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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1967

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Array I '■•'''. .     Jt-
Vol. XLVIII, No. 44
VANCOUVER, B.C.,   FRIDAY,   FEBRUARY  3,   1967
COLLEGE
Seven seek seats
for two AMS posts
Acclaimed to office Thursday Catherine Kerr, education
4, is now AMS secretary for the
year 1967-68.
She was one of eight candidates who .filed nomination papers Thursday for the positions
of AMS president, second vice-
president,  and secretary.
Miss Kerr was running on a
slate of candidates with presidential hopeful Bob Cruise, law
3, and second vice-president
candidate Doug Halverson, arts
3.
She declined comment to The
Ubyssey after she was acclaimed.
Elections for the positions of
second vice-president and president   will  be  held  on  Feb.   8.
Second slate elections for first
vice-president, co-ordinator, and
treasurer will be on Feb. 15
with nomination papers.due by
Feb. 9.
Running for AMS president
are   Cruise,   Frank   Flynn,   sci-
AND BRIDGE, TOO
Poets plead, prate
— powell hargrave photo
KEY TO VICTORY is to be unopposed, as
new secretary Catherine Kerr takes the easy
way   onto   AMS   executive.   Post   includes
plush/ private office, for privacy.
By  HELEN   MANNING
"Who knows what lurks in
the hair of men?" Poet Scott
Lawrence asked Thursday.
Similar puzzles were posed to
over 1,000 students and faculty
members who crammed, pushed and shoved their way
through a poets' market on the
second floor Buchanan Thursday.
They were attracted there by
the promise of seeing Vancouver poets in action as part of
the Festival of Contemporary
Arts, and they weren't disappointed.
Under the supervision of architecture and fine arts students, colored construction
paper blotted out blackboards
and hall ceiling lights to pro
vide  "atmosphere."
In the four large lecture halls
17 poets read.
Poets also read in the lounge
with the aid of a humming microphone. Booths set up to sell
their works madly made change.
Those looking for the bizarre
were happy. There were ragged blue jeans, scraggy beards,
bare feet and tripsy projections.
The poets themselves spouted  the  best  commentary.
"They might be slightly bizarre, but they happen sometimes."
"The next is a louse tale."
The excitement generated toy
the original creations by-passed
ten students, who managed to
carry on with the inevitable
Buchanan lounge card game in
the midst of the crushing crowd.
ence 3, Pete Olsen, applied science 3 and Shaun Sullivan,
commerce 2.
Candidates for second vice-
president are Halverson, May-
nard Hogg, science 2 and Kim
Campbell, arts 2.
Sullivan and Campbell are
Blue Guard members.
The campaign will begin at
an all-candidates meeting on
Monday Feb. 6 at noon in
Chemistry 250.
Cruise took a quick jump at
noon Thursday and 'began lecturing on himself and his ideas,
challenging other candidates to
debate in front of the library at
noon today.
Cruise, perched on tables in
the auditorium cafeteria and
Ponderosa told lunch-hour audiences: "I challenge all other
bureaucrats running for AMS
positions to state exactly what
they are going to do, if elected,
rather than what they say they
are going to do."
"I don't call myself a bureaucrat," he added. "We need a
student government that isn't
wishy-washy."
He cited the AMS executive
turn-about over the strike referendum as a perfect example
of ineffective student government.
"We need to form a real student movement that is concerned and will act."
Cruise called the university
a "knowledge factory turning
out so many degrees per year.
"We must work to build the
kind of university we really
want."
ARTICLE OBSCENE;
SAYS CAMPUS  COP'
Students riot over magazine ban
ITHACA, N.Y. (UNS) — The censorship of a
campus literary mazagine caused a riot by 1,000
angry Cornell University Students here.
They prevented the arrest of five students by
surrounding the unmarked police car in which
they were being held, letting the air out of the
tires, snapping off the aerial, and writing obscene
words on the car.
They threw snowballs at district attorney
Richard Thaler, dislodging his glasses.
The students shouted: "Get off the campus",
and "There are no dirty words, just dirty minds".
"We had a riot on our hands," said the district
attorney after retreating to the town. He then
armed himself with an injunction to stop the sale
and distribution of the magazine, the Trojan
Horse, containing an article considered offensive.
The 14-page article, "Selections from the Journal of David Murray", included a description of
some sexual fantasies. The author is said to be a
non-student now on the West Coast.
The printer, Art Craft of Ithaca, Inc., refused
to handle the piece on the grounds of obscenity
but ran off the rest of the issue. The student
editors, however, were not to be denied. Using
an offset press, they published the article and
stapled it to the front jacket of every one of the
estimated 14,000 copies of the Trojan Horse.
The next day, James M. Herson, the chief
campus policeman, concluded the piece was obscene- Acting on his own he raided Williard
Straight Hall and Noyes Hall, where the magazine
was for sale, and confiscated 135 copies.
On Herson's recommendation, dean of graduate studies W. Donald Cooks, issued a statement
saying the magazine had been banned because of
a complaint that the issue was obscene and in
violation of regulations of the student government
committee.
Denouncing this action as "censorship in its
most abhorrent form — censorship of a brave,
honest writer," James K. Moody, a past Trojan
Horse editor and David M. Brandt, president of
Gone to ground
Presidential candidate Dr. Ducky Fishworth
Thursday denied reports he saw groundhogs on
Groundhog Day.
"Nonsense, I saw no groundhogs. Nor am I
a candidate," grunted Fishworth, mentioned by a
downtown paper as a possible replacement for
president Dr. John Macdonld.
Thursday was groundhog day. UBC legend
says when groundhogs appear on such a day there
will probably be spring.
"It's a marvellous tradition," said classics head
Dr. Malcolm MacGregor. "And it's true too although radicals who are trying to destroy the
university may deny it"
"Certainly, I saw a groundhog," MacGregor
added. "He spoke Greek. I spoke Latin to him.
He was charming."
the executive board of student government, said
they would defy the ban by selling the magazine.
Students and college officials said the whole
matter might have been smoothed over had it not
been for district attorney Thaler "getting into
the act."
Thaler, whose popularity at Cornell has waned
since he unsuccessfully tried using undercover
agents to investigate alleged narcotics traffic on
campus, told deans he would invade the campus
and suppress further distribution of the magazine.
When Thaler arrived, students mobilized their
strategy. Crowds gathered and copies of Trojan
Horse went on sale.
"They sold like Fanny Hill in Boston," said
a student later.
Using a bullhorn Thaler told the jeering crowd:
"If you chose to sell now, I have no alternative
but to arrest anyone who sells the magazine."
His words were greeted with groans and shouts
of "Did you read it?" and "What right have you
to be a literary critic?"
When five magazine sellers were arrested and
thrown into the police car, it was quickly in-
mobilized by the students.
The five youths were subsequently released to
the cheering crowd when Thaler went for the
injunction.
James A- Perkins, Cornell president, said he
had not asked Thaler to intervene.
The New York Civil Liberties Union issued a
statement accusing the campus police and Thaler
of "conducting a hysterical smut hunt." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 3, 1967
TWO-DAY BATTLE
Madrid campus sealed
MADRID (UNS) — Madrid University,
Spain's largest, was closed Tuesday after
two days of battling between students and
security police.
The university board of governors ordered all university schools, with an enrolment of 25,000, closed for three days.
The schools of political, economic and
commercial sciences were closed indefinitely as  "centers of subversive activity."
The action culminates weeks of steadily-
building tension.
Earlier, the tribunal of public order in
Madrid held three trials of students charged with taking part in "non-pacifist demonstrations of a political character."
One student from a Roman Catholic college in Navarre was charged with promoting a street demonstration last April In
Barcelona.
The public prosecutor demanded a sentence of seven year's imprisonment and a
fine of 50,000 pesetas ($750).
Three Spanish writers who preferred to
go to prison Sept. 13 rather than pay large
fines were released following wide-spread
protest.
The writers are Alfonso Sastre, Lopes
Salina, and Dioisio Riduejo.
They had been charged with taking part
in an unauthorized "spring assembly" of
1,000 students at Madrid University on May
20.
Student unrest was also concentrated at
the University of Barcelona.
The government-sponsored Students Pro
fessional Association (APE) was rejected by
Barcelona students at a meeting called by
the association's president Escos Otega.
Students, demanding official recognition
of their own union, toooed, kicked and spat
on Otega as- he left the university.
One of the student leaders warned that
there would be no peace until the suspensions of 70 assistant professors and the expulsion of 38 students were lifted.
Education students
in east-west switch
A Quebec centennial project will enable
nine students from the UBC faculty of education to visit St. Joseph's teachers' college in
Montreal.
The same number of students from St.
Joseph's are currently visiting UBC until
Feb. 5.
The UBC students on the Feb. 5-12 tour
will visit Ottawa as well as Montreal and
tour the Expo site. Lectures and seminars
on Quebec are being arranged by McGill
University, the University of Montreal and
three Montreal normal schools.
The Quebec students and professor Real
Boulianne will tour Vancouver harbor, visit
Simon Fraser Academy and the B.C. Hydro
building. They will join in UBC activities and
attend lectures.
The UBC students will be accompanied
by education professor Frank Hardwick.
BURSARY STARTED
,j        A bursary in memory of Robin Asselstine is being organized by UBC students,
the   business   community,   and   his   own
' family.
Asselstine was killed in a traffic accident in Washington state on Jan. 22.
TO BOOST  EDUCATION
The bursary is called the Robin Asselstine Memorial Bursary. Contributions to
the fund can be made at Dean Gage's office in Buchanan.
It is not known how the bursary will
be set up until the amount of money is
determined.
AMS to have gov't lobby
By DAVE CURSONS
The AMS will have an official AMS
lobbyist in the provincial government next
year.
AMS president Peter Braund called the
proposed office "a positive alternative to
the student strike".
Braund admitted the AMS "made a mistake with regard to the strike proposal"
but would not acknowledge off-campus public pressure as a factor in the backdown.
"I don't care what the public says or
what the administration says. It's what the
students say that counts in these matters,"
said Braund.
He said that the proposal for the
election of an external affairs officer to the
AMS council will be passed under the new
constitutional revisions and will go into effect next year.
"There has been discussion as to whether
he should be appointed or elected by the
student body", said Braund.
"I personally prefer a popular election",
he said.
"He would have to be a very effective
and articulate person, being responsible for
communicating individually with every
MLA for the entire fall term of the provincial legislature. He could either migrate
over there at the opening of the legislature
or at least commute regularly," said Braund.
Braund pointed out that education is not
a very prominent issue in the mind of most
MLA's.
"Until we are able to push the rural
MLA's there will be no action on education," he said.
An AMS lobbyist would conduct propaganda for education among MLA's.
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
AUTHOR OF
WAFTING   FOR  GODOT
Directed by Judi Freiman
Thur. 12:30 Fri.
Feb. 2 25c Feb. 3
FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
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PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 84 - February 1,  1967
Anna and the Indians. Shipley. Ryerson Press 2.25
Attitudes. Jahoda. Penguin  1.85
Black March.  Neumann. Bantam     .75
Book of the Eskimos. Freuchen. Crest         .95
Canada's Past and Present: A Dialogue. Univ. of Toronto Press 2.25
Compulsory Miss-Education and the Community of Scholars. Goodman.
Vintage      _.  -       2.65
Crack of Doom. Heinrich. Bantam      -   _       .75
Creativity in the Theatre A Psychoanalytic Study. Weissman. Delta 2.25
Critique of Pure Reason. Kant. Anchor      -   -    -    2.25
Death of God. Vahctnian. Braziller _   2.50
Experiements in Visual Perception. Vernon. Penguin 1.85
Flying Saucers; Startling  Evidence of the  Invasion from Outer Space.
Lorenzen. Signet      __             .75
Gestalt Therapy. Perls et al. Delta _  .        2.95
Girl from Peyton Place. Matalious    O'Shea. Dell _._.—           .60
Great Pianists From Mozart to the Present. Schonberg. Simon & Shuster - 2.75
Greek Passion. Kazantzakis. Simon & Schuster — 2.50
Heidegger's Philosophy. King. Delta 2.25
In Cold Blood. Capote. Signet ..   . _.   _   _--  1.25
Indian Tribes of Canada. Henness.  Ryerson 1.95
Industry in the U.S.A. Owen. Pelican . 1.25
Journal of the Soul. Pope John XXNI. Signet     1.25
Modern  Constitutions. Wheare.  Oxford   1.50
Motivation. Bindra & Stewart. Penguin      _-.    1.85
My Forty Years With Ford. Sorensen. Collier MacMillan     .95
New Horizons in Psychology. Fo»$. Pelican 1.65
On Translation. Brower. Oxford -   -  2.15
A Path to Modern Mathematics. Sawyer. Pelican 1.25
Personality Assessment. Semeonoff. Penguin       1.85
Pictorial History of the Third Reich. Neumann & Kippel. Bantam       .95
Planet Earth. Scientific American. Simon & Schuster 1.60
Psychology of Human Ageing. Bromley. Pelican _._.___-    1.35
Putnam Collegiate Guide to English Composition Book 1. Dieb. et al.
Putnam -.._  2.50
The Putnam Collegiate Guide to English Composition Book II. Holton.
Putnam _ .   -      2.50
The Putnam Collegiate Guide to History of Art Book I. Myron & Fanning.
Putnam -   ..    - ...  2.50
One Hundred and One Puzzles in Thought & Logic. Wylie. Dover 1.15
Radical Tradition. Tawney. Pelican  155
Reading For Speed and Better Grades. Herrick. Delta 1.25
Reed Shaken by the Wind. Maxwell. Four Square -        .85
Science and the Common Understanding. Oppenhelmer. Simon o. Schuster 1.40
Scratch One Reader. Stein. McClelland & Stewart       2.50
Sex in Christianity & Psychoanalysis. Cole. Oxford  2.15
Sexual Revolution. Vo. 1 & 2 Krafft-Ebing. Delta vol. 1 2.45
         vol. 2 2.25
Social Anthropology. Lienhardt. Oxford      . 1.50
Social Change. Ogburn. Delta -      ._     2.40
Son of the North. Camsell. Ryerson  -.    2.50
Source. Michener. Crest      --      1.65
Spanish Armada. Lewis. Pan __.         1.25
Structure of the Universe — Vol. 1. True. Simon & Schuster   2.50
Studies in Zen. Suzuki. Delta .  1.95
Tolkien Reader. Tolkien.  Ballantine               .95
Towns and Cities. Jones. Oxford   .-  1.50
Treatise on Law. Aquinas. Gateway     - ... 1.10
United States, Great Britain & British North America. Burt. Ryerson   3.25
Use of Imagination. Walsh. Peregrine      .   . - 2.95
Vinland Sagas: The Norse Discovery of America. Magni/sson & Palsson.
Penguin      _  . _  .     .85
Wait Without Idols. Vahanian. Braziller      --       .    - 2.50
Watcha Gonna Do Boy . . . Watcha Gonna BE? Taylor. McClelland &
Stewart  .   .   _  .    2.50
Ceil Division & the Mitotic Cycle. Wilson. Reinhold      -   .   _-..   ... 2.10
Death of Jesus. Carmichael. Dell ... .     - .     .75
Exploring the Supernatural. Lambert. Canadian Best Seller Lib. -          .95
New Russian Poets 1953 to 1966. An Anthology. Reavey. October House _ 3.50
UBC BOOKSTORE Friday, February 3,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
70 HUMANIZE...
...THE MULTIVERSITY
His students tipple as they learn
Discussing genes over beer and all-night,
honor-system exams.
These are two of the teachings methods currently used by zoology professor Dr. David
Suzuki. Suzuki related his attempts to humanize
the multiversity in an interview with The
Ubyssey Thursday.
Suzuki's methods have been criticized toy
some faculty officials and students.
Last year, science dean V. J. Okulitch circulated a memo to professors which banned take-
home and unlimited time examinations.
Of the 225 students in Suzuki's class, more
than 200 signed a petition asking the dean to
withdraw the ban and examine the system for
other courses.
Suzuki was allowed to continue his unorthodox examination methods.
Suzuki's unique night exams begin at 7 p.m.
and continue until buildings close at midnight.
These unusual conditions are an attempt to
eliminate the pressure of time on exams.
"I've tried to allow as much time as possible,"
Suzuki explains.
The examination conditions are very relaxed.
Students may go for coffee, have supper, and
smoke.
"Some students claim others will cheat,"
Suzuki said.
"Cheating is fine with me. They only hurt
themselves and they will get caught eventually."
Suzuki holds seminars in his senior courses
at the Fraser Arms.
"For the first weeks dirty jokes are told," he
said.
"After that we start talking genetics.
"It is a great learning situation."
Suzuki's methods are radical to the student
used to constant lectures and regularly scheduled
exams.
However, they are serious attempts to deal
with many problems faced by all lecturers on
campus.
One of the most serious problem is that of
numbers.
"There are just too many students and not
enough faculty and equipment," Suzuki said.
"The larger number of students means that
standards have to be set so that the majority
No homecoming...
There's an excellent chance that UBC will not
have a homecoming next year.
Applications for committee chairman were
posted at the beginning of term and were supposed
to be in the AMS office by Jan. 25. A choice
by AMS Council was to be made according to the
constitution by Feb. 1.
"Up until now no one has applied," this year's
chairman Dick Reed said.
"If no one applies within two weeks we simply
won't have a homecoming next year," Reed said.
can obtain their degrees."
This means that there is too much concern
to get the lower students through and not enough
concern for the top ten in a class.
"They are just left to work on their own and
are often not stimulated by the material," said
Suzuki.
"I would like special courses for the top
students. It would be expensive but is one solution."
Suzuki also felt that the science faculty is
not providing a complete education.
"Education should be an attempt to discover
what the university is, to become aware of one's
self, one's society, and the universe.
"It is distressing the number of science students who can't even write an essay or read a
novel.
"There should be more liberal arts courses
in the faculty of science," Suzuki said.
"The quality of education on campus is a
very legitimate issue that the students should
concern themselves with," Suzuki said.
"Students should work to improve the education within the existing framework.
"You can't tear down the structure-lecture
system, exams and so on — but you can try to
improve it.
"Students should be willing to experiment.
"There must be more communication between
faculty and students about educaiton," Suzuki
concluded.
UBC engineer produces
reading machine for blind
An associate professor of electrical engineering at UBC has perfected a machine
which enables the blind to read printed
matter in the form of sounds.
Dr. Michael Beddoes has just returned
from a leave of absence at Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, where he worked
intensively to iron out many of the machine's
— called the lexiphone — shortcomings.
One of the most significant changes was
a total revision of the sound code which the
blind person hears.
"A year ago we had developed a sound
code for nine letters of the alphabet, which
utilized four sound pitches, three hisses and
a click," he said.
"These sounds were heard in various
combinations by the blind person, who had
to memorize the sound code corresponding
to each of the alphabet letters.
"There were, however, some real failings
in this code. It was complicated and some
listeners had trouble distinguishing between
the various code sounds."
But now a simpler code has been worked
out, one which Beddoes describes as "melodic", since it uses an increased number of
pitch values and since the pitch values are
also varied in strength.
The new sound code, which is pleasant
to hear can be controlled toy a highly accurate page scanner.
The new code is particularly valuable
because a large number of cells — up to 50
— can be used in the scanner, giving a better
sound definition of each letter.
In the lexiphone's operation, a book or
any printed material lies on a platform
which moves past photoelectric cells. These
cells convert each letter into electrical signals which in turn) control the sound generators that produce the sound code.
Teachers fail calling
— John tilley photo
LIKE MOSES come down from the mountain, poet Al Neil
weilds words at arts festival poetry reading Thursday.
Festival shall come to pass again today and next week.
(Story page 1.
6y PETER SHAPIRO
Only six lower mainland educators last
week met the challenge of an extension department course called Challenges in B.C.
Education.
The course, designed to present new ideas
in education to teachers, principals and
parents, has been dropped because of the
lack of interest.
Education extension supervisor Claude
Campbell told last week's speaker, Victoria
University president Malcolm Taylor, to stay
home.
Campbell sail he could "only speculate"
why the lecture series got so little support.
Demands of time ,other offerings, and the
location of the lecture on UBC campus were
some of the reasons he listed.
Campbell said he distributed the brochure
describing the course to all schools, all PTA's
school trustees, and those on mailing lists
complied from previous conferences.
The brochure claimed the course was an
"opportunity for concerned citizens to become better informed about today's educational issues and problems." THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
. by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
FEBRUARY 3, 1967
It's a lemon
The annual post-election crying about student
apathy and the low voter turn-out always reminds us
of the movie producer who called the absent customers
apathetic.
He was selling a lousy show.
The AMS sells lousy government for $29.
It sells everybody $15 worth of student union
building-cum-palace, even though student feeling last
year was against the play-pen.
Who needs it, students said. They wanted lounges
and study halls in individual buildings instead, and
we agreed.
It sells $4 worth of athletic events and chances
to participate.
It charges $3 to administer the whole bag — and
finishes with $7 to spend, on campus events.
But after you take out the $3 that is committed to
things like World University Service, the Canadian
Union of Students and registration photographs, you get
$4 to spend on student activity.
But what the hell. For all its administrative expense,
the AMS pays its staff coolie wages in return for long
hard hours. Even so, it can only keep its general offices
open six hours daily — from 10 a.m. to 4  p.m.
And for all of that, it spends a mere $5,000 on the
two academic programs it operates — academic activities
committee and special events.
We've been saying it all week and we say it again.
The AMS means nothing whatever to the bulk of
students at UBC, those people who come to class and
go home again.
It must involve itself in their situation, and as the
recognized student government it has every right to do
so — if those people want it. We suspect they do want
it, because we know there are problems that a working
student government can solve.
It can attack the curriculum, and should have had a
role in shaping the arts reforms passed last December.
It can publish anti-calendars to let students know what
they're getting into. Library hang-ups can be solved
and the whole computer knowledge factory can be
explored with a view to mollifying its human effects.
We'd like to hear what candidates for AMS offices
say about these problems, and whether they think the
AMS can be useful to more than 30 per cent of the
students.
We suggest students should insist it become useful to them, and should back candidates who have platforms that say something more than I've-got-umpteen-
years-experience-in-umpty-ump-different-organizations.
And if nobody presents a useful electoral platform,
as in past years, students should retain their right
to happily wallow in apathy.
News item: UBC board ot
governors to consider removing secrecy veil from its meetings.
Speak softly — the very walls have ears.
SECONDERS
STATEMENTS
Wheels in circles roll
Seconder's statements appear with all their original
grammatical errors. No statement was received for second
vice - presidential hopeful
Maynard Hogg, science 2.
President
CRUISE
Student council needs a
president responsible to students' needs, a man with leadership  experience.
Bob Cruise, an arts graduate now finishing law, spent
two years as AMS first vice-
president. He strongly urges
a student strike in September if fees are raised. He advocates higher AMS priority
for academic programs, noon-
hour speakers, science seminars and such, and more delegation of administrative work
to involve more students in
the AMS.
Cruise criticizes our university for being a knowledge factory — impersonal
and indifferent to the real
academic needs of students.
This year he has worked
with Internationalists t o
evolve serious discussions
about the real needs of students.
Now he comes to you with
a concrete program of action.
Vote Bob Cruise, AMS
president.
Charlie Boylan
AMS  first  vice-president
OLSON
We want leaders!
We want maximum student
participation in UBC activities.
UBC's prime purpose is to
develop worthwhile individuals for Canada. UBC is
more than learning. It is the
awakening and tapping of our
human resources.
We want a leader that will
bring this enthusiasm to the
students. He should be
amongst us — soap-boxing at
the library, at our undergrad
meetings — continuously representing us .
Let's  be  practical  — not
ideological.
Olson  might  try.   Sullivan
wouldl
DON   ALLEN,
Engineering 4.
FLYNN
Frank Flynn's platform
theme is simply make the
AMS relative to the student.
As Forestry president I
know   how   little   concerned
To Page 13
See: POLITICOS
EDITOR: John Kelsey
News             Carol Wilson
City       .   _ _  _ _   — _   Danny Stoffman
Photo        Powell Hargrave
Page Friday ._           Claudia Gwinn
Focus    _      Kris Emmott
Sports         — Sue Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Alt'. Newt Al Birnie
Ass't City   Tom Morris
CUP     _    Bert Hill
Groundhog day was celebrated.
"There may be spring," said the
ecclesiastic Wang Ming. With
acuity and style, these wrote:
Helen Manning, Peter Shapiro,
Dave Cursons, U Pant, Peggy
Eng, Charlotte Haire, Jackie
Leahy, Val Thorn, and Norman
Gidney. Muray McMillan and Val
Zuker  were  laid  out.
John Tilley and Al Harvey took
pictures.
'%<&.<tsm%££¥W'; >m .m»i»-!tro*«iiw v- ^> <*<*iVv*;
Irvine: Captive anteater is academically free
By TOM WAYMAN
Student government is in a very formative
stage, with a chancellor-appointed Student Finance
Committee sponsoring the student newspaper and
such enjoyments as Chad and Jeremy concerts and
a San Francisco-style Freak Out.
An ominously-titled Dean of Student Affairs
offers suggestions and through his subordinates
aids and abets the fledgling student activities.
"Plenty of time later to
worry about an administration - controlled stu-
d e n t organization," I
thought at first.
I was busy discovering that Irvine's administration permits such
progressive programs as
course credit by independent study and and
examination, for those
who feel formal classroom training too restrictive,
or who wish to continue to study in the summer
Ex-Ubyssey editor Wayman is studying at Irvine,
part of the (now) Ronald Regan empire. This is the
second of many parts about the California university
situation.
break.
All-in-all, it looked like UC Irvine's future
could be nothing but rosy. The school even offered
benefits beyond such things as the physical plant,
a superb academic community, and progressive
programs.
As Christopher Rand said in his laudatory account of Irvine in the Oct. 1, New Yorker: "The
Irvine campus will outpull all the other UC campuses when it comes to talent, because its environment is so good."
Sun, sea, surf can only make studying a pleasure.
"Tan while you learn," could almost have been
UC Irvine's unofficial motto.
The unofficial motto is actually "Zot", adapted
from the comic series B.C. The Anteater from
the comic strip was adopted by charter students,
as the school mascot and name for athletic teams,
an obvious mockery of UCLA's Bruins and similar
ferocious school symbols in the U.S.
As might be expected, there was very little
radical student action at Irvine. The local chapter
of the Students for a Democratic Society — the
catch-all new left organization — was concerning
.itself this fall with an anti-mark program.
The reasoning was that since marking is pain--
ful to both student and teacher, another way to
judge performance should be found.
Already, at Irvine, a student is allowed to take
a number of what are called Pass-Fail courses. If
a science student wants to take a basic history
course, for example, but is afraid of harming his
average, he may take the course on his Pass-Fail
option.
His record remains unblemished if he fails, and
he gets credit (though not the grades) if he passes.
One UC campus has experimented with Pass-
Fail for all courses; seminars and discussions were
To Page 14
See: "STUDENT"  y$r. >-*■** *.*»»' >H>i> *mm&?mMifPm®m( <■ sfj&txj*
W«_,
strive for the exotic sensuality of art nouveau via
the current hard-edge idiom- As a whole they
rarely rise above the level of the chic. His simple
but witty of twinky shapes and edges are bullied
down by the brilliant but arbitrary decorator
cushion coloring.
Instead of painting on a flat canvas, Samila
paints each color area on separate pieces of plywood which are then interlocked in jigsaw fashion.
This is part of a.general tendency among some
painters now to get out their tool kits and add
sculptural dimensions to the usual flat rectangular
canvas surface.
Samila's efforts in this direction don't amount
to much but it must be conceded that it does give
some dimensional interest to an otherwise monotonous surface.
By far the most interesting and most accomplished of the works exhibited are the goaches
by Vancouver artist Micheal Morris, who deserves
mention as one of the most vigorous new talents
to have arisen in the past year or so.
Morris' work, though on a smaller scale than
Samila's achieves a sensuality of color and line
that is richer, more harmonious and more gutsy.
Even though Samila achieves a kind of relief
effect with his jigsaw grooving, his paintings
still maintain the integrity of a decorative surface.
He breaks up the surface in order to reconstruct
it.
Morris, on the other hand, through tonal contrasts and optice tensions of line and color creates
an everchanging duality between the illusionistic
three-dimensional space and a two-dimensional
decorative surface-
Besides this visual ambiguity, Morris displays
a fascinating ability to play different kinds of line
and shape against each other in a witty and charming manner, something that Samila achieves in
his drawings but less so in his paintings.
What Michael Morris (among others) is getting
away from, is the rectangular window format
which contemporary artists have inherited from
several centuries of representative paintings
which seeks a glimpse into another world.
Although they are detached from the world of
real objects, Morris' paintings are not cut off by
a frame, but rather by having the format follow
the shap of the configuration. They assert themselves as integral • objects distinct from the environment, yet on a par with their environment.
If we cannot look through Morris' painting we
must look onto them, as we would a piece of
sculpture- Much of Morris' artistry lies in the fact
that once he has focussed our eyes onto the surface, he begins playing with our instructed notions
of apparent depth and rational structure.
In creating a painting-object, Morris* work
reflects a tendancy among painters today to move
into the domain of sculpture or at least structural
or constructivist art, just as recent colored sculpture (as in the Montreal group) is descended from,
or moving towards, painting.
The fact that neither of the processes is completed, thereby creating a dualistic ambiguity
between surface and space, gives these works
vitality.
construction
art
By IAN WALLACE
As part of the sixth festival of the contemporary arts the Fine Arts Gallery is presenting
four exhibitions of Contemporary Canadian Art.
If this year's art exhibit doesn't have the
sensational nature that has characterized the shows
of the past few years it is because contemporary
artists, young and old, are settling down and
elaborating upon ideas initiated 50 years ago by
the Dadaist, the Neo-Plasticists, etc.
For instance, a recent extension of the happening idea has been the audio-kinetic environment
such as light shows, strobe dancing. In the gallery
Toronto artist Zibgnew Blazeje has set up his own
variations upon that theme by linking sight and
sound through co-ordinating ultra-violet lights
with noise intensity from a tape recorder. The
louder the sound gets, the more intense the color
of Blazeje's constructed environment. The idea
has merit but the result in this case is less than
magnificent.
The paintings of David Samila from Montreal
Pf
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
Michael da Vita .
Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  3,   1967 film
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
One would like to say nice things about Danny
Singer's film Da Vita — but it's rather hard, and
it could be dangerous.
It would be nice, because Da Vita is an all-
student production, and the very fact that writer-
director Danny Singer at Simon Fraser could get
it made is in itself a creditable achievement.
But it would be dangerous, because there is
no point in patronizing local film-makers by congratulating them on getting the thing finished and
ignoring the fact that it's a bad movie.
That kind of attitude to Larry Kent only produced When Tomorrow Dies, which is even worse
than Da Vita. If Danny Singer makes another
film — and I hope he does — he's going to have to
learn from his mistakes. And that looks like a
3-unit course.
Not that Da Vita is all bad: the photography,
for instance, despite some vagarities of lighting, is
generally good, although at times somewhat
remote from the script.
The basic idea js also good. An old film-director
reviews the scraps of film from the massive document which was to be his masterpiece. The hundreds of miles of film which litter his room cover
every aspect of life.
Da Vita sees himself not so much a recorder
as a creator: "I have made this", he insists, "in
my  own  image".  But, like  God,   he  finds  his
humanity in revolt, and his particular Eve spends
her time throwing things at his camera.
Her name is Constance — weightily ironic,
because she is unfaithful to him, but even more
because he is unfaithful to her. A God has no
right to be a failure.
These ideas would be okay for a ten-minute film
— Da Vita drags on for 45 — but they are
swamped, covered, and irrevocably lost in a script
of quite incredible tedium and banality, which is
not helped by a very inadequate delivery.
It is not so much that the soliloquy device is
itself corny — anything that works is justified —
as that the lines themselves are so completely
empty. "I always photograph children well . . .
I guess because they're not grown up . . . because
they're . . . children."
Against this kind of opposition, the best photography in the world hasn't a chance of redeeming
the film from failure and the audience from boredom.
A final word to all the people who walked out
on it — don't worry, it didn't get any better.
And a final word to Mir. Singer: Sorry about
that, Danny. I'm not trying to be destructive. I'm
sure you can do a lot better than this, and I hope
you make it next time.
***■**__*_*■ ?&I> -
Jamie Reid disagrees with Lionel Kearns
Seymour Mayne
♦      Pll»y
Milton Acorn
poetry
FOR LEONARD COHEN
By SEYMOUR MAYNE
Watching you speak, poet—whispers in the night . . .
thin mists dissolving in the city's searchlight rays,
and two satellites
down in broad daylight.
—No one was amazed.   You humped your shoulders
casually; winked, clowned.    You would've wanted your
lips wet with acid, biting; but beige drapes rose
before your eyes over our coffees.   Were you thinking
of valleys, looming boulders?   Like that ancient Judean
aristocrat, were your daydreams haunted by fluent,
wistful rhythms, skeletal lyres in tawny hands • . . or
slingshots tuned soft?
Your bent left arm leaned on elbow, an acute angle
spawned by invisible silk webs.    I could swear with
every motion of your lowered head your nose disturbed
those elastic threads like a listless finger on the
biblic harp: Notes of an exile divorced from everyone
and even from himself, that kingdom's adopted son.
'X;^,*'._>^X.
"***■><*
*£* /,**',
;« "*$ss v.« >*
Friday,  February 3,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 After the wipe-out, a renewal
Leonard Cohen, Montreal poet,
novelist, singer and now painter
(he's planning an exhibition of
paintings later on in the summer)
has written five books: Let Us Compare Mythologies, 1956, The Spice-
Box of Earth, 1961, The Favorite
Game, 1963, Beautiful Losers, 1966
and Parasites of Heaven 1966. He
was brought to UBC under auspices
of the Festival of Contemporary
Arts.
Sandra Djw*a, a grad student in
English, interviews him for Page
Friday.
pf: At one point, when reading
Spice-Box, seeing all the poems that
you simply call "song" and later,
when you started singing on the TV
show "Sunday", I thought of you in
connection with that word ngin, I
think it means singer of the people.
Cohen: Ngin, yes. That's close to
the tradition. I mean, we have all
somehow lost our minds in the last
10 or 15 years. Whatever we have
been told about anything, although
we remember it, and sometimes operate in those patterns, we have no
deep abiding faith in anything we
have been told, even in the hip-
pest things, the newest things.
Everybody has a sense that they are
in their own capsule and the one
that I have always been in, for
want of a better word, is that of
cantor — a priest of a catacomb
religion that is underground, just
beginning, and I am one of the
many singers, one of the many,
many priests, not by any means a
high priest, but one of the creators
of the liturgy that -will create the
church.
pf: Is that one of the reasons why
the dominant personalities in most
of your books are poet-priests?
Even in Beautiful Losers the narrator-historian is a priest by election.
C: Yes, and since this is the vocabulary we are using for this discussion, I would say that Beautiful
Losers is a redemptive novel, an
exercise to redeem the soul.
pf: I also thought it was a pop-
apocalypse.
C: Yeah,  sure,  that's  good.
pf: But how do the two go together? That's what I don't understand.
C: When there's a complete wipe-
out, there's a renewal. In that book
I tried to wrestle with all the deities
that are extant now — the idea of
saintliness, purity, pop, McLuhan-
ism, evil, the irrational — all the
gods we set up for ourselves.
pf: But isn't there a kind of artistic dishonesty in setting up ideas
to wrestle with and then trying to
pin the structure of a book on it?
It doesn't always work.
C: If you could see the man who
wrote that book. I have always said
that my strength is that I have no
ideas. I feel empty. I have never
dazzled myself with thought, particularly my own thought — it is one
of the processes that my heart
doesn't leap out to.
When you said a singer, that's it.
A singer is one who embodies in
his person the idea. I have never
felt myself to be a man of letters.
I've always felt that whatever there
was, was me, and there was never
any distance between myself and <
the reader. I've never had the feeling of writing a book but of going
up and seizing somebody's lapel or
hem.
pf 3hree
Ecstacy is the solution -
the room sometimes turns to gold
I've always wanted to be created
just like the priest creates the
prayer for the mass for the congregation. It's not the idea of imposing
a prayer but that he creates the
finest part of themselves. It's that
job more than anything else that
I'm interested in.
pf: There seems to be a certain pattern in your work, that of
creation, moving between aspiration and disintegration. It seems to
me that your myth of art has two
women figures, that of the beloved,
the aspiring figure, and that of the
mad-woman, the destructive. The
whole structure seems to be that of
the Orpheus myth.
C: Absolutely. I've always honored both the wrathful deities and the
blessed deities and I'm in this completely. There are no functions that
I have in my daily life that give
me any distance from what I do
and I systematically cut all the
things that might. I've burnt all my
bridges. What you say is true and
I acknowledge it as we sit here. As
it comes out I just feel that I'm a
child. There's a poem about this, I
just wrote it yesterday and can't
quote it exactly: "I have come to
this green mountain/I am 33/a
child of the double trinity". YoU
know, one is dark and one light and
the third that comes from it like
a braid that takes its color from
tooth, like a salamander. That seems
to represent me to myself. That's
the way it's always been and I don't
think I have control over it myself.
I can tell you honestly, I've tried
a lot of disciplines — yoga, Hebraic
discipline — in an effort to control
my mind but I find that I have no
control. Its not that a man chooses
the gods that he worships — it's
the gods who choose him. And it's
only when we come closest to the
gods that we engage in creation. But
I feel that these parts are unreachable parts of myself. There are
times when I feel that I'll never
do another thing. Creating a work
is a lot of pain and that's all I'm
trying to get across. And because of
the pain you haven't got the opportunity to see the whole arena.
I'm not trying to dramatize or
anything, but I vomit a lot at ideas.
It's not that I put things in, it's just
that certain things obsess me and I
get nauseous. There are things I
have to do. Of course you've got to
watch yourself to see that you don't
get addicted to pain and remember
that there is another deity and that
ecstasy is the other side. The one is
the way to the other.
pf: Let's talk about Leonard Cohen, the folk-singing personality.
C: I wouldn't call myself a folksinging personality. I think this nation has a great case of schizophrenia. There's no contact, in a
sense, between the people who
watch me on TV and the other half.
I really don't care what they call
me. I'm not a particularly good
painter but I'm doing a little painting now, putting together a collection. I have this feeling that if you
liberate yourself, anything you lay
your hand on can sparkle. Professionalism is the enemy of creativity
and invention. There's a possibility
for men to live in a way of continually changing their evironment.
It's a matter of whether or not you
believe a man can change his environment. I believe he can. My
painting   and  my  singing are   the
LEONARD COHEN
same thing. I don't care what people
call me, whether you call it folksinging or some people call it a
priestly function or some people see
it as a revolutionary activity or acid
heads see it as psychodelic revolution or poets see it as the popularization of poetry. I stand in with all
these people. These are all the
people who say we can change, get
out of pain. That's why I'm interested in pop. In a way this is the
first time that people have ever
said, "This is our age and we exalt
in it and we delight in it, it is ours".
It's an assault on history and it's an
assault on all these authoritarian
voices who have always told us
what was beautiful. I like to be created by pop because it's an ally in
my own time. My time says it's
beautiful and it's part of me and I
want to be created by it.
pf: Is that why you choose an excerpt from a Ray Charles' record
"■Somebody said, 'Lift that bale'," as
an  epigraph  for Beautiful  Losers?
C: Yes, I think that's the real
news on the streets today. You
know, somebody said, somebody
saying, it can be better, I don't
know, maybe it can't but somehow
we can get closer to our center.
Somebody saying whatever there is
around that we don't like, can ibe
changed — the monolith has begun to dissolve.
pf: Are you suggesting the disintegration of personality when you
quote from Primo Levi at the beginning of Flowers for Hitler?
C: That quotation is, "Take care
not to let it happen in your own
homes". He's saying, what point is
there to a political solution if in the
homes these tortures and mutilations continue? That's what Flowers
for Hitler is all about. It's taking
the mythology of the concentration
camps and bringing it into the living room and saying, "This is what
we do to each other". We outlaw
genocide and concentration camps
and gas and that, but if a man
leaves his wife or they are
cruel to each other, then that cruelty is going to find a manifestation
if he has a political capacity and he
has.
There's no point in refusing to
acknowledge   the   wrathful  deities.
That's like putting pants on the legs
of pianos like the Victorians did.
The fact is that we all succumb to
lustful thoughts, to evil thoughts,
to thoughts of torture.
pf: In this admission you're suggesting that you're working in the
same structure as are the contemporary writers — maybe it starts
with Celine — Burroughs, Selbe,
Gunter Grass, and for that matter,
Sartre in Nausea.
C: The only thing that differs in
those writers and myself is that I
hold out the idea of ecstasy as the
solution. If only people get high,
they can face the evil part. If a man
feels in his heart it's only going to
be a mundane confrontation with
feelings, and he has to recite to himself Norman Vincent Peale slogans,
"Be better, be good", toe hasn't had
a taste of that madness.
He's never soared, he's never
let go of the silver thread and he
doesn't know what it feels to be
like a god. For him, all the stories
about holiness and the temple of
the body are meaningless.
pf: When Sartre talks about the
salauds, the cowards who are us all,
they're the ones who refuse the experience of nausea. There's some
point at which you allow yourself
to go or you don't. Lawrence talks
about this too.
C: The thing about Sartre is that
he's never lost his mind. He represents a wonderful Talmudic sense
of human possibility, but I know
he' never going to say "and then
the room turned to gold". He'll say
"the room turned to shit". But the
room sometimes does turn to gold
and unless you mention that, your
philosophy is incomplete. Like Bertrand Russell, he hasn't flipped out.
Anybody who has flipped and survived, who hasn't been broken by
conformity or pure madness like an
incapacity to operate, knows the
ecstasy and the hallucination and
the whole idea of the planets and of
the music of the spheres and of
endless force and life and god —
enough to blow your head off. And
Sartre never had his head blown
off. The thing that people are interested in doing now is blowing
their heads off and that's why the
writing of schizophrenics like myself will be important.
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February 3,  1967 "V"~.»
■■v~
Technology is
where it's at
Editor. Page Friday:
It was a chuckle listening to reactions in the crowd
leaving Buckminster Fuller's extemporizations. They
ranged from the middle-aged woman saying "how marvellous it was that he talked for so long without any notes"
to the hippy chick who "didn't know what half those words
meant".
I hope most of you were listening to WHAT he was
saying and not HOW he was telling us "like man, what is
happening," something most of us are clued-out about.
Bert Hill of Page Friday is still clued-out. He wrote
a clever little item which in part said, "Get everything
plugged into a computer and the world will presently be
okay."
In an idiotic way his clumsy sarcasm has ironic truth.
Computers can only be programmed with factual information (although in immense quantities and diverse qualities),
and the solutions they arrive at are not tempered by social
ideology, vested interest, social prejudice, unhappy childhood, or any of the hundred other incalcuables which will
influence even the most just man's decision.
By the simple, compelling force of logic and reason a
solution arrived at by a computer gains acceptance.
Industry and finance has known for years this totally impartial arbitration is the key to mutual success-
As second and third generation machines (computers
designed by computers) come into existence capable of dealing with vastly more information, we are going to see them
used in the problems of international trade.
This is to a large degree the basis of one government's
attitude toward another. When solutions of multilateral
acceptance can regularly be arrived at in this area, we are
moving in the right direction.   Okay.
The cleverness of Hill's item was the juxtaposition of
an observation on technology with a statement by Talcott
Parsons, sociologist. "Modern society does generate psy-
chopathologic personalities, and in a big way."
I submit that our society is generating psychopatho-
logic personalities because the fundamental basis of that
society is outmoded. That is, there is no reason for man's
main active struggle to stay alive. We have gained enough
information about the nature of things, that a high degree
of control is possible.
We are eliminating any need for brute toil of the earth..
This suggests a change in the fundamental human activity.
"Man, the food-gatherer, reappears as the information-
gatherer. Instead of being automated themselves—fragmented in task and function—men in the electric age move
increasingly to involvement in diverse jobs simultaneously,
and to the work of learning, and to the programming of
computers." (Marshall McLuhan)
It is the tragic mistake of our society that we still
force a large portion of it to compete with machines that
will do the job twice as well as people.
"Much can be done to treat those characteristics which
HS«g
ISRAEL
BARGAIN
Special cheap student flights from:
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cause people to reject, or be rejected by the modern industrial society- Educational deficiencies can be overcome.
Mental deficiencies can be treated. Physical handicaps can
be remedied.
"The limiting factor is not knowledge of what can be
done. It is our failure to invest in people. The present
preoccupation with material as opposed to human investment is inefficient." (J. K. Galbraith)
I am using a hammer to squash a pea in order to point
out what Fuller and the other handful of mid-twenties,
century futuristic thinkers are telling us.
They are telling us that the world has changed in a
profound, fundamental, and unprecedented way. They are
telling us what we are beginning to have the potential to
do. They are suggesting some things we might do NOW,
to extract ourselves from the great muddle.
John F. Mcintosh
science 3
— Monash University, Australio
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Come   and   Discuss
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MORALITY"
in "Talk-Back"
at
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on  University  Boulevard
SUNDAY NIGHTS AT 7:30 P.M.
BEGINNING   FEBRUARY  5TH
Coffee and Discussion 8:30-9:30 p.m.
Feb. 5th-What is the New Morality?
Dr. W. S. Taylor,
Principal, Union  College
of  B.C.
Feb. 12th-The New Morality ft WAR
Dr. John Conway,
Department  of History,
U.B.C.
Feb. 19th—The New Morality ft Sex
Rev.  Jim Taylor,
East Burnaby United
Church   Counsellor,
Pres.   of  B.C.  Conference
Feb. 26th—The    New   Morality   and
The Use of Drugs
Rev. Ted Kropp,
Chaplain, Matsqui Centre
for Drug Addiction
Mar. 5th—The New Morality and
Marriage and Divorce
Dr. Reg Wilson,
Union  College of B.C.
Mar. 12th—The   New  Morality  and
Church ft Community Life
Rev. Ted Nichols,
Executive  Secretary
B.C.  Conference
Friday,. February 3,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 mtss&qtj-miwi >" v*t »v. ^r -•
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Bartok bores
By   MURRAY   McMILLAN
Monday's performance by
the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra and guest violinist
Ivry Gitlis, was a concert of
dissonance, with one saving
grace.
Bartok's violin concerto is
marred by long scale passages
and discord — leaving the
listener uninspired, only-tired
at its conclusion. The second
movement, marked 'andante
tranquillo', was anything
but  tranquil.
Gitlis's technique is doubtless excellent, but he was let
down by the orchestra which
seemed at odds with guest
conductor Victor Feldbrill.
The  Bach-Stokowski  Little
Fugue in G Minor enchanted
the audience, particularly due
to spirited playing by the
woodwind section.
Weinsweig's Symphonic Ode was a different matter,
however — it should never
have been transcribed from
the original manuscript. The
Canadian composition is almost completely dissonant
and was saved only in two
passages when the first violins  shone through.
The saving grace was the
performance of Beethoven's
Symphony Number 3,
"Eroica". It was an enthralling performance of an equally
enthralling   masterpiece.
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
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Cars
upstage
actors
By NORMAN GIDNEY
The technical aspects of
Grand Prix outshine the insipid plot and the sleek
formula in which racing cars
outperform the actors. Grand
Prix is probably one of the
best examples of cinerama
yet produced.
Cameras mounted a few
inches from the ground
and on the fenders vicariously establish the spectator's
position in the driver's seat.
Director John Franken-
heimer has followed the
lives and soured love affairs
of four racing drivers as they
careen around Europe.
James Garner, as the down-
and-out-but-not-beaten American,   grits   his   teeth   and
climbs into his car (Japanese
made) to overcome insuperable odds, ending up world
Grand Prix champion. Characteristically he notes the
futility of it all. In a poignant wind-swept scene at the
end of the Monza race he
recalls the lucky events
which put him there. After
all, he only put the British
driver, played grittingly by
Brian Bedford, in the hospital at Monaco, watched the
Frenchman, Yves Montand,
try to regain the Monza lead
and smash himself on the
concrete track and passed
Montand's team mate, Antonio Sabato's Ferrari after
Montand's  death.
No sir, the American
never loses. It would be un-
American.
Frankenheimer, seems to
have been entranced by the
idea of playing with motor
cars. He does get very spectacular shots of car racing
but whenever he cuts to
one of the driver's lives the
film droops. Determined to
make as monotonous a contrast  as   possible,   he   gives
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN ALL THE WOMEN SUDDENLY SAY
NO?
lySiStrata
DEPARTMENT   OF   THEATRE   STUDENT   PRODUCTION
ARISTOPHANES FARCICAL
SEX STRIKE WITH MUSIC
DANCE AND ET CETERA
ADAPTED AND DIRECTED BY DONALD SOULE WITH
ORIGINAL MUSIC BY JOHN CHAPPELL. DESIGNED BY
DARWIN REID PAYNE. DANCES BY GRACE MacDONALD
FREDERIC WOOD  THEATRE - FEBRUARY 21-25
Matinee Feb. 23 at 12:30.   Student tickets 75c Everyone else $2.00
Book Early—Only 6 performances. Box office FW Theatre, Rm. 207. Ph. 228-2678
each of the drivers either a
bitch of a wife or a strong-
minded,   silent   girl  friend.
Essentially the same in
plot, Grand Prix does for
racing cars what Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines did for biplanes. But Grand Prix isn't
even mildly funny, unless
you call bad actng by Jessica Walters funny.
Without the plot Grand
Prix would have made an
excellent documentary after
the style of Tokyo Olympiad
and would have been much
cheaper. The camera work
on the actual races is beautiful in itself without the unnecessary encumbrances of
a plot and characters.
Eve Marie Saint summed
it up perfectly halfway
through the film: "But Jean,
there are seven more races,"
she said circuitously.
pf 6ix
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Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  3,   1967 Texts miseducate
Reprinted from ETC. A Review
of General Semantic published
by San Francisco State College.
By   BERNARD  SARACHEK
University of  Detroit
While a graduate student
and part-time instructor at a
typical large state university,
I was impressed by the fact
that undergraduates were encouraged to commit a basic
semantical error. Students
were conditioned to think of
an education as a compact
body of information which
could be absorbed in four
years. If, after four years, a
person is educated, he has no
reason to continue his studies. The necessary wisdom
has been imparted fully.
The wholesale use of graduate students as freshman
and sophomore instructors is
an important cause of this
erroneous attitude toward
education. Since they have
limited knowledge and experience, graduate students
can do little more than outline and explain the textbooks for their classes. And,
since they have difficulty in
organizing lectures and in
judging their students' abilities to grasp abstract concepts, their attempts to introduce novel ideas usually
end disastrously.
Graduate students are
keenly aware of their teaching inadequacies, and their
insecurity is reflected in
their concern regarding the
grade records of their classes.
Different sections of the same
course are usually given the
same tests. Each instructor
wishes to avoid  the embar-
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MUSSOC PRESENTS
"How To Succeed In Business
Without Really Trying"
Feb. 6 -11-8:30 Tickets 1.50, 2.00,2.50
Special Student Previews 75c
Feb. 6, 7-8:30      Feb. 9-12:30
SEE IT LIVE BEFORE
HOLLYWOOD MESSES IT UP!
rassment of finding that his
students consistently score
lower grades than the students of other instructors on
these "combined examinations". Consequently, a wise
instructor will limit his class
preparations to that body
of information common to all
class sections of a particular
course: the course textbook.
This conditioning process
of restricting the intellectual
horizons of the undergraduates is reinforced by the official university policy of
uniformity. All sections of
the same course must use
the same textbook and be
given the same assignments.
Even the combined examinations are control devices that
ensure educational uniformity. Students are not given
the opportunity to discover
that different teachers and
textbooks present different
ideas and approaches.
There is a reinforcing
feedback between students
and teachers. Students lose
interest in ideas which they
feel they are not expected to
learn. A graduate student
seeking the undergraduates'
approval of his teaching performance is reluctant to
buck student apathy by in-
troducing ideas and approaches which are not mentioned in the textbook. (In
common with other instructors, I have actually been
asked why we discussed certain topics not mentioned in
the textbook and not expected to appear on the combined examinations.)
Conditioning students to
think of their textbooks as
the basic elements in their
education is particularly unfortunate. Basic textbooks
rarely stimulate thought.
They present the "principles"
of the subject — the detailed
answers to dead issues. By
the time an issue is incorporated into a textbook, the
argument has been so thoroughly refined by thinkers
in the field that undergraduates are given little opportunity to challenge or seek new
approaches. Their intellectual armaments are no match
for those of the textbook
writers.
Most teachers in junior
and senior courses are experienced  faculty  members.
These teachers can introduce
challenging ideas and approaches. However, after
students" have been trained
for two college years to limit
their studies to their textbooks, experienced teachers
find it difficult to reorient the
thinking of their students.
F u r t h e rmore, experienced
teachers may be interested
primarily in graduate instruction and personal research. Consequently, they
may dispose of the chore of
teaching undergraduates by
presenting the same lecture
material year after year.
Like the textbook, their lectures eventually become so
well perfected that they do
not stimulate the students to
think   and   inquire  —  they
merely convince. Thus, even
experienced teachers may
frequently encourage undergraduates to conclude that
their education will be completed once they have mastered the small funds of information to which they will
have been exposed during
their four-year stays at the
university.
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Main Office 549 Howe St., Vancouver, Suite 210 685-2374
Friday, February 3,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11 By IAN CAMERON
As a rule, movies (whoever coined that
word?) don't excite me. As a matter of fact
they leave me cold. This one, however, was
somewhat better than most. In fact, it was
damn good. The title is The Wrong Box, and
it's playing at the Strand, down on Georgia
Street.
Michael Caine, whom they tell me was a
success in Alfie, the Ipcress File, and Funeral
in Berlin (I didn't see any of them) plays the
son of one of the two surviving members of
a tontine, and his father, the surviving member in question, is dying.
For those of you who are not familiar with
the term, Tonti was an Italian nobleman with
a wide streak of sadism. He set up a fund,
along with several other noblemen, the total,
with interest, to toe collected by the son who
lived the longest. This was back in the 16th
century, and because the sons started killing
one another off, it was outlawed soon after.
Now, of course, we have the same thing
in the form of life insurance, but there's no
way you can collect without dying. However,
the Tontine as this particular form of idiocy is
called, still survives, at least it did up to the
end of the 19th century. Nowadays it is found
mainly in literature. Oscar Wilde, Somerset
Maugham, and P. G. Wodehouse have all
based works on it.
And that is the basis for the movie. There
are two surviving members of the group, and
one of them is in excellent shape while the
other is at death's door. Then the one who is
in good shape dies, or does he? And the one
who is in poor shape also dies, or does he?
And the nephews of the one and the son of
the other are concerned about this, and so
they take the appropriate action, they think.
Maybe. They hope.
It's not a play, but it's good, and if you
can't find a play that you haven't seen, or
you don't like the theatre (what are you doing
reading this column), take it in. It's okay.
Poems love the lovers
Fragile and sincere
but not sensational
From the Portals of
Mouseholes by Seymour
Mayne, Very Stone House.
Price: $1.50.
Seymour Mayne's From
the Portals of Mouseholes is
essentially a book of love.
His poems are metaphoric
relationships of love, lovers
and   love-making.
A love surges
flows to the flanks
of the land to the round
waist of islands
Every day.
(from Lashings)
The poet with inner sincer-
pf 8ight
ity describes fragility in detail but not without the lusting demand of the conqueror.
/ stop saying —
our fragility
trembles
between us
the third animal
(from Touches)
Most of the verse is intimate dialogue between the
persons of "you" and "me".
But this does not detract
from the sense of universal
identity which might be applied to anyone who has
ever loved, or in the romantic sense has idealized the
human response.
Unlike the poet's own interpretation "My poems are
little mice. They bite . . ."
most of the poems are un-
s e n t i m e n tally emotional.
And even when by their
own admission "They became arrogant" it is not
without the smugness of "I
Am Still the Boy . . . ". The
youthful thrill of achievement remains throughout
whether:
Leaving your first woman
makes you
proud
(from A Chant)
or
I am too drunk and tired . . .
Days sometimes resolve
themselves without embrace
(from Sometimes)
Certainly this poet has
found that the sensual image
can be ultilized for effect
and intensity as well as
sensation — a mark of his
earlier work.
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Page  12
MU 2-4846
THE      UBYSSEY
STUDENT performances of Mussoc's How to Succeed are
Feb. 6 and 7 at 8:30 and Feb. 9 at noon. The show plays
in the auditorium Feb. 6 to 11.
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Friday,   February  3,   1967 Friday, February 3,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
FROM PAGE 4
Politicos' prose cont.
the AMS is with the individual student.
The AMS demands students
on the board of governors but
ignores elementary curriculum review.
The AMS cries for more
student money but gives less
and less back to the undergraduate societies.
Frank emphasizes the everyday student lot such as parking and residence fees and
conditions.
He is B.C. Assembly of Student's chairman and has also
taken a hard stand on equalization grants, a provincial
grants commission and reduction of tuition fees.
Vote for yourself, vote
Frank Flynn.
MIKE   SYWULYCH.
Science 4.
SULLIVAN
Shaun Sullivan possesses
the dynamic qualities of leadership and organizational
ability as well as the maturity which are essential for a
student president.
Shaun has a thorough grasp
of the major issues the student body will face in the
year ahead, especially the
all-important question of
effectively representing student opinion to the administration and the general public.
In the belief that only
Shaun Sullivan will bring to
the position of AMS President
those vital traits which the
demands of leadership require, I strongly urge you to
support this exceptional man
and his program of realistic
action.
MIKE   COLEMAN.
Law 2.
2nd Vice
CAMPBELL
I am pleased to second the
nomination of A. Kim Campbell for the position of second vice-president of the
Alma Mater Society. She will
bring with her the considerable experience she has gained while serving on students'
council, 1964-65, high school
liason committee, the Thunderbird booster club, and this
year, the open house committee.
Kim refuses to take a dogmatic approach to political
issues. Rather than align herself with the "right" or "left",
she would decide each issue
on its individual merit.
For creative tout responsible student government, I
urge you to vote Kim Campbell for second vice-president.
MIKE HUNTER
law  111
The New
Tenant
comedy of
the obsurd
by  Eugene lonesco
directed  by Judith  Penner
FREDERIC WOOD
STUDIO
Thursday
Feb. 9
12:30
Friday
Feb.  10
25c
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HALVERSON
Doug Halverson has been
Ubyssey council reporter and
he is quite familiar with the
game playing and petty arguing that goes on in the
AMS. That is why he is supporting the strong program of
action we have prepared for
student government.
Halverson is particularly
dissatisfied with the trends
which are making UBC into
a 'knowledge factory' where
important social issues are
never discussed and students
are just being trained to 'do
a job.'
Doug, like all candidates on
this platform, will not sellout or become bogged down
n the bureaucracy. Let's have
a united and militant student
council.
Come on strong . . . Vote
Doug Halverson.
BOB  CRUISE
law 3
Quelque chose!
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Cette isle du paradis, actuelle-
ment une colonie des Etats
Unis, etait autrefois sous les auspices de la France. Vive les
blorgues!
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Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
-Expert Tailoring
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SPECIAL STUDENTS DEPARTURE
WORLD WIDE INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
February 16 — Returning February 19
5700  University  Boulevard   (on  campus)
$83.15
224-4391 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  3,   1967
Waterloo fights draft
WATERLOO (CUP) — University of Waterloo students'
council has become the first local student government in Canada
to join resistance against the United States draft.
Council Monday (Jan. 30) concluded, a two-hour debate by
authorizing its "official representative' 'to give what assistance
they can to persons fleeing from the U.S. draft.
Peter Warrian, domestic affairs commissioner and member
of the Student Union for Peace Action at Waterloo, will be
authorizing its "official representative" to give what assistance
Once councillor who opposed the resolution was engineering rep Andy Moore who said: "If individuals are allowed to
run away from their responsibilities, society would break down."
Another councillor disagreed, saying, "If nobody in Hitler's
Germany had the moral right to object to the killing of 4 million people. If you want to say that, we'll settle the issue outside."
The draft-resistance program planned is intended to help
immigrants adjust to Canadian life. Legal information, employment opportunities and other background will be made available.
STUDENT ACTION
FROM PAGE 4
sponsored by SDS to consider similar programs for Irvine.
Other action began when a Student Autonomy Committee
was formed to combat the introduction of a proposed constitution for an Associated Students organization at UCI. In the UC
system, all campus organizations including student government
exist under the control of the chancellor.
The idea of an independent student society such as UBC
enjoys is foreign to UC student thinking. Irvine's SAC began a
program of education in the idea.
Students were asked to reject a constitution which denied
ultimate control of an organization to its voters and contributors. (Irvine student organization fees were set by the chancellor
at $7 a quarter.)
SAC based its bid for student autonomy on frictions which
were developing in three areas: campus bookstore, residence
regulations, and off-campus speakers.
The bookstore set-up at Irvine will be familiar to any UBC
student: a monopoly charging inflated prices to virtually captive
buyers, while professors enjoy a 10 per cent discount.
The residences were intended to be student-controlled. The
progressive administration originally announced that students
were to formulate their own rules with regard to noise, women.
Anything, in fact, but booze, since by state law as at UBC liquor
is not permitted on campus. After the students in the various
dorms duly had formed their own rules, the chancellor stepped
in and issued a far less liberal set.
Unfortunately though, SAC's arguments that students should
have the decision-making power in these matters were not
successful. The ASUCI constitution passed by a landslide.
Your SKI MYSTERY Entry
presented by
CYVR RAD 10-ubc radio society
n
duMAURIER
I 967
CASA
INTERNATIONAL
AT MT. ORFARD
in Quebec
CVENTS    ORGANIZE-)    BV    THE    CANAOIAN    AMATIUff    MCI    ASSOCIATION
The Clues to date.—
1. Birds of a feather flock together.
2. Person, Place or Thing are clues of which you
need remember two.
3. From Sea to Sea Canadians love to ski.
4. Mt. Orford and Whistler are a part — bring them
together and you have a  start.
5. There's Gold in Them  Thar  Hilts-
6. One of the seasons is a part of the whole
The correct choice determines your goal
7. We have the facilities but we must prove our capabilities
8. The  duMaurier  International   may  pave the way
for our mystery to occur one day
9. Ancient  Greeks  once  decided
that our mystery shall be provided
10. Our mystery comes but once in  four
in our nation we wish to score
LISTEN TO    CYVR    FOR DAILY CLUES
AMS ENTRY BOXES ARE PROVIDED
Prizes All  entries  become  sole  property
1. Pair of skS of  CYVR.   Judges  decisions  final.
2- Dinner for two atop Grouse First 3 correct answers win respec-
3. Months tupply of cigarettes. tive  prizes  upon  receipt of entry.
YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY
ANSWER       	
NAME       _.-    —	
ADDRESS -— PHONE -	
All UBC Radio Society Members & Employees of duMaurier are Ineligible.
1967 International Golden Gloves
Tonight & Saturday
GARDEN AUDITORIUM P.N.E.
Tonight  7:30   p.m. Saturday  8:00   p.i
Tickets:  $3.00,  $2.00 &  $1.00
Available at the Vancouver Ticket Centre or any Eaton's Store
Special elimination bouts Saturday 1  p.m.
Any seat in the house $1.00
ALL THESE METALS
ARE AVAILABLE AT
GRASSIES ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR ... 685-2271
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED AGAINST
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10% Student Discount on
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681-2004
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autothread,
forward,   still
reverse,    speed
control,   zoorn
lens.   An   exceptional   buy!
$79.88
8 mm Projectors   «/   /■%##
Many Models of /Z   ^/ff
Bolex, Argus, etc.
Super 8 Cameras -y   mf\g±
Many Models of /m\  ^-TiT
Canin, Argus,   Sankyo
Slide Projectors
Movie Projectors
B & H  Electronic 960 (N)       	
Argus 570 (N) -.. .   .    __.
Airequipt 500 (N)
Sawyer 500 Remote {Rotodisk) (N)
Kodak Cavilcade (U) 	
Airequipt 33 (U) 	
Wray (English) 300 	
Leitz Prodovit N24 (U)      	
149.88
- - 150.00- 99.88
. ...    69.95-39.88
.-    62.95- 39.88
39.00
33.00
25.00
133.00
Yashica 8 Proj. (N)    	
Elmo (U)        	
B & K Synero. movie & 35mm proj.	
Compco 8mm editor	
H.P.I. Editors {Reg. or Sup. 8) 	
124.50- 62.50
49.00
39.00
42.95- 19.88
29.45- 12.88
Movie Cameras
Tape Recorders
Paros, push  button, 4 track stero
Electra, 4 speed batt. ft A.C. portable
Phillips 101  portable .. ..
Phillips 4 track mono	
359.90—269.88
159.88
89.88
179.88
Rondomatic 10-40 Zoom (U)
Canon 8EE Zoom (U) ..
Keystone Zoom (U)	
Olympus Zoom (U)      __     ._
Yashica 8EE Zoom (U)
Bell ft Howell turret (U)    _
Kodak Electric 8 (U) _-	
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Nizo F.A. Zoom (N) 329.50-189.88
KERRISDALE CAMERAS
2170 WEST 41st STREET
PHONE 266-2622 Friday, February 3,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
BREAKING THE SOD for the playing field,
president; President L. S. Klinck; Dr. Henry
Jan. 5,  1931. From l-r: Don  Hutchinson, AMS
Angus; and Dean F. M. Clement.
RUGBY AND THE STADIUM
END OF AN ERA
By TONY HODGE
The turning of the sod, January 5, 1931,
marked the end of a strenuous student drive
to raise money, and marked the beginning
of the life of the UBC Stadium that their
money was going to build.
The track was in use toy fall of 1931,
but the field did not see its first major game
until November 5, 1932 when the Varsity
Ruggers beat the Occassionals (grads) 11-9
at Homecoming.
The stadium was built for rugby, began
with rugby, and will end as a rugby stadium.
The Wallaby-UBC game on Feb. 16 will
be the last organized game of any type to be
played in this stadium.
During the depression, at a time when
the very life of the whole University was
threatened, the students managed to raise
$20,000 for the stadium.
Support came from all directions. From
The Ubyssey of Jan. 20, 1931 came this
remark: "Mr. R. J. Cromie and the Vancouver Sun are behind the stadium project
to such an extent that Mr. Cromie contributed $100 directly, and permitted the Publications board to bend the policy of the
Sun to the purposes of the students."
President L. S. Klinck expressed his support in a letter to The Ubyssey.
"The assumption that ample physical
recreation comes to students spontaneously
is unwarranted. It is erroneous to postulate
that the natural setting of our campus is
conducive, in itself, to the highest degree
of physical and mental health.
". . . Where one student engages in athletics to the detriment of his studies, ten
need to learn how to play ...
"Because I believe unreservedly in well-
directed athletics for the whole University
community, I heartily approve of the campaign which the students have launched for
increased playing field accommodation."
While the campaign went on, students
and faculty worked together under Professor Frank Buck developing a difficult,
stumpy swamp area into a playing field
surrounded by a first class cinder track.
Men worked on what were called "relief" wages of $2 per day.
The preparation of the area was no small
task, because the East Mlall had to be cut
out from the brush, and the level of the
field area raised by about two and one-half
feet in the swampy section. The basic level
was about the same as the sunken garden
at Brock Hall.
To obtain the necessary fill, which had
to be moved by horse and wagon, Buck cut
approximately six feet of earth from the
Mall extending approximately from the administration building to the flagpole.
Many distinguished teams and individuals have performed in the UBC Stadium
including Queen's University of Belfast,
New Zealand All-Blacks, the combined Oxford-Cambridge team, the Universities of
California, UCLA, Stanford, Toronto, McGill, McMaster and Japanese rugby and
field hockey teams.
Our most distinguished visitor, however,
was Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth. As
Princess Elizabeth, she and Prince Phillip saw
their first American football game in our
stadium on Saturday, Oct. 21, 1951.
A crowd estimated on page 1 of The
Ubyssey as ten thousand, and page 4 as six
thousand, waited patiently for the arrival
of Their Royal Highnesses.
The game ended with a 13-8 score with
UBC on the long end over Eastern Oregon.
There are others who will recall memories of the stadium which are unsuspected
by most spectators. They are the hundreds
of boxers, wrestlers, and weight lifters who
for many years "worked out" in the centre
room of the stadium.
And now the life of this stadium is almost over. Construction of the new Student
Union Building, also paid for by the students,
will begin this spring on the site of the present stadium.
We will have a new stadium, bigger,
better, more modern. It won't even have any
posts to block the view. It will be the first
of its kind in North America.
But memories of the old stadium will
remain. New traditions, however, will have
to be built around the new stadium.
The Wallafoy-UBC game — end of an era
for the old stadium.
BIRDS AND BRA VES RETURN
UNDEFEATED FROM OREGON
The UBC Thunderbirds and Braves found out what it was
like to win in the muck, playing last week.
Going first to the University of Oregon at Eugene the Birds
won 8-3 over the team that was to be THE team to beat in the
Northwest Intercollegiate Rugby League.
Last year, the Birds lost to U of O 9-6 in the finals. Scorers
in the game were Doug Brazier with a try and a convert, and
Don Crompton with a try.
The Braves, meanwhile, tied the "B" team 3-3.
A very close convert was disallowed by the referee, amidst
the grunts and groans of the hard playing Braves. Scorer of the
try was Bruce Laughling.
The day after the night before, the teams moved on to
Corvallis to meet the Oregon State teams. Here the going was
a little easier as the Birds, with scoring by Dave Austin (try),
Don Crompton (two tries), and Doug Brazier (convert), coasted
to an 11-0 victory.
The Braves also won here with a 6-0 win. Doug Schick
scored a try on a scintillating run and Steve Owen bulldozed
over for the other try.
All four games were played in mucky muck of the best
quality.
The dual victories of the Birds put them solidly in first
place in the NIRL, with only University of Washington to play.
That game is this Saturday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. on Wolfson
field. A win will clinch the title for the Birds.
— don kydd photo
GETTING A HAND in the belly is rugger
man Dan Mclntyre as he reaches for the
sky during preparation for UBC-Wallaby
game. Augmented UBC team is practising five days a week for the upcoming
international match.
— don kydd photo
ROUGH  SCRUM  practise  involves,   as   it  seems  to   Doug
Brazier, pondering the pungent odors.
BIRDS  WORKING  TO
WALLOP   WALLABIES
The day the Thunderbirds will get a taste
of international rugby as they meet the touring Australian Wallabies, is looming closer
and closer.
The Wallabies, one of the world's great
rugby teams, will display their quick, slashing brilliance at 12:30 p.m., Feb. 16 at UBC
Stadium.
The Wallabies are stopping here en route
home from a gruelling, four month, 34
game tour of the British Isles and France.
The gold-clad XV, renowned for its aggressive attacking style of play, reached
Olympian heights against Wales Dec. 3, defeating the international champions 14-11
in a memorable battle at Cardiff's Arms
Park.
The Wallabies also defeated England 23-
11 in another international match, but suffered losses to Scotland and Ireland.
Included in the Australian team is Ken
Catchpole described by Duggie Harrison,
president of the English Rugby Football
Union, as "the greatest scrum half of all
time."
The Wallabies, against UBC, will be
meeting a team composed of present Thunderbirds augmented by former UBC players.
Tickets for the Wallabies-UBC game are
on sale at the UBC Athletic Office. Tickets
are $2 and $1 for students and are good for
either the Wallaby-UBC game or the Wal-
laby-B.C. Rep contest to be played Feb. 18. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  3,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Poet reads, films flick
CONTEMPORARY
ARTS FESTIVAL
Today poetry reading toy
Cecile Cloutier at 12:30 in Bu.
102. Program of CBC films,
3:30, Bu. 106. Admission 35
cents.
CLASSICS DEPT.
A. G. McKay speaks on The
Pleasure-domes of Baiae, Friday, noon, Bu. 100; The Hero
and the Courtroom, 8 p.m.,
Bu, Penthouse.
MATH CLUB
Meeting to discuss open house
exhibit,  Tuesday,   noon,  math
204.
COMMERCE US
Campus - a - go - go Saturday,
night, armory. Three bands, 4^
hour dance and show.
VCF
Joe Curry speaks today, noon,
Bi. Sci. .2000. Bus leaves Brock
for Mt. Baker at 5:30.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Meeting-Monday, noon, Bu.
214   to   discuss  delegation   to
Ottawa conference.
CURLING CLUB
Graveyard bonspiel, Saturday, 10 p.m., $12 per rink.
Enter at Thunderbird arena or
phone 261-6103.
MUSSOC
Anyone wishing to usher for
How To Succeed, please sign
list  in clubroom  above  auditorium.
CUS
Eugene Heckathorn discusses
ethics in business, today, noon,
Ang. 413.
INTERNATIONALISTS
Dr. William Willmott speaks
on South East Asia in Turmoil,
tonight,   8   p.m.,   lower   mall .
lounge. j
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
MP Heward Grafftey speaks
today, noon, Bu. 205.
WORLD FEDERALISTS
Dr.   Johann  Liebe  discusses
Macro  Trends  Toward  World
Federation,   today,   noon,   Bu.
202.
CLASSICS DEPT.
R. A. D. Cattley, speaks on
cracking   an   ancient  code:   a
triumph of modern cryptology,
Monday, noon, Bu. 100.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Hootenanny Sunday, 8 p.m.,
Newman lounge, St. Mark's,
free admission, bring guitars.
PSYCH CLUB
Meeting with film  and discussion of open house, today,
noon. Ang. 207.
EL CIRCULO
Barry Munn speaks on Rio
de   Janeiro,   today,   noon,   Bu.
204.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Dr.     iMacKenzie     discusses
planned  parenthood,   Monday,
noon, Bu. 203.
WAA
Undefeated basketball Thun-
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NONACTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
UNIVERSITY
CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL           1
ST. ANSELM'S
(United)
(Anglican)
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
8:00;   9:30;   &   11:00 a.m.
"Lefs  Face   It!"
Holy   Communion
2. Laughter and Tears     1
Let Man Go Free
University Hill        THE NEW MORALITY        7:30 p.m.
"What is the New Moral
ty"-Dr. W. S. Taylor
HAROLD MacKAY
JIM McKIBBON
BACKTO-THE-
B00KS EYEWEAR
Better vision can mean better marks! Start the new
year right with a visit to
your eye physician. Even if
your "prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
new frame can do wonders
for the disposition.
Hofa Optical,
8GMBO
1701 W. Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft  Mod.  «C
3195 Granvilk
7334772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
derettes host U. of Saskatchewan Friday, Saturday, 8:30
p.m., Memorial gym.
GERMAN  CLUB
Slides   of   Germany,   today,
noon, Bu. 203.
£Uwe £et &ih#4
now   at  the
College Shop
BROCK EXTENSION
Order Yours Now
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, S.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8. Found
11
LOST: SILVER INDIAN RING IN
Showmart washroom on Monday,
Jan. 23 (Evening) Phone Jack
261-3839.
FOUND: PEN AND PENCIL SET.
"Papermate" in south end of "C"
lot.   MU   1-5979   in   the   evening.
Coming Dances
12A
SEMI - FORMAL BLUE CHIPS
Commerce Dance at Commodore
Feb 3   8:30  p.m.
$600!
worth of big-beat entertainment
will be playing for your dancing and
listening pleasure this Sat. nite at
CAMPUS A GO-GO (Revisited). By
now you know who's playing — suffice to say that they are 3 of Vancouver's GREATEST BANDS. And
the cost to you? The same price
that you would pay to see a typical movie. You can go to a show
anytime, but how often is it possible to be entertained by a TRIPLE
BAND PROGRAM and yet pay only
$1.50   a person?
VERY,  VERT SELDOM
TOMORROW   NIGHT!
in
THE   ARMOURIES!
CAMPUS A GO-GO
RETURNS   TO   U.B.C.
FEATURING
THREE   GREAT   BANDS:
KENTISH  STEELE
and
THE   SHANTELLES!
plus
THE   SHOCKERS!
plus
THE   PAINTED   SHIP!
This adds up to 4% hrs. of continuous big-beat music: 8:30-1, and it's
only   $1.50/person!
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM BROAD-
way at Boundary. M,W,&F at 8:00
a.m.   Please  phone  224-6850.	
WANTED-RIDE FOR TWO GIRLS
to Rossland, Castlegar or Grand
Forks, at midterm break. Will
help pay gas. Phone Jean or Gael
Rooms    346   and   348,   224-9883.
RIDE     FOR     2     NEEDED     FROM
 Coquitlam   orPort^ Coq.   521-1007.
WOULD APPRECIATE RIDE, 8:30
classes Monday to Friday. Vicinity of Boundary and Kingsway.
Phone   434-0422.
Wanted
15
WANTED: "RADIO AND WIRE-
less 30" Vocational Correspondence   course   call   435-5767.
ONE   BLUE   205   KASTLE   COMBIE
Phone   Chris,   922-6592.
Travel Opportunities
16
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE AC-
commod. for tour in Russia.
Phone  Don at  228-8825.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles  For Sale
21
VAUXHALL CRESTA '62 std. trans.
31,000 miles, snow tires. $950.00 or
best   offer.   FA   5-3035.
1961 SIMCA EXCELLENT COND.
New clutch, battery. $300. Phone
Dave 266-0879.
1954    OLD'S    2   DR.    H.T.    POWER
windows.    $150.00.    261-5530.	
'53 CHEV — GOOD RELIABLE
transportation $75. Call Dick at
731-3881   or   224-9769.
Automobile Parts
21A
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4630
ELECTRIC TYPING, THESIS AND
essay. Call Joan 228-8384.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
ATTENTION: NORTH SHORE
students: Typing done in my
home. Fast, Accurate, Reasonable.
Phone   987-3548  before   8  p.m.	
TYPING SERVICE: MRS. GAIL
Symons 3885 W. 12th Ave. 224-
643 5.	
ESSAYS, THESES, MANUS-
scripts. Accurately typed. Elec.
machine. Phone 224-5046 after 6
p.m.
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Music
63
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sci-
ences and arts.  736-6923.	
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering. $3/hr. Minimum 5 lessons. 876-1859.	
LESSONS IN GERMAN FOR STU-
dents and persons eager to lean-
to speak the language. $2.00 per
lesson. Phone 325-4902.
'61 FIAT SFYDER PARTS. NEW
top, clutch, tires trans., body
parts.   CY  9-4874.
SLAVIC
FROLIC
FEB.
11,
8-12
Midnight.    I.H.
Dancing
to
the
"Entertainers".
Singing
bv
the
"South
Slavs".
Single
$1.50
—
Couple
$2.50.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and  see our minerals and fossils.
ALL ARTSMEN — ENTER THE
Arts Poetry Contest now. Cash
prizes. Deadline Feb. 24. For further information contact Arts
Office  Brock  359.
HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS
Without Really Trying. Student
Performances Feb. 6th, 7th, 8:30,
9th,  12:30.  75c.
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's —
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.
GIRLS: ESCORTS UNLIMITED
can provide you with an escort
for any occasion . . . Reasonable
rates. All inquiries handled personally and confidentially. Reply
1157   Steveston  Highway.	
DOWNY PLUSH IS ALL THE
nice things that could happen to
you, because DOWNY PLUSH is
for you . . . Think about it for a
while, then call CA 4-9921 to have
your questions individually
answered. Remember, DOWNY
PLUSH is your very own personal and confidential service. Re-
sults  guaranteed.	
AVAILABLE SOON—PSYCHEDE-
Iic posters for Zen meditation &
other joys. _
OIL CAN" HARRYS CONTINUES
to bring you the best bands in
Vancouver. This Friday: the sensational Shockers. Saturday: two
clubs for the price of one with:
Accents in Oil Can Harrys & the
Stags in Dirty Sals Celler. Tie &
Jacket, 21 & over. 752 Thurlow
St.   for   reservations   683-7923.
Bodywork, Glass
23
GLASS FILLING AND BODY
work at Commerce Blue Chips
dance Feb.   3.  Commodore.  8:30.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. — "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.
IF YOU DON'T LIKE BLEEDING
ears, hire the Jabberwok. They
play vaudeville, too. Phone John,
CA  4-9073  or  Lindy,   CA  4-4555.
8:30 P.M. — B.Y.O.B. — 1:00 A.M.
BLUE CHIPS. Commerce Dance
at Commodore Feb.  3.
FOR   YOU
This  Sat.   Nite
A TRIPLE BAND
SPECTACULAR!
A 4%  Hour
Dance & Show
at
CAMPUS  A   GO-GO!
HELP GUARANTEED — WE SPE-
cialize in Volkswagen servicing
and repairs. Compare our rates
we're the most reasonable in
towp. Auto Henneken, 8914 Oak
St.   (at   S.W.   Marine   Drive).
MARGE SAYS: JERRY DOES
want   to   get  married.	
HAPPY 21st TO THE SEXIEST
girl   in   the   world—JTHA.
DANGER!    MOUSE    IS     A    GIRL-
Guide!   Beware!
L?P?E?    ?I?C?T?E?U
Remember last Friday  ?  ?
OTIS A GO-GO PRESENTS CAMPUS A GO-GO featuring Topless
Miss  Otis.   K.S.E.F.
Sewing & Alterations
40
CLOTHES ALTERATION — NEW
— old — repairs — reasonable
charge. Phone 224 - 7141 afternoons.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
GETTING ENGAGED: I CAN SAVE
you up to 50% on any diamond
ring. Satisfaction guaranteed or
your money refunded. Call Mur-
ray 261-6671.	
METAL SKIS WITH MARKER
toe piece 215 cm. Remington Electric  shaver.   Phone   685-2170.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BASEMENT SLEEPING ROOM
for male student, separate entrance. Semi Private shower and
toilet.  Phone  224-5883  6 to  8  p.m.
Room & Board
82
EXCELLENT VTEW, GOOD FOOD,
and enjoyable atmosphere at the
Delta Upsilon Frat. House. Call
Ron   or   Scott   at   224-9841.	
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 between 5:00 p.m.
and 7:00 p.m.	
ROOM & BOARD AT UBC GATES
single $105.00; sharing $90.00. Only
those who are serious about their
studies   need   apply.   224-6441.	
TRAFFIC PROBLEMS? MOVE ON
campus and forget them! Room
and board. Feb. 1. 2280 Wesbrook.
224-9986.
Furn. Houses and Apts. 83
STUDENT OVER 21 WANTED TO
share West End apt. $42.50/mo.
Ride   9:30-5:30.   682-7604.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
WANTED TO RENT. 3 BEDROOM
house, Dunbar, Point Grey area,
as soon as possible. Phone 224-
3005.
Real Estate
86
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
FOR RENT
25,000   sq.   ft.   of   Dance   Floor   for
only   $1.50/person.   Triple   Band   entertainment at no extra cost! Apply
at the Armouries anytime.   Between
8:30-1:00.   This  Sat,   nite!	
HOUSE FOR SALE NEAR UBC
gates; large modern kitchen &
bathroom; double lot (60'); excellent revenue from basement
suites; married students wish to
sell to same; $4000 dn. payment,
(minimum). No agents, 224-6857
(5-7 p.m.).

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