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The Ubyssey Nov 28, 1986

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:/es Sexi^.
THE UBYSSEY
.Vol. LXIX, No. JO 2
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 28,1986
228-230V
Hetero week motives questioned
By SCOT MacDONALD
Insecure heterosexuals rejoice,
next week's Heterosexuality Week
is for you. Organizers say the week
is just a joke and not meant to offend anyone.
Patrick Kirkwood, a Sigma Chi
fraternity member, said "we're just
promoting heterosexuality but we
have nothing against gays and lesbians." He went on to say he hoped
by having a week to "help
heterosexuals who may not be confident with their sexual beliefs" it
would help decrease the tension
created by Gays and Lesbians'
Pride week.
The week, organized by members
of Sigma Chi, was originally set up
for "parody affect" with a format
"indentical to the Gays and Lesbian's Pride week" explained
Kirkwood. He said that he
"desperately wants to avoid bad
feelings between" heterosexuals
and homosexuals. Doug Bryson,
assistant co-ordinator of the week,
said the week was set up to
"celebrate heterosexuality".
The week will start off with Born
to Breed buttons sold in SUB on
Monday, December 1, jeans day on
Wednesday, and a dance on Friday
night in the SUB ballroom.
Scott Beveridge, vice-president of
the Gays and Lesbians of UBC, said
"originally I thought it was
funny." He supported a week to
"bring up topics and feelings that
heterosexuals feel are important."
Beveridge said he is "afraid of a
small percentage of the population
who will take it the wrong way and
will use it to foster anti-gay
feelings."
Beveridge said "we (Gays and
Lesbians) are a minority" and he
wanted to avoid any conflict
because "we'll get the heat."
Brent Lymer, Inter-Fraternity
president, said "at first I thought it
was funny but it has gotten out of
hand." Although the week seemed
to be backed by Sigma Chi Fraternity, he said it is "not an official
function of Sigma Chi."
Although Lymer represents 10
fraternaties and over 1,300 people,
Kirkwood said that Lymer is an
"individual" and has "no input"
into the H week program. He stressed that although Sigma Chi may be
associated with the week, "it is
meant to represent and encompass
the whole campus" and all
heterosexuals.
Kirkwood said his fraternity
Sigma Chi, does not use sexual
orientation as an issue to determine
acceptance of members. "We don't
discriminate and we don't choose
by it," he said.
The promoters of H week also
appear to be behind the Fight back
THESE MEN ARE heterosexual — straight UBC women can breathe a sigh of relief.
Jennifer lyall photo
Wilfred Laurier faculty divest
By The Canadian University Press
and The Ubyssey Staff
More than $880,000 of the
Wilfrid Laurier University faculty
association's pension fund is invested in with holdings in the apartheid nation of South Africa, faculty recently learned.
The response was swift. They immediately voted to divest at a Nov.
12 meeting.
The motion called on trustees to
divest of $252,000 in Seagram's
Company Ltd., $188,000 in
Rothmans, $183,000 in Cominco
Ltd., and $157,000 in General Electric.
In addition, faculty passed a motion to initiate discussion with the
student union with a view to jointly
participating in more "concrete action", said association president
Paul Albright.
Student union president Brian
Thompson said he would welcome
any initiative from faculty.
Political Science professor John
Redekop suggests funding scholarships for black South African
students, tenable at Laurier.
Albright said faculty were led to
advocate divestment by their consciences.
"Whether this will speed the process of dismantling apartheid is
where honest men can differ," he
said.
Last year, UBC's Board of
Governors indicated it had $1
million from its $90 million endowment fund in six companies that
have ties with South Africa. It also
reported it had $717,000 from its
$90 million staff pension fund in
three companies with interests in
Pretoria.
The Board voted in October to
sell its shares in two of the companies but left the door open for
future investments. The university's
Anti-apartheid group has labelled
the board's measures as "token
divestment," and says it will not be
satisfied with anything short of
total divestment.
Wilfred Laurier sociology and
Anthropology professor Andrew
Lyons said there is a "lack of
awareness here and in North
America about South Africa."
Lyons, who is active in the anti-
apartheid movement, noted Laurier
offers only one course on Africa.
"It's only offered (every) couple
of years, and until recently had very
low enrollment," Lyons said.
Albright stressed discussion of
the issue focused on what more the
association could do other than a
"showy display for the public eye."
Lyons said he was pleased by the
divestiture, but added it is only part
of "a vast public process".
Albright cautioned however that
the resolution may not be necessarily binding on the trustees who administer the fund.
Dorothy posters which appeared
last week in SUB. These refer to the
Gays and Lesbians' "Surrender
Dorothy" dance held on Nov. 22.
Beveridge said the posters were "a
good response to a good publicity
campaign" on the Gays and Lesbian's part.
Some members of the Gays and
Lesbians Club liked the idea of H
week but feared it would get out
of hand. Roger Mostad, a club
member said H week is "alright but
I'm afraid of what's gonna
happen." He added it would be
"great if it doesn't get out of hand"
but that the Gays and Lesbians
would have "more fun" during
their week.
Both the backers of H week,
some of whom are Sigma Chi men,
and the Gays and Lesbians, said
they want to avoid conflict.
Students gyped
By PATTI FLATHER
Thousands of UBC students may
(have participated in several illegal
pyramid schemes that began in
September, with investments ranging from a case of beer to $500 and
the lure being an 800 per cent profit
to help pay tuition and living costs.
The RCMP and some students
who have refused to participate
warn that seven of every eight people lose in such schemes, and that
anyone who enters now is almost
certain to lose.
"Students by and large don't
have a lot of money," said University RCMP Sgt. Don Schlecker. "It
hits the students where they're most
vulnerable."
Students said the schemes are
spread by word of mouth through
friends and a student residence
representative said cash has been
exchanged in meetings at Sedgewick
Library and Gage Towers among
other places.
Gage Community Council president Duane Mackie said he knows
many students involved in
pyramids, and was approached by
someone in his own faculty, commerce, to attend a meeting.
Mackie said he knows at least six
students who. entered the schemes
early, when the turnover was only
five or six days, and made large profits.
But, he said, as more students
have become involved in the
schemes, which expand exponentially as each new investor tries to
bring eight others in, the schemes
are starting to fall apart because the
field of students has been saturated.
One history student who paid
$500 into a pyramid, with the promise of a $4,000 profit, said he is
Marzari wins recount
Although it will not be official until Friday at 4:30 p.m., NDP candidate Darlene Marzari has once again been found the winner of the
second Point Grey seat.
The recount was filed by the Social Credit Party on November 13'
after Marzari defeated incumbent Pat McGeer by just 40 votes. After
the recount, completed yesterday, the margin of victory was 55
votes.
When contacted by phone on Thursday Marzari said she wanted
"To thank th* UBC students for finding the poll and for waiting in
the horrendous iine-ups. I knew it was the university poll and section 80 ballots that put me where I am," she said.
The riding was previously heW for"24 year? by Pat McGeer.
When asked if he he would consider running in three years time Pat
McGeer said, "Who knows what the future holds?"
The Social Credit Party can appeal to the Supreme Court for
another recount no later than 4:30 p.m. Friday.
still waiting for the money he
thought would help finance his tuition and living costs. The student,
who asked not to be identified, said
he knows of at least one other $500
pyramid and several $100 ones.
Another part-time student who
entered a $500 pyramid off-campus
in the first week of school said she
was living from month to month
worrying about paying bills and being able to buy clothes for her
lover's children.
The woman, who also requested
•her name not be used, said she
thought the scheme would be fun
and could not fail.
She said she attended meetings
every other evening with as many as
70 people, all "totally hyped." Her
school work began to suffer.
"I couldn't get to sleep I was so
excited," she said.
But when things started to go
wrong, "people started getting really furious with each other. Money
does funny things to people."
When her pyramid collapsed, the
student was lucky — her money was
returned. She said most people in
her pyramid really needed the
money, for tuition or a mortgage.
"The people who are interested
in pyramid schemes are the same
people who buy lottery tickets, the
people who have no hope of getting
a little money," she said in an interview.
David DeRosa, science 2, said he
and roommate John Landis, president of UBC's Social Credit club,
have had phone calls in the last
three weeks from friends they
haven't heard from in a long time
asking them to join pyramids.
"It's a good way to lose friendships," said DeRosa, who was contacted by students at Langara College and BCIT as well as at UBC.
DeRosa said one friend in a beer
pyramid put in one case of beer and
ended up with 16 cases, adding that
the liquor pyramids do not bother
him as much.
The University RCMP have
received only one complaint about
UBC pyramids, which has been
passed on to the Vancouver police's
commercial crime section, said Sgt.
Schlecker. The schemes, illegal
under section 19 of the Criminal
Code, are difficult to prosecute, he
said, because victims are embarrassed and reluctant to go to police, and
because of the sheer numbers of
people involved in tracking pyramid
organizers. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,1986
Cutbacks will hurt handicapped
By ALLISON FELKER
The B.C. Coalition ofthe Disabled, an advocacy support group for
disabled people, has launched a
much-needed fundraising campaign
to combat cutbacks.
"There has been a turndown of
support services", said Margaret
Birrell, executive director of the
Vancouver-based coalition.
"Premier Bill Vander Zalm has said
he does not believe in funding,
direct   lobbying,   or   advocacy
groups. He doesn't realize we're
lobbying for issues, not against parties," she said.
Some of the issues the coalition is
currently lobbying for are improved
accessibility, affordable housing,
and better transportation for the
disabled. The coalition is also concerned about the federal government's new drug patent policy and
its effect on disabled people who
need medicine.
Started in  1977, the coalition
The Ubyssey
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"The organisation is very costly
— we need the extra money for
publicity and for educational activities," Birrell said. The coalition
also acts as an information and
referral centre, and this service suffers without adequate funding.
The campaign for funding is an
experiment in telemarketing. This
includes sending letters throughout
B.C. to increase awareness of the
coalition and asking for funding,
Birrell said.
Peter Carver, chairperson of the
coalition board said, "restraint has
definitely hit us hard. We are not
favored with provincial government
funding."
Carver, who is confined to a
wheel chair because of arthritis, added that restraint has hurt "the in
dependent living" of the disabled.
Carver uses homemaking services,
and said that some people can no
longer afford such help.
Another problem for the disabled
is the attitude of some non-disabled
people.
"There is a degree of frustration
in meeting these barriers, especially
in obtaining employment. People
don't realize that a physical disability has nothing to do with working
ability," Carver said.
/pirns
CHRISTMAS
FAIR
November 24 -
December 19, 1986
SUB Main Concourse
Display Area
BHB' ENGLISH COMPOSITION
TEST SEMINAR
ii
HOW TO PASS"
SUB BALLROOM
Guest Speaker:
Ms. Nancy Horsman
WF.DNKSDAY, DKCKMBKR 3
12:30
Please be seated early. No one will be turned away.
FREE
"The student i
body marches
on the
2 for one
meal deal."
Bring this ad. show \our
1 valid student I.D. and lake
advantage of our 2 tor one
meal deal.
Order any item, we mean
any food item, and get another
one absolutely tree. The 2 for
the price of one meal deal runs
Sunday to Thursday until Dec.
8th. This otter is not valid
with other promotions and has
no cash value. If the 2 items
ordered are different prices the
ower-priced item is free.
Is this a great deal or what?
Bring a friend or your mother
or a total stranger.
See you soon at P.J.'s.
2966 West 4th Avenue.
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
NAPOLEON BONAPARTE
^
e<
C lip & Save PageS
committee photo
UBC'S MIKE BELLEFONTAINE missed this pass late in the game but the 'Birds won the Vanier Cup a few short seconds later on a Rob Ros touchdown catch, 25-23.
Bishop's University stops funding
LENNOXVILLE (CUP) — The
student council at Bishop's University has set precedent in Quebec by
deciding to fund a political club on
campus.
John   Ryan,   president   of   the
Young Liberals Club, successfully
presented a request for funding at a
recent council meeting even though
all club budgets were approved last
spring.
The funding will come from the
— vanier cup committee photo
. . . while tears flowed from the eyes of Western Mustang players
on the bench — they came so close to winning it all.
contingency funds of the council's
budget. The motion was to approve
$50 immediately and another $25 in
January.
"(The funding) broke the long
held precedent of the student council which said that political clubs
would not be given student
funding," said Mark Taylor, a
council representative. "Both the
NDP and Conservative clubs were
turned down before . . . The student council acted in haste without
proper judgement."
But Ryan argued that although a
precedent has been set, the
council's constitution does not
specifically state that political clubs
cannot be funded.
Council president Chris LeClair
said funding a political club should
not be confused with funding a
political party. None of the money
the Liberal club receives will go to
the Liberal party or be used to support candidates in election.
"We're funding political involvement, not an entity with a strict
ideology," he said.
No other university in Quebec
fund political clubs on campus, according to the largest student
organization, l'Association Na-
tionale des Edudiantes du Quebec.
McGill and Concordia universities
in Montreal both recognize political
clubs, but do not fund them or provide office space.
"There are so many political and
religious groups, we couldn't afford
to fund them all," said McGill
council vice-president Lindsay
Glassco. "It's setting dangerous
precedent at Bishop's. They'll have
to set limits or they could be approached by anybody in the
future."
Concordia council co-president
Scott White said funding a club is
the same as funding the actual party.
"If it happened here, it would
damage our credibility by favouring
one party over another. We weren't
elected to be spokespeople for any
political party," he said.
Racism gets boot
The B.C. Federation of Labour
has launched an anti-racism campaign with the assistance of the
federal government.
Federation leader Art Kube said
that every time there is an economic
downturn, considerable fear is
aroused by racists and bigots,
resulting in attacks on visible
minorities. "We are trying to build
a bulward within the trade union
movement to oppose and eradicate
racism," said Kube.
The federation's plan is to
develop human rights committees
and labour councils to plug into the
human rights network, said Kube.
"Adjustment committees would
implement hiring policies designed
to overcome systemic discrimination", said Kube.
The campaign will be conducted
within the trade union movement
and in homes, said Kube.
"Racism is anti-worker and it
destroys the solidarity of workers"
said Kube. The campaign will be
concerned with raising worker
awareness to the damage racism
does, said Kube.
He said the campaign is necessary
for many reasons, but, in particular
because of the elimination of the
human rights commission and the
human rights branch. "We are filling a vacuum that is largely the
responsibility of the provincial
government", said Kube.
The federal government is
assisting the campaign financially,
added Kube.
Watson defies accusations
By ROSS McLAREN
Papers and files are scattered
across the posh Kitsilano apartment, home to the Sea Shepherd
organization. On the walls hang oil
paintings of Sea Shepherd, her rainbow striped funnel and hull becons
against the greyness of the canvas.
Outside it is raining, a typical Vancouver day.
Inside Paul Watson sits dry in a
canvas deck chair, calm and composed, ready to spread his gospel.
Immediately, the conversation
turns to Iceland — Reykjavik, and
the sinking of the whaling ships.
Watson says that what happened
at Reykjavik was not a protest action but a policing action, in accordance with international law.
Icelanders, Watson says, kill whales
despite the International Whaling
Commissions' moratorium on all
hunting of whales. Iceland,
however, continues to kill over 200
whales a year, ostensibly for
research purposes.
Calling Sea Shepherd "the un-
nofficial policing body of the
IWC," Watson says the destruction
of private property will continue if
whaling nations continue to
disregard international law.
At Reykjavik in November, two
environmental activists, in an
operation coordinated by Watson,
scuttled two of Iceland's four whaling ships and destroyed computers
and machinery in a whaling processing station.
These destructive acts have gained Watson the label of terrorist, a
name that does not bother him.
Watson says the former U.S. Am
bassador to the United Nations,
Jeanne Kirkpatrick, defines terrorism as someone who deliberately
sets out to maim or to kill another
person; since Sea Shepherd did not
set out to harm life, he says we cannot be labelled terrorists.
Sea Shepherd, Watson says, does
everything possible to insure that
their operations will not injure any
people. Watson says, "no weapons
and no explosives can be taken on
these operations; as well, these activists cannot resist arrest and must
be prepared to accept responsibility
for their actions."
These precautions, however,
have not prevented Sea Shepherd
from incuring the wrath of the civil
authorities. B.C. Attorney-General
Brian Smith has asked a Vancouver
law firm to examine whether or not
See page 8: Watson Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,1986
Out of hand
Comic relief is always welcome, especially this close to exam
time.
It is frequently amusing to watch people profess their sexual
preferences in public. Humour may also come as a parody. These
are some justifications given for H week, or Heterosexual week,
organized by some members of Sigma-Chi.
On the other hand, groups at whom humour appears to be
directed at may feel threatened. What some people feel is light and
amusing, others find hard and threatening.
H week seems to parody the gays and lesbians week that is held
to educate and show pride, because homosexuals are frequently
oppressed and attacked in our society.
The organizers have said the week is to help heterosexuals be
"confident with their sexual beliefs". This is ridiculous, even funny.
They also say the event is to help "decrease the tensions created
by Gays and Lesbians Pride Week". This explanation is unfortunately much closer to the truth. It is hard not to conclude
homophobia plays a part in this event.
H week may have been organized with good intentions as well;
however, these things always have a way of "getting out of hand".
The Gays and Lesbians Club has suffered vandalism and had their
mail destroyed. The original fun H week now has some overly enthused Heteros calling for a Heterosexual club, presumably some
feel a need to be confident of a homosexual-free club.
H week has, perhaps inadvertently, given credibility to the.
homophobic voice. It is a bad idea.
^H.nl
"It's my parents. Quick, help me think of something heterosexual to say.'
H and Gay weeks aim to educate
Bazaar in SUB sickens
The shopping mall status of the
SUB makes me sick. The student
body has elected AMS representatives who had promised to rid us
of this problem. The SUB is supported by student fees and should
be used for the benefit of students,
not of outside profiteers.
There are two main problems
caused by the use of SUB space by
business. The mOst obvious of these
is their assault on the student's right
to the exchange of ideas and information through the various clubs
Take a stance
To elaborate on Devinder
Pannu's courageous statement
made at the Indo-Canadian function last week (Ubyssey Fri. 21), I
think her main point is that you can
have the best of both worlds — the
Eastern traditional as well as the
Western modern one. You can retain the rich cultural heritage of the
Indian community — the art, music
and language, but reassess (if not
dispose of) the oppressive traditions
such as blind submission to authority and marriage involving coercion.
Instead, Western values that encourage autonomy, as Devinder
points out can help young Indo-
Canadians make their own decisions affecting their lives. And after
all, isn't that what university is for?
To teach us how to think freely and
evaluate society's values constantly? Isn't it time for young Indo-
Canadians to take a stance?
Shelina INeallani
law 1
on campus that are prevented from
setting up literature tables for lack
of room.
The second is the assault on the
student's right to a place of re-creation and conversation free from the
noise and distraction of the
marketplace. Students don't need
Oakridge Centre re-created in their
livingroom. Students don't want
this, as evidenced by last years AMS
elections. Then why does it continue?
The AMS representatives should
hold to their election promises and
remove the bazaar. I challenge our
vice-president to keep to her proclamation still visible on the few remaining campaign posters. We
haven't forgotten why we elected
you.
Greg Beatch
graduate studies
It has come to our attention that
more and more people on campus
are taking "H" week in the wrong
spirit. As representatives of both
groups in question, we feel it is important to make clear our views and
our mutual support for two original
ideas, namely 'Lesbian/Gay Pride
Week' and 'Heterosexual Week'.
The purpose behind Lesbian/Gay
Pride Week is to bring to the public
eye issues of human rights
regardless of sexual orientation and
the denial of those rights, to foster
understanding of homosexual
lifestyles in the community, and to
generally make aware that
homosexual men and women are
proud of their sexual outlook.
As a minority that, at present, is
not guaranteed basic human rights
in the Charter of Rights, homosexuals feel the need to keep publicizing and educating people about
violence and prejudice feelings
directed towards them.
Everyone has problems to deal
with, and that includes heterosexuals in general as well. Nothing is
more critical in society than the sexual issues we all face. These conflicts and problems often are left
alone until they grow to immense
proportions and disrupt personal
lives and those of other people.
Heterosexual week is designed as a
forum to bring these problems to
the forefront of the campus community. By providing this week,
heterosexuals are given a positive
atmosphere to address any underlying feelings, frustrations and sexual
insecurities.  Heterosexual Week is
Jesus not Lord
We completely agree with the
comment made by the Jewish
Students' Federation in that
whoever posted the sign "Jesus is
Lord over UBC" had no right to
speak on the behalf of the entire
UBC student population. However,
we disagree that an analogy can be
drawn between the phrases "Jesus
is Lord Over You" and "Allah is
God Over You". Allah is not a
"God of the Muslims" to the exclusion of all others — rather,
"Allah" is the name given to God
in Arabic. In English, it's God. Is
anything lost or changed?
Devinder Pannu Shelina Neallani
graduate studies law 1
Opposing principles fuel cold war
When considering the issue of
peace or war, armament or disarmament, one must first consider the
essence of the opposing forces. The
Soviet Union is a totalitarian country, in theory and in practice. Its
government holds total control over
the lives of its people and those in
the countries it takes over; it
disposes of these lives as it sees fit.
The United States is based, at least,
on its principles, on its Constitution, which upholds certain inalienable individual rights because
of fundamental human nature.
Those rights protect the individual
THE UBYSSEY
November 28, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"It's so easy. . ■ " crooned Svetozar Kontic to Evelyn Jacob. But Rick Hiebert and Tony Roberts
disagreed. "Yeah, if it's really so easy how come only David Ferman is successful?" Peter Berlin asked
Nancy Rempel. Brad Newcombe felt obliged to mention hearing rumours about Ronald Stewart. "But
that's all of them," said Cassandra Freeman. "Yup, the rest of us are frustrated and obsessed with it,"
observed Jennifer Lyall. "It's actually quite sad." So when Michael Groberman suggested an orgy was
in order, Allison Felker and Victor Wong were happy to jump on the bandwagon, dragging with them
Scot Macdonald and Anya Waite, respectively. Ross McLaren wouldn't come because he was in love
h'ith himself, and Patti Flather preferred to go home early; but fellow sufferers Steve Chan and
malcolm Pearson pnte-ed in enthusiastically.
from oppression by other individuals or by the government.
The American and Soviet principles are fundamental enemies of
each other; Individualism and Collectivism are at war, with no peace
possible.
Once this fundamental war has
been recognized, the next issue concerns how one should defend one's
principles of freedom and therefore
life against a system that is devoted
to their abrogation. Should you try
to eliminate your own most powerful weapon, for whatever reason,
hope that your enemy will do as
much, and then seek brotherhood?
No. No brotherhood is possible
among fundamental enemies. Letting down one's guard against a
devout, incompatible enemy is
suicide. One must first try to
eliminate those fundamental principles and practices which threaten
one's life, and then let down one's
guard if one wishes.
If you value your life, but are not
committed to any principle by
which to live it, I urge you to consider that surrendering to the principles on which the Soviet Union is
based is surrendering your life. In
any struggle between two opposing
forces, the one which is fanatically
committed to oppression is going to
win over an equally powerful enemy
which is halfheartedly committed to
freedom.
If your standard is your life and
your freedom, and your enemy is
equipped with a weapon of any
kind, whether a nuclear bomb, a
cannon, a gun, or a knife, then your
total security of preserving those
values is impossible. But every additional bit of defensive and offensive
guard can only add to that security.
For those pragmatists who can
only see two countries and a lot of
big guns on each side, I offer a
more pragmatic truth: there exists
the principles of the United States
and the principles and practices of
the Soviet Union.
Stephan Weaver
applied science
not designed to put down or slander
the homosexuals at UBC, or
anywhere else; it is promoting
Heterosexuality.
We both feel that humour is a
vital outlet to get these points
across, and it is important that we
support each other and laugh with
each other. The Blue Jeans Day is a
perfect example. The point of the
day is not to try and distinguish
who's heterosexual or homosexual
on campus, but to remind ourselves
that we actually cannot tell, and
that it really doesn't matter.
However, there exists a small
percentage of people who will use
either or both campaigns to justify
violence and hatred. We have felt it
on both sides, in the forms of
negative feelings directed towards
the "H" week organizers, and the
increased hostility directed against
Gays/Lesbians of UBC and Gay
Pride Week. Violence is something
neither of us wish to see come about
from either campaign. We wish to
be aware of the difference and let
each other speak with a strong, fair
voice, with each other's support.
As long as we both take it as that,
we do not wish to see Heterosexual
Week become a cynical backlash
against homosexuals on campus.
All events during the week are nonviolent and promoted in a positive
manner. We condemn any violence
aimed at Gays and Lesbians, and
the Gay and Lesbian service
organization at UBC.
Please enjoy the week, but keep it
in the right perspective. Gays and
Lesbians are the minority in this
issue, and it is important that their
position be taken seriously. But also
the freedom to speak as a member
of the minority or the majority
must be taken seriously. Let's just
let both be, and support each other
decently.
Patrick Kirkwood
Organizer of Heterosexual Week
Scott Beveridge
Vice president. Gays and Lesbians
of UBC
Program aids disabled
Students and faculty members
should be aware of a new program
which has recently been initiated by
UBC's Student Counselling and
Resources Centre. The program is
called "Students Helping Students"
and it aims to help meet the needs
of the physically disabled student
on campus. Paid student assistants
are available, up to ten hours per
week, to assist the disabled student
in some capacity that would help
him/her through the academic year.
These paid positions are not expected to include work presently be
ing done by volunteers.
The disabled students at UBC
will gain maximum benefit from
this service only if they are aware of
its existence. If you know any
physically disabled students with
"special needs" would you please
ask them to contact me as soon as
possible. I can be reached on
Tuesdays 9:30-12:30 and Thursdays
9:30-2:30 in the Student Counselling and Resources Centre, Brock
Hall. 228-4840.
Charlene Hawthorne
Coord., Students Helping Students Friday, November 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Heterosexuals silly
By RONALD STEWART
What will those wacky fraternities think up next?
Sigma Chi fraternity has organized Heterosexual Week, in response
to the Pride Week and the "Surrender Dorothy" Dance by Gays
and Lesbians UBC. A parody, in
other words. Very funny. Funny,
that is, until you realize the real
reasons behind this little escapade.
GLUBC holds their week to call
attention to a minority group which
has been persecuted, slandered, and
hated by the majority for some
time.
The men of Sigma Chi feel that
Heterosexuals have their rights as
well, which of course they do.
Heterosexuals constitute the majority, and always will; thus their
rights are insured. Gays and Lesbians, a minority, have no such
guarantee; like Orientals and Jews,
they must constantly watch for and
fight against abuses of their rights.
But the heterosexual organizers
of this event feel threatened. Why?
Because some homosexuals stand
up for their rights once a year?
They feel that homosexuals are
promoting their lifestyle. They are.
Unless homosexuality becomes accepted as a viable alternative, gays
and lesbians will always be
persecuted.
However, promoting a lifestyle
does not mean one is trying to win
new converts. When other
minorities hold a heritage festival,
they do not want other people to
join their culture, merely to appreciate and understand it.
The Heterosexual Week
organizers obviously feel their sexuality is threatened. Deep down,
they think homosexuals want
everyone to be like them, and they
don't want to be that way. They
may even disapprove of homosexuality.
If these people feel threatened by
homosexuals, then they're obviously afraid of them. Fear and
misunderstanding, its cause, breed
hatred, which can only lead to the
tension the men of Sigma Chi claim
they want to avoid.
Heterosexuality Week is a cute
idea. It would be funny if Gay Pride
Week was not needed, if homosexuals had their rights guaranteed by
law. But homosexuals are still a
hated, underprivileged group in our
society. They face a long, uphill
battle to earn the rights and respect
they deserve. Tasteless jokes like
Heterosexuality Week do nothing
but hinder their cause.
Ronald Stewart is a Ubyssey staffer
who believes sex is a subjective experience and claims to have
remarkably varying tastes.
LECTURE SERIES
MONDAY, DEC. 1
Jewish mysticism — Is it for me?
MONDAY, DEC. 8
Is orthodox Judaism relevant or obsolete?
(part 2)
All lectures begin at 7:30 at
Bayview Community School
2251 Collingwood
in the library
No charge — For more information cal
266-1313
Sponsored by Lubavitch
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BBS NDFUCE HEBE.
lukon Jack never said much but,
when he did, he had something
to say. He was, in his way, very
particular on matters of taste.
"Southern things have their place"
he would say "and that place is
not here!'
I guess what he meant was that
light and airy and sweet things are fine
and good, if that's what you like,
but that here in the North a thing must
be more substantial. Finely crafted,
smooth and sturdy. It must be something you can put your hands around.
Yukon Jack did not believe in
comfort for comfort's sake, he saw no
point to it. But he did appreciate the
finer things. Another paradox.
-   2fc.
sheep of cmmrauons.
for Yukon Jack recipes write YUKON JACK RECIPES. Box 2710. Postal Station "IT Toronto. Ontario M8Z 5P1 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Nove
Thomas unlike anybody else
By PETER BERLIN
All the rock-show conventions
were gently turned upside-down
and then given a quizzical shake at
the Town Pump on Saturday night
as one of the pop world's great eccentrics ran through his bag of
tricks.
He mixed his dreamy singing with
occasional spoken monologues as
he encouraged the audience to imagine that they were following him
into English Bay and then under
water to look at the fish. Then,
after five engrossing, entertaining
minutes, Thomas began to tease the
audience with a discussion of the
problems of ending a rock song
without slipping into melodramatic
and insincere emotional rock
cliches.
Although he imbues everything
music
Dave Thomas
The Town Pump
November 22
For a start there are few rock
bands that consist of just a bassist
and an accordion-playing vocalist.
And Dave Thomas doesn't look
much like your average superstar
pinup. He's more like Dylan
Thomas with puppy fat. He
described himself in his bizarre
opening song as a "Fat pink blob"
and later on as a Ralph Cramden
lookalike, though he plays his role
altogether more benignly than
Jackie Gleason did.
Most importantly Thomas writes
songs completely unlike anybody
else does, and then performs them
in a highly idiosyncratic style. Fat
Pink Blob at the Bottom of the Sea
set the tone for the evening. With
Terry Mulligan supplying a
muscular, bass riff Thomas went on
a stream-of-consciousness, dreamlike discussion of what it would be
to be a fat pink blob at the bottom
of the sea.
DAVE THOMAS . . . fat. pink, blob
DANCING FREE
By CASSANDRA FREEMAN
If you expect a happy ending, or
an ending at all, or if you expect to
find a clear purpose behind dance
works you would have been disappointed by the Judith Marcuse
Repetory Dance Company's performance Saturday night. Because this
company   refuses   to   give   easy
answers. Its artists are much too
free and sophisticated for that.
Freedom and complexity wove
their way through all of the pieces
chosen by Artistic Director Judith
Marcuse in different ways. In Big
Shouders by Lar Lubavitch, each of
the nine dancers becomes one part
of several different pieces of
machinery.
dance
Judith Marcuse Repertory
Dance Company
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
November 21, 22
Their bodies move in original and
unexpected ways as they push, pull
and lift each other into a series of
geometric patterns.
This    work    is    free    from
with his own distinctive style there
are echoes of others. His whining,
yet tuneful vocals call to mind Captain Beefheart, the unstructured, insistent songs sound like those of
Berthold Brecht and Kurt Weill.
But his choice of subject matter is
all his own.
Thomas rounded off the set with
a protest song on behalf of
dinosaurs, which he insisted have
been the victims of cruel stereotyping by the media. The song contained a couplet of which Thomas was
justly proud: "Has the short end of
the sticks been given
archeopteryx?" he asked.
For an encore Thomas performed
a brutal cover version of Sloop
John B. The song was made famous
by the Beach Boys who turned it into a cheery singalong number, but
Thomas brought out the
unpleasantness of the lyrics which
tell a tale of childhood terror in the
face of drunkeness, violence and
the cops. When Thomas sang "This
is the worst trip I've ever been on,"
it was clear he meant it and felt it.
male/female stereotypes as the
women do their share of lifting and
shifting men into precise and often
precarious links and balances.
In And the Angels Sing,
choreographer Ginette Laurin
allows her dancers, in bare feet
suits and cocktail dresses, moments
of humour and playfulness. But
just when you think a romance is
about to begin the mood is interrupted by awkward or disturbing
actions. The women are swung
around by the neck in helicopter
spins, tossed callously from one
man to the other. In one situation,
one man is actually pushed off the
stage by the other three.
Danny Grossman's choreography
in Tryptich is as profound as it is
free from convention. Throughout
the piece, Betsy Carson, Eric
Rochin and Aaron Shields barely
budge from their initial' positions
centerstage, expressing their plight
through endless patterns of jerky
contorted movements.
They cringe and cower to the
sounds of a nightmarish symphony
score until the end of the piece
when they struggle but fail to free
themselves of their oversized dark
brown suits which symbolically im-
prosion their individuality. It is a
powerful portrayal of personal oppression.
Many times during Judith Mar-
cuse's works, Cortege and Time
Out, there are a series of steps that
personify the word freedom. Time
Out is a playful piece where the
eight dancers shed their winter
clothes and inhibitions, warming up
to Senegalese tribal and reggae
rhythms.
There are sharp, quick jumps and
bounces mixed in with free flowing
movements all performed with
energy and style, but it is Andrea
Lougheed who captures the
mischievous spirit Carefree as she
skips, hops and bounces through
her solo with non-stop energy and
joyful defiance.
Marcuse's dancers took each
piece of choreography and made it
their own, and it was their effortless
and natural looking interpretations
that ultimately made the evening a
success.
DOW
rood cycle.
Keaton comments
B> RICK HUBERT
Silent film comic Buster Keaton
lived in a strange universe of his
own making and the Vancouver
East Cinema has been offering
guided tours of it during its Buster
Keaton film festival this month.
Keaton, one of the most popular
film comedians of the 20's, doesn't
telegraph his humour as so many
comedians do today. Nothing
works properly in his world yet
Keaton takes it in his stride, his
stony face a mute comment on the
insane world around him.
the hilarious results of this problem, there are other fine touches,
such as the church full of brides,
brought there by an ad Keaton's
friends put in the newspaper, who
chase Keaton through Los Angeles,
a football game, a corn field and a
beekeeper's yard — wiping out
everything in their path. There is
also the classic sequence where
Keaton dodges an avalance of falling rocks. Needless to say, Keaton
gets married just in the nick of time.
film
Two b
Buster Keaton Festival
Vancouver East Cinema
November 17, 18, 24, 25
The Vancouver East Cinema
presents some of Keatons best films
in a manner befitting their style. A
bouncy, nickleodeon style soundtrack has been added to the films
and film archivist Raymond
Rohauer, who now owns the rights
to Keaton's films, has done an excellent job of preserving them so
that they look good even today.
The film Go West, although not
one of Keaton's best, is still bizarre
and quite funny. Keaton appears as
Friendless, a man wholly out of
synch with the world around him,
who goes to the West to seek his
fortune. There, he poses as the
complete cowboy, walking bowleg-
ged when around his fellow ran-
chhands and packing a deadly cap
pistol.
Keaton has an unusual love interest in this film, the cow Brown
Eyes, and they spend the film looking out for each other. After many
misadventures, including Keaton
stampeding a herd of cattle through
the streets of Los Angeles to the
slaughter house, the owner of the
ranch, grateful to Keaton, promises
him anything he wants. Keaton
points behind him towards his
daughter and says "I want her,"
surprising both the owner and the
audience when he leads Brown Eyes
out from behind the daughter.
Together again for good, Keaton
and Brown Eyes ride off into the
sunset in the back seat of the
owner's Model T.
Seven Changes, a 1925 feature,
was my favorite film of the night.
Keaton, in order to inherit $7
million, must get married by 7
o'clock that evening. Thinking that
the women he loves has rejected
him, Keaton starts proposing to
everything wearing a skirt, including a Scottsman. Aside from
By TONY ROBERTS
On August 2, 1979, Sid Vicious,
former Bass player for the Sex
Pistols was found dead in his New
York apartment, the victim of a
massive heroin overdose. Sid was
awaiting trial for the stabbing death
of his girlfriend Nancy Spungen,
killed two months earlier.
film
Sid and Nancy
Directed by Alex Cox
The Bay Theatre
For those of you who thought Sid
Vicious was a real neat guy, think
again. Sid was neither a spokesman
for   a   nihilistic   generation   or  a
WEBB, OLDEN ■nber28, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Bypass your brain
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
There will be another living
playwright on the Frederic Wood
stage, and blood and guts at the
mouth of hell down in the basement, next week in the theatre
department. And they're free.
The Death of Pilate is in the
Dorothy Somerset Studio, at the
back of the theatre building, next
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday
at noon, for free.
Masters  directing  student,  and
veteran actor of over 100 Frederic
Wood productions (including the
spear in Lear five years ago), Bruce
Dow   offers    direction    to    the
> medieval  one-act,  The  Death  of
[ Pilate,  in  the  Dorothy  Somerset
[ Studio.    Performances   are   next
i Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday
\ at noon.
Dow, explaining the obvious, indicates that Pilate is one of the last
plays in the Cornish Rood Cycle.
Explaining his choice of play, Dow
says, "I was attracted by the contradictions in the script; of seeing
blood-lust manifesting itself as an
institutionalized worship." Blood?
"It's quite bloody . . . hopefully to
some purpose."
Dow, now 23, completed his acting degree two years ago, feeling
disillusioned. "My interests went
beyond just my part." Now he's into sets, lights, line-coaching, and
stage positioning of actors: "It's
one thing to put people on stage in a
kitchen, but if you adjust that so
where they stand goes beyond
where they stand, that's when you
get art."
There are no kitchen scenes in the
Death of Pilate.
A former directing student
herself, Catherine Caines, now a
prof, is putting up a show on the
main stage next Wednesday to
Saturday at 8 p.m. She says she was
"approached" by a keener group of
bored,  but  talented,   fourth  year
theatre students. She couldn't
resist, "They're doing Michel
Tremblay," she explains.
The one-act play, Forever Yours,
Marie Lou, is by Quebec playwright
Michel Tremblay. Caines loves
Tremblay. "If I could write," she
says, "I would write what this man
writes. He bypasses my brain and I
respond with my guts."
Forever Yours, Marie Lou is on
the Freddy Wood stage next
Wednesday through Saturday at 8
p.m., for free.
Caines describes the play as
"very funny. Tremblay makes you
laugh, then he kicks you in the belly
while you're laughing."
She is excited at directing a play
that she feels will move people, "I
think theatre is meant to reach out
and touch people. I want the audience to go away knowing more,
feeling more, and not talk about so
and so's performance, or the set."
TANJA, JESSICA, MICHAEL . . . the Forever cast minus Kathleen, who refuses to be photographed.
rn losers face oblivion
socially aware anarchist. He was
not even a musician. Sid Vicious
was an ignorant, violent clod
manipulated by personalities which
he followed blindly.
Sid and Nancy, Alex (Repo Man)
Cox's latest film, is a brutally
realistic portrayal of two stupid
people doomed to face the consequences of their own destructive
vices in a world beyond their
understanding. Against the
backdrop of the London punk explosion of 1977, the Sex Pistols' imminent decay parallels the beginning of Nancy and Sid's slide into
oblivion.
Sid was chosen as the Sex Pistols'
bassist by Malcolm McLaren, the
band's manager, because he
represented  the  ugly,  destructive
o born losers.
side of punk, an element McLaren
knew was a guaranteed money
maker. John Lydon, the band's
singer, also known as Johnny Rotten, saw Sid as the perfect replacement because he could be easily
manipulated to wreak havoc and
disorder. Yet Sid's complete
musical incompetence and increasingly destructive acts soon became a
source of irritation for the band and
McLaren.
It's a disturbing film. Nancy, a
screaming schitzoid heroin addict,
meets Sid shortly after his joining
the Sex Pistols. A few days later,
Nancy injects Sid with his first dose
of smack. That evening is a vomit
drenched view of drugged sex, and
a premonition of the self abuse that
is to follow. Heroin becomes the
common tie that binds them.
Sid and Nancy protrays two born
losers indulging in their own world
of easy drugs and suicidal tendencies. It is a realationship that decays
towards inevitable death. In one
pathetically funny scene, Sid storms
out on Nancy, who pleads
pathologically: "What about the
farewell drugs?"
The acting is absolutely first rate.
Gary Oldman (Sid) and Chloe
Webb (Nancy), are at once gritty
and exhaustingly repulsive as the
doomed couple. David Hayman is
hilariously exploitive as manager
McLaren, the self-styled swindler
("Sid's more than just a bass
player, he's a fabulous disaster!").
Yet it's Andrew Schofield's performance as John Lydon that justifies
the price of admission. Combining
just the right elements of arrogance,
humour, and cynical snide,
Schofield is splendid as Johnny
Rotten.
There is a problem with Sid and
Nancy however, that exists despite
the superb performances of
Oldman and Webb. Nancy is so
self-destructive and parasitical, and
Sid so stupid and easily led, that it's
virtually impossible to sympathize
with either character.
But maybe that is the point. In
their lack of self-respect, they revile
our sympathies.
It may be a slight personal bias,
but the most interesting and worthwhile aspect of the film is the rise
and fall of the Sex Pistols
themselves. Whether or not you
hate 'em, it's an undeniable fact
that the Sex Pistols liberated an
enormous amount of creative
energy and pointed music in a completely new direction.
Perhaps this can be seen as the
best anti-drug film of the year.
Because "This," as John Lydon
would say, "IS NOT A LOVE
SONG."
SHATNER, SPOCK ... in 1986.
Whale search
By VICTOR WONG
Twenty years ago, North
America first saw the United
Federation Starship Enterprise,
boldly going "where no man has
gone before." Now, on the 20th anniversary of Star Trek, Harve Bennett and Leonard Nimoy have
brought the crew of the Enterprise
full circle.
film
Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
Directed by Leonard Nimoy
at the Stanley
If you remember the last Trek
movie. The Search for Spock, the
Star Trek universe appeared to be
thrown into chaos. Admiral Kirk
(William Shatner) and his crew were
now renegades, the Enterprise was
destroyed, and Mr. Spock (Leonard
Nimoy), who had just been resurrected from the dead, still didn't
quite have all his marbles in place.
To fix things up — that is, to
restore the plotline to the status quo
— Bennett and Nimoy decided to
send a cigarette to menace Earth —
or at least, that's what the big ship
draining power from passing star-
ships looks like. The ship is sending
messages to humpback whales currently in residence on earth and the
transmissions are wrecking Earth's
atmosphere. The problem is, humpback whales became extinct, 200
years before.
Since Kirk and crew are enroute
to Earth to face charges stemming
from the third movie, they're the
only ones in a position to save the
planet. And the crew arrives at a
solution: use the Klingon Bird of
Prey (the ship on which they are
travelling) to fire themselves back
to 1986, grab two humpback
whales, come back, and have the
whales tell the enemy ship, via
whale-song to shut up (Greenpeace
is going to love this movie). Simple,
right?
Well, there are complications.
Scotty (James Doohan) has to build
a whale tank, so he goes to a San
Francisco plastics shop and has
trouble with the shop's computer (it
doesn't talk). Chekov (Walter
Koenig) has to borrow some radiation from a nuclear powered carrier
(ironically, the real U.S.S. Enterprise) to stablize the Bird of Prey's
engines. Dr. McCoy (DeForrest
Kelley) has to go to a hospital (he
calls the surgeon a barbarian in the
operating room). Kirk and Spock
have to ride a bus to a nearby institute to get the whales (Spock
doesn't know what "exact change"
means). And the marine biologist
who has the whales (Catherine
Hicks) won't let them go.
It looks like the film cast and
crew had a lot of fun shooting in
modern-day San Francisco, and it
shows. According to Time
magazine, no one in the city proper
recognized the cast in costume; apparently they regarded the garb as
normal for San Francisco. The
sense of "family" among the cast is
very strong. There is a touch of
humour in the main characters' performances, suggesting that Nimoy
and Bennett must have had considerable input from cast members
who, after all, do know what their
characters are like.
Like the third Trek film, this is
obviously a movie meant for the
die-hard Trek fan; unlike the third
Trek film, non-fans can get in on
the fun.
I do have some complaints. The
music (by Leonard Roseman)
struck me as being much too serious
for the overall tone of this film;
much of it is unmemorable. The ending sequence, emotionally, is a letdown. And the introduction of a
new Starship Enterprise (yes, it's
back, the hull number is NCC-
1701A) is irrelevant to the story.
But what the hell. This is, for the
most part, a fun movie to watch.
And you're supposed to have fun
on an anniversary.
Gutsy jazz duo sparks
By ANYA WAITE
Pendulum, a jazz duo of piano
and vibraphone, piled rhythm and
style into a potpourri of gutsy,
humorous playing. As soon as Ted
Piltzecker and Jim Hodgkinson
came grinning on stage, it was obvious that their personalities, not
just their music, would run the
show.
music
Pendulum, jazz duo
Vancouver Playhouse
November 23
They jumped right into their first
number, a swinging piece by Chick
Corea called Armando's Rhumba.
Piltzecker hammered away at the
vibraphone with indulgent pizzaz,
throwing out enigmatic little smiles
as he danced and sang along with
the vibraphone, a beautiful instrument with a soft, ringing tone.
Hodgkinson had an interesting
combination of lovely classical
technique and a relaxed jazz flair; a
quieter, almost serious image beside
Ted Piltzecker bounding around
behind his own flailing mallets. But
there was a spark of crazy humour
between them that seemed to draw
them together.
These two most expressive of per-
cussion instruments blended
beautifully, in finely-tuned performances of everything from Fats'
Waller to the Beatles. They turned
out Ain't Misbehavin' in a great
syncopated flow of traditional jazz,
a super sense of style, and relaxed,
laughing rhythm. Great rhythm.
Yet when they tackled Debussy's
First Arabesque, they managed its
great calm well, and Round Midnight, a soft blues piece played as a
solo by Hodgkinson, came off as
almost a virtuoso performance.
They spiced the evening with
humorous anecdotes and people's
comments during their extensive
travels as a duo: "I've never seen a
styrofoam before t" But despite
their casual verve, they were absolutely precise, and carved every
nuance of the music with
meticulous care. And with soul.
They let the tones of piano and
vibraphone ring long, for instance,
hanging and blending in the air long
after a piece was over.
Their own compositions were
perhaps the most intriguing.
Hodgkinson's melodious, swinging
ballads, were great /contrast to
PJItzecfcer's peppery rhythms and
wild gesticulation.
They were hilarious. And they
played great jazz. This Pendulum
swings to one amazing beat. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,1986
Watson defends sinkings
From page 3
charges should be laid against Watson.
Watson, though, is unconcerned.
"In Canada, they can only
charge me with conspiring to commit a crime in another country. But
that cannot be proven as there was
no telephone or mail correspondence in Canada, or from
Canada, with the activists who went
to Iceland," he says.
Watson also thinks Smith had
personal reasons for wanting to
charge Watson. Smith, Watson
believes, was embarassed by Watson during the last wolf kill campaign in B.C.
Legal problems are not new to
Watson. In 1981, Sea Shepherd invaded Russian territory to film illegal Russian whaling activities.
After being pursued and then
threatened by Soviet navy vessels,
Sea Shepherd escaped and
presented it's information to a
grateful IWC organization.
Watson also struck earlier in
1979. Sea Shepherd rammed, not
once but twice, the pirate whaler
Sierra. After being repaired in
Lisbon harbour, the Sierra was
sunk in April 1980 by Sea Shepherd
activists without injury. The Sea
Shepherd was responsible that year
for the sinking of the Spanish
whalers Isba I and Isba II, also
without injury.
Closer to home, Watson has been
criticized by Greenpeace for
destroying years of environmental
success in the whaling field with his
radical actions.
Watson shrugs off the attacks
and in turn accuses Greenpeace of
"bureaucratic conservatism".
Organizations like Greenpeace,
Watson says, have a vested interest
in the continuation of whaling.
Without the money generated by
anti-whaling campaigns ($50
million in the U.S. last year), these
people would be out of work.
Therefore, says Watson, these
groups, specifically Greenpeace, do
not vigorously oppose whaling.
Watson adds, "not one single
Greenpeace campaign has ever saved a whale".
The need for effective environmental   protection,   Watson
says, is greater now than in the past.
Citing the Global 2000 report, a
report on world conditions in the
year 2000, Watson says one quarter
of all plant and animal life will be
extinct by the year 2000. We are losing valuable serial crops and
medicines before they have been
discovered, he says. The radicals,
he charges, are those who are
destroying the planet for nothing
but profit.
It is because Watson sees the
world in such simple terms that he is
complacent about the destruction
of private property. Life, he says, is
more important than proterty.
Sea shepherd, Watson says,
breaks civil law only in the face of a
higher, universal law, that is the
right to life.
History, Watson says, will vindicate him and his cause.
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Fully licensed lounge and sundeck,
lodge and cafeteria
Buy your pass by November 28 lo be
eligible for a fantastic Grand Prize
Passes available at:
The UBC Intramural Sports Office
Room 66 Lower SUB Concourse
Phone 228-6688
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DaycrNfeht...
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machines are available 24 hours a day!
Bank during YOUR hours anytime, day or
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If your hectic classroom schedule keeps you
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see us about a Royal Bank Client Card. With
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own Personal Security Code! Cards without credit entitlement are available to all
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There are over 80 Personal Touch Banking
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ROYAL BANK Friday, November 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
vista
Vancouver has a free Arts Hotline where a
living human being, not a recording, answers
all your questions about entertainment. Call
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday:
734-ARTS.
stage
Many theatre tickets can be purchased for
half-price on the day of the performance at
Front Row Centre (1025 Robson, 683-2017).
It's Snowing on Saltspring, the play
Nicola Cavendish wrote, about a magical
Christmas on Saltspring where Cavendish, a
remarkable actress and playwright who also
graduated from UBC and is going to Broadway in Janaury plays four different roles, and
it's at the Arts Club Seymour Street (1181
Seymour, 687-1644), December 4 - January 3,
Monday to Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays at
6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., 2 for 1 matinees
Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m., with special holiday schedule.
Don Messer's Jubilee, the newest play by
famous Canadian musical writer John Gray
(who wrote Bitly Bishop), and who hopes this
musical tribute to this legendary Canadian
entertainer will make everyone forget his
Christmas play of a few years back (Better
watch out . . .), at the Arts Club Granville
Island (687-1644), November, until
whenever, Monday to Friday at 8:30 p.m.,
Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.,
Wednesdays, 2 for 1 at 5:30 p.m.
Ain't  Misbahavin',  the longest  running
musical ever in the history of the free world, at
the  Arts  Club  Revue  Theatre  (Granville
Island,  687-1644),  same  times  as above,
until the end of time.
Babel Rap, the famous one-act by local
playwright John Lazarus, who is related to
Bonnie, at Studio 58 (Langara campus, W.
49th, 324-5227), at 12:30 p.m., December 1-5.
Forever Yours Marie Lou, a one-act by
Michel Tremblay and directed by Catherine
Caines and on the Freddy Wood Stage
(UBC, 228-2678), December 3-6 at 8 p.m.,
FREE.
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
10% DISCOUNT ON
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LICENSED PREMISES
Mon -Fn. 1130-9:00 p.m
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Sundavs and Holidays   '
4:00 p m   9 p.m
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M-TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
The Death of Pilate, a very bloody
medieval piece about poor Pilate's demise,
and directed by Bruce Dow (who was in Lear
five years ago), in the Dorothy Somerset
Studio (around the back of the Freddy Wood
Building) November 2-4 at 12:30 p.m., FREE.
The Madwoman of Chaillot, by the
never-heard-from-before Theatre program at
Capilano College (Theatre R Building Studio
105, 986-1911 for directions) December 3-6
and 10-12 at 8 p.m.
Private Lives, Amanda and Elyot, once
married to each other, meet again by chance
while honeymooning with new spouses on
the Riviera in this mad foray to the fringes of
theatrical experience, offered up by the ever-
testing Vancouver Playhouse (Hamilton at
Dunsmuir, 873-3311), December 6 to
sometime in January, cheaper preview night
is December 5.
Charley's Aunt, the amusing story of an
Oxford undergraduate who dresses as a
woman for reasons typical of Oxford
undergraduates, and the entire play, including
the rather complicated denouement, is explained entirely in the press release, at
Presentation House (333 Chesterfield, N.
Van., 986-1351 for directions), December
3-20, Tuesday to Friday at 8 p.m., Wednesday
at 5 p.m. (2 for 1), Saturdays at 6 p.m. and 9
p.m., Sundays at 2:30 p.m.
Pinocchio, Carousel's stupendous new
Christmas production that will soon be
reviewed by big, bad, Jimmy Nelmes, at the
Waterfront Theatre (Granville Island,
685-6217), Fridays at 8 p.m., Saturdays at 2
and 8 p.m., until December 24,
Everyman in the '80s, a lively update of
the medieval classic by a brand new profes
sional theatre company called Theatre at Lrge,
whose artistic directors both went to UBC, at
Heritage Hall, (Main and 15th, 683-2257),
November 22-December 5.
Main Street Players, a brand new professional theatre company will present five new
works, with an emphasis on B.C. playwrights,
at Vancouver Little Theatre (in the basement of Heritage Hall, Main and 15th,
876-4165) at 8 p.m. November 13-15, 20-22
and 27-29.
18 Wheels, a musical by John Gray (who
wrote Billy Bishop), in a production by one of
the best theatres in Vancouver, Studio 58
(Langara Campus, 100 W. 49th, 324-5227),
where their last production, Dreaming and
Duelling, was the best production in this city
in October, November 14-December 7, Tuesday to Saturday at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2:30
and 8 p.m., previews November 12, 13 at 8
p.m., are half price. Tickets are $6.
Theatresports, improvisational theatre
that provides jobs for many UBC graduates
and is often good and occasionally tasteless,
at City Stage (751 Thurlow, 683-2017), Friday
and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m.
Scared Scriptless, improvisational theatre
at the Arts Club Revue Theatre (Granville
Island, where Ain't Misbehavin' lives), Fridays
at 11:30 p.m.
music
The Vancouver Cantata Singers, singing
Shakespeare set to music, with dramatic
readings by Malcolm Armstrong, the Richmond Gateway Theatre (6500 Gilbert Road,
270-1812), November 29 at 8 p.m., and at the
Arts Club Granville Island (687-1644),
November 30 at 8 p.m.
The Rhythm Pigs, a three-piece San Fran-
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Shriekback. a dynamic British band, at the
Commodore Ballroom (870 Granville,
681-7838), December 4, 5.
Saxon, a real living,  breathing,  roaring,
rock and roll band, at the New York Theatre
(639 Commercial Dr., 254-5934), December 2.
Parachute Club, smart, tough, and passionate, according to the L.A. Times, at the
continued on page 11
UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC
COUNCIL
The Alma Mater Society is now accepting applications for three (3) student positions on the University Athletic Council (U.A.C.)
The U.A.C. is responsible for all areas governing
athletics on campus, including finance and long
range planning.
Applications can be picked up in SUB Room 238 &
returned with brief resume by December 5th, 4:00
p.m.
BUY ONE
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Bring a friend, better yet,
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SIDE DOOR
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Come Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays...
You'll be Glad you Did! Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28, 1986
tween dosses
TODAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Speech, "Soviet Perception of the Reykjavik
Summit," by Thomas Perry, noon, SUB 206.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational   meeting,   everyone   welcome,
noon. International House.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
An Evening of opera, French Tickner director —
scenes from works of Mozart, Verdi. Massenet,
and Stravinsky, 8:00 p.m., Old Auditorium. Free
admission.
Also, Guest Artist Performance: Dennis Simons,
violin from London, England, 3:35 p.m.. Recital
Hall.
UBC r-n (EX-CE-L-L-E-N-T) -. T
Th e  eat e r Y
1 FREE BUB6ER
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF ft TOFU BURGERS ONLY,
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OH ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5298
GREY HP
SEE IT LIVE IN THE
SUNDAY, NOV. 30
at 1:30 p.m.
GREAT FOOD & REFRESHMENTS
FEATURING FOR THE FIRST TIME
TWO GREAT SPECIALS EACH FOR
$1.99
THE THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
6066 THUNDERBIRD BLVD. 228-6121
EVERYONE WELCOME. . .
GREAT GOLF! BEAUTIFUL CLUBHOUSE! FABULOUS FOOD!
THE ALL NEW PUBLIC
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
An Outstanding Public Course and Clubhouse
z:u(J p.m.
224-7513
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
MARTY GILLAN
Fri.-Sat., Nov. 28-29-8 p.m.-12:00 a.m.
We can honestly say we have the best prices in town!
University Golf Club
5185 UNIVERSITY BLVD., VANCOUVER, B.C.
Banquet & Office Phone: 224-7513
Pro Shop Phone: 224-1818
Also, Collegium Musicum Ensembles: John
Sawyer, Ray Nurse and Moma Russell, directors, (repeat of Nov. 27 concert), noon, UBC
School of Music Recital Hall.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Pub nite, 7:30 p.m. - 12:00 a.m., SUB 212.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Xmaa party for all fourth year psychology
students, noon -12:30 a.m., Kenny Building, 1st
floor-Atrium.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Gymn nite - bedminton and volleyball, 8:00
-11:00 p.m., Osborne Gymn.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Beer garden, 4:00-8:00 p.m., SUB 215.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion Service, 10:00 a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Sunday worship service, 12:00 p.m., 2490 W.
2nd Ave.
MONDAY
FILM SOCIETY (SUBFILMS)
.Film: Paul Newman in "Exodus," 7:00 p.m. only,
SUB auditorium.
AMS ART GALLERY
Art show, 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., AMS Art
Gallery.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Video Night — On the Waterfront, Casa Bianca,
7:30 p.m., Grad Centre Lounge.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
General meeting, everyone welcome, noon,
Grad student Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Study and discussion group, all welcome, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM group I meeting. All members pick up
newsletters and obtain party tickets, noon, Hebb
12.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, 5:00 - 6:00 p.m., SUB ballroom.
JOIN!     J0,N!
JOIN!
JOIN!      JOIN!
Hey!!! are you a prospective young writer?
Want a good start? Pierre
Berton & Allan Fother-
ingham did it at the
Ubyssey so why don't you
come on in to SUB 241 k?
We need news writers,
photographers & sports
writers.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines. 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days. $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
-_^_±, Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van,, B.C. V6T2A5
^p^P Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 29
CURES IN
CANCER
Dr. John Goldman
University of London &
Hammersmith Hospital,
England
Lecture Hall 2, UBC Woodward
        Building at 8:15 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
IBM SELECTRIC 3 Typewriter. Complete
with correcting tape. $450 OBO. 734-4777.
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER. Sharp PA-1000.
Display correction, memory system as weli
as 5 ribbon cassettes & thermal paper.
$250. 732-9806.
1979 PONTIAC CATALINA, V8, 305, 4 dr.,
P. brakes, P. steering, air cond., stereo, excellent condition. Ph. 943-0429.
1981 LADA 1500S. one owner, 100,000 kms,
good cond., runs well, many extras included, $1500 obo. 731-2495 anytime.
20 - HOUSING
GAGE. TOTEM PARK, PLACE VANIER &
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT: room and board,
and room only: Available for men & women
in the student residences. For information,
apply at the student housing office, 2071
West Mall, Ponderosa Bldg., or call
228-2811, Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
ROOM FOR RENT in shared house with
Spanish-speaking family. Female student
N/S. Richmond. 277-1453.
16th & HIGHBURY. $250. Female to share 2
BR home. 266-2636.
KERRISDALE. Spacious, furn. bachelor
suite. Gd. level. Firepl. $375/mo. incl. util.
Jeanette day: 261-7276; hm: 263-9204.
30 - JOBS
30 - JOBS
ARE YOU FREE ON Tues. (11:15 a.m. -
5:15 p.m.) & Thurs. (8:30 a.m. - 5:X p.m.)?
We require a mature, respon., N/S person
to care for our 2 children (3 & 6) in our
home, vicinity 16th & Arbutus. Transportation an asset. Start Jan. 1987. Ph. 734-3720
bet. 9 & 4, M-F or 738-9937 after 7 p.m.
35 - LOST
LOST—Gold/silver men's Seiko Lassale
watch, bathroom (M) Buch B211, Fri., Nov.
21. Reward if found. Ph. Lyndon 253-9478.
KEY RING includes Toyota, UBC, round
bike, color coded. Lost between Education
and Acadia housing. Phone 228-1761.
Reward.
70 - SERVICES
PREGNANT?
Free Tests ■
731-1122
Confidential Help
CRISIS PREGNANCY! Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests).
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
presents
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, NOV. 30th
following the service.
Dr. John Conway
will lead a forum
on "The Jewishness
of Christianity"
Everyone is We/come
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
OPPORTUNITY TO EARN money on a
commission basis selling used cars as well
as lots of time to study. Approx. 4 hrs. /day.
Call   Hank,   736-0855   between   5:30-6:30
p.m.
BABYSITTER needed. My home, near UBC,
for 2 children. Mondays, 9:30 a.m.-4:30
p.m. starting Jan. '87. $5/hr. 228-8339.
PART-TIME WORK selling designer earrings
straight from artist. Deborah 224-7144.
BARTENDERS, WAITERS, WAITRESSES
Full & part time. Must be fully experienced
in all aspects of high volume bar procedures. Bubbly personality & pride in the
position is essential. Willingness to promote in-house functions would be an asset.
Neatness & cleanliness a must. Please send
resume with covering letter to: Mark
McDougall, UBC Thunderbird Sports Centre, 6066 Thunderbird Blvd., Vancouver,
B.C. V6T 1W5.
COOKS. Full & part time. Requires a person
with a knowledge of operations &
maintenance for a new kitchen facility. Experience in food costing, menus Et stock
control is a must. Friendly personality, high
energy levels & a positive outlook is essential. Please send resume with covering letter
to: Mark McDougall, UBC Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre, 6066 Thunderbird
Blvd., Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5.
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
AND PRESBYTERIAN
CONGREGATIONS
invite you to join us in worship
Sunday mornings at 10:20 a.m.
in the Epiphany Chapel.
Vancouver School of Theology
Young Adult Groups Sunday
or Monday evenings.
PHONE 224-6377
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
RESEARCH PAPERS
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Time and Improve Your Grades!
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213-477-8226
Ext
49
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Custom research also available—all levels
75 - WANTED
UNIVERSITY STUDENT in Australia study
ing for B.A. in Humanities looking for a
"pen pal" in Vancouver to learn about
lifestyle, etc. in Canada. Write Michaela
Dedek, 28, Delicia Rd., Mapleton, 4560,
Queensland, Australia.
85 - TYPING
WILL DO TYPING in my Kits apartment.
Undergrad. degree and, small
business/executive-clerical experience.
Reas. rates. Prof'l appearance. Don
734-1715.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM  NOTICE REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumas,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORDWEAVERS - word processing
(multi-linguai). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area.  Paula, 873-2227 24
hrs.
ACADEMIC and BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reas. rates. Days/evenings. 263-4862.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-10 p.m. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE. -
WORD PROCESSING, EDITING, writing:
resumes, theses, papers, letters. Pick-up &
delivery avail. 324-9924.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
THE   GOOD   WORD   PROCESSING   CO.
Spelling,  grammar expertise.  Days,  eves,
wknds. Stud, rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies.
Stud, rates. 3737 W 10th at Alma
222-2661.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1 50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form tetters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing, 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & VISA accepted.
ON-LINE TYPING SERVICES Fall special
Fast, professional results @ $1.10/dble-
spaced pg. In-town or Richmond drop-off
or pick up. Glenna 277-0410 (24 hrs.)
WORD PROCESSING - Experienced,
reasonable. UBC location. Heather,
228-5528 or 261-7652 after 5 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
Resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind Kinko's
Copies, 224-0763. Student rates.
TYPING & WORDPROCESSING: Fast &
accurate. Student rates OR rent your own
station/hr. on our U-Type plan. 734-1612.
ACCENT WORD PROCESSING - 278-0764.
Francais - English - Italian. Delivery on campus - letter quality.
W/P TYPING: Term papers, theses, mscpts,
essays, tech. equations, letters, resumes.
Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
NO FANCY TYPESETS-Just a correctly
typed and correctly proofread paper for
$1.10/pg. (tables extra). Experienced. Campus pick-up, drop-off. 736-9031.
SUPPORT THE
UBYSSEY! Friday, November 28,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
vista
music
From page 9
Queen   Elizabeth   Theatre   (Hamilton   at
Georgia, 280-4444), December 3.
The Golub-Kaplan-Carr Trio, playing an
all Beethoven programme with the Vancouver
Symphony at the Orpheum (Smithe at
Seymour, 280-4444), December 6 at 8:30 p.m.
and December 8 at 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, with
soloists Jon Kimura Parker and Steven Dann,
at the Orpheum (Smithe at Seymour,
280-4444), November 30 at 2:30 p.m.,
December 1 at 8:30 p.m., and December 2 at
7:30 p.m.
Terrance Simien and the Mallet
Playboys, Cajun music, brewed in bayous of
Louisiana and simmering in the nightspots of
New Orleans, at the Town Pump (66 Water
St., 683-6695), December 2-6.
David Lee Roth, from Van Halen, now he
re-records Beach Boys songs, at the Pacific
Coliseum (P.N.E. grounds, 280-4444),
December 7.
Drum Heat, a three-day festival of percussion with dancers and singers, at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (1895
Venables, 254-9578), November 27-29 at 8:30
p.m.
The Twinkle Brothers, a solid reggae
group known for their infectious roots dance
sound, they were here in June 1985, at the
Commodore Ballroom (870 Granville,
681-7838), December 6 at 8 p.m.
Billy Bragg, reluctant folk hero who draws
together rock, folk and punk, whose new
album is entitled Talking to the Taxman about
Poetry, at 86 Street (B.C. Place, 280-4444),
December 5 at 8:30 p.m.
The Unicorn, the Gorgon and the Man-
ticore, Gian Carlo Menotti's satirical fairy
tale, a series of twelve madrigals which tell the
story of a poet and his three "children", at the
Orpheum (Smithe at Seymour, 738-6822),
December 5 at 8 p.m.
donee
Five Moving Pieces, new dance works by
SFU faculty and students, kind of like Fame,
wht Kay Huang, at Simon Fraser (on top of
that mountain, 29J-3514), November 27-29 at
8 p.m., November 28 at 12:30 p.m.
From Letterman to Richmond
THE COMEDY
SHOPPE
al The Sk>line
presents
mmm
JONATHAN
tonite at 8 & 10 p.m.
Sat. & Sun. in the Skypub
Call 278-5161
for showtimes, tickets
SKYLINE AIRPORT
HOTEL
3031 No. 3 Road, Richmond
JERRY'S COVE
GREY CUP WEEKEND
COME JOIN
JERRY'S COVE
(MINIMIS
fas Tow of Pibs
Sit., Nw. 29
(Tickets available at the bar)
WATCH YOUR TEAM IN
ACTION, SUN., NOV. 30
50% OFF FOOD ALL DAY
JERRY'S COVE
NeigUMvhood Pib
3881 W. 4th (Alma)   734-1205
campus countdown
CITR   •   UBC
# ARTIST
Shriekback
Billy Bragg
Fishbone
John Zorn
The Stranglers
Talking Heads
XTC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
lO
Big Audio Dynamite
The Chameleons
This Mortal Coil
Radio   •   FM102   •   CablelOO
ALBUM
Big Night Music
Talking With The Taxman
In  Your Face
The Big Gundown
Dreamtime
True Stories
Skylarking
No.  10,  Upping St.
Strange Times
Filigree & Shadow
Hear the Countdown in The Pit every Thurs., 8:30 p.m
film
Exodus, the story of the birth of Israel in
which Paul Newman plays Ari Ben Canaan, in
SUB auditorium, December 1 at 7 p.m.
Legal Eagles, a comedy with Robert Redford in which he plays himself, for a change,
in the SUB auditorium, December 4-7,
Thursday-Saturday at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.,
Sunday at 7 p.m.
Adam's Rib and Dance, Girl Dance, the
comedy about the tribulations of a district attorney, with Spencer Tracy and Katherine
Hepburn, and the film from the 1940's by
female director Dorothy Arzner, in SUB
auditorium, December 3, at 7 p.m. and 9:30
p.m.
Stalker, the journey of three men from a
devastated post-urban wasteland into a realm
of ambiguously transformed nature, by exiled
Russian film-maker Andrei Tarkovsky (1979)
at Pacific Cinematheque (1131 Howe St.,
688-3456), November 28-30, at 7:30 p.m.
Nostalghia, a Russian musicologist, investigating the life of a Russian composer exiled in Italy, meets an outcast and is drawn into
her crusade to save the world, by exiled Russian film-maker Andrei Tarkovsky, Pacific
Cinematheque, (1131 Howe St., 688-3456),
December 4, 6 at 7:30 p.m.
The 1986 International Advertising Film
Festival, the best of television advertising
gathered from around the world, at the Ridge
(16th and Arbutus, 738-6311), December
5-11, at 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
galleries
Broken Muse, the work of 15 young Vancouver artists, at the Vancouver Art Gallery
(750 Hornby, 682-5621), until January 18.
Ten Years Later, the anniversary exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery (555
Hamilton, 687-1345I, until December 20.
Circus Dreams, Adrian Ross transforms
the gallery into a circus of colour and whimsey
in an exhibition of sculptural animals and
birds, banners and tableaus inspired by
childhood dreams, at the Cartwright Gallery
(1411 Cartwright St., Granville Island,
687-8266), December 4-28.
The Company She Keeps portraits of
family, friends, and associates form the
nucleus of these recent sculptures by the
chair of Emily Carr's three-dimensional division, Sally Michener, in the UBC Fine Arts
Gallery (north end of Main Library,
228-2759), until December 19.
Salt-water City: the Chinese in Vancouver, 1886-1986. at the Chinese Cultural
Centre (50 E. Pender, 687-0729), until
December 21.
The Alien Equation, we are not alone, at the
H.R. MacMillan Planetarium (1100
Chestnut, 736-4431), often.
Sandra L. Hall, a new painging show in the
AMS Gallery (SUB), opens Monday, until
November 28.
hot flash
Sea Shepherd activist Paul Watson debates with Doug Collins,
North Shore News joke reporter,
today in SUB auditorium at noon.
Come and see what new insults the
ingenious Mr. Collins can come up
with today. Watson was recently
involved in an altercation with whaling ships in Iceland.
Cheers to... mike
CRITCHLEY
AMS#
Fogg AMS #
13355839
1 (C   /v' Ik ^ou are *'1's wee^ s lucky
I *tea"'—     .. -r^ Fogg n Suds AMS Card Winner.
I Everything   UBC  wants Call 73-BEERS,
1in a Restaurant. For less. Fogg on 4th
0
ACCEPTNO SCHNAPPSTTTUTES.
In the interest of
.public awareness we bring
you the complete
story of how to
recognize cool,
crisp Hiram
Walker Schnapps.
Highly decorative
Hiram Walker coat
of arms.
An amazing 750
millilitres per bottle.
1858: The year in which
Hiram Walker, with —
appropriate fanfare
and general hoopla,
proudly opened his
first distillery.
Conspicuous by their
absence are the
designations of the
many flavours of
Hiram Walker Schnapps
such as Peach, Orange,
Peppermint, etc.
(not shown here).
Hiram Walker gPSons
denotes that the
Hiram Walker tradition of monstrously
good quality lives on.
Transparent cool,
crisp f lavourful liquid
ideal for any sized
cylindrical object.
— Very clever "fc'-Z "opening twist- off style cap.
Economically
 designed hand-sized
neck for foolproof
pouring.
Exclusive "Hiram
Walker" name seen
only on "Hiram Walker'
products.
I he Hiram Walker
name and coat of arms
, boldly displayed.
/ twice, on each and
S      ever^ bottle.
In this space go the
many illustrations
of the many flavours
f of Hiram Walker
/ Schnapps.
"Schnapps', as in
Hiram Walker, The
/ best selling Schnapps
/ in Canada,
"Liqueur": an unusually accurate descrip-
„ tion of the contents
herein.
Walkerville, Canada.
,The birthplace of
Hiram Walker Schnapps.
In order to complete
your Schnapps education may we suggest
writing to us for some
spellbinding Hiram
Walker Schnapps
recipes, P.O. Box 2343,
Department S,
Brampton, Ontario
L6T 3Y9.
Hiram Walker Schnapps.
Taste the Difference. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 28,1986
Carleton engineers apologize for insulting paper
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carleton
University's student engineering
society escaped with little more than
a hand slap at a recent council
meeting, following a month-long
review of the society's policies, actions and structure.
A review board was established
to investigate charges that the society was violating the council's constitution by distributing sexist,
racist and homophobic material on
campus.
The board in a 16-page report
concluded the society violated the
constitution by distributing its
newspaper The Orifice and several
hundred copies of a banned
Labatt's Breweries poster, both of
which were deemed sexist.
Although the council's constitution states de-certification or
withdrawal of all council funding
and resources may occur if a society
violates the constitution, another
council committee chose a milder
option of binding the society to
follow a set of recommendations.
As a result of the ruling, the
society must drop all social events
that show a "direct or indirect intent to harm any individual or property," establish an editorial board
for its newspaper, and take recommendations from a board of experts" on how to achieve journalistic professionalism.
The review board concluded the
society has been "run
irresponsibly," and called its "control over its actions and accoun
tability . . . severely lacking."
Review board member Paul
Edgecombe said the decision was
not strong enough, calling it a
"white-wash" which did not match
the board's conclusions.
"The complaint (that The Orifice
violated council's constitution) still
stands unacted upon. That's the
bottom line," he said.
But review board member Amy
Heron said the engineering society
executive showed a willingness to
co-operate.
"When we started out I think we
all wanted de-certification — every
one of us was really out for blood,"
she said. "But as the review went
on,    most    of   us   changed    our
minds."
In a letter to The Charlatan,
Carleton's campus-wide student
newspaper, the society's executive
apologized to "the gay community
at Carleton, and in particular, to
the gay students in engineering,"
for comments made in The Orifice.
earl's earl's earl's
10th ave./trimble
#222-1342
mexican days dec. 1-5
fashion show dec. 7 .,„„„„
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m.-11:00 p.m./Fri. & Sat. 11:30 a.m.-midnight
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT—C.A. FIRM
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
If you are a 2nd or 3rd year accounting student with
academic and leadership abilities and are interested in professional employment with a C.A. firm May to August
1987, please submit your resume (UCPA form is suitable)
and a copy of your most recent transcript of marks by
December 17, 1986 to the Canada Employment Centre on
Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. Campus interviews will
be held in mid-January.
Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Office.
Highlights of Changes
to 1987
Autoplan
Effective January 1,1987
Liability Limits
For the majority, increases will be under
$25. About a quarter of a million will pay
between $26 and $50 more. For about 5,000
commercial vehicles with larger premiums
than private passenger cars, the increase
will be over $50.
For many motorists, an increase inThird
Party Legal Liability premiums will be offset
to some extent by a reduction in the cost of
Collision coverage. Those who do not carry
Collision will be most affected by the premium increases.
A limit of $15 million Third Party Legal
Liability is now available for all vehicles.
Weekly Payments Increase
The weekly "No-Fault" payments for disability or death increase from $130 to $145
for victims of accidents occurring on or
after January 1, 1987.
Weekly dependent survivor payments
increase from $30 to $35 for victims of
accidents occurring on or after January 1,
1987.
Equipment of a Motor Vehicle
Revised coverage will apply to new and
renewal policies issued on or after January 1,
1987 for most private passenger and light
commercial vehicles. Attached equipment
supplied by or available from the vehicle
manufacturer is automatically covered with
no dollar limit.
Coverage for equipment not supplied
by or available from the vehicle manufacturer has dollar limits:
• a $500 limit applies to coverage for permanently attached sound and communication equipment;
• a $ 1,000 limit applies to coverage for any
other permanently attached equipment.
e.g., special paint finish and canopies.
Where it is of benefit to the motorist, the
new additional coverage will also apply to
existing 1986 policies for accidents occurring on or after January 1, 1987.
Some premium comparisons for motorists with a four year claim-free discount:
Medium priced
Vancouver Island
Fraser Valley and
Northern B.C.
vehicle
South
Central and North
Southern Interior
1985
1986
1987
1985
1986
1987
1985
1986
1987
1985
1986
,1987
1985
1986
1987
Pleasure use only
$441
$402
$426
$361
$329
$349
$381
$348
$370
$368
$335
[$355
$406
$368
$390
To or From Work
r   543
500
527
445
410
432
469
433
456
453
417
439
501
459
482
Business use
666
553
571
546
453
467
575
479
494
556
461
475
619 :    511
525
1987 AUTOPLAN
MOTORIST KIT
Information at
your fingertips!
Pick up your copy
from any Autoplan
agent or Motor
Licence Office.
□ INSURANCE
CORPORATION
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

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