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The Ubyssey Sep 26, 1972

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Array Eight seek posts in byelection
Only one of three Alma
Mater Society executive
positions, and two of four
student senatorships will have
to be decided in the Oct. 5
byelection, AMS treasurer
David Dick said Monday.
The positions of graduate
studies senator, arts senator
and ombudsperson will be
contested. Students will also
vote on referendums concerning a covered pool and a
motion to strike out the
political clubs act from the
constitution.
Dick said seven positions
were originally open but four of
them were won by acclamation. Acclaimed were coordinator Bob Angus, internal
affairs officer Rory Rolston,
applied science senators Fred
Andreone and senator-at-large
Colin MacKenzie.
The candidates for grad
studies  senator   are   S.   J.
Rosval, graduate studies 10;
Alan E. Davis, graduate
studies 9; and James A.
McEwen, graduate studies 2.
McEwen is the former
applied science senator and
has been a member of the
senate for two years.
The candidates for the arts
senator are Jay Munsie, arts 4
and John D. MacLachlan, arts
3.
The candidates for ombudsperson are Coreen
Douglas, arts 2;  Douglas B.
MacKay, arts 3;  and David
Varnes, arts 3.
Steve Garrod, former AMS
president and the previous
grad studies senator, is writing
his thesis this year and is not
running for re-election. He has
been a member of the senate
for two years.
Terms have also expired
for Tom MacKinnon the
previous ombudsperson and
Gary Litcher the previous arts
senator. Neither are seeking
re-election.
The current science senator
is Svend Robinson, science 3.
His term does not expire until
next year.
The referendum concerning the constitutional
amendment will allow students
affiliated with political
organizations to run under
their party banner. Political
subsidization is permitted if
necessary.
Previously, students who
had political connections were
not permitted to campaign
with their parties' support.
This was the case last year
when the young socialists were
Vol. LIV, No. 5        VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1972
228-2301
not   permitted   to   run   for
election.
Advance polls will be open
on October 4 at the following
locations and times: SUB, the
education building, War
Memorial Gym, the law school
and the medical school
from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Polls will be open from
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on
election day at these locations:
Buchanan, Angus, Civil,
MacMillan, Main Library,
Sedgewick Library, SUB north
and south, and the Woodward
Library.
Candidates will submit
statements to The Ubyssey by
Oct. 2 giving their positions for
the students to examine.        ,
Dick also said that UBC
students will face another
ballot in February to elect the
council executive. He said he
would not be seeking reelection.
WANT TO GIVE SOME BLOOD? If you do, the place to be is Brock 213 at the
northeast corner of the main floor where the Canadian Red Cross Blood Donor Clinic
—ed dubois photo
is set up this week only, Monday to Friday 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Along with the
coke and cookies, you get a card stamped with your very own blood type.
Leon Koerner dies at 80
Leon Koerner is dead.
The timber baron and
philanthropist died Monday at
the age of 80 in his penthouse
atop the graduate student
centre.
He had been ill for some
time, partly as a result of a
broken hip suffered last May in
a fall at his penthouse.
Koerner arrived in Canada
in 1939 fleeing from the Nazi
occupation of his native
Czechoslovakia.
He became president of
Alaska Pine and Cellulose Ltd.,
with a mill in New Westminster and large timber
holdings on Vancouver Island,
after discovering a way to
process hemlock to make it
acceptable for commercial
usage.
In 1955, he used $1 million to
set up the Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation, the
largest single philanthropy in
B.C. history. The foundation
has since distributed more
than $1 million to various
causes.
UBC has been a major
recipient of Ko&rner's
philanthropical blessings.
He gave $500,000 to the UBC
endowment fund in 1957. Two
years later he gave $400,000 to
build a graduate student centre
with a penthouse for himself on
top. Then in 1962 he bought a
$30,000 house for retiring UBC
president Norman MacKenzie.
He provided a $600,000 grant
to build the faculty club.
And   since   1967   the   top
LEON KOERNER
. dies in campus suite
student at Simon Fraser
University has received a gold
medal and $500 from the
Koerner Foundation. The same
year this award was instituted,
UBC received $25,000 to set up
an eye-research centre.
Administration president
Walter Gage said in a
statement that Koerner was a
"staunch friend and supporter
of the university.
"His notable gifts were the
UBC faculty club and the Thea
Koernor Graduate Student
Centre, but over the years he
also made many contributions
to establish and support
scholarships for UBC students.
Dr. Koerner always stressed in
making these gifts that he felt
an obligation to repay the
country   of   his   adoption   to
which he felt he owed a great
deal.
"He knew the importance of
higher education and he made
his gifts to UBC because he felt
strongly the need for citizens to
support such institutions. Dr.
Koerner was a man of sterling
qualities and he will be missed
by all who knew him."
Koerner was educated at the
Export Academy in Vienna,
then at the London School of
Economics and the Sorbonne.
He is survived by a sister,
Else Reif and a brother Walter
Koerner, recently retired
chairman of the UBC board of
governors, and nephews and
nieces.
In accordance with Koerner's wishes, no funeral or
memorial service will be held. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1972
New building
sparks protest
OTTAWA (CUP) —
Residence students at Carleton
University here are occupying
a campus lawn to protest a
university proposal for a new
building on the site.
The students say the lawn is
the only large grassy playing
field in the university's
residence area.
The occupation began Sept.
20 with a campfire and the
establishment of tents on the
site to allow students to sleep
there overnight.
At a meeting of 300 residence
students, university administrators advised them to
submit a brief opposing the
construction to the university's
building advisory committee.
The administration claimed
the committee could still
decide against construction on
that site. The students will
submit the brief tomorrow
morning.
The new building would
house classrooms and administration offices for St.
Patrick's College, an institution affiliated with
Carleton and now located in
mid-town Ottawa about five
miles from Carleton's main
campus, Carleton sold the old
St. Pat's building to Algonquin
College of Applied Arts and
Technology last spring.
St. Pat's plans to use an
existing Carleton residence to
house its students and wanted
its main building close to its
residene.
The university rejected two
sites on another part of the
campus because of allegedly
prohibitive costs.
The protesting residence
students say construction of a
new building so close to
existing dormitories would
create unbearable construction noise. They also say
that St. Pat's main building
should be set apart from the
rest of the campus for the
college to maintain its
separate identity.They claim
that Carleton received more
from the sale of the St. Pat's
building to Algonquin than the
cost of a new building.
But the major reason for the
protest is the fact that construction would eliminate the
only grassy area around the
residence complex.
Construction had ' been
scheduled to begin Sept. 1, but
delays pushed the date forward
until  students were back  on
OFS reaffirms
fee referendum
TORONTO (CUP) — The Ontario Federation of Students
executive has re-affirmed its intentions to hold a referendum in
October for students to decide whether to withhold their second
term tuition fee instalment in January.
The fee boycott would be a protest against the Ontario
government's decision to raise tuition fees and cut back in
student award grants.
The referendum will be held Oct. 10 to 12 on all campuses
belonging to OFS. The organization represents students
councils at 13 universities and community colleges. The
decision was made amid indications of overall success for OFS'
campaign urging students to pay only their first fee instalment
at registration. However, accurate figures were not available
from most schools.
Carleton University student association president Bruce
Cameron told the meeting that 88 per cent of Carleton students
had paid only their first instalment. Yvon Lachappelle,
president of the students general association at Sudbury's
Laurentian University estimated his school's mark at 95 per
cent, but the figure was unofficial.
OFS treasurer Eric Miglin, president of the University of
Toronto student council, claimed the overall figure was between
70 and 90 per cent.
"Whatever the figure, it is true that more students paid by
instalment than before," OFS general co-ordinator Craig Heron
said in an interview.
The referendum will ask students three questions:
o Whether they endorse the OFS demands that tuition fee
increases be deferred until full discussion with interested
groups and publication of the final report of the Ontario Commission on Post-secondary Education, and that the Ontario
Student Awards Program be amended to allow part-time
students eligibility and restore the $600 loan ceiling, recently
raised to $800.
o Whether they agree to withhold their second instalment
of fees when it becomes due in January.
0 Whether they would be willing to withhold the entire
tuition fee amount next year if tuition fees are again increased.
OFS will meet after the referendum results are known to
decide on further action.
Dr. Sidney B. Smordin
and Dr. Susan K. C. Chow
announce the relocation to new offices
for the practice of Dentistry
at 4433 West 10th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Effective approximately October 10th, 1972
Telephone remains Tw° Blocks East
224-3205 of present Location
campus and became aware of
the implications. The
university's plans had
previously received little
publicity.
Trevino out?
Alma Mater Society
lawyer Ben Trevino will meet
with AMS executives today to
discuss whether or not he
should resign his position, The
Ubyssey has learned.
Trevino, a UBC senator
who was recently nominated to
run for the board of governors,
apparently feels a conflict of
interest would result from his
being both an AMS lawyer and
a board member, because the
lawyer is currently handling a
lawsuit against the company
which supplied faulty roof
beams for the winter sports
centre.
CLUBS' DAY
THURSDAY - SEPT. 28
ALL DAY IN SUB
COME SEE THE EXHIBITS
GET INVOLVED
JOIN A CLUB Tuesday, September 26, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Hospital workers expect contract
By SONDRA MARSHALL
SMITH
Striking Sandringham
Hospital workers are hopeful
that    the    new    provincial
government will assist them in
their two-year struggle to gain
a contract.
Strike tactics and strategies
were discussed Sunday, when
the working women's
association presented its third
seminar on labor unions.
Speakers  included  hospital
workers   Kay   Hornsby   and
Margrit Perry who are participating in the strike against
Sandringham Private
Hospital, Victoria and Pam
Smith   who   organized   the
SUB WORKERS Vic Venn,  left,  and Morgan Grant haul in 950 cases of unmentionable, unpicturable
refreshments Friday for the fifth meeting of the Pit in the clubs lounge. —kineret annina mcdonaid photo
California grape boycott in the
Lower Mainland area.
Pat Barter said that the most
important aspect of strike
organization was whether it be
a sit-down, walkout or rotating
strike — is "to hit the employer
where he is most vulnerable."
She illustrated her idea of
successful tactics b"
examining the strikes of th.
French railroad workers in the
late 180O's, Textile workers in
Lawrence, Mass., in 1912,
General Motors workers, in
Flint, Mich., and the province-
wide Quebec strike of May,
1972.
She emphasized that public
and community support is
another vital factor as the
solidarity of the Quebecois
showed in their fight for a
hundred dollar a week
minimum wage during Spring,
1972.
The turbulent history of the
1966 Lenkurt Electric strike
was summarized by Melody
Rudd. The combination of
many grievances and low
union membership was
complicated by. collusion
between Lenkurt management
and international executives of
the International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers. Contradictory information, passed
to the strikers by IBEW union
officials and company
management made settlement
negotiations difficult and
resulted in only 137 of the 257
original employees being rehired.
During her discussion on
boycotts, Smith said the
success of the Lower Mainland
boycott on California grapes
which cut market profits to
unacceptably low broke the
Grape Growers Association
resistance to the workers'
demands.
She said the discretionary
power which consumers have
and seldom exercise has great
possibilities for labor
negotiations.
On Oct. 1 the final session
on unions will be held in
Fisherman's Hall, 138 East
Cordova.
Admission is free and child
care is provided. This seminar
will deal with shop steward
structures, grievance
procedures and maintenance
of membership.
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
This is the third year in succession that I've seen
the enclosed advertisement in the Ubyssey — and
it hasn't changed a bit; same girl, same glasses, and
the same come on, "student discount given".
Well, let it be known that Prescription Optical
does NOT offer any student discount — I know, I
found out the hard way.
After picking out my frames and making out the
bill I asked how much of a discount I was to be given.
Surprisingly, I was told that there was no student
discount, and that the ad in the Ubyssey was in
error.
So when I went to pick up my glasses, I brought
along a copy of the UBYSSEY with me, and pointed
out the ad, telling him that it had been run for at least
a few years, and each time with the same false
statement: "student discount given".
What gives? The closest thing they have to a
student discount, he told me. is that they will hardex
lenses free for children. (The retail cost of hardexing
is about $3.00.) But that applies only to children, and
definitely not university students.
GORDON HILLIKER
Arts 3.
The office that you purchased your glasses at was
closed about 2 months ago.
According to Trevor Reid, manager of the 1700
West Broadway location, you should have received a
10 per cent discount.
If you take your receipt to him, Prescription
Optical will issue you a refund.
Reid told me that his location had been giving
student discounts of 10 per cent for the last 23 years
and that the ad is not in error.
Dear Exposure:
Your article in the Sept. 12 issue of The Ubyssey
invited letters informing you of rip-offs, etc. Well, I
ran into the biggest UBC bookstore rip-off of all time
(to the best of my knowledge).
The book is required for Math 413, a course in
logic. There is one section for this course containing
approximately 45 students. The book is:
Robbin, Joel W. Mathematical Logic: A First
Course. W. A. Benjamin, New York, 1969.
This book is only 200 pages long, approximately
five-eigths of an inch thick. The price? Would you
believe $16. Excuse me, it's only $15.95.
In any case, somebody is taking a hell of a profit
in this deal. My feelings can be summed up in the
following points:
1. I have purchased the book already (in a
moment of weakness or insanity).
2. The prof thinks the book is good but is appalled
at the price.
3. I am appalled at the price.
4. Everyone I have shown the book to has been
appalled upon seeing the price sticker, sitting in the
upper right hand corner in all its glory.
I think it is safe to say that 45 Math students are
being royally shafted. I'm sure you will agree with
me.
CAM M. OSBORNE
Math 4
Legally I cannot counsel you to Xerox the hook as
this may prove a violation of copyright but. . .
Actually, if you are appalled at being ripped off
about $8 to $10 extra you are in the company of the
UBC Library.
Recently they purchased from University
Microfilms [Ann Arbor, Michigan] a nine volume
computerized index of all known PhD dissertations
.for $1000, excuse me $995 U.S. to be exact.
At a little over $110 per volume it wasn't exactly a
bargain.
The most annoying part, however, was the
classifying of the contents. Take for example
"Ghana's development experience 1951-1965" which
is classified under the key word "%i" [sic] or "ST"
which indicated a thesis titled "The St. Lawrence
seaway & power project."
Now that's what I call a royal rip-off. Needless to
say at time of writing this compendieum has been
returned and UBC's money is supposedly on its way
back. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1972
Food
The Alma Mater Society executive is trying to buy
the SUB food service.
"About time" many of you will reply. We agree,
provided they are able to change the quality of the food,
improve the service and decrease the prices without going
bankrupt.
They seem to believe this is possible and without an
increase in student fees. However, this does mean the
present student fees will be continued over a longer period
of time.
The administration is trying to pay off the $1.2
million loan used to set up the SUB food service in 10
years.
In other words, each year the administration needs
to get $163,000 profit out of the food service to meet this
loan. At this time, the largest profit has been $104,000.
This is one reason why food prices are high.
The AMS executive proposes to extend the loan to
about 1986 or another five years. The money to pay the
loan off would come out of the $15 in student fees now
allocated to the SUB loan.
There are a couple of advantages to a student owned
food service.
If the quality of food doesn't shape up we can fire
the AMS executive whereas food service administrator
Ruth Blair, cannot be fired by the students.
A co-op food store could more easily be added to
the SUB food service as the ability to buy in bulk lots
decreases food prices.
We like the idea but are waiting for the completion
of the feasibility study now under way before giving our
support to the project. J.O.
Teapots
We've always had this thing about teapots.
Three years ago we pointed out how the metal
teapots then in use dribbled tea down the spout and left
rings on the tables.
Also, metal teapots make inferior tea. This is pointed
out by George Orwell in his famous essay on how to make
a good pot of tea.
We then asked that the little green china teapots be
returned.
Anyway about two weeks later one china teapot
appeared among all the egregious metal ones.
However, the situation has deteriorated. There are
no teapots in the SUB cafeteria.
So again we make a plea. Could you please return
the teapots?
At this point, we are even willing to revert to the
dribbling metal ones. Anything that resembles a pot would
be better than making tea in a cup or carrying it to the
university in a thermos.
If you can find the china one, great. .    J.O.
Cutlery
Ha, we caught you this time Ruthie.
Trying to sneak disposable cutlery back in the SUB
cafeteria. It's subtle but you're not going to fool us.
You think we're going to believe that all those
plastic knives, forks and spoons are only for take-out
orders when there isn't a piece of real cutlery to be seen
within five miles of SUB.
No way, we know a nefarious plot when we stumble
onto it. This is only the first step. Next, you'll be telling us
the dishes ran away with the spoons.
J.O.
V
ths tidnsn
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
With trembling hands, Lesley Krueger read the note, scrawled hastily
on the beaten, bloody carcass of Berton Woodward: "If you don't turn
over to me intact, Kent Spencer and John Andersen then I'll refuse to blow
up the Wally Gage Towers, signed: the Killer." "Oh, woe is us for we are
lost," moaned Dirk Visser. "Nay," said stalwart Jan O'Brien, "this note is
so "foul it could have originated in the SUB cafeteria." "Yes," chorussed Ed
Dubois and Linda Hossie, "at least it must have been written there." "We'll
form a search party," said Kini McDonald. Half an hour later they broke
down the door of the storage room and found Sondra Marshall Smith and
Forrest Nelson bound and gagged. "A masked figure dashed into the
elevator," screamed Larry Manulak and Steve Morris. Karin Nielsen and
Gary Coull dashed to the top floor. There shivering on a ledge Killer was
revealed as Mike Sasges. "Keep back," Sasges yelled, "or I'll jump."
Vaughn Palmer rushed forward.
SCK006E rVDlCK
Students lost in fog
The following article is a view of student
life by Gary Coull, Arts 2.
After UBC's performance at last week's
Shinerama it is time to evaluate the effectiveness of educating 19,000 people in the
same place.
To say 52 people came to shine shoes out of
all the students at UBC is to say no one showed
up. This statistic says more than the obvious
fact that UBC students can't shine shoes.
What happens to peoples compassion for
others when everyone is lumped together and
educated like robots? Everyone at UBC,
especially during registration week, is forced
to think entirely of themselves because of the
de-personalized system of education. This
attitude carries on into the year and is vividly
self-evident by the refusal of UBC students to
help people afflicted with cystic fibrosis.
Students at UBC are lost in a fog. They live
in their own world not because they
necessarily want to, but because they are
forced to in order to survive.
However, it seems that BCIT's system of
education breeds compassion and empathy.
They had 500 students donating time at their
Shinerama. The fact that only 2,900 students
go there is the reason.
The smaller colleges in Vancouver such as
SFU where 5,000 attend or Vancouver City
College (Langara) where 4,200 attend, as well
as BCIT, are not pressured into handling
students in the same manner as UBC. As a
result, the smaller population appears to be
making better human beings.
Educators should study the feasibility of
more small colleges to eventually take over
UBC. The emphasis should be placed on
transferring UBC's unquestioned academic
superiority into these smaller colleges. Not
only would the costs to the student decrease,
but the individual could be stressed to a
greater extent.
It is not a question of UBC students being
apathetic. Apathy is saved for those who show
lack of interest in a cause. At UBC there are so
many diverging minds, that there is not even
enough unification to have a cause in the first
place.
Gay lib
The Toronto headquarters of
the Globe and Mail, English
Canada's most prestigious
newspaper, was the scene
recently of a demonstration by
200 homosexuals. The protest
was in response to publication
in the Globe of a virulent anti-
gay article, later picked up by
the Vancouver Sun, that by
week's end had turned into a
high-powered anti-homosexual
slander campaign. Utilizing
falsehood and distortion, and
invoking the hysterical word
"seduction", the time-worn
rallying cry of anti-gay bigots,
the Toronto and Vancouver
press showed gays precisely
where this powerful institution
stands on the question of gay
liberation. Significantly, the
press blacked out reports of the
demonstration.
The slander campaign first
saw the light of day in an ar-
Letters
tide by Kenneth Bagnell in the
Aug. 23 Globe entitled Gay
Liberation, which discussed a
signed article by Gerald
Hannon called Of Men And
Little Boys, appearing in the
July-August issue of The Body
Politic, a Toronto gay
liberation newspaper which is
distributed cross-country.
Bagnell insinuates that federal
grant received by-CHAT, The
Community Homophile
Association of Toronto, to
operate a distress centre, is
being used to publish a paper
that counsels the seduction of
young boys. The next day the
Globe followed up its purveyor
of received opinion with an
editorial urging police action
against The Body Politic. The
same day, the Toronto Star
escalated the vicious attack
into a campaign directed
against Canadian
homosexuals, with a lengthy
and strident editorial that
suggests gays are exploiting
children. The editorial goes on
the threaten that gays "may
lose the freedom they have and
will certainly destroy the
tolerance that gave them the
amendment in the first place".
(Reference is to the 1969
amendment to the Criminal
Code to provide that
homosexual acts in private
between consenting adults no
longer be an offense.) The
right-wing Toronto Sun found
the anti-gay pitch of the Globe
and Star editorials insufficiently feverish. In a lead
editorial of Aug. 28, it
laments that Toronto has just
endured Gay Pride Week,
drages out the old line about
"abnormality", and "perversion", demands that the
government rescind CHAT's
grant, and concludes by
reminding gays that "there is
an enormous difference between tolerating something and
condoning it."
The most dishonest part of
this classic anti-gay attack was
played by the Vancouver Sun, Tuesday, September 26,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
which cloaks its anti-
homosexual bias in a reprint
from another newspaper. In its
Saturday, Sept. 2 edition, the
|Sun reprinted the original
slander, sensationally
headlining it Are Gays Urging
Boy Seduction With Federal
Money? To date the Sun has
refused to publish a letter of
protest from the Gay Alliance
Towards Equality which
replies to the slander. When
GATE} phoned the Sun, we
were told that a letter was sent
in response to our protest. This
we have not as yet received.
It is no accident that this
well-orchestrated slander
campaign against
homosexuals in Canada should
coincide both with Gay Pride
Week in Toronto, and with the
decisive entry into the
political arena of gays in
British Columbia, as evidenced
by the gay civil rights campaign in the provincial election. The mass and immediate
response by the gay community to the attack demonstrated its determination to
meet'such an assault head-on.
At a press conference and in a
letter to the Globe, George
Hislop, president of CHAT,
exposed Bagnell's dishonest
tactics. He pointed out that no
financial link exists between
CHAT and The Body Politic,
and reiterated his group's
advocacy of lowering the age
of consent. Both the Body
Politic editorial collective and
Gerald Hannon, in letters to
the Globe, effectively dealt
with the press slanders and
distortions. In a vigorous
defence of free speech, they
reaffirmed the view, basic to
gay liberation, that all consenting sexual relations are
positive in nature and should
be a basic human right. They
pointed out that it was the
venom of the press which
construed the article as one
conselling seduction.
This experience, which will
raise the consciousness of
many gays, shows that the
time has long since passed
when such attacks can be
made with impunity.
MAURICE FLOOD
Chairman, Gay Alliance
Towards Equality
Vote no
Why should hard-pressed,
starving, financially poor
students be expected to fork
out another 1-1/2 million bucks
for an indoor swimming pool?
True, it's only $5 per year per
student (for some 22 years), or
as Grant D. Burnyeat,
Chairman Ad-Hoc Committee
to Get a Covered Pool for UBC
tells us, only 60 cents a month,
but I bet if that pool is built at
least 10,000 students will pay
their 60 cents a month and
never use it. So why should
they be paying or it?
Moreover, I'm annoyed at
the high pressure campaign to
make   students   believe   that
If you've ever been
involved in
YOUNG LIFE
or to
MALIBU
Come to
SUB room 211
on Wed., Sept. 21
at 12:30
Letters
they need a new pool. UBC is so
far behind other Canadian
universities, they say. So what.
In recent years UBC
students have built all too
many sports facilities in my
opinion and ended up with too
little money for educational
funds.
If we've got 4 million dollars
to give away, why not give
every student a classroom?
Some poor arts men are still
forced to switch classes every
Tuesday, Wednesday and
Friday.
But let's get back to the issue
of sports facilities. We've got a
beautiful football stadium that
is filled but once a year (for the
Home Wreckers game), a
virtually brand new PE
complex and Winter Sports
centre. Don't forget that we
already spend five bucks for
extramural sports per year
and relegate ourselves to a few
cents a year for intramurals.
I hope that on the Oct. 4
referendum a lot of students
will feel as cheap as I do and
vote No on the pool referendum
question.
KENTSPENCER
Arts 3
Weird
I happened to be walking
down the Main Mall today at
about 12:30 when I flashed on
this really, really weird guy.
He was the. strangest-looking
student (and we have some
strange ones, believe you me)
that I have ever, ever seen.
The first thing I noticed was his
sort of stooped walk, like he
carried the burden of the whole
country on his shoulders or
something. You know the kind
of stoop I mean. And he was
wearing horn-rimmed glasses.
Now, I haven't ever, ever seen
horn-rimmed glasses on
campus since I was in Phu
Kalla U fraternity in 1966. His
face was sort of wizened like
he'd been looking for too long
across a room with about 265
people in it. He didn't have
much hair, which I really can't
dig, you know, and he was
wearing a suit. The suit was
about a year out of date, to top
it all off. (He was wearing a
narrow tie, too). But the really
weird thing about this guy, the
really, really weird thing was,
that he'd keep falling asleep all
the time. No kidding. He'd
begin talking, he'd say "My
fellow young voter" or
something and then ZZZZZZZ-
ZZ. Like, he couldn't finish a
sentence or anything. I was so
flashed I followed the guy, and
he fell asleep on the Main Mall,
like I said, and he fell asleep on
the steps of the Library and he
knocked off by Hebb and he
started snoring when his head
hit the garden in front of SUB.
All the time he'd be trying to
say something about
"unemployment insurance
welfare bums" but he never
finished. His eyelids would
droop and then they'd fall shut
and we'd never hear what was
coming. I heard he went into
the SUB auditorium because
he'd booked it or something but
apparently he just sat in the
audience while they introduced
him and when they turned the
spotlight on him he just
mumbled a few words in his
sleep and it made headlines in
the evening paper. Weird, eh?
ERROL FLYNN
Dentistry 2
Uncanny
We wish to commend the
bookstore on its uncanny
ability to secret required
textual materials. Not
everything is hidden yet,
however, so that we advise
anyone to hurry over who
needs a licence-plate bracket,
T-shirt, coffee mug, jock-strap,
or souvenir postcard . . .
GORDON TURRIFF
RANDY ZIEN
DAVE MARTIN
AL MCDONNELL
Law II.
THE FOOD SCIENCE SOCIETY PRESENTS
DR. S. KIMOTO
JOEL, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan
"SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON
MICROSCOPY"
Thursday, September 28, 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.
Room 158, MacMillan Building
International Book Year 1972
Storewide   BOOK SALE
20-80% OFF- SEPT. 29-0CT. 7
Canadiana
Socio-economic
History
Art Books
• Children's Books
• Prints, Posters
• Russian Language Books
• Records, Poetry, etc.
PEOPLE'S CO-OP
BOOKSTORE
341 West
Pender, 685-5836
FEATURES:
MOSCOW— Architecture and Monuments —
by M. Ilyin Regular $4.50, SALE PRICE $2.95
THE IDIOT—  Fyodor  Dostoyevsky —  2   volumes —
150th Anniversary Gift Edition.
Regular $8.50 2 vols. SALE PRICE $3.95
STORIES— Fyodor Dostoyevsky — 150th
Anniverary Gift Edition. Reg. $4.25, SALE PRICE $1.95
A WHALE FOR THE KILLING — Farley Mowat. (His
other books also in stock) Reg. $6,95, SALE PRICE $5.55
SCALING THE OLYMPUS — Marat Shishigin — Pictorial
History of the U.S.S.R.'s participation
in the Olympics. 495 pages large photographic Album.
Regular $27.95, SALE PRICE $15.00
ANGELA DAVIS: If They Come In The Morning . . .
— by Angela Davis, Ruchell Magee, Soledad Brothers, and other
Political Prisoners. Reg. $135, SALE PRICE.$.75
The engineers invite
oil girls on compus to:
ANOTHER
"GARDEN DANCE"
in the S.U.B. ballroom
on Friday, Sept. 29 at 8:00 p.m.
Featuring: another great band
Free Passes for Girls Fri. Noon in SUB
Admission at Door: $1.00
A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATION
A Film from Igmar Bergman
'SKAMMEN'
- SHAME
Thurs. 28th 7:00
Friday 29th & Thursday 30th 7:00 & 9:30
Sunday Oct. 1, 3:00
SUB AUD.   50'
CAMPUS MINISTRY   ^«|
Anglican-United-Lutheran  beginning Oct. 2
Radicalism & Biblical Thought— G. Her.manson. A
construction of ethical framework based on biblical
and political concepts of liberation, power, and
commonity.    Wed   noons Qr Thurs 3.30
Gospel Perspectives on Jesus—Charles Anderson views
about Jesus, his views about God, discipleship
ressurection jues 12:30
Growth Group —D. Johnson. An opportunity to
explore the dynamics of relating in a group. Learning
occurs through experience.
Wed. 3:30
Old Testament—P.  Fribley and C. Armerding. 5 topics
to be probed like Abraham and election — Moses and
Exodus to  help one to  see the Old Testament as a
resource for today    Tues. at 4.30
To sign up ph. 224-1614 or come
to the Lutheran Campus Centre
SCIENCE ELECTIONS
Nominations are now open for the following Science Undergraduate Society executive positions, and close on the 29th of
September (this Friday). The nomination for one of the following
positions should be submitted together with the signatures and
student numbers of ten (10) nominators to Box 178, SUB.
• ATHLETIC CO-ORDINATOR
• PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
• SOCIAL CO-ORDINATOR
Election (if necessary) will be held
on Friday, 6 October.
THE S.U.S. PRESENTS
DR. R. KUCERA
Showing   the   Best   Canadian  Science  Film  of   1971,
"What Happens at the Front of a Glacier."
12:30 Wed., Sept. 27 Hennings 200 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1972
Residents protect children
By LARRY MANULAK
Monday night Acadia Camp
residents did what they claim
the Housing Administration
should have done long ago.
They claim that there is a
traffic hazard to the more than
100 children in the area, and
they put up their own traffic
signs.
Maureen Moore, president of
Acadia Camp Householders
Society, admitted that they
were unsightly and would
probably be torn down by
morning. "But," she said,
"they are preferable to no
signs at all." She said they
were an attempt to counteract
the inaction of the Housing
Administration.
Moore said they want
Housing to put up fences in the
area or to stop through traffic.
They have asked for speed
bumps but the fire department
said they are illegal on a public
road. She said this summer a
child was hit by a car on Tennis
Crescent and the car did not
stop. Though the boy was
unhurt, his mother protested to
the assistant director for
family housing. Speed bumps
were installed the next day.
,. Housing director Les
Rohringer said Monday he has
not heard of this accident and
would be interested in finding
out the details.
Moore said a survey of
Acadia Camp residents showed
that 85 per cent favor lockable
barriers at the corners of
Fairview and Acadia and at
President Row and Acadia.
They will be meeting with the
housing administration
Tuesday to discuss this
proposal.
Moore said that the only
action from the housing administration until now has
been to fence one playground
in the area — after a year of
negotiations. Rohringer said
that all but two of the
playgrounds are away from
any traffic. Of these two, one
on the corner of Presidents
Row, has been fenced for about
nine years. The one on Tennis
Crescent has been fenced for
two years and this summer the
fence has been extended to
include property not part of the
playground.
Moore said that all the UBC
traffic office can do is hand out
parking tickets. She said the
Society wrote to the RCMP and
the action they got was to have
a police car parked at the blind
corner of Acadia and Fairview
twice for about an hour each
time.
Moore said that until some
action is taken "we would very
much appreciate people not
using the Acadia-Fairview
route to the Winter Sports
Centre parking lot."
FORESTRY
Presents
THE UNDERCUT
Saturday, Sept. 30th - Full Fac.
SUB Cafeteria
8:30-1:00
$3.50 Couple
Dress Hard Times
Tickets: In SUB
or from MacMillan Building
Maclnnis hit for age, beliefs
A first-year law student contesting Grace
Maclnnis's riding in the Oct. 30 election claims
he could beat Maclnnis because of her age and
her "extremist" beliefs on women's liberation.
Although John Cherrington says he has only a
40-per -cent chance of victory, he does believe
certain factors favor him over the experienced
New Democratic Party MP:
"Grace Maclnnis is getting old. Also her
extremist views on women's lib hurt her."
Cherrington's views on women's liberation
are: "In certain areas improvements can be
made. For instance there should be equal pay
for equal work, equal opportunities for
professional training. Also in the area of
daycare, improvements are needed."
But he said: "Women should not be encouraged to work if they have children."
"I have deliberately copied NDPJactics. The
campaign is a grass roots effort. Most of the
staff in the campaign are young, many are
trade union members. There are few
professionals.
"The issues of the campaign are economic,"
says Cherrington. "The single most important
issue is unemployment."
' 'The Conservatives are also concerned with
the denial of civil rights, suppression of
minorities, the spiralling crime rate. Economic
rights too are being attacked. Look at the
taxation of middle-income groups, or the
hardship levied on small businesses."
SUB
Open every day
for your enjoyment
Concession Desk
Films — Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday
Games Room — Billiards and Bowling every day
Games Room Annex — Skill Games
'Pit' — Monday through Friday
Co-Op — used text books and handicraft
Cinema 16, CYVR, Ubyssey, Photosoc, Filmsoc,
Speakeasy, Travel Service, Business Office, Bookings
Outdoors Clubs
Cafeteria, College Shop, Bank, Barbershop
(P.S. Tenders have been called for renovations to
Lounge and Music Room — delayed by construction
strike — hope to open by Christmas).
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY LTD.
5754 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
224-3202
FREE DELIVERY
DUO TANGS
EXTRA
SPECIAL
_______■ \mWea.
VITAMIN
SPECIAL
ONE MONTH'S SUPPLY
PARDEC
TO SUPPLEMENT YOUR DIET
SPECIAL   1.98
THIS WEEK ONLY
VITAMINS ARE ESSENTIAL
TO GOOD HEALTH
BRECK
ONE
Dandruff Shampoo
SPECIAL   1.99
Idu       (ju       rfb       (ju       tft>       (ft       <n»       (j>       (jj»       (&C&I
I      USE THIS COUPON      *
$        AS A | $r°°| BILL •
$ When Purchasing $1000 worth of $
$ Toiletries — Cosmetics $
$ and School Supplies $
ONE$   $$$$$$   $ONE
24oz-
LISTERINE
Plus Toothbrush
2.98 value  ,   rfx
1.69
value
for
SAVE MONEY
on Prescriptions.
Bring in
your drug
subsidy card.
SCOTCH
TAPE
SPECIAL
Reg.
49c
3/1.09
STUDENT HEADQUARTERS
for
PIPES — TOBACCO — LAMPS
CLOCKS — PENGUIN BOOKS
TOTE BAGS
AND U.B.C. UMBRELLAS
LOOSE-
LEAF
REFILLS
Value Pack
SPECIAL
Reg. $1.29
99
Ask about
your
FREE
ASHTRAY Here's to Canada
The land of the free
Where a bird in the hand
Is worth two in the trees.
THE PLANK
Hut if in the bush
A lair maiden should stanc
A push in the bush
Is worth two in the hand.
Vol. 41
STUMPVILLE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1972
Mo.  4sTree
Summer experience in the Nitinat
Nitinat Lake is located
almost directly southwest of
Nanimo on the west coast of
Vancouver Island. It is a
combined fresh- and salt-water
lake. Since this lake opens out
into the Pacific Ocean the top
ten-foot layer is salt water. The
lower layer is 'still' water
supplied only by mountain
streams. The top layer
provides an abundance of
ocean livifig creatures while
the lower layer is noted mainly
for its fresh-water fish. Also,
due   to   the   opening,   which
contains sand bars, the lake is
closed off to the Pacific Ocean
during low tides. Therefore,
there is justification for this
body of water being called a
lake, not an inlet.
During the first two months
of this summer, I was employed as a compassman-topo-
grapher in a timber cruising
party. My job involved
directing the cruiser through
the woods on a previously
defined course, as well as
drawing a topographical map
of the area. The cruiser's job is
to follow me as best as possible
and record data about
reflected trees so that a
statistical inference can be
made as to the types of trees,
their volume, and their disease
in that particular area of the
forest. These combined and
coordinated compassing and
cruising positions are two
enjoyable jobs, especially
when each worker enjoys
looking at trees and truthfully
believes 'Wood is good.'
Contrary to popular notions
among certain individuals
belonging to certain clubs, thev,
Nitinat Lake Triangle forest is
not the most enjoyable, easily
accessible wilderness area or
picnic ground in North
America. As wilderness area
lor public use the forest is not
easily accessible from Nitinat
Lake or various logging roads
without caulked boots. It was
once stated that a person could
enter the forest with tennis
shoes. This person might leave
(he forest with a broken ankle
or at least a tired body from
*-";!"._'     ';-4^4*^"'
,*c*^*i^"*
r%*r    .__,
,£#^.r.-« &*
'"^^"*^^S-    Mm*
•. |I; '&b- #
>W*. t
AVERAGE FORESTERS spend the summer in an office like this. Notice the size of the water cooler. The absence of trees should preferably
not be noticed.
Hodge-podge view
Despite what you may read on the
business pages of your daily newspapers,
forestry in B.C. is ridden with problems.
While the companies are still able to
consistently declare annual dividends, the
forest industry is plagued today by attacks from without and dissatisfaction
from within. Unfortunately, the circumstances under which this industry
functions in B.C. are almost as complex
as the biological inter-workings of the
forest itself, and no simple solution will
ever be found to satisfy all the ills.
People usually enter the field of forestry
through an interest in the outdoors; there
are one hell of a lot of ex-boy scouts in the
Faculty Forestry right now. They
generally respect the forest as "a delicate
ecosystem easily prone to damage and
deserving of rational treatment if its wood
is to be consistently re-harvested on a true
sustained yield basis. Many of those
entering forestry even go so far as to
elevate  the  forest  to  an  unassailable
position, wherein logging (or harvest of
the resource, as it's often cleverly called)
shouldn't be practised at all. A lot of these
individuals modify their stance, perhaps
by realization of the values wasted by not
intelligently utilizing the forest, or maybe
simply by being worn down by four years
of professional education and contact with
the industry proper. The ones who
maintain a steadfast viewpoint of guarding the forest are invariably dissap-
pointed. Obviously, a company's interests
can't agree with those of a person committed to stopping commercial exploitation in the forest, so he'll be first
frustrated by a lack of employment.
Secondly, he'll probably be disheartened
by the magnitude, extent, and intensity of
this commercial endeavor.
All is not lost, however; the ecological
awakening in society as a whole has not
left the Faculty of Forestry untouched;
this year enrollment in the First Year
class is approximately 60% higher than
last year, and an unusually high number
of students have expressed interest in the
biological and wildlife aspects of forestry.
Surely many of these will be disappointed
in the manner already described, but
hopefully enough will finish their degrees
and enter the profession with at least a
vestige of their original principles. This
will eventually, of necessity, change the
practice of forestry in B.C. Already,
students in their summer jobs find that
their opinions and attitudes conflict with
those of their superiors, perhaps
graduated only six or seven years ago.
Hard economic realities may force the
students to soften their objections, but
basic attitudes are changing and
hopefully will remain changed. The odd
industrial forester is worried by the
students' attitude and condemns the
education that we receive, totally
ignoring the fact that the student usually
enters forestry with his- new ecological
See page 4: ILLS
walking over slippery waist-
high forest undergrowth. The
Nitinat forest has its beauty
though with its high mountain
lakes and extremely old trees.
But this environment can be
enjoyed by the public only if
proper recreational facilities
such as marked hiking trails
and picnic sites are provided or
in other words only with the
provision of 'best-use' forestry
techniques.
The major forest company
which harvests the Nitinat
forest is, and will be in the
future, implementing best-use
forestry techniques. This
company is known widely
because of its logging
operations and forest products.
Its past logging technique was
at one time quite acceptable
but is now considered a 'no-no'
for logging present-day
multiple-use forests. Lately
though this company has taken
a mature modern attitude
towards the use of today's
forest crops. Besides logging
the forest, the company
provides good permanent
roads and roadside picnic sites
and campsites so that the
public can use the forest to its
fullest advantage. In the
J'uture, its new methods of
logging will involve strip-
logging as compared to the old
clearcut method. This method
will leave behind tree stands
and hills which will not be as
visually scarred as others were
in the past. This method of
logging will be a new step
forward towards the implementation of modern
forestry practice.
Upon leaving the Nitinat
Lake area for another location
on Vancouver Island I was
leaving a small logging camp
at the edge of the lake and only
accessible by ferry. It was a
camp where on a normally
bright sunny day a person
could not see too far because of
the regular coast fog blanket.
Its beach was a trap for driftwood and purple jelly-fish
washed up after a mid-summer
storm.
With these fond memories, I
will surely return someday to
wooded Nitinat Lake.
R.K.W.—The'Phantom'
Wanted
WANTED — A man for hard
work and rapid promotion; a'
man who<can find work to do
without fie help of a manager
and three assistants; a man to
get to work on time in the
morning, and doesn't imperil
the lives of others in an effort
to be first out of the office at
night; a man who is neat in
appearance; a man who
doesn't sulk for an hour's
overtime in emergencies; a
man who listens carefully
when spoken to and asks only
enough questions to insure
accurate carrying out of instructions; a man who looks
you straight in the face and
tells the truth every time; a
man who moves quickly and
makes as little noise as
possible about it; a man who
doesn't pity himself for having
to work. APPLY ANYWHERE
— the world is searching for
such men. Page 2
THE PLANK
Tuesday, September 26, 1972
THE PLANK
The Plank, winner of S.F.A., is published by the
Forest Club once a year in conjunction with Forestry
Week, the culmination of which is "UNDERCUT". All
opinions expressed are solely those of members of the
Forest Club who claim to represent nobody else although
they often do. Please do not praise or blame the Ubyssey
or its staff for the contents of our paper as they are
innocent of all involvement. We would, however, like to
thank them for their assistance and cooperation in layout
and printing.
Random
ravings
This is the local defamation corner of our illustrious
Forest Club "Plank", the newspaper that would have won
all university press awards if it had not been for other rags
lobbying to prevent us from being viewed by the judges.
However, we are not jealous of others and to show it, we
are allowing the Ubyssey to include our supplement in this
paper, thereby upgrading their paper as we do once every
year.
While we are talking about the Ubyssey, I would like
to pose a question. When are they going to quit allowing
their financial quarrels with the A.M.S. to interfere with
total factual reporting. Referring to the upcoming pool
referendum, several facts about our involvement in cost
sharing that were brought up in the A.M.S. council
meeting were either sloughed over or blatantly ignored in
their recent article. Surely, the A.M.S. has enough bad
points to degrade it without using some pry that effects
the stu dents f i na nc ia 11 y.
Now that we have drifted around to the A.M.S., I was
extremely impressed at a recent council meeting I
attended. They processed at least forty minutes of valuable
work. It's too bad it took them 3V* hours. Discussion
periods roamed into a question-counter question session
which several times went full circle to again reach the
original question. It seems that some members were so
worried about their own questions that they did not listen
to the answers to others' questions. Voting was absolutely
unreal. Only once was a count taken and only then when
the vote was challenged. Typically most members did not
even vote and it looked like the president never bothered
to count, but just repeated, "All in favour... against.. .
abstain... pass". The council's theme song should be
"railroad".
Handbook
The Forestry faculty, both students and staff, have
for. the third time since 1956 put out an edition of a
reference book that is used throughout the world as the
bible for foresters. The 815 pages have chapters on Forest
Resource Management, Forest Ecology, Silviculture,
Forest Protection, Forest Measurement, Forest Harvesting,
Wood Products, and General Information and the text is
required for U.B.C; B.C.I.T., and Malaspina and Selkirk
Colleges. Direct inquiries to the Forest Club, McMillan
Building will get you one of these beautiful little gems. If
you are plagued with long sleepless nights and you are not
gifted with any outlets to the standard sleep inducers like
booze, sex, 'Sominex', or 'Night-All', try a couple of pages
of the handbook. Guaranteed!
The forester
Ethics! Friddlesticks
And the douglas-fir grew
Till the axes flew in the year 02
And all went well as the douglas-fir fell
Cause people never thought
That the land could be bought
And they would be caught
With just what they got.
Things didn't change as the years passed the door
Cause the cutting was more
And people adored all the things from the store
And to their children
They passed the land
Burned as a brand
Dried as the sand
Sold to the man, Uncle Sam
He gave us his hand,
And he smiled all the while
As a crook to a child.
So the children we cried
As our fathers had lied
About the good life were in
T'was theirs to begin
To make ruins of
For the sake of their God
When Money was King.
The modern university graduate in forestry is involved
in all aspects of management of forest land and the
forest environment. After a period of suitable practical
experience, most university graduates are deeply involved
tn the development of policy and plans relating to forest
land management. In earlier times the forester was
primarily responsible for logging and fire protection.
Although he may still be involved in these needs
today,    he    is   also    intimately   associated   with   the
See page 4: THE FORESTER
Now as a man
You can choose your stand
Editwhore: T. S. Ellios jror now its your land
Nudes Toncas      To buy or to sell
C*Y ■■LapJ.?i     To deal to the devil
g£te      neF^r        And buy back in hel1
Sports '"'.".'.  &s.      F°r the half of your worth.
Managing Junyah
£*£A ■ jD™%%     You're making me blue
Moth* ! '. '.'.'.'.'.'.'".".'.'.'.'.'.'.".    . .Burke        ^ the things that you do
others others     As the young always say
mM^^imsstszm^^vxM:,*?.^ mmnsmm When we can't get our way
Fools persevere in our age
Praising the ways of your days
They too scream and shout
To secure without doubt
A skyscraper tall
For the progress of all
Who still heed the call
That money is all.
If you look around
At what's to be found
But don't let yourself be pulled down
By a clown with a crown.
And you stand in his gaze
The crowd is ablaze
With the hate for your kind
You didn't think they would mind
If you tried for their sake
To expose this fake.
But don't ask for fame
Only seek shame
If you enter the game
It's yourself you mustntame.
As your children grow old
Their words grow bold
They turn cold against the old
And when you've died
You might say that you lived and you've tried.
Can you pass on with pride?
Or did you just try
To grab all in sight
For the coming flight
From your own blight.
Now I'm really uptight
Bout your might and what is right
Hope that some fright
Brings light to our night.
M. FENGER Tuesday, September 26, 1972
THE PLANK
Page 3
Forestry Week a big splash
YES! It's Forestry Week at U.B.C. once
again. The Super Trees have pulled out their
roots and are stalking the compass.
Again we are offering instruction on hand-
logging sports in front of S.U.B. all this week.
On Thursday, those bathing queen beauties in
Home-Ee and Nursing will be on hand to entertain you at Empire Pool. Friday, it's merry
making day in front of S.U.B. when we
challenge the Boat Racing teams to a duel. This
year the event is under the careful supervision
of our infamous "Loyal Order of the Browns",
to ensure there is no excessive spillage etc.
Saturday night, Forestry Week will be
climaxed by Undercut.
If you want to really enjoy a dance on
campus this year, this is the one. Don't miss it
and bring your friends!
DAY PLACE EVENT
Today SUB Mall       Axe Throwing
Chokerman's Race
Wednesday SUB Mall       Double Bucking
Single Bucking
Thursday    Empire Pool Log Burling
Boomstick Race
(Home Ec vs
Nursing)
Friday       SUB Mall      Boat Races
Animals mismanage woods
I was working this summer with a cruising
party, somewhere on the mainland near the
northern tip of Vancouver Island. Cruising is
the art of wandering around in the woods
measuring trees so that logging companies or
the Forest Service can estimate wood volume
per acre. One day we were walking along and
one of us spotted a deer.
"Christ, I wish I had my gun!" he said.
It turned out that that was the only deer we
saw in the area in thirty-seven days. And he
wanted to kill it.
I know, and like, the feeling, of pulling a
trigger and having something blown to ... In
my opinion there is no tomato can like a dead
tomato can. However, I cannot comprehend
the attitude of "If it moves, shoot it!"
To me it is logical to leave the deer alone
and perhaps see it another day, or give
someone else an opportunity to see it.
Something that has always puzzled me is
now hunters who use vehicles such as boats,
motor cycles, airplanes and skidoos justify
their hunting techniques. The technique is
usually to chase the animal until it drops from
exhaustion, then shoot it. Most hunters do not
compare to bears, moose, wolves, deer or
other animals they shoot in stamina, speed
and general woodsmanship. So they take
along equalizers like telescopic gun sights and
motorized vehicles. I don't know if they still
call hunting a sport.
Actually, I'm glad for the existence of this
type of hunter. These assholes are giving
hunting such a bad name that an editorial in
"B.C. Outdoors" predicted the demise of
hunting within ten years.
Some people say, "Why not kill? There's
lots more of them out there." Perhaps it was
this attitude that has left the United States
with about three eagles. Isn't that a riot. It's
their national symbol and they have almost
killed them all off.
Maybe it seems funny that a forester is
concerned about our wildlife when it appears
as though he is dedicated to cutting down and
burning up forest habitats. A forester
however, almost by definition, is also
dedicated to the regeneration of forests. Tall
trees seldom have branches close to the
ground, and therefore this energy source is
inaccessible to most animals. When trees are
cut down, light and nutrients are made
available for growth of blueberries,
huckleberries, salmon berries, as well as
trees. A far greater food source is then accessible to wildlife.
Getting back to hunters, I would like to
know what it is that makes them tick. Where
does the desire to kill come from? Logic
suggests that if you leave the animal alone
you will be able to enjoy it again later. Killing
for food does not make too much sense these
days. Meat prices are high, but so are hunting
costs and risks. One can live well without
meat anyway. The desire to kill must be a
drive that lies deeper than logic. In time,
perhaps, this drive will determine part of the
future of British Columbia. Did anyone notice
what happened to all the Indians who used to
manage things around here.
This article was not written
by our illustrious sport's rep
due to the fact he was up at the
playing fields searching for his
jock. Seems that he went the
wrong way while covering his
check in a football game, and
was left with his pants down.
Actually, the great Green
Machine is rolling over all
competition     once     again.
Green machine rolling again
Taking our cue from International hockey, the Forest
Club has imported
professionals to bolster our
already strong teams.
In fact, our scouts and
recruiting system could give
the extramurals an example.
So far we have recruited
gorillas for football (no
lineman under 225 lbs.)  and
giants for basketball. Many of
our hockey stars and curlers
have returned from a year out,
so far north that all they could
do was practice all year. Our
efforts to sign Bobbling Ore
have run into legal proceedings
with the N.H.L. at this
moment. Our curling squads
are only using U.B.C. as a
practice area before going to
FORESTRY GIRLS prove victorious in boom-stick race. Event will
be held Thursday at noon in Empire Pool.
the briars.
From our own ranks we have
enlisted the greatest assortment of superstars yet. Mean
Meehan, Slippery Silviera,
Young Oak Tree Doubchek,
Leaping Lap, Wrecking Week
and Jerking Jones costipate
only a few of our athletes. Our
hamburgar teams will again
demonstrate the showmanship
like aspect at all our games.
This fearless group will hold
practices one half hour before
each game at the Fraser Arms
Bar. Here they will have to
down ten beer while running
forty laps around the pub.
Anytime the pink pansies want
to take us on in an automobile
race, we will mobilize our
expert drivers, our big pig
(hopefully), and "Pit" crew
(yes, the same Pit) who
alternate their time between
the Forestry building and the
Grand Prix sites in Europe.
Yes! Most certainly, the Green
Machine is a threat to all this
year. B.S.
FOREST CLUB PRESENTS
UNDERCUT '72
DRESS - HARD-TIMES
BAND - SHYLOCK
TICKETS - $3.50/COUPLE
Full Facilities  SUB CAFETERIA
SATURDAY, SEPT. 30
8:30 P.M.-1:00 A.M.
t Page 4
THE PLANK
Tuesday, September 26, 1972
Ills from within
Undercut '72
Once again the Forest Club is providing you less fortunates
at U.B.C. with the opportunity to experience the UNDERCUT.
Contrary to popular opinion girls are not ravished at Undercut unless it is by their own free will. Thus, for the benefit of
all U.B.C. chicks the Forest Club will be providing a limitless
supply of FREE WILLS at UNDERCUT. As such, if any girls
should decide to bring their own Free will we must ask them to
have it checked in at the door to assure that he meats the high
standard of hygiene and quality that the Forest Club maintains.
Undercut will kick off this year on Sept. 30 at 8:30 p.m. in
the S.U.B. Cafeteria. It is rumored that this year's UNDERCUT
will far exceed previous years in both quantity and quality of
horror shows, orgies and just plain good times. So come out and
let yourself go to the sounds of SHYLOCK at the 1972 UNDERCUT.
Dear Jack, Forestry's
answer to Ann Slanders
Because of popular demand
the Forest Club is once again
presenting their '73 "Dear
Jack" column, with your
friendly advisor in personal
affairs: Mr. Jack Pine.
Dear Jack,
I am in 2nd Year
Engineering and have a very
personal problem which I
cannot disclose to my parents
or my peers for fear of ridicule.
It seems that I have developed
a double hernia and a blistered
right thumb from masturbating. What should I do and
how can I prevent this from
occurring again?
Signed — Concerned Gear
Dear Gear,
Your problem is actually a
fairly common one amongst
Engineers. This phenomenon
stems from the poor
techniques which are
displayed to young members of
your faculty during their
orientation. Because of the
average size of their "members", Engineers have
traditionally used the thumb
and one forefinger method
when masturbating.
The possibility exists,
however, that your member
exceeds that of the average
gear in size and as such, you
should deviate from the
techniques suggested by your
classmates.
I could suggest that you try
the "two handed" technique
popular amongst sciencemen.
However, should this prove
ludicrous, I might direct your
attention     to     a      recent
development of which
Foresters have known since
puberty but which your faculty
has not yet been exposed. It
seems that God took a rib from
Adam and made Eve . . .
Signed: Jack Pine
Classified
LOST: Frat rat pin. Some girl on
campus is running around with my
Frat pin. Have lost my identity and
feel insecure without it. Phone
George at the I Felta Thi House.
RIDE WANTED: To Spanish Banks on
Friday nights for evening lectures in
Astronomy, submarine observation-
and other things. Contact Q. Gear
Eng. I.
WANTED: Expert Cheeseburger maker
for Sub Caf. Contact Head Chef in
Student Union Building.
LOST: One Dean vicinity of McMillan
Building. If found contact Head of
Goon Squad E.U.S. Building.
Continued from page 1
awareness already intact;
education more often supplements it than actually
changing it.
The forestry student is given
a very thorough and complete
education in all of the sciences
dealing with the forest. He is
taught to think of himself as a
true professional, with duties
and responsibilities that such a
title would entail. Unfortunately, this area gives
rise to a second source of
discontent; the forestry
student all too often graduates
and enters the field only to find
his professional skills pretty
much unneeded. While the
forestry engineer may find
good uses for his abilities, the
practise of "timber mining"
rather than the employment of
good forestry practises in vast
areas of 'this province
discourages the application of
many forestry skills. The
responsibilities of the forestry
profession are clearly understood and set forth in
publications        of such
organizations as the B.C.
Association of Registered
Professional Foresters, the
Canadian Institute of Forestry,
etc. But all too often these
publications read more like
joke   books   to   the   rtewly
graduated student who finds'
few of the principles really
applied.
The new employee is then
left with a number of unhappy
alternatives; he can be
seduced by the industry into
science, he can leave the field
altogether, or he can opt for
change. Of these, the first is
perhaps the easiest, and the
last the hardest, but it is hoped
that more and more people will
choose the last, and fewer and
final word on this aspect of
forestry; not all who graduate
are unhappy. Certainly, there
are a lot of happy people in
forestry, and hopefully their
interests won't conflict with
any movement towards change
in the profession.
So much for the ills (or
fanciful ills) from within.
Foresters have long functioned
as an elite group and, until
very recently, had little occasion to deal with the public at
large. As a result communications between the industry and the people have
become progressively worse
until, on the whole, the
profession doesn't know how to
deal with the sudden pressures
of public scrutiny into commercial activities on what the
people consider a public
resource, the forest. The
public, on the other hand, often
refuses the basic right of a
company to earn a profit and
constantly holds the forest
companies in low regard
simply because they've turned
a profit in the forest. The
problem, of course, isn't
helped by hypocritical companies screaming about their
"ecological awareness" when
they build one tiny campsite on
their lands, or rough out one
simple hiking trail. Such crap
is rejected by the people, and
the industrial elements
honestly wonder why. What is
needed is greater honesty and
responsibility — on both sides.
If companies would
acknowledge their debt to the
forest and repay it with
responsible forest practices,
and if the people would admit
the right of a company to a
profit and respect the incredible investments in the
forest that these companies
have made, harmony or a
semblance of it, at least, may.
yet be achieved. But communications must improve;
the two groups, the public and
the industry (in the person of
professional foresters) must
learn to discuss the problems
rationally, without having the
public on the attack constantly,
and without the foresters
inevitably throwing up a solid
wall of unyielding defense.
Trees
Trees litter beaches but float on the water in such graceful shapes as Intepid and Gretel.
Their limbs have given Emily Carr inspiration and made widows of loggers wives.
They have made barrels for wine that had been drunk under the bough with thou.
They have been carved into totem poles and roped into hanging trees.
Trees have been made into lecterns for preaching and stakes for burning heretics.
Trees make the houses we live in and provide the paper for eviction notices.
Trees have been worshipped and cursed but dogs prefer them to fire hydrants.
They can provide the heart of a home in the fireplace or an inferno for square miles.
They are home for bird and squirrel and small boys.
They are the butts for rifles and the splints for wounded.
Trees give us shade, fruits, perfume and the matchsticks that can mean their own destruction.
They have made fences, stockades,  battering rams, horses of Troy and the ships that were
launched by a face.
They absorb impurities in the air and get in the way of those who would blacktop the world.
They are slashed away for the steel trees carrying power and burned in great heaps, blackening
the sky and fouling the air.
They boost the gross national'product, keep B.C. Green in money, provide jobs and homes and
the paper on which to appeal for more respect for the trees.
An appeal for much greater reforestation — let us save them in the city.
Let us plant more of them. Let us consider trees before sidewalks.
They seem to have done us more good than we have done them harm.
Peace to the trees — especially in our town.
DESPERATE: I pine for a steady
boyfriend and will balsam for
anyone.
Nim Fo Maniac
FOR SALE: Forestry student has Al
Sivics text, notes, assignments and
pillow. See Wayne, For IV.
The Forester
Continued from page 2
management of the forest environment for water, forage,
wildlife and recreation. He must be keenly aware of the
overall public interest and of his responsibility to hand
over the land and its resources unimpaired to the next
generation.
He works now with people as much as he does with
wood, and he has to live as much of his life for the future
as he does in the present, trying to fit his technology and
management to the future social and economic needs of
society. He is likely to be as much at a desk as he is in the
woods and to be as familiar with a computer as he is with a
water bomber.
These are demanding requirements. Foresters must
have a social conscience allied with a strong streak of
realism.
UNDERCUT TICKETS
On sale at—all Forestry Functions
— booth in SUB
12:30-1:30 all this week
—Forestry Draggin' Waggin'
(Fubar—the Green Machine)
—any true Forester
Ed Note—only 200 left as of printing date, so get yours now and
have a hell of a good time. Tuesday, September 26,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC STUDENT Errol Flynn got more involved Friday than his apathetic self usually
allows. He was just sitting there in the SUB conversation pit minding his own
swashbuckles and dreaming dreams of the high seas when a band called Soul began
singing about pirated songs and walking through the greensword. Errol's hearing isn't
as good as it once was and he had to get up and prove he still had what it takes.
—bruce west photo
Ideal school revolutionizes the middle
By LINDA HOSSIE
Revolutionary education took a new direction
with the opening of the Ideal School this month.
So far the movement from traditional education
has taken schools to the opposite extreme: from
rigid, authoritarian assembly line to an archaic
market place. The ideal school is slung, ideologically
somewhere in the middle.
Both school principal Gary Nixon and Bob Bacon,
chairman and "dubious pinnacle" of the Board of
Advisors, have taught in situations at both extremes.
Bacon admitted that he lasted "a term — no, a
month" in the free school situations.
"At least 75 per cent of the kids had absolutely no
interest in doing anything," Bacon says. "Many of
them were desperately disturbed. The school was so
unstructured and loose that things changed completely from day to day. It was aimless. Nothing was
being done."
"The idea that people respond to human kindness
and gentleness is a lovely idea, but it just isn't true.
Some children have been treated so badly by society
that when they are shown kindness by a faceless
institution they treat it as a whipping boy."
To be accepted as a student at the Ideal School,
you have to want to learn. You have to be willing to
work. No student is accepted unless he or she wants
to enroll.
Bacon admits that the school is not geared
towards all kids. Applicants had to undergo interviews during the summer to make sure that their
learning objectives matched the school's.
The staff, in turn, makes the commitment that no
student will be held behind his or her rate of
development, although teachers are already finding
it is hard to do, and no student will be made to feel
stupid. The teachers, as much as the students, must
wait to experience ioy in the students.
"I guess one thing we say at the school is "If you
don't waste our time, we won't waste yours'," Bacon
says.
The Ideal School makes no pretensions to being
unauthoritarian. Attendance at classes is compulsory (which in view of the fact that all the
students want to learn seems somewhat redundant),
and there is a set curriculum for each grade.
"Children like limits — it's good road curbside
justice. A way of showing concern," Bacon says.
The emphasis of the school's creativity lies in its
approach to learning. The classes are small and
informal. Students are encouraged to talk about their
ideas, to ask questions and to share their knowledge.
They are encouraged to enjoy their abilities and to
enjoy themselves.
Richard Holmes, one of the teachers, calls it the
"pleasure principle" in learning.
"The basic difference between this school and
others is the way jpeqple think about themselves,"
he says. "The school moves towards the kids and
meets their needs. In an ordinary school, you are
manipulated."
In his own classes Holmes obviously tries to meet
his students' needs. He is ah intense outgoing man.
His personal energy and enthusiasm are the impetus
of his teaching.
I attended the first class of a course he is teaching
based on the television series Civilisation. The
students' reserve vanished after ten minutes of
Holmes' encouragement. Their energy gathered
momentum in an almost visible relation to his. This
is the success of Holmes' teaching, and this is the
success the school wants and needs.
There is still some loosening up to be done in
teaching. In some of the classes the teachers
dominate the students' thinking. One of Holmes'
classes tried to arrive at a reason for studying
literature.
Holmes' reason was for the pleasure of it, but his
questioning was so directed that the students had no
room to explore their own reasons. They finally
settled for giving the answers they thought he
wanted.
Unless such a process of understanding involves
the students' own ideas and reasons, it is as pointless
as the traditional dogmatic approach to learning.
In spite of this there is a good feeling at the school.
There is the sense that this is what they have all been
waiting for: a chance to learn and exhange ideas on
an almost unlimited basis.
The electives range from Chinese and Russian to
French Cuisine to city planning to environmental
studies and on and on.
The school also gives B.C. government approved
courses from Grade 4812.
The teachers have been used to teaching unwilling students in classes that are so overcrowded
that communication is almost nil. Now they can use
their abilities creatively.
Students feel that their education is a matter of
real concern, not just a propaganda factory or a
means of keeping them off the street.
Everyone at the school can respond, not to human
kindness and gentleness particularly, but to human
concern and attention.
Certain things about the school may cause trouble
later on.
For one thing the classes are run by the individual
teachers. There is no unifying philosophy behind
them.
This could lead to isolation, especially in terms of
individual needs.
Arrangements for some students to do concentrations of study would have to be an exception
rather than a well integrated part of the system in
this kind of set up.
Lack of a student organization could lead to
problems for students who have trouble expressing
their criticism and needs. One grade ten student has
already noticed that class participation depends on
how self-confident and assertive, or how shy the
student is.
The school is housed in the old Vancouver Sausage
Factory at 16th and Willow. When it was being
rebuilt into classrooms some students contributed
weeks of their time working with the carpenters and
designers.
The majority of students, according to one who
helped, weren't involved, either through lack of
information of lack of initiative. This is the kind of
limitation the school may have to face in other areas.
There are ways open to the students to express
themselves. There is a "Bitch-box" in the student
lounge. Students are welcome to come to staff
meetings. Hopefully this openness and the mutual
respect behind staff student relations will keep many
potential problems from arising. With the school only
two weeks old it is still too early to tell.
In one of his classes Homles described the objective of the studies as "exploration, not perfection." This could easily be the objective of the
school as a whole: the exploration of a new approach
to education. There is no guarantee that Bacon and
Nixon have the ideal answer, but they do have ideals,
and now, the means to explore them. Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26,  1972
spend six
nights in
another
It's a world of entertainment that's quite unlike any
other. Because it comes to
life right before your eyes.
You're there — and you're
a part of it.
It's the world of the Playhouse Theatre Company.
And this year — our Tenth
Anniversary — it's better
than ever, with top actors,
directors and technicians
presenting some of the
most brilliant plays to be
found anywhere.
PLAYHOUSE 72/73
Oct. 16 ■ Nov. 4: FORTY YEARS ON
— a fast-paced satire by Alan Bennett, directed by Paxton Whitehead.
Nov. 13 - Dec. 2: HOW THE OTHER
HALF LOVES - a side-splitting
comedy by Alan Ayckbourn, author
of last season's hit "Relatively
Speaking".
Jan. 15 - Feb. 3: THE APPLE TREE
— an unusual musical evening by
the creators of "Fiddler on the
Roof".
Feb. 12 - Mar. 3: OLD TIMES - a
poetic study in nostalgia by Harold
Pinter.
Mar. 12-Mar. 31: PILLAR OF SAND
— a brand new spoof on religion,
politics and sex by Eric Nicol.
April 9 - April 28 - To be announced:
something special to round out our
Tenth Anniversary season.
Plus our Special Christmas Presentation TREASURE ISLAND.
(Subscribers receive box office-priority)
SPECIAL PRESEASON OFFER
• Six plays for as little as $17.50,
or as little as $12.25 matinees and
previews. (Ask about Special Student and Senior Citizen Prices.)
• Christmas Special box office
priority.
• Charge to your Bay account.
• A chance to win a new Datsun
1200, courtesy Brasso Datsun Ltd.
student   ...
tuesday $10
let complete details from
THE PLAYHOUSE THEATRE COMPANY
or FAMOUS ARTISTS BOX OFFICE,
The Bay, 4th Floor.  681-3351
SPECIAL DISCOUNT PRICES FOR SEASON SUBSCRIBERS
A
B
I         C
Reg.
Disc.
Reg.
Oisc.
Reg.
Disc.
Mats. &
Prevws
2f_8C
1900
18580
16 50
iStSb
1225
Mon -
Thurs eve.
2>CB
24 50
2>flb
21 75
19*D
17 50
Fri , Sat
evening
3(5*6   27 00
2fcflD
24 50
2>So
20 25
STUDENT a SENIOR CITIZE_>
BONUS PRICES
A
B
C
Mats  &
Prevws
10 50
9 00
6
00
Mon -Thur
evening
13 50
12 00
9 75
WISH TO ATTEND EACH PLAY ON:
CHECK CHOICE OF SEAT SECTION A □
SECTION B—Balcony □ Orchestra Q
SECTION C a
Not*: TIME CHANGES 'or the  1972-73 Season
Friday and Saturday Preview performances at 6 30 pm   Opening
Night   {1st  Monday),   at   7 30   p.m.   Thereafter   all  evening   performances   at  8:30  p.m..   with   Saturday  Matinees   at   2:30   p.m
Student
Tues. S10
8:30 D
Friday
Preview
8:30 C.
Saturday
Preview
8:30 3
1st. Mon.
(Opening)
7:30 c
1st Wed
8 30 n
1st Thurs.
8:30 r.
1st Fri.
8:30  L)
1st Sat.
2.30 C
8:30  [__
2nd Mon.
8:30 n
2nd Wed.
8:30 ___.■
2nd Thurs.
8:30 n
2nd Fri.
8:30 [j
2nd Sat.
2:30 _;
8:30 C
3rd Mon.
8:30 □
3rd Wed.
8:30  D
3rd Thurs.
8:30 n
3rd Fri.
8:30 n
3rd Sat.
2:30 D
8:30 C
Charge to my BAY account No.
or
1 enclose my cheque or money order payable to
FAMOUS ARTISTS for $ to cover the cost ol:
No. of Adult Playhouse subscriptions        @ $
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NAME
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Mail to FAMOUS ARTISTS BOX OFFICE
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»
'3U   4th FLOOR,
VANCOUVER 1, B.C. Tuesday, September 26, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Enumerators out of line
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY
PRESS
OTTAWA — Canada's chief
electoral officer says
enumerators have stepped out
of line when they prevented
students from registering to
vote in their university constituencies.
J. M. Hamel said
enumerators "were going
beyond their terms of
reference" last week, when
they subjected University of
Western Ontario residence
students to lengthy interrogations about their independence from their
parents.
"I talked to the returning
officer in London West last
week, and I quoted from your
article what I had said: that it
was for the student to decide
where he considered his ordinary residence to be,"
Hamel told CUP. "Nothing in
the -Election Act authorizes
students to go through a
complete interrogation."
London West returning
officer John Kerr had said
single students living away
from home who wanted to vote
in London must declare
themselves independent of
their parents and be able to
prove it. By Sept. f6 only 285
residence students had been
enumerated out of a residence
population of more than 4000.
"There was a rumor that
students were going to be
subjected to a means tests,1'
Hamel said. "But we simply
cannot demand that. It is none
of our business where a student
gets financed. We don't care."
Hamel was unaware of a
similar problem at Devonshire
House, a professional students'
residence at the University of
Toronto.
Enumerators   have   told
Workers
sought
DOWNSVIEW (CUP) —
York University's part-time
college should recruit more
working class students, a
report to the dean from the
college's political science
students' union says.
The report recommends
that Atkinson College conduct
a recruiting program in factories and at union meetings,
and advertising in union
periodicals.
Dean Harry Crowe was
unavailable for comment.
The 17-page report was given
to Crowe in August and circulated to Atkinson political
science professors, with the
demand that a student-faculty
committee study it and suggest
a future course for Atkinson
"as a part-time institution of
higher learning for working
people."
The administration has
taken no action yet but the
student union meets this week
to discuss it.
Besides the recruitment of
workers, the report suggests
"more courses which are
relevant to industrial workers"
— such as class and race
relations, union history,
organization and structure,
and the literature, politics and
history of the working class in
Canada.
Atkinson should also sponsor
pre-university courses to
upgrade any worker students
who lack reading and writing
skills needed for university
work, the report says.
students that "accepting
money from parents means the
student must vote in the
parents' riding."
However, the local returning officer accepted Hamel's
statement to CUP, and said:
"We will make every endeavor
to ensure every student who
wants to vote here can."
By Sept. 16 students said
that only four of 80 students in
one residence wing had been
enumerated but the returning
officer said he didn't know
enumerators used improper
procedure.
"I am determined to allow
every student who wants to, to
vote here," he said. If
necessary, "I will ask the
authorities to extend the
enumeration period."
Hamel explained the
problems have occurred
because all 95,000 enumerators
across Canada couldn't be
expected to interpret
guidelines from his office in the
same way.
Although memoranda
which Hamel sent to local
returning officers drew a sharp
distinction between students
"away from home" and those
"on their own", the chief
electoral officer said his recent
statements do not represent a
retreat from an earlier policy.
"The only additional
question we can ask a student
is whether he would be willing
to declare his university
residence to be his ordinary
residence under oath on
election," he said.
Under the new Canada
Elections Act students no
longer have the choice of being
enumerated at their parents'
home riding and where they
live while at university. Instead, they may vote by proxy
in their parents' riding if they
cannot appear on election day
or for the advanced poll.
Hamel denied reports that
proxy voting procedure is
cumbersome. He said students
can pick up both Form 47, the
proxy form, and a statement
from their university registrar
certifying their status as
students at the registrar's
office. They must mail the
completed forms to the proxy
voter in the parents' riding,
who then must take them to the
local returning officer. Only a
person registered to vote in the
same polling division can act
as a student's proxy voter.
From the student's end "the
whole thing could be taken
care of in less than five
minutes", Hamel claims.
whiti tower mitct
* SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD,
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Mon. -Thurs.
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Fri. - Sat.
11 a.m. -4 a.m.
Sun.
11 a.m. -1 a.m.
TAKE OUT ORDERS tsmgx
HOME DELIVERY    738-9520
DINING
LOUNGE
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3618#. Broadway'
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738-1113'
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HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
I 3123 West Broadway
738-3211
STUDENTS & ADULTS
ADMISSION $1.00
1   Kirk Douglas
& Henry Fonda
September 25, 26, 22, 28, 29, 30
'FRIENDS"
Al <;n       Mature Audience
MLalJ  Show Time: 7:30 p.m.
"THERE WAS A CROOKED MAN"
Show Time: 9:25 p.m.
October 2-3-4-5-6-7 Nude Sex scenes
.f      Academy Award Winner A       "QIRLS IN Coarse Language
L   THE BIG DOLL HOUSE"
Richard Roundtree    Show Time      §       i^Q^ Show Time:
Moses Gunn 9:15 O   >Jr,!5s..J?J_^S-» 7:30 p.m.
Best Musical Score
'SHAFT"
10  -   11
12
13   -   14
October 9
Ali MacGraw a Ryan O'Neal
in "LOVE STORY"
sh'ow Time:    "TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN"
7:30 p.m. This showing Only $1.25
Show Time:
9:15 p.m.'
IMMMftMW
CANADA'S LARGEST CREDIT UNION
"Owned by the people it serves"
SAVINGS PLANS FOR EVERY MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
FIRST & SECOND MORTGAGE LOANS • STUDENT LOANS
CONSUMER LOANS • TRAVELLERS CHEQUES
THE LATE ST VAIlCiTH INTER EST RATES!
1     " -9 —i^___________________________________________________^^^_^_______^__^____________
Term Deposits
FIVE YEAR
Oa/O
Effective June 20, 1972
if Deposits of $500 or more
if Interest paid yearly
THREE YEAR
71%
Effective June 20, 1972
New!
Personal Chequing
if Interest paid quarterly
if Cheques personalized
without charge
i_r Cheque charge only 11c
if Statements and cancelled
cheques returned
Effective
July 1, 1971
4%
ONE YEAR
7%
Effective June 20, 1972
■fa Deposits of $500 or more
if Prior withdrawal at any time
futura
if Interest compounded
annually
if Deposits in $50 multiples
if Possible Income Tax
advantages
Effective
April 1, 1970
7%
PLAN 24
INTEREST CALCULATED
ON DAILY BALANCE
5a/o
Effective May 1, 1972
if Interest compounded
semi-annually
if Deposits   and   withdrawals
for any amount at any time
The Provincial Share
and Deposit Guarantee
Fund protects the
shares and deposits of
all individuals in every
credit union in British
Columbia.
VANCOUVER CITY SAVINGS CREDIT UNION
Serving the University Area
3295 West Broadway — Telephone 736-7451
•    FIVE OFFICES IN VANCOUVER AND WEST VANCOUVER    •
Hours of Business: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. / Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. / Closed Monday
WMEffDB Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1972
'Vfe"*'^'
Tween classes
TODAY
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist, Lutheran Campus Centre
Film on Everdale, noon, Educ. 100.
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice and registration, 4:30, SUB
ballroom.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 205.
CANOE & KAYAK CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 209.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
LTC, 7 p.m., SUB 205.
HILLEL
Learning   with   Rabbi   Hier,   noon,
Hillel House.
WEDNESDAY
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Al    Rimmer    on   "Education    and
Status Quo," noon, SUB 207.
YOUNG LIFE ALUMNI
Meeting, noon, SUB 211.
AMS
Student   Council   Meeting,   8   p.m.,
SUB 206.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Vancouver     Quadra     federal     all
candidates    meeting,     noon,    SUB
Auditorium.
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Ron  Polack  on Harmony with the
Life Process, noon, Buch. 216.
Quadra hopefuls
to speak
A meeting of all federal
candidates for Vancouver Quadra
will be held at noon Wednesday,
in the SUB auditorium, sponsored
by the Experimental College, the
meeting will feature Karl Burau as
chairman.
Got a banana?
Bob Stanfield, leader of the
national Progressive Conservative
Party will speak at noon today, in
the SUB ballroom.
AAC meet
The     Academic     Activities
Committee   is   holding  a   forum
LUTHERAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist,   noon, Lutheran Campus
Centre.
VOC
Meeting, noon, Angus 104.
SUS
Film: "What happens at the front of
a Glacier," noon, Hennings 200.
ABORTION ACTION
Ann Thompson on Abortion, noon,
SUB 213.
HILLEL
Hot Lunch, Learning Classes, noon,
Hillel House.
STUDENTS     WIVES     ASSOC.
Coffee Party, 8 p.m., Cecil Green.
THURSDAY
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Supper and discussion on education
and values, 5:30, Lutheran   Campus
Centre.
GAY LIBERATION
Meeting, Noon, SUB 213.
KARATE CLUB
Workout,      7:30,     Winter     Sports
Centre, Gym E.
ECKANAR
Introduction,       Organizational
Meeting,' 8 p.m., SUB 211.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square Dancing, noon-2:30, SUB 207.
LEON DEGRELLE OSTFRONT
TOURS SOCIETY
■ ,"■   '■"■■ * ■'~i'»:'H^'^-.—♦
Hot flashes
on the issues of the federal
election at noon Thursday, in
Buch. 100.
Speakers include Donald Blake,
assistant political science prof,
mathematics prof, Colin Clark,
and D. MacDonald, federal
candidate of the Communist Party
of Canada.
War     games     display,     10:30-2:30,
SUB 216.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Meeting,   8   p.m.,  1962 Acadia  Rd.
FRIDAY
WOMENS ACTION GROUP
, Organizational meeting, noon, Board
" room of Grad Student Centre.
STUDENT MOBILIZATION
Slide show: "The Automated War",
Ron   Johnson,   NDP   Candidate   in
Vancouver Centre, noon, SUB 125.
SKY DIVERS
Meeting, Noon, SUB 212.
PHRATERES
Meeting, noon, SUB 205.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
NDP
Meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
SATURDAY
VOC
Long Hike, VOC Whistler Cabin.
STUDENT MOBILIZATION
Vietnam Action Conference, NDP
speakers, 10 a.m., Fisherman's Hail,
138 E. Cordova.
MONDAY
PENTECOSTAL CHAPLAINCY
Dinner,   6   p.m.i   Lutheran Campus
Centre.
ED. S.A.
Meeting, noon, Ed. 100.
Cinema rolls
The Thief of Baghdad, first in
Cinema 16's series of
Swashbucklers films, will be shown
at 6 and 8 p.m., today, in the SUB
theatre.
Douglas Fairbanks stars in the
1924 flick which at $2 million
was the most expensive film of its
time.
Free schools
A co-founder of one of
Canada's first free schools will
speak at UBC this week on
free schools and on the political
implications of education.
Al Rimmer, who helped start
Everdale Place, will speak on free
schools at noon today in
Education 100.
Rimmer, currently national
secretary of the National Christian
Movement, will speak on politics
and education at noon Wednesday
in SUB 207.
HELLO YOU BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE!!
Your U.B.C. Card is worth 5% Off
on any purchase!
HAPPINESS IS. . . sale days everyday
. . . try us, our prices are lower on all
new Fall Fashions — sweaters,
blouses, slacks, co-ordinates, brushed
denims, cords. Happiness Is . . .
Boutique, 45 76 West 10th Avenue,
228-9931. Across from Safeway.
OUR DESTINY
t$ WHAT WE
CHOOSE
TOIvVKEIT"
1. An election is called.
2. By October 18th a team of two enumerators should have called on you to
register you for the voters list. Also,
they should have left with you a form
to prove that you were called on. If no
one was at home when the enumerators
called, they should have left a callback
card. This card will tell you how to
proceed.
3. If you will be 18 years of age, or older,
on election day, your name will be added to the voters list.
4. Immediately after October 18th, a list
of all the voters in your poll will be
posted In a number of public places
such as on telephone poles, and in your
local post office. Check this list to make
sure your name is on it.
5. If your name is not listed contact the
E. Trudeau.
revising officer immediately. His address
and phone number will be listed at your
post office.
6. Proxy voting. If you are a full time
student living away from home you may
appoint another elector to vote on your
behalf in your home riding. To do this,
you will require a statement from the
school registrar to the effect that you
are living away from home. Your name
and the name of the elector you appoint
to vote for you must be on the list of
electors under your ordinary residence
address, and you or your proxy must
present an application for proxy to the
returning officer in your home riding not
later than Friday, October 27th.
Liberalism — An Openness to new ideas
October 30 — The Federal Election,
Express Yourself.
UBER4LB4RTY
614 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
~~" OFFICE OF "	
STUDENT SERVICES
has a new location
PONDEROSA ANNEX WEST MALL
228-3811
SERVICES TO ASSIST STUDENTS
COUNSELLING
Assistance with
CAREER PLANNING
PERSONAL CONCERNS
STUDY PROBLEMS
EDUCATIONAL DECISIONS
APTITUDE EVALUATION
PLACEMENT
Assistance with
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
CAREER EMPLOYMENT
1973 Graduates are urged
to Register Now.	
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 Ikies, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the dav before publication.
Publications Office. Room 241S. U.B.. UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
MEET YOUR FRIENDS AT UN-
dercut 72. Sat., Sept. 30, 8:30-1:00
SUB Cafeteria. Hardtimes, full
facilities.	
DANCE TO SUNSET CAVALIERS
Steel Band, Sat., Sept. 30th, 9
p.m.-l a.m., $1.00 per person. Grad
Student Centre. Everyone welcome.
Greetings
12
BONNIE: WHO ARE YOU?
GORDIE
Lost & Found
13
POUND:   PURSE.   GRETA   LUND-
borg, please contact at 731-8360.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
CHRISTIAN AS. INNOVATOR.
Thurs., 12:30. Alan Rimmer, National Secretary, S.C.M. Seminar
Room.  V.S.T.   6050 Chancellor.
EXPERIMENTAL SCHOOLS —
Film and presentation by a founder of Everdale Free School. Wed.,
6:30. V.S.T., 6050 Chancellor, Sem-
inar  Room,   basement.	
GIRLS! PHRATERES IS A CLUB
designed for social service, meeting people, and fun. Come to signup meeting, Fri., Sept. 29. 12:30.
S.U.B., 205.	
DINNER — FOR CHARISMATIC
& Pentacostal Students. You are
invited to the Annual get acquainted gathering for food and
fellowship. U.B.C. Lutheran Campus Centre, 5585 University Blvd.
Monday, Oct. 2nd, 6:00 p.m. No
Charge. Phone 263-8219 for reservations    immediately.
 —Chaplian   Beinice   Gerard
SKIERS — LARGE 1JJXVKY~AC-
commodation avail, for 8 mature
people at Whistler, $415 for sea-
son.   Chris.   988-341.1..	
BE HIGH WITHOUT DRUGS!—
Manuscript describes methods:
provides 84 references. $2.00 to
Omega   Point,   Egmont.   B.C.	
DR. BUNDOLO'S PANDEMONIUM
Medicine Show. "A must for insomniacs"   .   .   .   Horsefly   Gazette
WANTED HELP FOR FILM PRO-
gramme Sunday nights Dunbar
Centre. Controversial topics. Stu-
dents   or  faculty   call   224-1374.
MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATE
Student Centre can obtain pamphlets describing the Centre and its
functions from the office of the
Centre.	
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October ■      	
DISCOUNT STEREO. EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai. A.G.S.,
Zenith   TVs.   Call   732-6769.
TraTel Opportunities
18
Wanted—Information
17
HELP! HIT & RUN. On Fri., Sept.
22 at University Boulevard at
10th at 11:50 p.m. A yellow '69
Toyota Carolla was hit in the
rear by another car. Anyone
seeing this please phone Craig,
224-7235.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
ai
'72 TRIUMPH SPITFIRE. IMMAC,
best offer over $2000. Smith, Gage
Res.   E17B6.	
1967 CHBV. VAN. EXCEL., 4800
miles, $1400; 12" port. TV: Airie/
guitar. Chris, 988-3413.	
'68 FIREBIRD 350 CONVERT.
Must be seen.  Offers. 879-1924.
Autos Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating & Copying
34
Photography
35
tfje %tni antr gutter
Cameras
IT'S A TIME
FOR READING
Time-Life Photo Books
M &   M  Lab   Book   	
$8.95
$29.95
FULL   SELECTION  OF
KODAK   BOOKLETS
This Week Only
Kodak  Darkroom  Guide   $4.50
3010 W. BROADWAY.
736-7833
Scandals
37
RETURNED  VOLUNTEERS  —
Crossroads   Africa   or   Canadian
Crossroads   who   are   interested—
call Nora Mann, 733-3276.	
YAC (YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB) IS
back! At Cecil Green Park on
campus. Every Thursday from 8-
12 mid and Fridays 4:30-12:30 p.m.
For Alumni & Graduating Students.
Typing
WILL JACK FELL JANE AT UN-
dercut 72? Cum and see! Sat.
Sept.   30   SUB  Cafe.	
 40
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. THESIS,
essays, etc. REASONABLE. —
Jean,   after  3  p.m.   874-5558.	
EXP'D TYPIST^ THESES. ESSAYS,
etc.   Phone   Mrs.   Brown.   732-0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
CHILDREN'S AID NEEDS MA-
ture, dependable men and couples
as "uncles" for aunt-and-uncle
teams) for boys 7-15. 1 hrs. a
week for a year or more. Expenses
paid. 733-8111, local 278.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
81
Special Classes
62
LEARN CHINESE DANCING AND
Mime.   Phone  261-5918.	
CHILDREN'S CREATIVE ART
classes. Child Art Centre. Acadia
Rd., South Section 1: 9-14 yrs.,
Mondays, 3:30-5:00. Section 2: 6-8
yrs., Wednesdays, 3:30-5:00. Section 3: 9-14 yrs., Thursdays, 3:30-
5:00. $8.00 for the year. Phone:
Miss Spears, Faculty of Education.   UBC.	
83
Tutoring Service
Tutors—Wanted
84
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
COMFORTABLE1 ROOMS 10 MINS.
from campus on 15th Ave. Private
entrance. Cooking facilities available.   224-3427.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BREAKFAST FOR
responsible female student in exchange for evening babysitting
services. Experience with children
necessary. Private room and bathroom. Laundry facilities available.
Close  to campus.   Phone  263-4764.
Automobiles—Repairs
24 I Furnished Apts.
83 Tuesday, September 26, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Tough Blues
sock 'Birds
WW^****-
—kini mcdonald photo
SPORTS EXCITEMENT is here again — any way you want it, be it
intramurals, extramurals, or simply leisure entertainment. This PE
student enjoys a Monday a.m. tennis game.
Intramurals booming
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Participation in intramurals is up this year due to unprecedented enthusiasm for golf, badminton, tennis and
bowling.
One hundred eighty-two are playing tennis this year compared to 60 last year and bowling has gone from 33 teams to 50'
Badminton is up to 160, of which 56 are from the up and coming
hot shot science group.
Softball opened Sunday with the new soft pitch rule —
pitches must be easy so even the most hopeless of players can
hit the ball. This new rule prevents super-pitchers from
dominating the league.
Football starts Wednesday with PE and Betas in hot contention and a resurrected (ghost?) Fort Camp team Entry
deadlines come Friday for these events:
1. Turkey Trot — a 3-1/2 mile race. Prizes are a turkey
goose, chicken and one dozen eggs.
2. Arts 20 — This is an eight man running relay race from
VGH to UBC.
3. Cross-country cycle — This is UBC's oldest athletic
event, started in 1920, it's a gruelling 10 miles
The much coveted Unit Managers of the week award goes to
Adrian Belshaw of science and Doug Allan of Arts for dedication
beyond the call of duty in recruiting athletes.
There is a Unit Managers' meeting today in SUB council
chamber at 7:00 p.m.
Information on intramurals can be found on a notice board
m SUB beside the Men's can. The football game schedue is
outside War Memorial Gym 308.
Rugby
In Vancouver rugby action
over the weekend, UBC teams
met with mixed success.
The first division (Mainland)
UBC Braves easily beat
Burnaby 42-4 in the game
played at Thunderbird rugbv
fields. The Braves had been
invited to return to first
division play by Mainland
clubs hoping to meet some
stiff er competition.
The second division Totems
won their second game 8-7
against Kats rugby club but the
third division UBC Frosh team
lost 32-0 to another Kats team.
The first division (Vancouver) Thunderbird team did
not play.
If the UBC soccer team had a
couple more rookies like inside-right forward Ed Soltysik,
they could expect to win some
more games.
As it was UBC lost 4-2 to the
Canadian finalist New Westminster Blues despite the two
goal performance of UBC's
prize rookie.
The game started with the
appearance of Joe Johnson,
who by strange coincidence
was coaching both teams.
Johnson came out in blue strip,
indicating he had complete
confidence in his New Westminster team.
UBC showed promise in the
early minutes of the first half
and kept the Blues off balance
with tremendous pressure on
the Blue goal.
It was 3-1 at the half and
anybody's game right up until
the final 15 minutes, when the
Blue's experience began to
show through. But UBC kept
going right up until the end.
Another UBC rookie to show
fine play was right forward
Chris Suzuki. Johnson was
surprised last year to see
Suzuki sitting on the Richmond
Junior bench. Johnson said
that if Suzuki would come to
UBC he wouldn't be sitting on
the bench.
The Blues are off to Toronto
Friday for the Canadian soccer
championship. In view of the
Blues' impressive winning
abilities Saturday's result
shows promise for the 'Birds'
line-up in the 72-73 season.
Football win
The UBC Thunderbird
football team came up with a
good effort in Regina Saturday
and rolled over Saskatchewan
13-11 for their first win of the
season.
Rookie quarterback Ten Hon
Choo completed only two of 11
passes, but the second was a 63
yard bomb to flanker Henry
Thiessen with 25 seconds
remaining in the game.
From the 13 yard line
halfback Bruce Kiloh easily
split the up-rights for the
winning points.
Other 'Bird notables were
defensive halfback Jim
D'Alfonso with three interceptions and halfback Gord
Penn, who ran for 107 yards.
Teammate Nick Zuccaro
added another 50 yards along
the ground.
In other Western Canadian
football action the U. of
Manitoba Bisons edged the U.
of Calgary 10-4 for their third
straight win.
The Bisons now lead the
conference with six points,
followed by Edmonton,
Calgary, and UBC.
points. The 'Birds have played
one more game.
Saskatchewan brings up the
rear with zero points in two
games.
Intramurals
There will be an important
meeting for all managers
Friday at 12:30 in Rm. 213 War
Memorial Gym re T-shirts.
Please attend.
Anglican United
Campus Ministry
Sept. 27 SUB 207-209 12:30
FOUNDER EVERDALE - TORONTO - AL RIMMER
Education and Change
Sept. 26 Ed 100 - 12:30 - FREE SCHOOLS
Sept. 28 Lutheran Campus 5:30
Discussion of Education Values
Oct. 2. - BISHOP OF DUBLIN
S.C.M.
SWIMMING LESSONS
at Empire Pool
Lessons   are  offered   to   students,   faculty,   and   staff  during  the
following hours:
TWF   9:30-10:15   -   Bronze;  Red  Cross -  Beginner, Junior,
Intermediate, Senior.
TWF 10:30-11:15 - Bronze, Award of Merit, Distinction.
MTH 9:30-10:15 - Red Cross - Beginner, Junior, Intermediate,
Senior.
MTH 10:30-11:15- Red Cross - Beginner, Junior, Intermediate,
Senior.
Lessons are  in progress and those interested to attend need only to
appear on the pool deck at the times listed above. No registration required.
For further  information   inquire  to   Room 208 Memorial
Gymnasium or telephone 228-2401.
U.B.C. musical theatre society
presents
THE WORLD PREMIERE OF
MACBETH
— a rock opera —
by Richard Ouzounian and Marek Norman
October 25 - November 4
U.B.C. (old) auditorium
TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE
OLD AUDITORIUM BOX OFFICE
Further Information 228-3176
BUY —SELL—INFORM
with UBYSSEY Classified Ads.
BE CRITICAL OF
SPEED READING COURSES!
Ever Investigated speed reading? Maybe now's the time. And
when you do, be sure to ask about other things besides speed
—like understanding, retention, concentration. Obviously you
have to enjoy and remember what you read or there's fiot
much point in Increasing your speed. Sure speed's important.
Some people do read many thousands of words a minute but
that's not all there Is to it. Come to a free demonstration by
the world's most honored reading school — and be critical.
ATTEND A FREE MINI-LESSON
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA: S.U.B. Room 205
Tuesday, September 26th—12:30 p.m.
Wednesday, September 27th—12:30 p.m.
□
Evelyn Wood Beading Dynamics
Sponsored by Dynamic Learning Centre (B.C.)
556 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.      Call 872-8201 Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1972
BOB
STANFIELD
SHOW YOUR CONCERN — HE DOES!
TODAY NOON
S.U.B. BALLROOM

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