women's Athletic Office,
10 Signatures Required
Nominations Close Monday
March 8, 1971
General Meeting and Compaign Speeches on Thursday,
March 11 - 12:30, Upper Lounge, Memorial Gym
Voting 12:30-4:30
I know enough to change things."
He than said that with outside
agitation including The Ubyssey,
he had come out as a top AMS
hack.
"Since I am a top AMS hack, I
know the weaknesses and can
change things given the
authority."
People close to council expect
no trouble in having council direct
another presidential election.
Bruce believes it would be
stupid for them not to.
"Students' council would be
most stupid not to ratify the
court's decision," he said. "Even
stupider than usual."
A surprising latecomer in this
second round is Ubyssey
columnist Jim Davies.
Davies is well known for his
outspoken criticism of the AMS,
but he believes "that this election
will open up a new political
avenue for me."
Davies promised to start a
"sub-human government."
SKIING
IN
AUSTRIA
-#*<
==* =
film
with slides
and music
live narration by three of
Austria's       greatest
sportsmen
SUBAuditorium
MONDAY, MARCH 1
12:30 p.m.      50c Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26, 1971
Frontier College recruits;
guaranteed $1,200 income
Frontier College will be recruiting
laborer-teachers for the coming summer Monday
noon in Bu. 100.
A representative will outline the Toronto-based
institution's program, which places university
students in labor camps where they teach fellow
workers basic subjects in their off-hours.
About 100 students, 90 per cent of them men,
are sent to work camps in different areas of Canada
each summer.	
The volunteers are paid by their employer, but
are guaranteed a minimum net income for the
summer of $1,200 plus basic travelling and
educational costs.
The students are expected to do their teaching
after a full day's labor. Their pupils are usually
under-educated, unskilled or functionally illiterate
fellow workers who are taught any number of
subjects, depending on their need and the student's
qualifications.	
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Rene Goldman of Asian studies de-
partment will speak at noon in Inter-
national House on '/France and
China".
UBC—NDP
Caucus meeting, 12:30. SUB 213.
SPECIAL   EVENTS/CONTEMPORARY
ARTS
Retina Circus — multi-media light
show with quadraphonic sound. SUB
ballroom, 12:30 and 8 p.m.. $1 per
student.
VARSITY  CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Dr. Rennie, SUB 207-209, at 12:30.
SUNDAY
FIRESIDE
Discussion on Vancouver with a
source person from the Urban Design
Centre, Union College reception room
(on campus). 8 p.m.
MONDAY
CRAUER  LECTURER
Sir Isaiah Berlin speaks on "The Russian Conception of the Writer's Calling", Fredy Wood Theatre, 12:30.
MUSSOC
General meeting for election of officers for '71-*72, Mussoc clubroom,
Old Auditorium, 12:30.
WEIGHTS
WANTED!
733-8976 Evenings
this
PATIO.
EAT IN -TAKEOUT* DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
INTERESTED
IN AN
OVERSEAS
CAREER?
DR.    ROBERT   GULICK,   JR.
will  be on the campus
MONDAY,   MARCH 8
to discuss qualifications for
advanced study at
THUNDERBIRD
GRADUATE SCHOOL
and   job opportunities
in the field of
INTERNATIONAL   MANAGEMENT
Interviews may be scheduled at
THE  PLACEMENT  OFFICE
THUNDERBIRD
GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF
INTERNATIONAL   MANAGEMENT
{Formerly: The American  Institute
for Foreign Trade)
P. O. Box 191
Phoenix, Arizona 85001
Affiliated with
The American Management Association
VARSITY  DEMOLAY
Meeting 12:30, SUB 215.
HELLENIC   CULTURAL   SOCIETY
Greek   folk   dances,   everybody   welcome. International House, 7:30 p.m.
'tween
classes
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Skiing in Austria, film, slides, narration by three famed mountaineers,
50  cents,  SUB  auditorium,  12:30.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Series on the failure of UBC, part
four, the senate. Karl Burau and Dr.
Robert Clark, SUB 125, 12:30.
ALPHA   OMEGA   SOCIETY
General meeting, SUB 211, 12:30.
SPANISH  CLUB
Discussion on ancient Mayan civilization. International House room 402,
12:30.
TUESDAY
GRAEUER   LECTURER
Sir Isaiah Berlin speaks on "Bus-
sian Obsession with History and His-
toricism". Totem residences, 8:15
p.m.
cuso
Latin America Night — newly released film on South America, 7:30
p.m., Initernational House room 402.
COMPARATIVE  LITERATURE
PROGRAM
Josef Skvorecky speaks on "Contemporary Czechoslovakia", Buch. 102,
12:30.
UBC   SAIL  CLUB
Big color film '*Admiral's Cup", Buch.
104, 12:30, free.
PSYCH CLUB
A speaker from the Crisis Centre,
Angus 24, noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
THUNDERBIRD SKI CLUB
Leaving Thursday noon for Mt. Hood,
Oregon; returning Sunday night (Mar.
4 - 7), info, athletic office, Memorial
Gym.
LEGAL AID
Mon., Wed., Fri., 12:30, SUB 228 and
232.
Ctehal ODEON U 8?
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
PETER SELLERS GOLDIEHAWN
clAer&aG&r!intMjfSottp
WARNING: Some swearing and coarse language
— B.C. Director.
Show times 12:45, 2:50, 4:55, 7:00, 9:05
Bartira Streisand The Owl
George Segal    and the
Pussycat
WARNING: Much swearing and coarse language
— B.C. Director.
Odeon: Show times 1:35, 3:35, 5:35, 7:35, 9:35
Suburbans 7:30, 9:30
riflpnn  I New West I West Van
UUbUII      ■        ODEON       ■       ODEON
881   GRANVILLl 5 J J~ 7626 »22-6343
682-7468
H0WMUCHLOVING9
FILMS YOU'LLj
NEVER
DOES A NORMAL COUPLE NEED?
Coronet
Loving 12:20, 3:45
6(5-612*        Woman 1:45, 5:05, 8:20
T FORGET!
VJOXAN ,
Varsity
224-3730*
4375 W. 10th
Chabrol's films are masterpieces.
IMS Hon Must Die
Show times 7:30, 9:30
..A THRILLER color
NOMINATED FOR 5 ACADEMY AWARDS
INCLUDING BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR — Robert Altmen
BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS — S. Kellerman
sbss. MASH
Park
IAMBIC  »t   18th
176-2747
Frequent swearing & coarse language
— B.C. Director
Show times 7:30, 9:30
Shakespeare Testival
■     Sunday at 2 p.m.
Feb. 28th - "Midsummer Night's
yw» IA/w/Ih Dream" (USA)
*il*lo9                 James Cagney, Olivia de
4J7S w. ion. Haviland, Mickey Rooney	
THE   DOLPHIN   THEATRE
proudly
presents Part 2 of "CANNES AWARD WINNERS"
Sunday, 2 p.m.
Feb. 28th - "I Even Met Happy Gipsies"
(Yugoslavia)        ^	
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before
publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE AND BEER GARDEN
Crosstown Bus. Sat., Feb. 27, Totem Park. $1 res., $1.25 non-res.
9  p.m.  -  1 a.m.
Greetings
12
SONGFEST FEB. 26 QUEEN Elizabeth Theatre. Students $1.25.
Tickets SUB 230 or at door.	
HAPPY BIRTHDAY F. APE LUV
C.   Bear.
Lost 8c Found
13
THREE PAIR GIRLS SKI BOOTS
left red Volks. Thurs. ride from
Whistler. Contact Hanneke, 731-
9348. 	
FOUND TWO CAR KEYS BI-SCI
Faculty staff lot Wed. Feb. 17.
all John,   987-2737  eves.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
'THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRO-
die'. You've heard about it! Now
see it! SUB Aud. Fri. and Sat.,
7:00' & 9:30; Sun., 7:00. AMS card
holders,  50c.
DO YOU OWN TIBETAN MUSN
cal instruments? If so, please call
me at 733-0500.
FREE VACATION-STAY PLAN
USA   -   Canada   -   Europe   -   etc.
"FOR   STUDENTS   ONLY"
Discover   how   qualified,   responsible
people are saving hundreds of $$$$$
while     widening     their     vacation
worlds.   Details   on   request.   Write:
Student  Vacation   Registry,   Box  73,
Station 'N' Toronto 14, Ontario.
SAVE   $20.
Waterbeds   all    sizes   and   shapes
Phone Florence 738-3464 2-6 p.m.
Mon. - Fri.	
STUDENT DOUKHOBOUR CHOIR
from Castlegar will perform at
SUB Auditorium. 12:30. Fri. March
R. Program will consist of folksongs and hymns in Russian and
English.
FIRESIDE: DISCUSSION WITH A
source person from the Urban
Design Centre in Vancouver
Union College Reception Room (on
Campus) 8:00 p.m. Sunday. February   28.
Hear the  Distinguished
Czech writer
JOSEF SKVORECKY
speak on Contemporary
Czechoslovakia on Tuesday, March2, 1971, at 12:30
P. m.    in    Buchanan    102.
SONGFEST FEB. 26 QUEEN ELIZ-
abeth Theatre. Students $1.25.
Tickets SUB 230 or at door.	
16
Travel Opportunities
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa, Hong Kong.
106—709  Dunsmuir St.,  Van.   1,  B.C.
SUMMER WORK IN SWISS ALPS
for room & board. Kitchen & farm
help. (M & F). 266-5246 for details.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1961 ZEPHYR. NEW MOTOR. NEW
battery. Needs generator. Good
condition $150.00. Rick, 733-2891
after  six.	
'63 HEALEY 3000 H.T.-O.D. GOOD
condition, new wheels, 224-4278.
Offers?	
'46 CHEVY STYLE MASTER.
Good cond. Radio, driving light,
$150.00   or best   offer.   Phone   263-
7274
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
1969    NORTON     COMMANDO     750,
extended  12",  frame painted,  Triumph pipes, 2500 mi. Phone Larry,
'    731-9792. Immaculate.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care ft Baby Sitting    32A
Photography 34
Scandals
37
"GIVE ME A GIRL AT AN IM-
pressionable age and she is mine
for life." Quote from Miss Jean
Brodie, SUB Aud., Fri. and Sat.,
7:00 & 9:30:  Sun., 7:00.	
SONGFEST FEB. 26 QUEEN ELIZ-
abeth Theatre. Students $1.25.
Tickets: SUB 230 or at door.
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
NORTH VANCOUVER. WILL
type your thesis or manuscript.
Experienced — reasonable rates.
Phone   988-5420.
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ESSAY AND
thesis typist. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.   Ann  Treacy.   738-8794.	
— AMS TYPING SERVICE —
30c  per   page   with   1   day   service.
12:30   -   1:30  in  SUB  Co-ordinator's
office  weekdays,  879-0095.  Evenings
and weekends.
 — SEE US FIRST! —
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, thesis. Neat,
accurate work. -Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
EXP. TYPIST WITH THESIS,
will type my home. No hand written essays please. Vic. P.N.E.
Phone Rosie at 255-8853.	
TYPING—ESSAYS, THESIS, ETC.
Phone Mrs. Brown, 732-0047.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED.
Experienced Typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096. ^_
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al Typing Service. IBM Selectric
— Days, Evenings, Weekends.
Phone 228-9304 — 30c per page.
STUDENTS! I WILL TYPE YOUR
term papers. Reasonable rates.
Call Yvonne — 738-6874.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION fe SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
PRACTICAL GUITAR LESSONS.
No "sit by the notes and suffer
sessions." $1.75. Priv. lesson! 874-
9761.
Special Classes
•3
Tutoring
84
COACHING FOR ENGLISH 100
students for whom English is a
new   language.   261-6410.	
WILL TUTOR HATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Bat. Reasonable
rates.   Phone  733-8644—10  a.m.   to
1 p.m.	
FRENCH TUTORING, TRANSLA-
tion into French, experienced
Parisian teacher. 687-6494. Alain
Neumand   (804),   1949 Barclay St.
IS ONE OF YOUR COURSES A
drag? Need help? Come to the
UBC Tutoring Centre. Almost all
subjects,   SUB   100B,   228-4583,   12-
2 p.m.,  daily.   $3.00  per hour.	
GERMAN TUTORING: CONVER-
sation & Grammar, by qualified
ex-University Teacher, Native-
Speaker, Group & Quantity Dis-
counts.   Eves.:   731-0156.	
THREE HAMBER GIRLS WANT
group tutoring in Math 12. Phone
(after 4  p.m.)  Andrea,  263-9485.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FISCHER SKIS; MEN'S BOOTS —
10: lady's boots — 10%; lady's
skipants—size   14.   Mary—228-2404,
 9-4.  Mon. - Fri.	
23" T.V., 3 YEARS, PERFECT
cond. Dark walnut, $107, Suite 2—
2368 West Broadway.
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS FOR RENT, MEN ONLY.
Near UBC. $40.00 a month. Call
682-2581.	
ROOM FOR RENT, NEAR U.B.C.
Separate entrance, bathroom. Girl
preferred, 224-0650.
Room 8c Board
■2
FREE ROOM AND BOARD FOR
girl student in exchange for help
with children. Near UBC Gates.
224-6192.
Furnished Apts.
83
MALE GRAD STUDENT LOOKING
for another to share 2 B.R. apt. IN
VILLAGE! Call Frank, 228-8213.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
GIRL TO SHARE BASEMENT
suite with 2 others. Own bedroom,
$40.   733-3345.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
FEMALE GRAD STUDENTS OWN
room in large house avail. March
1st, 732-9868. Phone on weekend. Friday,  February 26,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
Puck rivals meet in semis
In the just completed Western Canada
Intercollegiate Athletic Association regular season,
the University of B.C. built up quite a hockey
rivalry with the University of Calgary Dinosaurs.
The clubs split four games, including two last
weekend as UBC lost 4-2 Friday, but won 6-3
Saturday. The Saturday game ended in a brawl.
Now that it's playoff time, the opposition when
the 'Birds take the ice at Thunderbird Arena tonight
at 8 p.m. will be the same Dinosaurs. The
best-of-three semi-final continues tomorrow at 8
and, if necessary, Sunday afternoon at 4 p.m.
UBC won home ice advantage with a 15-5
record — the Dinosaurs were 13-7.
In Winnipeg, the other semi-final will match the
University of Calgary (12-8) and the University
University of Manitoba (16-4).
Thunderbird coach Bob Hindmarch hopes to
have his scoring ace Bob MacAneely into the lineup
for the series. MacAneely cracked a bone in his arm
two weeks ago and didn't play last weekend. The
high-scoring center may be able to play with the aid
of a special cast, but Hindmarch won't be sure until
game time..
Even without MacAneely, the 'Birds are
confident of advancing to the final.
Barry Wilcox, Tom Williamson, Doug Buchanan
and Rich Longpre give UBC enough fire-power to
fill any net, and goalie Ian Wilkie is improving each
time out. If the 'Bird defenceman can hold their
own, Thunderbirds will advance to the finals.
Capacity crowds are expected for all games
even though students have to pay a buck to get in.
The sudden charging has something to do with
having to pay the visiting team's expenses. But the
hockey is the highest calibre in Vancouver,
excluding pro, and all you violence freaks may even
see another brawl.
Hoop squad faces
tough opposition
It's a "do or die" weekend for
the       University      of      B.C.
'Thunderbird basketball team. In
effect, it is the same for the
Manitoba "Bisons". They will be
fighting in Winnipeg for the
opportunity to represent the
Western Canada Intercollegiate
Athletic Association at the
Canadian Collegiate finals to be
held in Wolfville, Nova Scotia the
following weekend. Only one of
" these teams can go.
The Birds earned the right to
go to the WCIAA finals by
defeating a stubborn University of
Alberta squad in last weekend's
semi-final in War Memorial Gym.
At the same time, Manitoba
advanced over the University of
Winnipeg.
The finals in Winnipeg will be a
best of three series, starting
Friday night and continuing
Saturday. The third game, if
necessary, will be played on
Sunday.
In order to win the series, the
Thunderbirds will have to
overcome the distinct home court
advantage that the "Bisons" will
hold by virtue of their first place
finish.
The "Bisons" have defeated
the UBC squad twice this year
already. The first victory was an
overtime thriller here at UBC,
when Angus Burr sank the crucial
final two points to set the score
78-76.
In Winnipeg the Birds fared
even worse, losing by an 82-70
margin.
The task, therefore, will be a
difficult one for UBC. They must
stop a high flying Manitoba squad
in their own gymnasium. They
must effectively check the Bison's
pesky little Angus Burr. They
must come up with their own
solid offensive and defensive
showing. And they must do it two
times out of three or end up dying
for the 1970-71 season.
Birdies host tournament
Badminton players from six
universities across Canada will be
meeting at the PE Complex this
weekend for the Western Canada
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association Badminton
Championships,
The UBC team will be
competing to regain the WCIAA
title, lost last year in Brandon.
As hosts of the tournament,
the team will have the advantage
of playing on familiar courts.
Although winners of the
women's aggregate last year, the
UBC team finished third in the
over all competition, behind the
University of Calgary and the
University of Alberta. These three
universities are again expected to
dominate the competition.
The round robin tournament
begins today at 9:00 a.m. and
continues until 4:30 p.m. On
Saturday, the action starts at
10:00 and goes'til 3:30.
The standard of competition is
expected to be excellent this year
and support from the students
would be appreciated.
Hoop girls win, others travel
• The UBC Thunderette
basketball team successfully
defeated the Victoria Maplettes
on Wednesday night at War
Memorial Gym by a 61-41 score.
It was the first game in a best of
three finals which now goes to
Victoria for the remaining events.
Winners of this final will
represent British Columbia at the
Canadian finals. The UBC girls are
defending Canadian champions.
In Wednesday's game, Linda
Willard and Terri McGovern led
the team with 18 and 13 points
respectively, while Joanne Sargent
added a great defensive effort.
The volleyball and curling
teams are in Saskatoon this
weekend to compete in the
WCIAA championships. Both
teams are considered to be strong
contenders in a bid for the first
place.
TOUGH RUGBY ACTION goes
this weekend when the UBC
Thunderbirds take on the
University of Washington. This
year's Birds are undefeated,
sporting a 15-0 record. Saturday
game time is 2:30 p.m.
Intramurals
Frank Cnup Guest Speaker — at this
year's Intramural Awards Banquet to
be held in SUB ballroom on March 15.
All persons receiving awards must be
in attendance to receive their trophies.
Basketball — Beta's captured the Division 1 basketball tiUe by defeating
the Engineers on Wed. night.
Position's Available for Men's Intramurals — applications are now being
accepted for the following positions in
the Men's Intramural Executive: Director, Assistant director. Referee-in-chief,
Assistant referee-in-chief, and Publicity
Director. Written applications stating
position sought, year, course work, and
qualifications should be directed to the
following before March 5, 1971:
Mr. N. Korchinsky
School of PE and Recreation
War Memorial Gym
UBC
Point Standings-
Engineers, 2475; Forestry, 2052;
Beta Theta Pi, 2042; P.E., 1559;
Commerce, 1425; Union College,
1175; Fort Camp, 1123; St. Andrews,
1037; Delta Upsilon, 987; Arts, 930;
Dentistry, 923; Education, 915;
Science, 895; Phi Gamma Delta, 892;
Agriculture, 890; Delta Kappa Epsilon,
823; Sigma Chi, 675;Sigma Alpha Mu,
587; Alpha Delta Phi, 563; Totem
Park, 545; A.T.C., 508; Kappa Sigma,
370; Pharmacy, 370; Grad Studies,
350; Carey Hall, 276; Hillel Club, 200;
Phi Delta Theta, 170; Architecture,
121; Medicine, 65; M.B.A., 45; Law,
22; Social Work, 10.
time out
By KEITH DUNBAR
Ubyssey Sports Editor
The moment has come to take an editorial time
out. Although things aren't at a crucial stage at this
particular moment, they are rapidly approaching a
plateau of confusion.
So far this year there have been the usual
compliments and complaints over the sports page. Since
compliments make poor news and are not considered to
be fighting words, complaints are on the agenda for the
day.
A few observations have been made — both pro
and con — about the content of the page. Certain
'athletic minorities' have not felt that they have been
properly represented. That would seem to be a valid
point to be annoyed with.
Other individuals have been offended by some of
the material that has been printed. That's a pretty fair
criticism at the best of times.
The usual annual attack on the number of pages that
are alloted to sports in relation to the rest of the paper
has risen to the top on the occasion. That's a fair
allegation, too.
The last point will be the first to be dealt with.
The sports page is just another section of the
regular paper. When there are enough advertisements to
warrant a larger paper, the amount of space alloted to
sports increases as well. People never really see that
when there are stories chopped from the sports page,
other sections of the newspaper also lose space for some
of their good stories.
There are also not enough sports advertisements
placed with the paper to warrant a second page to carry
these ads.
But then again, there is not much point in having
two pages if there is not enough copy to adequately fill
them. This brings the argument around to the first two
points.
There are lots of activities happening on our
campus that could be publicized, some people have been
heard to say. We couldn't agree more!
However, someone must write these articles.
The sports page recently contained a blurb asking
for bodies to come and write material for us. Not one
person responded to the plea.
Not long after this, the page contained a couple of
articles that were considered, by those who complained,
to be obscene. There is no room for that kind of thing
on the sports page, the complainers continued. Again we
might agree, but at least the authors of the articles took
enough interest to submit some copy. That reason alone
is enough to have material considered for publication.
This brings the subject around to the most
important aspect of the editorial.
The sports page cannot exist without editors and a
staff of writers. Next year's Ubyssey may not contain a
sports page at all. The reason for this will not be because
'the left wing radicals of the paper'will have decided that
sports is not important to the paper. It will probably be
because no student on the campus is interested enough
in journalism and sports combined to organize a sports
page.
This is to announce, therefore, that applications
are now being received for the position of Sports Editor
for the 1971-72 year. All applicants are requested to see
Keith Dunbar in The Ubyssey office, second floor of
SUB, any Monday or Thursday afternoon; or to leave
their name and a telephone number where they can be
reached.
If there is to be no response to this
announcement, rest assured that you will probably not
have any complaints about the sports page next year.
Time in. Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 26,  1971
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—brett garrett photo

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