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The Ubyssey Sep 14, 1984

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 2
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, September 14,1984
228-2301
Essential science courses denied
By CHRIS WONG and
PATTI FLATHER
More than 200 students are
unable to enrol in a requisite first
year chemistry course as part of a
campus-wide trend of increasing
class sizes and decreasing the
number of sections.
Chemistry head Larry Weiler said
students from departments such as
rehabilitation medicine and dental
hygeine do not have first year labs
and are sitting in on lectures hoping
a lab will open up.
"I don't think there's much
chance of getting into these labs,"
Weiler said Thursday. "I feel sick
that we have to say no to these
students."
Chemistry enrolment increased
significantly this year and included
a 48 per cent increase in third year
students, Weiler said. He added the
department has no money to pay
extra lab assistants with and this is
the worst year yet for trying to accommodate students.
He said the provincial cutbacks
to post-secondary education were
directly responsible for the lab shortage. "The cutbacks meant we had
to scale down our operation
significantly," said Weiler.
The province cut university funding five per cent this year and has
threatened to cut university funding
five per cent next year.
Economics head John Cragg said
economics students are being allowed into classes but some classes are
Mail degree
hurts schools
A new means of getting a degree
in B.C. is actually an attack on colleges in the interior, Simon Fraser's
student president said Thursday.
Stephen Howard said the
development of a degree program
by The Knowledge Network, Open
Learning Institute and B.C.'s three
universities erodes college power
because it places more control over
course offerings in the provincial
government's hands.
Howard said he expected more
cutbacks to interior colleges in the
near future.
The Open University Consortium
which runs the new program will offer either a general B.A. or a B.A.
in public administration by correspondence, telephone tutorials,
television shows and videotapes,
Open Learning Institute president
Ron Jaffel said.
He said he could not give figures
on who or how many people are expected to enroll in the program.
Jaffel added past OLI students
tended to be more mature people
who did not need the university environment to study.
"It (the program) cannot do the
socializing aspect of education,"
Jaffel said. "That is a great force in
education, more important than the
lecture."
The OLI has had the power to
grant degrees previously but did not
use it, said Jaffel. Individual
university senates will determine if
B.C.'s universities will respect the
new degrees.
University spokesperson Jane
Burnes said the new program will
not greatly' affect college enrolment. "The program was designed
for those who could not otherwise
attend university," Burnes said.
now so large they are unmanageable. Cragg said economics
100 classes have between 200 and
450 students in them.
He   said   one   section   of   450
students   taught   in   Woodward
building has only five teaching
assistants, one per 90 students. The
quality of education will definitely
suffer because class discussions and
individual attention will be severely
curtailed, he added.
He said students were turned
away before registration ended but
it is still the worst year economics
has faced. Economics enrolment is
actually down this year, but
economics has fewer  faculty this
year, Cragg added.
He said provincial government
cutbacks were responsible. "That's
the shortchange you get from
underfunding from the provincial
government."
■»   *%$
* ,■* 4f*^f~ '•*5b'
LOVING FEMALE PICKS fleas off mate, then asks for banana.
-kevin hall photo
Residence students petition liquor prohibition
By PATTI FLATHER
Students in UBC's residences
have mounted a petition drive opposing restrictive UBC housing liquor proposals, including a ban on
parties from Sunday to Thursday.
Floor representatives are circulating a petition in Gage Towers
and will present it to housing today,
Max Pethybridge, Gage residents'
association president said Wednesday.
The petition reads: "We, the
residents of (the residence floor),
believe that the elected community
council has the right to determine
an appropriate and acceptable
social calendar, i.e. that the traditional Wednesday night dances
should be allowed to continue."
Proposals banning Wednesday
beer nights and requiring bars to
close at 11 p.m. at Saturday and
Friday events will only increase
alcohol-related problems,
Pethybridge said.
_. - ..__.
"All they're doing is lowering the
amount of organized functions and
increasing unorganized functions,"
he said. And early bar closure
means students will party in their
rooms or off-campus, leading to
more students drinking and driving,
Pethybridge said.
Pethybridge said he hopes 50 per
cent of Gage residents sign the petition. If housing ignores them then
"there's going to be hell," he said.
"They (housing) have to follow
the direction of the people. At least
I hope we're living in a democratic
residence." While housing consulted the residence association last
spring, Pethybridge said no one
suspected an end to beer nights.
Totem Park floor representatives
are also organizing a petition protesting new responsibilities floor
reps will have due to the proposals.
Third Shushwap floor representative Robyn Angel said she will
now be responsible for bring-your-
own-booze parties where people
may bring as much liquor as they
want to.
Housing director Mary Flores
said "the petition would have to be
very convincing before I would consider change." Flores said she had
not seen the petitions and will wait
to see how many signatures are collected.
Flores said the provincial Liquor
Control Board is definitely behind
housing's crackdown on parties
where alcohol is sold. Other housing proposals include a ban on
drinking games at organized parties, and the required use of paid
professional bar staff. Housing is
holding a one-day bartending
workshop Saturday for a $25 fee.
Andy Lucko, UBC RCMP
detachment head, said the LCB
crackdown was prompted when the
Law Students Society obtained 11
liquor permits over a two months
period last spring.
"As a result of this the Liquor
Control Board wanted to know why
so many permits were issued for a
specific time."
Lucko said while the LCB determines how many liquor licenses to
issue there is some flexibility. "It's
not a shut-door policy."
David Thompson lives on
v^
Now shit hits old foil
it's back. The Ubyssey, UBC's favourite rag and seat of all sin
and depravity on campus, is back for another action-packed season
of fun, thrills, social responsibility and hard-hitting news.
Entertainment editor Charlie Fidelman said she'f just into *
celebrating life this year and hopes The Ubyssey's reader's join her.
City editor Robert Beynon said, "Charlie that's the bep thing that
could happen to this stuffy paper." 1
The Ubyssey wants to change the world and itself this year. The
game plan includes redesigning the paper and forging a new relationship with the Alma Mater Society that could possibly include
autonomy. That is The Ubyssey could become a separate society
from the AMS.
The Ubyssey needs a large staff dedicated to the ideal that Canada
needs to become a more egalitarian society; that women, gays, lesbians and people of all races have a right to equal rights and education.
So if you're a photog, sports writer, feature writer, news wrfter,
cartoonist, or graphic artist, come in to The Ubyssey office in^ SUB
241k. Letters triple-spaced on a 70 space line are also requested.
News tips are also greatly appreciated.
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
At least part of Nelson's David
Thompson University Centre survives.
The Kootenay School of Writing,
formerly part of DTUC, which the
Social Credit government closed in
May, is being continued in Nelson
and Vancouver by former faculty
and students.
The school will continue in the
closed centre's style offering its own
special courses, DTUC graduate
Jeff Derkson, who teaches at the
school, said Thursday.
"It (the school) grew out of our
frustration as to where we were to
go after DTUC closed," he said.
The six courses being taught in
Vancouver include Poetics Today
and Vancouver Literary Landscapes which are being taught by
Derkson, Canadian poets Tom
Wayman and Daphne Marlatt and
others.
Derkson said, "We're getting
students who can't find the courses
they're looking for at any other
place."
In Nelson courses from previous
years, including a Seniors Writing
Class, are being held in the DTUC
students' union building, the only
part of the campus apart from the
library that isn't locked up. The city
of Nelson runs the library.
The founders have big plans for
the school and hope it will grow into a foundation that will restart
DTUC in the future, Derkson said.
He said, "Either we'll be nonexistent or larger in a few years."
The centre is being started with
$2,500 from the founders who have
also applied for several federal, provincial and private grants. Fees will
run the centre if the grants do not
come through, Derkson added.
But he said this bothers him.
"We don't want to become an example that universities can fund
themselves because that's what the
Socreds would love," he said.
The Nelson DTUC campus is
now owned by the ministry of
highways and Nelson city council
has a year to find a way to reopen it
without cost to the B.C. government, he said, adding the city wants
the buildings to be used as a school
for the arts. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,1984
AMS to sell used
textbooks in SUB
Hatfri I am trappad Inatda thla gray box, and I can't aaoapaf Tha gray acraan ia Hka a mfaama of atanch. Tha black borders aur-
roundlng ma ara unbrokan and inpanatraMa. I can'taea, can't faol, I cant avan movat Oh, wW aoma unauapactina raadar out
there take pity on a poor wretch Ilka ma?
The Alma Mater Society wants to
Case student's financial hardships,
so they started a used bookstore
and put it in SUB.
AMS director of administration
Glenna Chestnutt said the
bookstore has 3,000 titles now and
hopes to go through 8,000 texts
before it closes in a couple of
weeks. Most of the texts are for the
arts faculty though, she said, and a
disproportionate amount are for
English.
Chestnutt said, "We have some
engineering books and a couple of
medicine books, but in areas like
that   people  tend   to   keep   their
books."
She added the store will hire 12
students part-time.
. The bookstore is a real help for
students she said and added she
hopes the project develops into a
year-round used bookstore like the
one the Simon Fraser University
student society operates.
The only problem with the
bookstore is its obscure location in
the north-east corner of SUB, said
Chestnutt. "It was just the only
space we could get."
Meds fear Pepsi seizures
ST. JOHN'S (CUP)— Members of
the Pepsi generation may be suffering from small seizures when they
take the aspartame challenge, doctors say.
Aspartame, the sugar substitute
contained in most diet soft drinks,
can cause seizures in a drinker's
neurological system, similar to the
petit mal seizures of epileptics. But
some seizures may go unnoticed by
the sufferer.
"I don't know that the case has
been made for or against diet soft
drinks," said Dr. Chris Newman, a
Memorial University pharmacologist at the campus health
services centre. "But I do feel a twinge when I drink them myself."
Aspartame has adversely affected
mentally handicapped people, who
cannot tolerate phenylalanine, a
common amino acid found in the
chemical additive.
Some scientists fear aspartame
can harm the body by altering the
metabolism of other amino acids.
Newman said studies conducted by
a researcher at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology showed
reactions to aspartame do exist, but
are relatively small.
The researcher, however, said the
high amounts of aspartame in diet
soft drinks is a cause for concern,
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10°'c DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fr. 11 30 9 00 [> m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4 00pm   900pm
.     2142 Western Parkway
i UBC Village
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
INTERNATIONAL
HOUSE
Gate 4 Lounge
1783 West Mall
228-5021
Open Sept. 4/84
12:00-2:00 p.m.
Bagels/Cheese, Coffee, Tea
(or bring your lunch)
Licensed Lounge
Open Sept. 10/84
7:00-11:00 p.m.
and warned soft-drinkers from consuming too much of their favourite
substance.
GRE4T    GEATUiroiA*     <&fcOUIU££ \ I I
C<vc4u\ of -W\<_. S"v*aII prinV \*
l.rtvik t>c reo-lLj  hu/vy;^; e»rcx>olic<> vwia^+t>c feici o/\e<,.
Z-- ^u^- he  Qb>^o\\Ac_ connoisseurs of Cviosye^S.
3. Must- W^d.  no  wrcje+d V\ex\JC  wooMcA -TrcwwpV-ecl rx<, bo
4. Must tM*-*, or«L oVKfr 'buna   of <r<^utul or oxecAer \/al*j€
dr\c\  t>rir\C\ tV\><> pA£\__ £>f Vr\€. pAp>er iaJvH\"ivou-Cop"*^
won
$ S ?^<
pAper iaJvWv^W5U.£op"\££,
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3431 W. BROADWAY • 738-5298
| * tv_e< uaj**seo       ^(Sjood *ri_ocraB_pt_0|
Enter the
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P1
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3 LUCKY STUDENTS WILL EACH WIN A BRONCO!
FIRST DRAW DATE: OCTOBER T7,1984 SECOND & THIRD DRAWS: NOVEMBER 28,1984, FEBRUARY 20,1985
PLEASE ENTER ME IN THE
Clip out this entry form and keep it handy Fill it iri as you make your long
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the required entry information (see rule <fl) to MAKE SOMEONE HAPPY LONG
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AREA CODE NUMBER CALLED
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spieled ocfwH
:■   piQ!r Oieiv o* paper Also
" A.igust l_   1984 ond February
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Address
Apt
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Prov
Postal Code
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(Where you can oe reached )
College or University Ait ending	
I have read the contest rules and agree to abide by them
Signature	
1 To enter pr nt your rene address cd telephone number on on. officio: Telecom Conada
pnnf telephone numbers .'including area codes} ond dates ot three (3) Long Distance colls'
20 ^85 f acf> qroup ot three (3) completed 1 ong Distance calls mav be entered only once
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On an s ' _ « i1 piece ot paper onnt you' name address ond telephone number Also _r:nt tie numbers .rcud.ng ne area codes; ot me
three 3 io"q Distance cans you would like to moke and Destde each a hand written description ot nor iess than __ word'- stating why you
uvo_id like to make the con Only the angina, hand written copies wil' be acceptable Any mecnanical'y duplicated coces wn' De disqualified
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4 Random selections will De made trom all entries received by the contest judging organization on October 17 f984 November 28 1984 and the
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All taxes eligible under me loi sur les loteries les courses les concours pub'icitaires et <es apareiis
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j/jjjjjj- Friday, September 14,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students search for scarce rides
By STUART COLCLEUGH
Some 1,000 students without
transportation were scrambling to
find rides to UBC this week as a
result of the three month old bus
dispute. And most — not surprisingly — are at least coping.
Chantel Trudeau, arts 3, was one
of numerous students who tried
posting ride appeals on bulletin
boards around campus, "but the
only reply I got was from another
girl who was also looking for a
ride," she said. Trudeau is relying
on the loan of her boyfriend's car
for the remainder of the dispute,
she said.
"I have been lucky to secure a lift
in from the other lads downstairs in
the morning," said Ali, graduate
studies. "Otherwise I don't know
what I would have done . . . buy a
bike, hire a car or something like
that. I still have to hitch-home at
night though, which is a real pain."
Erwin Wodarcyak, arts 3, is borrowing a car three times a week and
hitching rides from friends.
Stan Stevens, an employee at the
computer centre, posted a notice
offering rides and quickly filled a
car with needy students. Stevens
said he is furious about the provincial government's impending
legislation because it circumvents
the collective bargaining process to
force bus drivers back to work.
"He's (Bennett's) trying to break
the unions in this province and this
is just another one of his plays,"
Stevens said, adding Bennett waited
until public sympathy for the
driver's declined before legislating
an end.
But anticipated traffic problems
LOOKS LIKE ALL those years at the Pit paid off, gasped unidentified
but definitely seasoned UBC veteran fending off obviously rookie Pit-
goer from hard won musical chair much like flinging off drunken frosh
during typical hockey night viewing at varsity watering-hole. "I'd better
— rory a. photo
win that $100 because I'll need it to lift all those jugs. I'll need to bring
my body back to drinking perfection after losing so much weight in this
fiasco," he continued.
Expo pitches in pennies for student housing
By ROBERT BEYNON
University president George
Pedersen announced yesterday the
administration has tendered the
construction of a new Acadia Park
student residence to Gauvin Construction Limited, a non-union
firm. P«dersen said he was not concerned about hiring non-union
labor on the campus.
Associate vice-president for student affairs, Neil Risebrough who
organized most of the project said
UBC does not have a policy of hir-
Why me?
A member recently appointed to
the UBC board of governors cannot
figure out why he is there.
"I don't know why I was
chosen," Robert Lee said Thursday. He said the provincial cabinet
likely chose him because he is a successful businessman and president
of Prospero Realty.
"I don't want to brag (about why
I was likely chosen)," Lee said, adding he is a director of the Port of
Vancouver and a bank director.
Board chair David MacLean said
his cabinet likely appointed Lee
because he is a successful
businessperson which is a requirement for a board member. "That's
critical," MacLean said, "because
the board administers the university's finances."
He added Lee is also a member-of
the commerce dean's advisory
council and a prominent member of
the Chinese community in Vancouver. It is important to have
diverse community members on the
board, he added.
ing contractors who offer their
employees fair wages. He said
because UBC is a public institution,
it must accept the lowest bid to be
responsible to the public. But he
said one can assume material costs
are constant and the lowest bid is
likely to come from the firm which
has the lowest wages.
"It's always lowest bid," he said.
He added that of the last four
contracts awarded on the campus,
two have gone to union contractors.
Pedersen said the 187 two and
three storey condominiums will
house   25    per   cent    of   UBC's
students. And with a project of that
magnitude, it is critical to build by
the cheapest means possible.
Pedersen added the project was
facilitated by Expo 86's offer to
lease the suites during next year's
world fair. The university hopes to
make $1.5 million profit from Expo
which will help pay the $14.3
million construction bill.
Risebrough added student's rent
of approximately $250 a month
when the residence opens will pay
off most of the remaining debt in
the next 20 years.
The Acadia Park  project is of
particularly value to the university
because the units can be converted
into family residences in the future.
Risebrough said the university is
critically short of good, affordable
family housing.
The entire project, which was
originally planned in 1982, will be
built in a False Creek type format
with townhouses facing onto common squares. It will house a total of
780 students when it is first opened.
A decision has not been made as
to whether or not to construct
underground parking for the
development at this point.
Bus cMvors manr dofv Gov't back to woi_k ar&mr
By DEBBIE IO
Bus drivers may riot, return to work despite provincial legislation, an Independent Canadian Transit Union executive said Thursday.
"We don't want to defy the back to work order.
It depends on the conditions in it. If it's under the
company's imposed positions, we won't be back,"
Barry Robertson told 50 people in SUB 207.
The B.C* legislature passed legislation today to
end the three monthold dispute in timefor the
Papal visit.
Robertson charged the government planned to
legislate the drivers back to work a long time ago,
and the new legislation was a move to try and break
the union.
"The government's actions have been a farce
and this (the three month long strike) never should
have happened," said Robertsoij.
The drivers will vote Sunday on whether to obey
the back to work order if a mediation proeedure
between the drivers and Metro Transit is set up and
if an arbitrator is appointed to work towards settling the dispute, Robertson said.
He said the points of contention between Metro
and the union are:
• the hiring of part time drivers
to j do full time workers work while full time
wqrkers are being laid off and bus service is being
cut;
• |the employee lay off and recall procedure continue to be done in order of seniority;
• i the removal of the working practices clause
wh|ich gave the union veto power over changes to
Metro working conditions.
Conflicts between Metro and the union have not
always been this sharp Robertson said. "The souring relations are due to the fact the union has taken
a stronger stance with the MTOC," he said.
♦'This is not an economic fight. This is a fight for
survival," said Robertson describing the anger that
has built up among the drivers-.
Robertson said the B.C. government waited
'■three months to legislate the drivers back to work
because public pressures increased now that the
summer is over. The government is using the public
and especially students as leverage, because so
many students rely on the buses as their main form
of transportation, he added.
Forty-eight dollars was collected for the drivers
starvation fund during the forum yesterday which
was sponsored by the Students For a Democratic
University.
during the bus shutdown have not
materialized, said UBC traffic
patrol supervisor Terry O'Brennan.
He said the traffic office will continue to be "fairly lenient" on parking violators if the shutdown continues, as long as they have parking
stickers.
Tami Roberts, Canadian Federation of Students Pacific region
chair, said while an end to the shutdown would be welcome, "a lot of
students use the service that the
Metropolitan Transit Operating
Company is talking about cutting."
Grads turn
down report
By ROBERT BEYNON
The Graduate Student Society
refuses to accept a presidential committee report on the future of the
graduate student centre, the GSS
president said Thursday.
Ramesh said the GSS disagrees
with the report for the following
reasons: the GSS wants recompen-
sation for money lost over the summer due to the takeover, wants no
administration control of the centre, wants the administration to
respect a 1982 agreement and wants
the administration arid the GSS to
find an equitable means of repaying
the centre's debt of more than
$100,000.
The GSS presented the administration with a letter last week
outlining their differences with the
report, Ramesh said. "The ball's in
their court," Ramesh said.
President George Pedersen requested the report after the administration took the centre over in
May.
Ramesh claimed the accusations
of unfair labor practices at the centre were false. "We tried to abide
by the contract by hiring students
for less than four hours a day which
is allowed within the contract,"
Ramesh said.
He said the GSS is still considering suing the university if the society does not receive what it wants.
"We have most grad students
behind us," he said.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice
president for student affairs, said
the administration is still flexible in
attempting to negotiate a settlement
to the dispute.
But he said the GSS must be
more reasonable, adding campus
unions are unofficially boycotting
the centre because of the GSS's
labour practices.
He also said the GSS must present a reasonable way to eliminate
the centre's large debt. There are
other issues separating the two sides
he is not free to discuss, Risebrough
said.
Student board of governors
member Dave Frank, a member of
the president's ad hoc committee on
the centre, said he has washed his
hands of the whole affair. He added
he did not know how the two sides
would come to an agreement but he
thought legal action was a poor
alternative.
The administration originally
took over the centre in May, ended
the centre's food services and froze
its assets. The administration says
the takeover was precipitated by the
centre's increasing debt, its poor
labour practices and the GSS council's irresponsibility.
The GSS says the administration
is breaking a binding legal agreement which transferred the centre's
control to the GSS in 1982, and is
attempting to stifle student
autonomy.
The provincial ombudsoffice expressed interest in examining the
case earlier this year but the administration said the university was
not within the ombudsoffice's
jurisdiction. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,1984
Centre funds held
wwwwwwww^i^^^iw^>
TORONTO (CUP) — The student
union at the University of Toronto
has not yet approved funding for a
campus women's centre because the
service is viewed as a "hot potato"
by some council members who want
more to say about its operation.
A motion to secure $5,000 for the
centre, the first ever at the university, was defeated at a recent student
union meeting. Linda Quirk, student union vice-president, said the
money should be held until the
union knows the "rules" by which
the organizing committee will run
the centre.
Quirk said she doubted the
women at the centre would be
tolerant of other women's political
beliefs. "I'm a woman on this campus, and I go to the committee's
meetings, but my point of view is
not listened to. They don't want to
hear it."
Neil Henderson, another student
union member, also had reservations about the centre.
"Women are hard done by in a
few places in the university. But
I've talked to a few women, and
they're doing well, and they don't
see why we need a women's
centre," Henderson said.
"You know, women are on the
upswing, while men are having to
learn to deal with their reduced
role. Men are on the downswing."
Quirk said funding of the
women's centre would be a controversial issue at student union
meetings because it will likely offer
abortion counselling. The U of T
sexual education centre was dropped from the council's budget as a
result of protest about its abortion
referral service.
"We got out of the sex-ed centre
because it was a hot potato and the
women's centre could be in the
same situation."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Z
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>
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09
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03
urat ml tunntli5?
ttj t's all very, very unfortunate.
1. We all wish there was more
money available for everybody."
University Minister Pat McGeer
makes this statement on student aid
seriously and evenly, without a
blink, speaking as if it were a case
study in one of the yellow-bound
journals or medical texts neatly
shelved in his Psychiatric tower office near the UBC hospital.
But McGeer, also a UBC medicine professor, adds he is not sure that stiffer student
aid policies will keep students from attending
university. Talking calmly like a doctor to a
patient, he says since 1981 post-secondary
education enrolment has been increasing in
size although the average student's
disposable income has been decreasing.
Theoretically student attendance should be
decreasing, says McGeer, adding that is what
the university presidents have told him to expect.
"Maybe in the future I'll get correct advice," he says. When asked if he is aware that
a Simon Fraser University report says a drop
in attendance there this summer, the first
drop since 1979, was caused by the end of the
grants program this February he is not fazed.
"Well, we're sympathetic to circumstances
and watching what trends develop." But he
says he can not know if the grant portion of
the student aid program will be started again.
On the subject of providing operating
funds for post secondary institutions in B.C.,
McGeer says "body blows to the resource-
based industries" of this province have
translated into "body blows to the university" because the government does not have
the taxes to pass along to the universities.
He says, "The Social Credit government
has made a decision to make the budget fit
our income and not to introduce major new
taxes."
The payment of half a billion dollars to
B.C. Rail in the February budget can be
justified, says McGeer, because you have to
build an industrial base before you can support society.
McGeer says Organization of Economic
Cooperation and Development reports which
say funding universities strongly helps the
economy directly are wrong and we should
not fund universities for that reason.
"If the OECD reports are accurate Canada
would never have suffered the recession,"
says McGeer. „
UBC president George Pedersen would
not say if he agreed with the OECD reports
but he says B.C. universities are definitely
not the best funded in the world.
"Clearly not," says Pedersen. He said one
must consider provincial revenues are down
considerably before attacking provincial funding.
"I think it should be possible to look at
new initiatives," between government and
universities, Pedersen says, adding this could
lead to more funding.
Alma Mater Society president Margaret
Copping says post-secondary education
should be a higher priority for the Social
Credit government. "I think there are other
ways of stimulating an economy than the
ways the Socreds are using. I'm saying that
supporting education can help," Copping
says.
She adds by ending the grant program the
government lost a budget expense but in the
long term it may not help the province
because it will deny people access to school
and because in the future the province will
have to pay a large debt on all the unpaid student loans.
She says McGeer is probably a better
defender of education within the present
cabinet than most people realize.
Canadian Federation of Students Pacific
chair Donna Morgan says she is surprised
McGeer says B.C. universities are so well
funded. "Any publication concerned with
education points to B.C. as an example of
underfunded institutions," Morgan says.
But Morgan says it does not surprise her
that McGeer says universities are well funded
because he has been saying that for years.
The Social Credit could fund the post-
secondary education she says, but it has
chosen not to make it a priority.
"I think McGeer would like to see more
money in education too, but he seems quite
content to rationalize Social Credit
philosophy."
Students scramble as university doors close
OTTAWA (CUP) — Hundreds
of high school graduates scrambling
to get into university may be out of
luck as many institutions across the
country impose stiff enrolment
restrictions for the first time.
Along with community college
transfer students, high schoolers are
competing fiercely for the few spots
available in already overcrowded
universities. They are trying to
return to school after suffering
another summer unemployment
rate of 20 per cent.
The competition is especially intense in Ontario. At the University
of Toronto, more than 25,000
students have applied for only 6,300
spaces. At York University, which
is accepting 200 fewer first year
students in September, nearly
19,000 are vying for 4,700 spots.
Administrators at both universities say strained resources have
forced them to close their doors.
Sheldon Levy, York associate
vice-president, said inadequate
government financing, cramped
quarters and a desire to preserve the
existing quality of education prompted the administration's move to
restrict enrolment.
At the University of Alberta,
nearly 2,000 students have been rejected. They failed to meet the
university's new academic standards, which jumped from an
average of 60 to 65 per cent this
year.
The U of A student union recently took the university to court in a
bid to remove the new standards.
But an Alberta court judge ruled in
favour of the administration, saying
enough notice had been given to
grade 12 students who would need
summer school to boost their grades
for admission.
At the University of Manitoba,
500 students seeking science degrees
have been turned away. Restrictions
are now in place there in every
faculty except arts, said Desmond
Bevis, director of admissions.
UBC, which has pegged first year
enrolment at 3250 students, has rejected 500 students who failed to
make the grade standard of a
C-plus average.
In St. John's, Newfoundland,
Memorial University is thinking of
limiting access in first year to 3000
students. But Ward Neale,
Memorial's vice-president
academic, said no official decisions
have been made.
Ontario's colleges also turned
thousands away as applications for
first year spots have increased
dramatically across the province.
At Seneca College, 27,824 students
are vying for only 1,133 spaces.
Seneca's most popular courses —
aviation and flight technology and
all health sciences — were filled by
the end of June.
At Humber College, more than
23,000 students applies for about
5,000 spots. Fred Embrey, Humer's
registrar, says many students are
waiting to get into the college's
creative programs as well.
"We've had to restrict enrolment
for the past four years," he said.
"We are crowded at the north campus with nearly 8,000 students
here."
The   campus   was   originally
designed to hold about 5,000
students.
Humber administration president
Robert Gordon says the record
numbers are a new trend which has
significantly sharpened in the last
few years.
"We know people are being turned away from the doors of universities and colleges. It's still a problem. High tuition fees, quotas,
and the high rate of unemployment
are all having an impact."
Beth Olley, Canadian Federation
of Students chair, said accessibility
for new students looks just as bleak
as it did last year.
Olley said many high school and
transfer students are not even applying for post-secondary education
because they do not have the
money. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,1984
'Birds bash bumbling Bunnies badly 10-3
By MONTE STEWART
The Thunderbird hockey team
might like to bank some goals in
preparation for the upcoming
season. The 'Birds baked the
Kokudo Bunnies of Japan 10-3
Tuesday night at Thunderbird
Winter Sports centre.
It was the second win in a row for
the 'Birds over their Japanese
counterparts. Four T-Birds scored
two goals each in the game which
was tied 1-1 at the end of the first
period.
Bill Holowaty, Dave Brownlie,
Kevin Argue, and John Hemmerl-
ing notched two goals each, while
Craig Angus and Mike Coflin
scored single markers.
Hiroyuki Shimohira, Tadamitsu
Fujii, and Kazmu Unjo scored for
the Bunnies.
"We had three regulars — Rick
Amann, Daryl Coldwell (a Canada
West all-star in 1983), and Renzo
Berra — sitting out," said UBC
coach Fred Masuch. "But most of
the players from this game will be
with us for the regular season,"
said   Masuch.
SPORTS
wing, before passing to Argue in
front of an open net at 10:03. Argue
wasted no time, scoring his second
goal 33 seconds later.
The 'Birds then scored three
goals from Argue, Coflin and
Holowaty within a span of five
minutes.
Trailing 6-1 at the third period's
start, Kokudo scored the Bunnies
second powerplay goal of the game
at 4:35 when Fujii fired a shot high
over Curt Korman. Holowaty pro
vided the T-Birds with a shorthand-
ed goal at 11:08 while Paul
Jacobsen was in the box.
Brownlie notched his second goal
at 13:19 before Unjo connected on
a nifty three way passing play for
Kokudo. Hemmerling scored the
final two goals of the contest.
Holowaty furnished Hemmerling
with a perfect pass from behind the
net, allowing Hemmerling to onetime his shot at 18:33.
Hemmerling    then    scored    22
seconds later. He shot the puck high
into the net with two players
sprawled on top of Kokudo
goaltender Mitsu Miyazaki. Feeling
that a penalty should have been
called on the play, Kokudo players
refused to line up for the ensuing
face-off at centre ice. The Bunnies
subsequently received a two minute
minor for delay of game.
UBC outshot Kokudo 54-19 in
the game which was viewed by approximately 200 fans.
After Brownlie and Shimohira
exchanged goals in the first period,
UBC exploded for five straight
tallies in the second. Bobby Hull Jr.
intercepted a pass at the UBC
blueline,   and   skated   down   left
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15706 University Blv
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
DR. BILLY GRAHAM
COMING TO U.B.C.
TO DISCUSS PEACE
"This is the first generation that faces the prospect of being the
last generation", were the words of the world renown evangelist,
Dr. Billy Graham during recent lectures at various universities including Harvard, Yale and M.I.T.
In these recent lectures on "Peace in a Nuclear Age" Graham
has endorsed the now-shelved Salt II strategic arms limitation agreement between the Soviet Union and the United States. He also expressed his sympathy with the current church led national movement to bring a world freeze on production of nuclear weapons.
Graham, however, sees it necessary to go straight for what he calls a
Salt 10 treaty — the destruction of all these weapons of mass
destruction.
Although Dr. Graham is committed to working for peace
among nations, he probes the problem beyond mere politics,
straight into the human heart.
You have an opportunity to hear Dr. Graham for yourself. He
will lecture on "Peace in a Nuclear Age" in the UBC War Memorial
Gym on Oct. 12 at 12:30 p.m. Admission is free.
MATTHEW TABENT
5th Sec-Ed
INTERNSHIPS
PROVIDE
SENIOR STUDENTS
IN THE
FACULTY OF ARTS
WITH
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IF INTERESTED IN NON-
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WORK-PLACEMENTS IN
VANCOUVER
SEPTEMBER - APRIL
COME TO
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THE LONGER THE BLADE-
TO-ICE CONTACT. Friday, September 14,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
When
government
funding
fails...
WmW avid McMillan, UBC's first
vice-president for development and
community relations, briskly beams
before offering a firm handshake:
"I had a $50,000 phone call this
morning." He says a letter from a
generous dcnor was not handled
well, but he smoothed it out wih a
phone call.
McMillan is confident and talkative in his old administration building office. The office is roomy. On
one wall hangs a large piece of paper covered with the scribbles of
strategy in process. A scribble asks
"what does the university want?";
another answers "funding support
and public recognition" and singles
out five groups to get this from, including "big money boys."
McMillan's appointment was
largely a response to declining provincial education funding. UBC's
operating budget for 1984-85 was
cut five per cent. Both Simon Fraser
University and the B.C. Institute of
Technology recently created positions similar to McMillan's.
McMillan, formerly executive
vice-president of the Canadian Direct Marketing Association of Toronto, talks about the new UBC
role he filled six weeks ago.
"A university of this size and significance has the opportunity of
raising lots of money." McMillan
says about $280 million of UBC's
$360 million budget is provided by
the provincial government and $80
million flows in from business, donations, and research grants.
"In many cases it's coming in almost unsolicited." McMillan believes the community, when it sees
universities as places to solve problems, is willing to work with them
and provide cash. "My job is to facilitate that," he says.
Currently UBC has more than 10
independent fundraising campaigns, McMillan says. He adds he
will try to coordinate them so that
several campaigns are not all asking
the same company for funds.
If he does raise private funds
there may be problems though, he
says. If he raises $1,000 for UBC,
"I don't have a guarantee that the
provincial government won't take
$1,000 away."
McMillan raised the issue with
the few cabinet ministers he has
spoken with. And various UBC officials say private funds earned may
translate into public funds lost, McMillan says.
But McMillan is still raising
money in "a nice sort of quiet
lobby."
The new vice-president is sympathetic toward provincial government education cutbacks though
saying, "There is real severe
restraint in the provincial budget.
The tax base is just not there," he
says.
And McMillan says he echoes a
favorite theme of provincial univer-
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CLUBS DAYS
THURS. SEPT. 20
FRI. SEPT. 21
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1985
graduates for Vancouver and all other offices of the
Firm. Submit your resume to the Canada Employment
Centre on Campus (forms are available from the Centre)
by October 3, 1984.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 12th regarding campus interviews which take place during the week of October
22nd. Additional information is available at the UBC
Canada Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
Se//ing the university to big business
sities minister Pat McGeer by saying
the fundraising future likes with
high tech.
McMillan respons to a charge he
is apolitical. "Who told you that?"
and looks irritated. "My experience
is you never win anything from government by bashing them and I
don't care which political party is in
power. You get support from
government by helping them find
solutions to their problems."
He continues, "I'd like to know
how much effort has been made to
help the government in Victoria
find solutions to its problems. Or
has the general tone been 'We deserve money, give it to us, and don't
ask us to account for it?' "
And McMillan hestitates to call
By PAW FLATHER
his high-ranking appointment a step
in a new philosophical direction for
UBC, towards less dependence on
government funds.
"We could have a grand time
figuring out symbolically what my
appointment means. This job has
never been here before."
The new role, McMillan says, will
be one of translator — of the business community to academics, of
academics to business, and of academics to government. McMillan
says not to expect a great chute in
the sky to open up and pour
millions of dollars on UBC though,
because it won't happen.
Over the short term McMillan
says he has not set a money goal.
But in the next 12 months he wants
Charlie fidelman photos
to create a sound office structure
for the job, and identify between 20
and 50 large donors and beginning
with them. «
"Over the long term I would like
to see us build a very coordinated,
aggressive development and community relations program." McMillan says he wants UBC recognized as a "great" university
"perceived to have all the resources
necessary to be Canada's academic
window on the Pacific Rim."
McMillan is determined to succeed — "I only like being associated with success," he says.
"There's a lot of people around
this university who want to see
some change and growth. They see
they can now begin to move."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1984
Q
Flying   over  ~rHE
Thickets, I  ,s
°6sT/eK^e_,
Higher
TuiTion
*dkw '84
Strike scam
A group of no doubt well meaning individuals at UBC who rally
to protect the rights of students in the province have organized the
most ineffective, and ultimately damaging, protest on campus in
recent memory.
The Fee Hike Strike Committee, who have intimate connections
with the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist), urge
students to withhold their tuition cheques from the university administration, and instead give them to the committee based on last
year's rates. The Fee-Hike Committee promises to use this bounty
to bring the university administration to its monstrous knees.
While the action has a certain sense of power about it, students
should avoid the scam as though their life depended on it. In fact, if
your life includes the joy of studying at UBC, remember the administration has the right to de-register you if you do not pay your
fees.
The administration is not to blame for the tuition increases; your
friendly neighbourhood Socreds are, and the only way to change
the fees at UBC is to make the government of the province more
aware.
An occupation of the administration building, or the president's
new abode as a feasible campus action to demand an open public
forum with the Premier and the Minister of Universities would be a
step in the right direction.
But until something exciting like that comes along, don't be
sucked into a political action that will only ruin your chances at
even attending classes this year.
THE UBYSSEY
Sept. 14, 1984 VOL. LXVM NO. 2 228-2301
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Robert Beynon, who it was said always knew the whereabouts of Patti Flather, was talking to Robby
Robertson, who, as his name would suggest, was not related to Chris Wong, the man with the dirty
yellow Volvo. Victor Wong, who some thought was actually related to Chris, was actually not. Both
Chris and Charlie Fidelman might die at the thought, although some, like Gordon Clark, who were less
urbanocentric, might only faint and froth at the orifices at the somewhat novel and terrifying idea.
Stephen Wisenthal was also not inclined to socializing, though not for lack of trying. Jody Findley and
Debbie Lo, the neophiles at the BIG ROOM (with the acidic internal decorators) were talking about the
merits of British Imperialism with Monte Stewart. Mark Nielsen and Renate Boerner could not believe
the things being said, and Kevin Hall even went so far as to give up trying; he was tired from his day at
school, as the whole thing was new to him. Rory Allen, truly the most mystical of the crowd had an
avertion to lights, almost like Dracula some had commented. The last person to be caught by the written word was Sturt Colcleugh, someone who was still attempting to find the word urbanophile in a
standard Engligh dictionary.
Hitchhiker gives fast guide to transit dispute
By KIRK COOPER
Well here it is fall again in beautiful British Columbia. Back to
school for those of us able to afford
to come back to UBC. The campus
is somehow different this fall.
Could it be the slightly decreased
enrolment or the longer lines? Perhaps it is the drastic cutbacks in
courses and the low post-secondary
education morale at the university.
No, these are not the answers.
This year something vital is gone
from the campus, in fact absent
from the whole city.
The current bus strike has been
hard on all those who rely on public
transit and especially on the old
people and those of us who can not
afford cars. The strike did not seem
so bad in the summer. At least the
weather was nice and if one happened to work close enough to
home a short walk or cycle ride was
sufficient to transport one from
point A to B.
This fall we UBC students face
not only a huge tuition increase and
further cutbacks in our education,
but we must also contend with a
seemingly insensitive provincial
government which has allowed a
transit strike to continue for three
months leaving thousaads of us
stranded only to find alternate
modes of transportation to and
from the university. For many the
only way to and from school is to
hitchhike.
For many that means facing the
demoralizing and degrading experience of hitching a ride with anyone
who is willing to offer a lift. Motorists may fight the traffic in their
cars, while we are left exposed to
the elements and dangers of traffic.
Many motorists are seemingly un
caring. Why should they care, they
have a car and are able to get
around relatively unaffected by the
lack of public transit.
Many drivers pass hitchhikers by
believing that it is not their responsibility to offer a ride and
know that if they do not offer a ride
someone else will.
The rain poses several new problems for the hitchhiker. In the rain
one not only becomes wet while
waiting for a ride but motorists are
even less sympathetic and less willing to offer a ride to a soaking wet
hitchhiker. Who wants to get their
car messed up by a wet stranger.
Many drivers pass by in the rain and
sneer thinking that they do not want
to pick up a wet hitchhiker looking
for a lift to the university.
One driver actually drove up to
offer a ride, only to have a passenger seat full with a box and a briefcase only to stop, stare and drive
away. How degrading to the hitchhiker.
For women the situation is even
worse. It is dangerous for a woman
to hitch a ride with a stranger. In
this day and age a woman never
knows what kind of weird person
may offer a seemingly innocent ride
only to turn out to be a pervert.
Who is to blame for the strike
and who has the power to end it?
The government cannot be blamed
since they are democratically elected and have decided to remain
largely outside of the dispute, preferring to allow the collective bargaining process to take its time. The
union cannot be blamed for wanting to protect its members from
non-seniority-based layoffs.
One should think that a government elected by the people and declaring itself responsible to the people would never have let such a situation develop leaving the union no
alternative except to strike for its
demands.
Both sides declare a settlement is
close at hand but still none is reached. Grace McCarthy and Bill Bennett seem not to care. Why should
they? Neither has need for public
transit and neither is old or a student left to rely on the buses. Nei
ther Bill nor Grace are left exposed
to the cold and rain while trying to
hitch a ride somewhere and God
forbid that ride should be to a university!
Perhaps it is time that both sides
begin to act like rational compassionate human beings and realize
that transit is an essential service
within Vancouver. It is a disgrace
that a city the size of Vancouver
should be left without a transit system for three months.
Kirk Cooper is a poor, often wet
student hitchhiker who really misses
buses.
Is Heracles myth relevant today?
By FRANK FRIGON
According to Greek mythology,
Heracles was temporarily driven insane during which he slew some of
his own children.
Once freed of the spell, he sought
atonement for his deeds. He was required to put his knowledge and his
strength at the service of those affiliated by a variety of physical and
psychological ills. As such, he became an agent of their liberation.
To what extent is this myth relevant to the situation facing us as
students?
We are as students afflicted by
the spell of technological change. It
seems to provide the key to lucrative employment and secure status
in a world teetering on the brink of
disaster.
A study of the impact of technological change in the United States,
a country which is much more industrialized than Canada, indicates
there will be by far a greater increase in jobs related to janitorial
work and fast food outlets than to
computers.
Since B.C.'s economy is based on
the export of unprocessed resources
requiring at best semi-skilled labor,
and on the import of the skilled la-
bolr, one can only conclude the
faith in 'high tech' has no rational
basis.
One only has to examine the impact of technological change on
'marginalized' groups such as wo
men. Having been drawn into the
labor force, chiefly as a source of
low-paid service workers, women
find themselves streamed by the operation of the education system into
traditional career patterns revolving
around clerical, nursing or teaching
tasks.
At the same time, it is these very
areas that are being eliminated by
governmental 'restraint' or technological change.
How to rid ourselves of this spell?
We must begin by identifying and
bringing under control those elements in our psyche which make us
vulnerable to it.
In the process, there are aspects
of the university that we can drawn
upon for assistance. Its cosmopolitan faculty and student population
does create a climate wherein we
can transcend the limitations imposed by our geographical and cultural backgrounds.
It is much less effective, however,
in helping us become aware of the
prejudices derived from our socioeconomic origins. Both faculty and
students tend to come from or aspire to the same social status, therefore, making it difficult to see the
extent to which we are part of a
privileged few.
But then, how many of us can
risk    the   massive   disorientation
which breaking the mold protecting
our self-concept would entail? We
need a supportive atmosphere in
which we can explore without risking our very sanity.
It is in this respect that the university fails the students the most.
As an academic bazaar with its disciplinary entrepreneurs attempting
to convince us of the overwhelming
importance of their particular products, students cannot hope to find
the integrating mechanisms which
may begin to make sense of the confusion and competing claims.
The dominant theme which emerges from the noise and activity, is
that there is no absolute.
The competition within faculty
for prestige and resources, while
useful for the upper levels of graduate studies, is destructive in two
ways for the vast majority of students who do manage to gain access
to the  university.
On one hand, those who come to
accept these assumptions abandon
the hope of integrating their spiritual with their intellectual life. Those
who cannot accept this coldblooded approach to living are often compelled to seek refuge in a
cult whose admission price is the
abandonment of the critical faculties.
Increasingly, the university stresses the material advantages of its offerings as a means of catering to this
See page 12: FINDING Friday, September 14, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Not bad for a first edition
Juat what ara (ray box**?
Toning tn your ataap until you know.
Watting anxioualy for tha next Ubyaaay which might raveat th* truth about thaaa
omnlpreaant warpa.
Stay tunad. Sama bat tlma. Sama bat channal.
Again this year, UBC students
have their very own newspaper to
read, thanks to the efforts of an interested few. Bravo.
The students newspaper cannot
be all things to all people. Nor can it
describe the real world outside the
campus without making some
"political" decisions; i.e. the
relative newsworthiness of various
stories, or a suggested perspective
from which to view the issues raised.
Many may disagree with the
editorial slant of the Ubyssey, but,
as big boys and girls, we can surely
choose to agree or disagree with
what is said based on a rational
analysis of competing ideas. And
unlike the situation in the more progressive and democratic (sic) countries of the world, the competing
ideas here are not too hard to find.
However, I do believe I have a
legitimate complaint about two of
the items in this school year's first
edition of the Ubyssey.
On page two, in "Ana Banana's
true life testimonial", you portray
Christian faith in a demeaning and
belittling light. Will the Ubyssey be
poking fun at the adherents of other
religions?
If, for example, an off-campus
publication were to ridicule Jesus, I
would expect the Ubyssey to expose
- not support this sort of irrational
attack. Many, in the course of the
ensuing discussion, would remind
us of the political beliefs of the
Nazis - which brings me to my second point.
If the Ubyssey wishes to attack
(see photo and caption on page
three) the ideas of those with whom
it disagrees (like Al Haig, or the
Socred Youth, for example) then
that's fine! But I do ask that you
wo uld have more respect for the intelligence of your readership by
presenting us with your ideas and
arguments.
For it is the discussion of ideas,
not ridicule or name-calling, that
has characterized great universities,
and should characterize this university's student newspaper.
Rob Culos
Law 2
Insensitive Socreds pay no
heed to Tranquille comforts
Recently, substantial media attention has been paid to the latest
developments in the Tranquille
deinstitutionalization program in
Kamloops. Media coverage has
centred around forty-eight
residents being moved to Glendale
hospital near Victoria, a move that
has clearly shown the government's
glind insensitivity to the needs of
the the residents, their families, and
friends.
The government shows no
understanding of the mentally handicapped condition. As well, it
disregards the basic human rights of
the residents of Tranquille as adult
members of our society.
The minister of human resources,
Hon. Grace McCarthy, does not
seem to understand that these people have the same human rights as
all of us. Does the government
decide where you live?
For example, residents were not
consulted prior to the decision to
move them to Glendale. Family,
friends, and those working directly
with the residents were not consulted. The government showed no
sympathy whatsoever when asked
by family and friends of the
residents, to explain its irrational
decision.
UBC RUGBY CLUB
WELCOME BACK
DANCE
with
SILENT PARTNER
Sat. Sept 15
SUB BALLROOM
Tickets $6       AMS TICKET OFFICE OR PLAYERS
puns
M
Nominations are now open
for seven positions on
STUDENT COURT
Nominations close 4 pm
Tuesday, Sept. 18, 1984
Forms available from SUB 238
A local society for mentally handicapped people has shown the
government that it is willing and
able to accommodate three
residents of Tranquille slated for
the Glendale move, but the society
has received no positive response.
Even the provincial
ombudsman's office, after receiving a flood of calls and letters from
concerned citizens, presented a
report outlining problems with
moving the residents to Glendale.
This report has been ignored.
It is time the provincial government gave a rational explanation
for it's actions. The move makes little short term, and no long term
sense, and the residents will surely
not benefit. Would not a responsible
government explain its actions?
I ask anyone concerned to please
telephone your MLA and the
provincial ombudsman as soon as
possible. The ombudsman's
telephone number is 736-8721.
Will Sparks
Arts 3
I
WELCOME BOCK
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While you were away we've
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To help you overcome the
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bring in this coupon, along with
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(offer expires October 31st)
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CLUBS
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FRI. SEPT. 21
STUDENT
UNION BUILDING Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,1984
Letters
Please write to me
I'm writing you this letter because I can recall seeing copies of The
Ubyssey as a youngster and recently I came across a reference to The
Ubyssey along with your address in the prison library where I work. You
see, I'm a Canadian, Vancouverite to be exact, who is incarcerated in
Florida. As it sits, time and distance have conspired to effectively rob me of
correspondence, and hence outside contact.
This is the matter in which I seek both your aid and co-operation. It is
my hope that you may see clear to publish my name, address, and circumstances as either a space filler or personal and somewhere within your
pages, thus giving me the opportunity to correspond with any of your
readers who see fit to respond to my request.
If you need any additional information please feel free to write and ask.
But the basics are: I'm 28 years old, 145 pounds, with brown hair and eyes.
I draw, push weights, do yoga and read to fill the boredom.
I'll thank you now for the consideration I know you'll give the request.
Michael Dunne
G-253-P.O. Box 158
Lowell, Florida, U.S.
32663
Theatre Department
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS
for
TWELFTH NIGHT
by William Shakespeare
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
(To be presented Nov. 7—17/84)
TIMES:    WEDNESDAY, September 19
THURSDAY, September 10
FRIDAY, September 21
PLACE:   Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
5
5:00 - 8:30 pin
(OPEN TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF)
Arrange audition appointments in Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre or Phone 228-2678
Be prepared to read from Twelfth Night
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS
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C1984TI Friday, September 14, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
 rory a. photo
ONE OF LAST of dying breed, raving pacifist gives fraternal sign as
curious look onwards unable to comprehend concepts he represents, let
alone look in the right direction. "Maybe I should just go buy a pair of
sunglasses and some suntan lotion because I'm going to get a good tan
whether I want to or not," he sighs.
Tories abusive
REGINA (CUP) — University of
Regina students got a taste of what
their newly elected Tory government and its supporters think of
student protest at a pre-election rally.
Progressive Conservative supporters verbally and physically
harassed student protestors carrying placards while a grinning Brian
Mulroney and two Tory candidates
averted their eyes.
Lori Latta, U of R student union
vice-president internal, said the
students only wanted to express
their views on the crisis in post-
secondary education but were pushed and shoved aside by Mulroney
supporters.
"They shoved us and hit a little
girl in the face," she said. "Some
PC youths came up to us and said
'If you don't shut up we'll beat
your face in'."
Tory candidates Brian Keple
from Regina East and Dan
Stephens from Regina West claim
not to have witnessed the harassment. Keple said he could not condone such an action, but quickly
added he would likely get the same
reaction if he walked into a
1,000-strong NDP rally.
Keple and Stephens, who failed
in their bid for a seat, and
Mulroney all thought the protestors
were NDP supporters. During the
rally, Mulroney said, "Don't be
hard on these NDP hecklers, they
come to the only place where they
can draw crowds."
Latta said the students were surprised by the hostility they encountered from the Tory supporters. "Most of the people who
harassed us were men in three-piece
suits and middle-aged women," she
said.
Angered by the demonstration,
Mulroney fans tried to push the
protestors' signs out of their
leader's view by putting their own
in front, Latta said. The students'
placards read: "Education is Job
Creation", "Education Funding
Improved the Economy" and "Rationalize Politicians not
Education."
Some demonstrators also carried
signs reading "Mulroney is Pro-
Reagan, and Reagan is a War
Monger." Leslie Mitchell, U of R
student union vice-president external, said one woman dropped her
sign only to have a Tory supporter
stand on her hand and refuse to let
her pick it up.
Gays not included in new
Manitoba rights code
WINNIPEG (CUP)— Manitoba's new human rights code may
not protect lesbians and gay men from discrimination because the
concern is not a priority of the provincial government, a gay community spokesperson says.
"It's too dangerous politically," says Louise Fehr. "It's disappointing but it's not surprising."
The proposed human rights code gives teeth to existing laws
against all forms of discrimination, but a clause specifically prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation may not be
included, according to Manitoba attorney-general Roland Penner.
Fehr says the NDP government fails to follow party policy on
issues such as sexual orientation and reproductive choice.
Quebec is the only province whose human rights code bans
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. "We keep waiting
for the rest of Canada to catch up with Quebec, but it won't
happen," Fehr says. "The political climate in Canada has gotten a
lot more conservative."
The proposed code also defines sexual harassment and prohibits
language which incites hatred and violence. It has won the tentative
approval of the Manitoba Association of Rights and Liberties.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14,1984
Finding 'community' key to finding role of learner
From page 8
economic trend. Professional education is slowly becoming training.
In the process, the prestige associated with the participation in the
university breeds a form of hubris
which serves to encourage the exercise of power without any appreciation of the moral consequences.
The greatest labor facing students
in the '80s is the critical re-examination of the meaning of the university. It will be successful to the extent we can shed the effects of that
arrogance which has been bred in us
by the operation of educational institutions.
As our circle of contacts expand,
we may begin to find community —
not the superficial kind associated
with 'boat races' or the mindless
submission to the unrestrained ego
of some guru but that based on the
union of mind and heart.
Within this atmosphere, we may
begin to understand how to apply
the theoretical abstractions of our
studies to practical problems. As we
grow in effectiveness, we may become sensitized to the many ways
by which our words or actions influence others.
Through community, we may begin to see the value, not only for
ourselves but for society in general,
of the role of learner.
In what ways should the university encourage this role? It must return to its classical origins and reaffirm those basic values valid for any
age. Some of these include the stress
on the development of a person's
intellectual, spiritual and physical
resources rather than on preoccupa-
DON'T JUST HIGHLIGHT IT,,
"BOSS"IT!
Put STABILO BOSS to work
and get attention. "BOSSING"
is highlighting at its best.
Computer printouts, book
reviews, graphs and maps
To colour-code or
emphasize, "BOSS" them
all! Insist on the original.
STABILO BOSS,
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at a special
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tions with status, and a prescription
for seeing life as a whole instead of
in fragments.
At the same time, the university,
unlike the classical ideal, must develop ways through which students
can apply this universal perspective
to particular problems. As students
in a relatively privileged institution,
we must ask ourselves what is our
responsibility to those students in
other but less privileged institutions
in B.C., in Canada, and abroad.
How can we expand the priviliges
we enjoy to those who have been
denied access to them? How can we
use our professional skills in ways
which enhance the personal development of others — whether on the
job or elsewhere? In what ways can
the overwhelming influence of the
United States upon our cultural life
be diminished so as to permit the
development of Canadian solutions
to Canadian problems?
Many other questions come to
mind but these should indicate the
gap between what the university is
and what it could be.
The real value of the university
lies in the opportunities it provides,
not only in its formal offerings but
also in its nooks and crannies, to
discuss, act, and reflect upon a wide
range of concerns. Most of all, it
makes it possible to participate in
our own liberation. Tuum Est.
Frank Frigon is an astute graduate student.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1984 AUTUMN LECTURES
HIDEO TANAKA
Professor Tanaka, a leading scholar in the field of legal studies, was Dean of the Faculty of
law at the University of Tokyo until March 1984. He is an expert in the areas of Anglo-
American law, comparative studies of Japanese and Common Law legal studies and the
Japanese Constitution. Professor Tanaka has published extensively in both Japanese and
English and his text The Japanese Legal System: Introductory Cases and materials is a standard reference source in this field. He is the representative director of the Japan branch of the
Japanese American Society for Legal Studies and recent past president of the Japan Society of
Comparative Law.
THE ROLE OF LAW IN JAPANESE SOCIETY: Comparisons with the West
Saturday, September 15      In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at
8:15 p.m. (Vancouver Institute Lecture)
LEGAL EQUALITY AMONG FAMILY MEMBERS IN JAPAN: The Impact of the Japanese
Constitution of 1946 on the Traditional Family System
Monday, September 17       In Rooms 101/102, Curtis Building, at 12:30 p.m.
JAPANESE LAW FROM A COMPARATIVE STANDPOINT (Seminar)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE—PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information.
BACK TO SCHOOL   BACK TO SCHOOL
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Lunch hour classical music brightens day
By JODY FINDLAY
So tell me, what were you doing
at lunch hour, your first Wednesday back at UBC? Probably a lot of
you poor souls were waiting in line
for books at the bookstore, or in
line for course changes, or perhaps
you were drinking suds while watching All My Children in The Pit.
Well, for all of you, you don't
know what you missed at the
Recital hall, located in the Music
Building, out here, yes, at UBC.
This Wednesday marked the first of
several classical music concerts to
be given on campus.
Music by Mozart and Bruch was
featured at this, the first of the
scheduled concerts. The trio of
Wesley Foster on clarinet, Gerald
Stanick on viola, and Robert Silverman on piano captivated the large
audience for 40 straight minutes.
After hearing these three play a
colourful and inspiring combination of movements by each composer the audience parted ready to
gallantly attack the second half of
the day.
Of the pieces played, Bruch's Op.
83, No. 3 (C sharp minor) was
especially well played, conveying a
charming mood in an impeccable
manner.
Don't be disappointed if you
missed this concert. Next Wednesday all you classical buffs can get
out and catch some Chopin, played
by none other than R. Silveman,
same place, same time, same location. Enjoy.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy puce blorgs on this tiny island
ran rampant in the streets once
again as internal staff dissention
once again took hold of the island
newspaper The Daily Blah. UNS
correspondents present report that
Blah entertainment editor Snarly
Diddledum and Bordeom Lark
were seen in public disagreeing over
the size of by-lines in the paper.
FREE FITNESS CLASS
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WHY NOT JOIN
THE THUNDERBIRD BOOSTER
CLUB?
—The Thunderbird Booster Club is currently looking for more new members to become involved in supporting Thunderbird teams. Events such as Thunderbird Nights, game promotions and
other activities are what the Club promotes. And new people are needed for the following
groups:
1. U.B.C CHEERLEADERS:
New uniforms and sponsorship by companies means that the Cheerleaders/dance
group is looking for people to get involved in a whole new look. Cheerleaders can be
male or female. If you're interested in some dance experience, keeping in shape, fun
times and meeting people, call now to join up.
2. SEAGRAM'S PEP BAND:
If you would like to toot your horn (or drums, guitar, sax, etc.) on an organized social
basis and would like to support the Thunderbird teams at their home events, here's
your chance to get involved. The Pep Band will have uniforms (nothing fancy!) and all
sorts of promotional items to give away at games. Should be fun for all.
3. OTHER EVENTS:
The Club also runs Thunderbird Nights, gets involved with campus promotions, and
liases with fraternities, sororities and undergraduate societies to get them involved in on-
campus activities. And we are always looking for your ideas and projects. Your ideas are
welcome.
BE A PART OF THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY
—SUPPORT THE THUNDERBIRDS!
CALL 222-BIRD
Special Thanks to the Booster Club'_ Sponsors:
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
HOURS'
MON. TO FRI. 8 A.M. 7 P.M.
SATURDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M.
Seagram's
CANADIAN WHISKY Page 14
Friday, September 14, 1984
ExUhifc        HouU6
Autochromes: Color photography comes of
age: a collection of some early color prints,
until Oct. 7, Presentation House, 333 Chesterfield Ave., N. Van., 986-1351.
Margaret Randall: Photographs "from Nicaragua: Insightful black and white photos, until
Oct. 7, Presentation House.
Vancouver/Seattle: Three dimensional art
in glass, ceramics, and fibreglass, until Sept.
30, Surrey Art Gallery, 13750-88th Ave.,
Surrey, 596-1515.
Director's choice: Mixed media exhibit
selected by retiring Vancouver Art Director
Luke Rombout, until Oct. 28, Vancouver Art
Gallery, 750 Hornby St., 682-5621.
Jiri Kolar — Poetry of Vision, Poetry of Silence: Collages by internationally-known
Czech artist, until Oct. 21, Vancouver Art
Gallery.
Brancusi — The Sculptor as Photographer: 50 silver prints by this great figure in the
development of modern art, until Oct. 21,
Vancouver Art Gallery.
Bob Steele, So Far. . .: Retrospective of this
important Vancouver photographer and
Drawer, Sept. 19-Oct. 21, Burnaby Art
Gallery, 6344 Gilpin St., 291 9441.
SUB Films (SUB Auditorium, 228-36971
Educating Rita, 7 and 9:30 p.m., Sept.
14-16. Splash, Sept. 20.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 730-6311)
The Clinic, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455) Sept. 14-16: Z 7:30 p.m.;
Hanna K, 9:45 p.m. Sept. 17-18: Three Sisters, 7:00 p.m.; Butley, 10 p.m. Sept. 19-20:
The Big Chill, 7:30 p.m., Tootsie, 9:30 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 W. Georgia,
732-6119) Sept. 14-15: Golden Sita, 7:30
p.m.; In Search of Famine, 9:15 p.m. Sept.
19, 20: The Circus Tent, 7:30 p.m.. Saga
From the Sea, 9:45 p.m.
Arts and Media Centre (456 W. Broadway,
872-2250) Sept. 14: Daughters of the Nile, 8
p.m.
H.B. Concept: Hip Vancouver soul band, until Sept. 15, Club Soda, 1055 Homer,
681-8202.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave
731-9112
TIMETABLES:
s CLASSES
^ EVENING STUDY
p- EXAMINATIONS
s EXAM
PREPARATION
FEATURING...
INFORMATION ON:
ESSAY WRITING
FOOTNOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
EXAM
PREPARATION
STUDY TIPS
WORLD FACTS
PROJECT INFO
HOMEWORK
SCHEDULE
PLUS:
HOLIDAY &
PERSONAL
DATE BOOK
ADDRESS &
TELEPHONE BOOK
METRIC CONV.
CALENDAR
Send Cheque or Money Order
($7.95 includes postage and handling) to:
Horseshoe Distributing, 2420 Speers Rd.
Oakville, Ont. L6L 5M2
Dealers Enquiries Invited
Rubber Biscuit: Return of the rockers, Sept.
17-22, Town Pump, 66 Water St.
Chris   Sigerson  Trio:   Jazz,   Sept.   14-15,
Good Neighbor Jazz Cafe, 535 E. Broadway,
879-8208.
Jim Beatty Jazz Band: Dixie band from
Portland, Sept. 21-22, Hot Jazz club, 2120
Main, 873-4131.
Kin Lalat: Guatemalan band who play a variety of instruments, $5, Sept. 15, Vancouver
East Cultural Centre, 1895 Venables,
254-9578.
Poisoned: Featuring Art Bergmann, local
guru of rock and roll, Sept. 21-22, 8:30 p.m.,
Vancouver East Cultural Centre.
Magnetic Band: Performing works by U.S.
avant-garde composer Steve Reich, Sept. 21,
8 p.m., SFU Theatre.
Skool: A musical look at education from the
student's point of view, until Sept. 22, Presentation House, 333 Chesterfield, N. Van,
986-1351.
Look Back in Anger: Honest and courageous protest against things as they are, Sept.
19-29, 8 p.m., Frederic Wood Theatre, UBC
campus, 228-3880.
Talking Dirty: Canada's favorite comedy,
until Sept. 22, 8:30, Arts Club Theatre,
Granville Island, 687-5315.
Ain't Misbehaving: Fats Waller Classic, until
Sept. 29, 8:30, Arts Club Theatre.
The Late Blumer: Comedy based on the in
teraction of the love generation with the
Eighties, until Sept. 29, 8:30, Arts Club Theatre.
Celebrations: Three one-act plays including
Letting Go, Between Mouthfuls, and Gos-
forth's Fete, Sept. 19-22, 8 p.m., St. James
Auditorium, 3214 W. 10th Ave., 266-6473.
a: ^~         _____ _
— kevin hall photo
LINEUPS . . . time for reading The Ubyssey
Pacific Motion Dance Company: Premier-
ing two pieces: Dream Spill and Durga, Sept.
20-22, Firehall Theatre, 8:30 p.m., 689-0926.
Les Grands Ballets Canadiens: Four as
tounding works, Q.E. Theatre.
FRIDAY
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Western Intercollegiate Football league game,
UBC vs. Manitoba, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Stadium.
FEE-HIKE STRIKE COMMITTEE
Open meeting, noon, SUB lounge.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL DISAR
MAMENT
First general meeting, all welcome, noon. SUB
205.
AMS ROCKERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
SATURDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Movie: Chariots of Fire, 7:30 p.m., Buch A104.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
"Hands across the Border" demonstration to
protest U.S. intervention in Central America,
noon. Peace Arch Park. Phone 253-0553 for car-
pool.
SUNDAY
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Presentation: "The Papacy: Focus of Unity" St.
Mark's College Music Room, 8 p.m.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Sunday worship service, 10:30 a.m., SUB 212.
JEWISH STUDENT'S NETWORK
First   meeting   of   the   year,   4:00   p.m.,   Hillel
House.
MONDAY
UBC BALLET AND JAZZ CLUB
Early fall registration, 12:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., SUB
216E.
DANCEWORKS-UBC
Early   registration   for   UBC's   unique   dance
ensemble, 12:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m., SUB 216E.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Office warming party.  All interested in joining
welcome, all week 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. SUB 228.
TUESDAY
FIRST YEAR STUDENT COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, noon, SUB 213.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film: No Longer Alone, 7:30 p.m., Buch. A104.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .86c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
COMING EVENTS
WANTED!
Women To Play Rugby
- no experience necessary
- everyone welcome
- social team sport
PRACTICES: THURSDAYS 6:00 pm
at  BALACLAVA  FIELD (W.  30th
Ave. at Balaclava)
COME OUT AND TRY!
More info:
Joanna 733-3877
TOUR TIME
at Main & Sedgewick
LIBRARIES
Every Day This Week
10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. & 3:30 p.m.
Meet in Main Library Entrance
FOR SALE. Single bed with posture board
& highboy dresser. Excellent condition.
Best Offer. 733-8613.
30 - JOBS
INVESTMENT Business Opportunity. Sell
Canada Savings Bonds with national
brokerage house. Mr. Starke 689-3324.
WANTED   RELIABLE   BABYSITTER.   My
home 2 evenings alternate wks, 3-7:30 p.m.
266-6402
11
FOR SALE - Private
40
MESSAGES
The first weekly Co-operative
Christian Campus Ministry
Eucharist will be held Tuesday
Sept. 18 at 12:33 p.m. at the
Luthern Campus Centre Chapel
(across from Administration
Bldg.)
Our first potluck supper, followed by a study program, will be
held Thursday Sept. 20 at 6:00
p.m. at Luthern Campus Centre.
1973 RENAULT R12 SW. 4-Speed, 100,000
Mi. Gd. cond. new exhaust, brakes. $900
o.b.o. Zena 228-5844, 228-0960.
ALMOS NEW 1969 100 cc Yamaha Street
M/C. Only 1700 Mi. $265. Also 10-speed
Bottecchia bike. $85. 263-3440.
GARAGE SALE. Sat. Sept. 15 10-3 p.m.
only at 3167 W. 5th. Enter from lane. Used
building materials Et fixtures, contemp. Et
antique furn., clothing, household &■ fabric
misc., books, records.
RENAULT GRODINI Excellent shape, low
miles, fwd, 5-speed, fuel inj., AM-FM,
great sunroof, great summer Et ski car.
$3500. Don 689-8118 or 688-6585.
1975 GREMLIN, 82,000 mi., automatic,
rebuilt brakes, new paint job. Call Paul at
734-1678. Will accept any reasonable offer
for this hot little car.
WOULD CYCLIST that witnessed car accident on S.W. Marine on Tues. Sept. 11 at
5:30 p.m. please call 261-6763.
60 - RIDES
BLIND STUDENT NEEDS RIDE from New
WEST, to UBC Mon-Wed Er Fri. for 9:30
-2:30 (Negot.) will help with gas. Susan
526-5991.
80 - TUTORING
NEED TO REVIEW high school math or
English? Phone 733-3135 for tutoring by experienced, certified teacher.
TUTOR IN ENGLISH: Writing skills, essay,
E.S.L. 683-2863
85 - TYPING
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PROF. HIDEO TANAKA
Faculty of Law
University of Tokyo
The Role Of Law In Japan:
Comparisons With The West
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, Saturday, Sept. 15
at 8:15 p.m.
FURNITURE SALE
Sunday, Sept. 16, 1984
From 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
2779 W. 21st Ave.,
Vancouver
Come early for great buys.
1973 OLDS CUTLASS. Power steering Et
brakes. Just serviced, good condition.
$750. 228-1803.
SOFA, Lge contemporary, natural linen,
exc. cond., $750 new, asking $250, ph.
278-0493.
1970 COUGAR well maintained car $750 obo
266-2872.
RELIABLE    TRANSPORTATION.    AMC
Gremlin   1975,   new  clutch  AM/Cassette
$895 obo Walter 261-4656.
TYPING — Fast, accurate, reasonable rates.
734-8451
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG (DS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
TYPING. Essays Et Resumes. Also Transcription from cassette. Spelling corrected.
Layout on resumes optional. 263-4736.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs, year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5106.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
QUALITY TYPING. Fast & reliable service.
Judith Filtness: 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351 (24 hrs. I Friday, September 14,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Tough recession
stings students
The recession hasn't ended for
B.C. students who were out of work
this summer in greater numbers
than in 1983.
Statistics Canada figures for B.C.
show an average of 47,000 young
people were looking for work during May, June and July, up from
43,000 during the same period in
1983. Figures for August 1984 were
not yet available.
But the Canada Employment
Centre at UBC made 2,365
placements this summer, an increase of 339 over last year, said
CEC manager Ann Norbert.
"There had been more vacancies
available, but some of the
employers changed their minds and
hired through another centre," she
said. "They recruit through us; they
don't always hire through us."
There are currently 75 job openings posted at the centre, not counting library jobs and placements in
the work-study program.
This summer Joblink, a student
placement centre the Alma Mater
Society organized, placed 400 full-
and part-time jobs, an organizer
said. Simon Seshadri said the centre
found jobs for half the people who
registered with them.
He said the centre received much
praise, as well as being covered by
the Globe and Mail and The Sun.
"The only major complaint we had
was that students couldn't get to
their jobs because of the bus
strike," Seshadri said.
UBC work study
budget slashed
The provincial government slashed $100,000 from UBC's work
study budget this summer.
UBC awards officer Byron
Hender said the UBC program
would have had only $50,000 this
year except that UBC made an extra
contribution of $500,000.
Henders said the province's cutback is "part of the fiscal entrench-
Don't
join
The
Ubyssey
we hate
you anyway
ment this province went through."
Last year 400 UBC students used
the work study program. And
Henders said he expects an increase
in applications this year because the
program's criterion has been changed to make it more accessible to
students.
Work study programs at other
B.C. post-secondary institutions
have been cut back even more
drastically, Canadian Federation of
Students Pacific chair Tami
Roberts said.
She said at Douglas College in
New Westminster the province is
supporting only one work-study
position this year. 4,000 students attend Douglas.
"At a lot of campuses there's going to be work-study at all this
year," Roberts said. "Most campuses cannot make up the difference to cover the cut." She said
UBC has the largest commitment to
work study of any B.C. campus.
The work study program provides on-campus work for students
who prove they need more money
than the student aid program can
supply them with, and is administered through the provincial
ministries of labor and education.
The government spokespersons
could not be reached for comment.
DINNER DELIVERED?
Call Candia Taverna
Traditional Greco-Roman Cuisine
4510 West 10th Avenue
Open Sunday through Thursday 5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Friday and Saturday 5:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
For reservations and delivery: 228-9512 - 228-9513
Try Candia Taverna's carefully prepared Greek dishes, from such standards
as Mousaka, Souvlakias grilled carefully to your tastes, Greek Salads
smothered with Feta Cheeses, to specially prepared Kalamaria brought to
your table piping hot and delicious. Sample the large selection of Greek and
Italian appetizers: Kotosoupa, Tzanziki, Homus, Italian Salad rich with Moz-
zarella. Candia Style sauces prepared for the Lasagna, Spaghetti and
Tortellini are great favourites, as are the wide varieties of pizzas. The chef
lovingly creates daily specials such as spinach pizza and BBQ Chicken for
your appreciation. A friendly staff member welcomes each customer at the
door and insures that a visit at Candia Taverna is a memorable one. And to
the delight of the customers, each Friday and Saturday evening dancers
perform their Dance Oriental.
HaMo.'Howara you doing? FMHng good 'euz it'* Friday and you Just survived your first weak of dum? Ooodl Homework
not too heavy for tha weekend, right? Planning to }um relax? That** a nloa thought. Mind you, you'tt probably flunk out and bring disgrace to your name and your family, and you'H wind up a broken aod wandering around Skid ftoad, but that*• not going
to atop you from enjoying yourself this weekend, right?
Tbiiche Ross &Co.
Chartered Accountants
We are an international firm of chartered accountants with offices in Vancouver, New Westminister, Langley, Victoria, Prince George and all major centres in Canada. We are seeking graduates who wish to make a career in
Chartered Accountancy with future opportunities in a number of specialized
areas such as audit/accounting, tax, valuations, insolvency and EDP.
If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession, we invite you to meet
with representatives of Touche Ross & Co. on October 22/23 & 24 on campus.
Applications, accompanied by recent course transcripts, may be submitted to
the Employment Centre on Campus until October 3rd. We will be in contact
with you subsequent to that date.
CA
The career with a future
».*S*s
People with the expertise and skills to meet today's
business challenges are a step ahead in the competitive world of
the Eighties. A Chartered Accountant is one of those people.
CAs are at the centre of the financial decision-making
process and a Chartered Accountant's training and judgment are
always in demand. The Graduate Admission Program could be
your first step toward a career with a future.
GA P prepares you for entry into the School of Chartered
Accountancy leading to membership in the profession. In the
Graduate Admission Program you will obtain a sound grounding
in business finance, economics, taxation, computers, commercial
law, financial and management accounting and organizational
behaviour — the skills employers and clients need in today's
complex economy.
Chartered Accountants come from a wide variety of
backgrounds. They have university degrees in arts, science, law,
education, commerce and other disciplines. They've made their
degrees work for them. The excellence of their professional
training is recognized internationally.
Firms of Chartered Accountants in British Columbia will
be interviewing and hiring 1985 graduates on campus in October
to begin the program next spring. Make an investment in your
future — inquire about The Graduate Admission Program.
For further information, visit your campus Manpower
Centre or contact Gail Noden at the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of British Columbia.
[•y
Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia
1133 Melville Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6E 4E5 Tel: 681-3264
Canada's leading accounting professionals Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 14, 1984
Bambaataa spins hip hop crock
By CHRIS WONG
Lemme get this straight. James
Brown, The Godfather of soul, the
king of funk, the hipster saint of the
"baddest" American music ever
made, is on vinyl with the head hon-
cho of hip hop, Afrika Bambaataa?
Sounds like Tommy Boy Records
from New York City have pulled
off a musical coup. But wait , hold
on to your pennies. A few spins of
their disc, Unity, reveals that a
more appropriate description would
be musical crock.
Sorry, but Unity doesn't make it
despite the presence of the
heavyweights, Brown and Bambaataa. Brown should realize an aging soul star can't easily learn new
tricks. Brown's infamous "say it
loud and proud" vocal approach
worked in 1968, but now the James
Brown growl is simply redundant.
Bambaattaa, the co-lyricist on
Unity with Brown, and also the
record's co-producer and arranger,
achieves none of the brilliance
found on last year's Renegades of
Funk single he recorded with the
Soul Sonic Force. That single had a
permeating drum beat and eerie
synthesizer runs that carried
breakdancers into a nirvanic state.
And the vocals were not overpower -
ing as they are on Unity.	
Unity
James Brown and Afrika Bambaattaa
Tommy Boy Records
Unity is divided into six parts —-
all are devoted to spreading the
message that "Peace, unity, love
and having fun" are needed in the
world. And when that earth shattering information is not being
repeated ad nauseum, a gamut of
issues are touched on superficially:
nuclear war, education, colonization, etcetera, etcetera.
If you're looking for outstanding
descriptive analysis similar to
Grand Master Flash and the Furius
Five's The Message, keep looking.
There's no analysis here — it's not
intense social comment. Hell, this
stuff is embarassing. Brown should
stick to Dick Clark's annual televised rock and roll revival shows.
But the big mystery here is Bambaattaa. Bambaattaa is a self-made
musical genius who was roaming
the streets in the South Bronx
neighbourhood of New York with
the Black Spades gang when Brown
was at the peak of his career. He
took his name from a chief in the
Zulus, an African people.
Bambaattaa emerged from the
violence of the gang lifestyle to
become one of the originators of
the hip hop sound. In recently
published book Hip Hop, Steven
Hager notes that Bambaattaa
received the title "Master of
Records" for his deejaying abilities
at the turntable, that only a few in
the Bronx could match.
Planet Rock was the single that
gave Bambaattaa world-wide
recognition as the king of the turntables. With Planet Rock, copyright
lawyers developed ulcers as the tune
freely borrowed passages from
Kraftwerk, the film The Good, the
Bad and The Ugly and other
groups. This innovative single
recorded on Tommy Boy set the
tone for electrofunk and revolutionized dance music, reports
Hager.
Now Bambaattaa seems to have
pulled up his Bronx roots. His
singles have sold substantial
amounts, and he even appeared in a
movie, Beat Street. Success has impaired his ability to produce the
crisp arrangements he is known for.
Not even the competent musicians assembled for his record can
generate true excitement and soul.
The players include drummer Keith
Leblanc who was responsible for
the excellent Malcom X single, No
Sell Out bassist Doug Wimbish, and
guitarist Skip McDonald. They
should have skipped this date and
used their talents on a more relevant
recording.
Recordings like Unity prompt the
question of whether the hip hop
movement has already run its
course. The music which burst suddenly onto the scene via ghetto
blasters and discos was originally a
perfect blend of electronic funk and
intelligent lyrics performed in rap,
the innovative style of talking to the
beat.
If hip hop is not to be dismissed
as another fad, continual innovation and excitement must be injected into the music. Unity says
nothing new, and it does nothing to
further the promising career of
Afrika Bambaattaa. And James
Brown should keep to the pure soul
he is capable of belting out.
£oam
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>eP_„ ^iaPner iPft   '    *here   _   r
^ powe/ir35 a v«Ua7°.^ashiro
fo^ed Sf "lan/a; a **u to See°
Quiet  fin,       to the T   ance Per
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a°f**hfW*'«Aa /Stents
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Sta&.HeT    tolled      ed   ^   '
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bre*kneck    °ther s0_nd,' Jabber.
to- ,    May   „     s ^onje) i~      r°nt
?red-on.e^e/07'    Three
cI3S   ^d°nl^tinuous-^AM
r°reogranh   °   tell   v.: da"ce. /,
b^an  ThP er hft off wli*e   q-1'
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day?ay *bich   a$a deling of^er
Tinted a;er^4ZZ''y
Cape from   he Piece Hn°t>n-
Pebbie £' M°nmen,L    Tr'nitv
^^n0,^' KathyV*?Escape'
?lU?,nS blackn UnusmCoa Bourget
Even a  /•' across
8eniUs   is  fe" moment

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