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The Ubyssey Nov 9, 1971

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Labor Week to expose historical materialism
History is not the story of great men — of kings and
generals. Nor is it a series of isolated events on a time line.
History is made by ordinary people struggling against
oppression and exploitation for a better way of life ,and to
gain a measure of control over their own lives.
This is why the Alma Mater Society special events
committee is holding a labor week Nov. 15 - Nov. 19,
says committee member Brian Sproule.
"Those who wrote history books interpret history
according to their world view. Bourgeois historians seldom
emphasize the role played by ordinary working people in
shaping history," said Sproule.
"In Canada, events such as the Winnipeg general
strike of 1919 and the On To Ottawa trek of the
unemployed in the 30s, are forgotten."
More recent events such as the Nova Scotia
fishermen's battle for unionization, the strike by Canadian
women textile workers in Brarifford, Ont. and the
National Farmers Union boycott bf Kraft foods are
mainly covered and supported in campus and
underground newspapers, said Sproule.
"These events are given cursory coverage in the big
business-controlled newspapers in which they are treated
as minor and isolated departures from the pattern of
peaceful and harmonious development of liberal
democracy," he said.
National Farmers Union spokesman Stuart Affleck
will speak at noon Nov. 15 in the SUB auditorium. Before
this at 11:30 a.m. a film called "This Film is about
Farming" will be shown.
Charles Lipton, author of The Canadian Trade Union
Movement 1837-1954 will speak Nov. 16 at noon in the
SUB auditorium on the international unions in the past
and present.
Vol. Llll, No. 24 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1971
228-2301
Rev. Ron Parsons, supporter of the Nova Scotia
fishermen and Homer Stevens, president of the United
Fishermen and Allied Workers Union will discuss the
UFAWU strike in Nova Scotia Nov. 17 at noon in the SUB
ballroom.
The fishermen have been fighting for a year against
the government, courts, companies, the Canadian Labor
Congress and a conservative union for representation by
the union of their choice.
Madeline Parent, secretary-treasurer of the Canadian
Textile and Chemical Union and active in the Brantford
strike where police and professional strikebreakers were
used against the strikers will speak on the Canadian
workin class Nov. 18 at noon in the SUB auditorium.
Parent has been involved in union organization since
1946 when she worked in the Dominion Textile Plants
strike of 6,000 workers in Valleyfield, Quebec. The strike
was won, including an equal pay for equal work clause,
for the first time in Quebec.
The Working Women's Association is planning on
holding an off-campus meeting with her in the evening.
Time and place will be in Tuesday's Ubyssey.
Parent, Parsons and Lipton will discuss the future of
organized labor in Canada Nov. 19 at noon in the SUB
auditorium.
Sproule said the committee is trying to organize
evening meetings with the speakers for campus workers.
For more information call special events at 228-3708.
Resistance to Belshaw
Confidential memo sent to selected faculty, which failed to draw any response in the
form of letters to The Ubyssey.
THE UNIVERSITY  ■.  ,; BRITISH COLUMBIA
VANIOUVFR    8.   CANADA
DEPARTMFNT OF
ANTHROPOLOGY  AND SOCIOLOCY MEMORANDUM
9
TO:  Faculty FROM:  Cyril Belshaw
1st November 1971
The centre pages of the Ubyssey of Friday 29th constitute
a deliberate and mischievous attempt to open up divisions and wounds
in the department which had long since been healed, and indeed to
exaggerate issues which were once with us.  All the material is old
and none had any bearing on this year's tenure discussions in the
Promotions and Tenure Committee.
It is particularly ironical that Ubyssey should attempt to
slam the highly creditable activities of faculty who have searched
for research funds, at least ninety per cent of which go to the support
of graduate students. And that Bill Willmott, who has been opposed to
Ubyssey's line, should be quoted outsof context.  This is the information which I know to have been in Ubyssey hands prior to the beginning
of the whole unfortunate episode:  they deliberately waited until he was
out of the country before tipping their hand.
I have been deliberately responding to Ubyssey, in part to
answer, not them, but querying students, and in part to smoke out what
they were up to.  Since most of the discussion has surrounded tenure,
faculty have quite properly maintained public silence.  I may add that
I have received numerous compliments about the department from fellow
faculty in other parts of the university, who have commented on the high
morale, self-control, and professional ethic which has obviously governed
your conduct.
However, the centre pages on Friday go beyond tenure:  indeed,
have little to do with it. . This time I will not respond.
But I do ask faculty now to individually bombard Ubyssey with
letters attacking their divisive tactics and demonstrating that they
have not worked.  They should not be allowed to continue to think that
If they attempt to abuse and destroy faculty members will allow them to
get away with it:  they should at least be placed on the defensive.
Don't, however, get sucked in to the tenure discussion. And don't allow
this to upset you, or spend too much time on it. We must not allow this
kind o'f pressure to deflect us from our positive concerns.
The graduate student question is another matter, about which I
will be seeking advice during the week.
Rag takes break but library remains open
There will be no Thursday and Friday editions
of The Ubyssey because of Remembrance Day, a
statutory holiday, on Thursday.
However, UBC libraries will accommodate all
failing and fanatical students Thursday.
Main, Sedgewick, Woodward and Law libraries
will be open from 9 a.m. to midnight. Other faculty
and department branches will post their own hours.
Brock Hall study area will be open from 8 a.m.
to midnight.
increases
Anthropology-sociology head Cyril Belshaw's hard-line position
on departmental tenure cases is eroding steadily.
Faculty pressure in favor of reconsidering the decision made on
the careers of sociology professors Matthew Speier and Ron Silvers is
increasing. However, Belshaw is giving no indication of willingness to
change his stand.
Speier and Silvers were narrowly recommended for tenure in
October by the department's promotion and tenure committee, only
to be rejected by Belshaw.
A month-long struggle has ensued, during which student-led
opposition has questioned the fairness of Belshaw's decisions, as well
as the department's tenure case procedures.
The revelation Monday of an enraged Belshaw's
effort-to-muster-the-troops (see memo to left) came as something of
an ugly anti-climax to several days of behind-the-scenes manoeuvring
in the department.
Full prof backs brief
It is now possible to piece together a sequence of largely-secret
events that have occurred since last Tuesday.
Much of last week's action came as a result of a brief issued by
the anthrosoc grad student tenure committee on Oct. 28, which •
revealed a series of puzzles, discrepancies and inconsistencies in
departmental decision-making in the Speier-Silvers cases.
The brief claimed that both Speier and Silvers met and surpassed
all faculty and departmental criteria for tenure. It presented new
evidence in favor of granting tenure to the two profs and dissected all
the old evidence, uncovering a plethora of disturbing irregularities.
At the faculty level, the breakthrough came Nov. 2 when
professor David Aberle, a member of the promotions and tenure
committee, called in a memo for a reconsideration of "relevant
procedural and substantive issues" raised by the GSA brief.
Aberle said: "I have read the GSA report on 'the tenure situation'
from beginning to end. It seems to me to be careful, temperate and
well-executed."
'Bombard Ubyssey'
The day before the Aberle memo, Belshaw claimed that The
Ubyssey's feature story of Oct. 29, "The Politics of a Department",
which examined the history of factional struggle in anthrosoc, was "a
deliberate and mischievious attempt to open up divisions and
wounds".
Belshaw, who had carried on a lengthy public correspondence in
the newspaper, explained his secret strategy to department members.
Said Belshaw: "I have been deliberately responding to Ubyssey,
in part to answer, not them, but querying students, and in part to
smoke out what they were up to."
Belshaw concluded his attack on the student press with an appeal
to fellow faculty: to bombard The Ubyssey with letters attacking
"their divisive tactics and demonstrating that they have not worked."
As of this date, the Belshaw appeal has failed. The Ubyssey has.
not received any letters supporting the Nov. 1 memo. Faculty
members took a dim view of Belshaw's military-style missive, and the
move cost him considerable credibility among uncommitted senior
faculty, it was reported.
See page 2: MEETINGS Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9, 1971
Grey mass between ears
called pollutant by Suzuki
By SANDI SHREVE
Ecology is just another social
fad where people scream for
change but still demand the
benefits which have led to
environmental decay, says
zoology professor David Suzuki.
"People are working for a
common cause but are deluding
themselves by thinking if they
save the ecology they will ensure a
better world," Suzuki said Friday.
"In no case are we near to the
solutions for any of our problems —
the new ones only bury the old,"
he told more than 800 persons in
the SUB  ballroom.
"The autonomy of elite groups
are the basis of our problems.
There are specialists in every field
and their numbers grow each year.
Then they acquire or are granted
special powers through which
they become immune to public
criticism," he said.
"Rules and regulations impede
the good for those they were
originally set out to serve."
Suzuki's prime example of this
situation was the "double-edged"
role of scientists in society.
''Scientists have a
responsibility to inform society of
their work, the implications of it
and to stop it if the possibility
exists the results will be bad. This
can't be avoided any longer," he
said.
He   discussed  in  some   detail
recent developments in the study
SUZUKI
. . . revolution in mind
of genetics which could lead to
cures for diseases such as diabetes
and the prevention or at least the
prediction of such births as
crippled, blind or mongoloid
children.
Meetings, words
From page 1
Last Wednesday evening, the department's junior faculty met and
wrote a statement signed by 12 faculty members which urged P and T
committee "to reconsider you recent tenure recommendations" and
to "vote again on the cases of Dr. Speier and Dr. Silvers."
Belshaw responded Sunday to the junior faculty letter to the P
and T committee with an offer to meet personally with them, but
refused to discuss the actual cases. Junior profs were unhappy that
Belshaw is maintaining his policy of acting as sole intermediary
between the various groups in the department.
The anthrosoc undergraduate union got into the act on Thursday
by sending Belshaw a letter calling for reconsideration of the cases and
student representation on the department's P and T committee.
It said students would raise these issues as motions at the next
department meeting and asked Belshaw to tell them when the meeting
would be held. (Belshaw, who calls the department together at his
own discretion, has so far only held one meeting this term.)
The letter formalized the basic position students have taken since
the beginning of the dispute.
On Friday, in a rather dazzling display of the mastery of
ethnographic techniques taught in the department, the undergraduate
union published a paperback book, Learn-In: The Crisis in Sociology
at UBC. (The students had videotaped the sociology crisis meeting
held the previous Friday, showed their tapes to students on monitor
TV at various campus locations during the -week and published
Learn-In, an illustrated transcription of the meeting, all within seven
days.)
Review copies of the book landed on faculty members' desks by
Friday noon.
Meanwhile, in contrast to student efforts to promote open
discussion of the cases and the underlying issues, Belshaw huddled
with faculty members, whom he called to his office in groups of two
and three.
Belshaw sounded faculty out on their reponse to the grad student
brief and by day's end added up faculty sentiment on the matter and
planned his strategy for the upcoming meeting of the P and T
committe, to be held at 2:30 p.m. today in the small groups lab of the
Henry Angus building, where the Speier-Silvers case will no doubt be
discussed.
Belshaw also called in grad students Friday afternoon, but the
talks were reported to be inconclusive and not indicative that Belshaw
was willing to give ground gracefully.
In the meantime, students continued to express their concern to
faculty members and to appeal to them on moral grounds not to be
deterred by technical considerations of 'proper bureaucratic
procedures' from reconvening hearings on the Speier-Silvers cases.
While grad students have consistantly expressed near-unanimous
opposition to Belshaw's decisions, a count of faculty members now
indicated that a substantial majority of them are unwilling to go along
with any plan that will sweep the matter under the rug.
In addition to the P and T committee meeting slated for this
afternoon, the anthrosoc undergrad union will meet at noon today in
the Henry Angus lounge to continue discussion of the issues and plan
further student action.
However Suzuki said he was
pessimistic about the amount of
good which could come from such
progress, explaining the many
harmful uses of those discoveries.
An example of this, he said, "is
the strong possibility of devising a
weapon with such high selectively
it could totally eliminate one
racial group leaving the others
alone, using the same information
concerning inherited genetic
differences.'
Suzuki said we are all in the
game of power.
"We play it seriously and by
playing we only perpetuate it."
"We need a revolution in our
minds," he said. "We need to
understand the loss of power gives
freedom and this in turn gives
responsibility for ourselves and
others.
"Science is misused now
because scientists do not have the
courage to control it."
Suzuki questioned whether a
technological society could
perpetuate human dignity, saying
it has so far created loss of
satisfaction from work,
polarization of young against old
and a high dependence on drugs.
"Scientific methods are even
being applied to emotions. So
often we are told we are being too
emotional and if over a period of
time we change our minds we are
accused of being inconsistent.
"This reflects a narrow view of
the world — we negate real
feelings because they can't be
understood," Suzuki said.
He told his enthused audience
that people are not what they
claim to be but are what their
actions prove them to be.
"Politicians always sound great
in what they say they believe in
but their actions contradict their
words."
Suzuki said the world situation
would get much worse before
it got any better.
"Maybe it would be best for
the Amchitka bomb to go off and
for Japan and a half of Vancouver
Island to go under. Then maybe
the people of Canada will
acknowledge where they stand
with the U.S. and do something
about it."
His quote from cartoon
character Pogo best summed his
point of view: "We have
confronted the enemy and them is
us."
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL
NOTICE
Election of
New Executive
NOMINATIONS   are   now   open   for   the   following
executive positions;
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
SECRETARY
COORDINATOR OF ACTIVITIES
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
Nominations will close at 4 p.m. Wednesday, November 17.
Nomination forms may be picked up from the Secretary's office
SUB-256.
The Election will take place
WEDNESDAY. NOV. 24
SATURDAY, NOV. 13
FEDERICO FELLINI
"VARIETY LIGHTS"
(1950)
HEBB THEATRE U.B.C
Two shows only
7:30 & 9:30 P.M.
75' EVERYONE
ONE DAY ONLY
SATURDAY, NOV. 13
A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATION
— Elia Kazan's —
THE ARRANGEMENT
_ WITH —
Kirk Douglas, Deborah Kerr, Faye Dunaway
FRIDAY 12th & SATURDAY 13th
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 14th — 7:00
50c
SUB
THEATRE Tuesday, November 9, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
$24 million green light for hospital
By BERTON WOODWARD
A planned $60 million,
350-bed training hospital at UBC
can now go ahead following the
confirmation Friday of a $24.3
million federal grant.
The hospital, to be a training
centre for 450 medical students,
600 nursing students and an
estimated 3,000 students in allied
professions, will be used to treat
.ambulatory patients and persons
from all parts of B.C. who cannot
obtain the care they need from
local facilities, medicine faculty
dean J. F. McCreary said Monday.
An overhaul of earlier plans for
the hospital will now be made to
make sure they are not outdated,
he said.
The announcement comes
more than four years after a $6
million donation to UBC from
department store magnate P. W.
Woodward "for the development
of the health sciences at UBC".
However Woodward stipulated
that  construction  on a training
hospital must begin before July 1,
1967.
The federal government's $500
million health resources fund for
medical training centres across the
country had already been set up.
Thus before Woodward's
deadline, construction began on
UBC's $5 million 60-bed
psychiatric ward, financed by
Woodward and the federal
government.
The future of the main hospital
began to look doubtful, however,
when the provincial government
placed a ceiling on all money
available for hospital construction
for all time.
McCreary and Premier W. A. C.
Bennett had a meeting at which
time it was agreed that the ceiling
would be removed provided a
government investigation
approved the plans for the
hospital.
The four-man team, consisting
of an engineer, two architects and
a    cost    analyst,    subsequently
—kelly booth photo
BINS OF BOOKS await buyers at alternate co-op bookstore in SUB basement. Operation has been expanded to include records, magazines
and other goodies, as dissatisfaction with university bookstore grows and grows.
approved everything but the shape
of the building.
The provincial government in
November of 1970 decided to
proceed with the hospital.
In July, 1971 the government
agreed to share 50 per cent of the
cost as long as it did not exceed
$58.5 million nor 410 beds.
Friday the federal government
came through with most of the
remainder of the money. The last
$7 million came from private
sources.
$12.5 million of federal health
resource funds have already been
spent.
The money financed half of
four projects — the psychiatric
ward, the Instructional Resources
Centre which will be completed in
January, the Woodward library
addition and the community
practice unit to be completed in
April, 1972.
The other half of the financing
came from Woodward's donation.
The federal health resources
fund is administered on a per
capita basis for the provinces. Of
the $500 million, $400 million
has been made available.
Since B.C. has about 10 per
cent of Canada's population, the
province is theoretically entitled
to about $40 million, UBC
treasurer Allen Baxter said
Monday.
UBC has received $36.2 million
which is basically all the money
allotted for this province.
Baxter said Monday UBC is
"very fortunate" to be receiving
the money.
However he said the hospital
project still needs about $1.5
million to be completed.
McCreary said federal funds
flow at a yearly rate of only $28.6
million for all hospitals across the
country.
"When we get to the
heavy-spending term it may be
that the project has to be
delayed," he said.
McCreary said the hospital is
costing more than community
hospitals because of training space
needed.
Community hospitals use
about 800 square feet a bed while
UBC will use about 3,000, he said.
He added that Canadian
doctors are "overusing hospitals".
He said in the U.S. patients spend
40 per cent less time in hospital
thus hospitals there need 40 per
cent less beds.
"If we are building a teaching
hospital we should be teaching
people how to use hospitals," he
said.
<a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
PhD unemployment is soaring.
An unreleased report on recent
unemployed PhDs is already causing a
great deal of concern among government
economists and university administrators
who are in the know.
The report, prepared by an
independent federal government agency,
details the meteoric rise in true
unemployment and not just
underemployment being encountered
particularly by science and engineering
PhDs.
In addition to the unemployment
figures the report details the fact that 80
per cent of the post-doctoral fellows
presently in Canadian  universities are
Table I. Percentages of unemployed science and engineering PhDs
Canadian Citizens non-Canadians
1969-1970      1970-1971 1969-1970
0.0 7.5 4.6
2.4 3.8 10.2
2.9 12.3 4.2
Discipline
Engineering
Life Science
Physical Sc.
1970-1971
12,8
12.6
17.3
non-Canadian and that two-thirds of
those sought employment in Canada thus
adding to the already bad situation.
Twenty-seven per cent actually remained.
Another indication of the lack of jobs
and the resultant lengthening of the labor
pipeline is that 18 per cent of the
post-doctoral fellowships continue on
past the normal two years.
The report also notes that graduate
students have been dropping out of
graduate programs or switching to other
fields in extremely high numbers.
"If the present rate of decline in
graduate enrolment were to continue
there would be a drop in PhD enrolment
of 15 per cent by 1975 and 35 per cent
by 1980," the report said.
Any over-reaction of this sort, the
report warns, will lead to a worsening in
Activity Status of
PhD Graduates From Ontario
Per cent unemployed
Year of Degree
- all fields
64-69
0.3%
69-70
2.4%
70-71
5.5%
the supply-demand imbalance for PhDs.
Nonetheless, graduate students faced
with bleak employment prospects in a
primarily resource-based economy have
little to look forward to. Although some
of the report's statistics may be open to
debate the results of this careful study
show a definite shift of potential and
actual PhDs out of their own discipline
and into the ranks of the unemployed. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9, 1971
Labor Week
By and large, most of us do a pretty good job of
ignoring workers.
On campus, we pay little attention to the people
who rake leaves, type reading lists, sweep floors, serve
food, mimeograph assignments, do repairs.
And in the classroom, the almost total absence of
any material dealing with workers is enough to make
one believe that these people have played no part in
world history.
Meanwhile, as we proceed along our middle-class
paths, the university and society continue to operate on
the backs of these people.
Recognizing the need for radical changes in our
attitudes towards workers, the AMS special events
committee has designated next week as Labor Week at
UBC. We urge everyone to participate.
Patton
Ubyssey staffers crouched in their bunkers last
week awaiting the onslaught from Cyril Belshaw's crack
fusiliers.
However, the exhortations contained in Belshaw's
secret memo to selected faculty members (reprinted on
page one of today's Ubyssey) failed to arouse the
martial spirit of the department.
The Ubyssey has not been "bombarded" with
letters from faculty attacking its Oct. 29 anthrosoc
investigation report. In fact, we have not received even
one letter of attack.
And for a very good reason. The Ubyssey story was
true.
This, the latest product of Belshaw's unparalleled
career as a memoist, can hardly be regarded as a
milestone in rational debate.
We suggest that when Belshaw takes his next leave
of absence and writes his promised tome on the mess
he's created, perhaps he could entitle it: I Didn't Know
the Gun Was Unloaded.
Fetish
The portrayal in the Nov. 2
issue of The Ubyssey of a crippled
Victoria news vendor, a man well
known on the Victoria harbor
waterfront for years, as "Irving
Fetish" was cruel and in bad taste.
The idea that it is clever to
make fun of crippled people is a
childish one which originally
stems from a childish fear of these
people. It is a peculiar idea of
humor that one would hope we
had grown out of by now.
Perhaps you didn't know that
the person you portrayed as
"Irving Fetish" is a real, live
person — presumably with real
feelings, that is, if his sensitivity
has not been totally eroded by the
jibes of those who think his plight
is an amusing one.
We can only hope that this
man will be spared the hurt of
being exposed to this picture.
It is disillusioning to see that
The Ubyssey, which professes to
stand for idealism and
"humanity", actually gets off on
making jokes at the expense of a
permanently disabled man.
25 signatures,
Law
The Ubyssey staff does not
"get off on making fun of
cripples. The picture and caption
you refer to do not in any way
depict the Victoria news vendor as
a cripple, or refer jokingly to his
condition.
As far as we are concerned, the
picture is that of the head and
shoulders of a man who is sitting
in a motorized news cart. Thus
our picture caption is exactly the
same as it would have been if the
man was not crippled.
We think this is a
straightforward,   valid   approach.
And we suggest that before
you make accusations about our
motives in the future, you look at
yourselves and wonder why you
mimsstr
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
EDITOR:  LESLIE PLOMMER
First off, Mike Sasges wrote this masthead and if you don't like it, well
just kiss off John Andersen and Jan O'Brien. David Schmidt said he doesn't
like dogs, but apparently Ginny Gait and Sandi Shreve do. Be that as it
may, Paul Knox and Vaughn Palmer let it be known that there are certain
contradictions on the paper — Berton Woodward, Stan Persky and Art
Smolensky. Bruce Wilson simply couldn't see the truth but Lesley Krueger
vomited: it's here somewhere.
Perhaps it's in the darkroom where Kelly Booth, Warren Mayes and
Brett Garrett were hard at it, said Sandy Kass over the telephone.
Kent Spencer said the truth is in Calgary. Gord Gibson agreed. Lest we
forget — Brian Sproule.
—warren mayes photo
Letters
read the motives you did into the
picture caption.
Pelts
We were appalled at the report
on "Fur Woman" and her cohort
in the Nov. 5 Ubyssey.
We feel strongly that no animal
species should be decimated for
the unwarranted sale of its pelts
to (mostly) unsuspecting students.
We urge the AMS to let these
people peddle their "bloody
skins" elsewhere; it makes us sick
to our stomachs to see them take
their 30 pieces of silver for the
lives of living creatures.
Throw th'ese inhuman butchers
out of the temple!
5 signatures
night is, after she found out about
the pool?
When are we going to grow up,
to learn to accept people for what
they are, not for what they look
like? It's bad enough to live with
the hate, the prejudices, the
perversion of the generations that
have gone before us. Do we have
to breed the same sort of
ignorance? Is there any chance
that we can live up to the ideals
we profess?
Peace, brothers — have a good
time at the party.
K.R. Taylor,
First Year pre-commerce
Shop
Hogs
This morning I overheard a
conversation in SUB lounge that I
cannot ignore.
There is a party being planned
which is being called a Hog Party.
The main point is that these super
cool university "men" (I use the
term lightly) will invite fat, ugly
girls in order to humiliate them (I
believe the term used was "to
gross them").
Oh yes, we're a great group, we
university students. What is the
point of the education we receive,
the understanding of our fellow
woman and man that we profess
to have, if this kind of behavior is
going on at UBC?
Does anyone remember grad
year, when the ugliest girl in the
grade was worth a certain amount
of money to the poor jock that
was unfortunate enough to get
stuck with her? Did you ever stop
to think what her memory of grad
Although this will not repair
the damage done by your Friday
front page article, Corporation
threatens crafts tables, I should
like to try.
(Why does The Ubyssey use
headlines like that? It does not
need to sell papers like the Sun.)
The Thunderbird Shop has
actually supported those
"non-student crafts" in SUB by
buying articles like candles and
posters from such people in the
past.
Perhaps I can straighten out, or
at least add, some facts about the
shop et al. Collegiate Advertising
(who is National Advertising?)
was bought from National
Student Marketing Corporation in
1969 by four Canadians. It is still
Canadian-owned.
Further, Collegiate Advertising
is not a corporation but a limited
company. Unlike the
"non-students" who run the crafts
tables, the staff and management
of the Thunderbird Shop are
students or recent ex-students of
UBC. The rent the shop pays is
currently $7,500 annually, more*
than $4 per foot, three times the
rent on a house.
Finally, Sue Kennedy, it is not
"the power of that corporation"
which forced the issue, but a legal,
binding contract Between two
consenting parties. Contracts like
those which allow the AMS to
carry on much of its business, and
those which advertisers sign with
this paper.
Glen Ewan,
Arts 2
We don't know who National
Advertising is either — the
paragraph should have read:
"Since then Collegiate Advertising
broke away from NSMC."
We note in the story's second
paragraph that Collegiate
Advertising is a limited company.
Its legal status, however, does not
negate the use of corporation in
the headline. The Oxford English
Dictionary defines a corporation
as a "united body of persons
especially authorized to act as an
individual."
The headlines states The
Ubyssey's belief supported by the
story below it, that the four
Canadian owners you mention,
acting as an individual group, are
threatening the crafts tables.
M.S.,J.O.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste. Tuesday, November 9, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
The legion's other side
By BRIAN SPROULE
Nov. 11, 1918 was the end of
the First World War, the so-called
"Great War."
One year later to the day
Wesley Everest, logger and
member of the Industrial Workers
of the World, was dragged out of
the Centralia, Wash, jail, castrated
and lynched by members of the
legion.
The legion in co-operation with
local businessmen and officials of
the lumber companies deliberately
chose Armistice Day to march on
the I.W.W. hall hoping to drive the
wobblies out of town.
But the wobblies defended
themselves and several attackers
were shot before Everest was
captured.
The legionnaires were too
cowardly to kill him in daylight so
they waited until dark. Everest
was a victim of war too - class
war.
This incident shows that there
is another side to the American
and Canadian legions. They do
more than emerge from their
clubrooms once a year to sell
poppies on behalf of crippled
veterans. The legion defends the
status quo and helps perpetuate
the acceptance of war and
militarism as a legitimate human
activity.
On Nov. 11, we are asked to
remember only what the legion
and the ruling class want us to
remember. The inscriptions on the
cenotaphs read "For King and
Country". We will hear
long-winded speeches about
defending freedom and
democracy.
What bullshit!
In the First World War the
youth of the capitalist countries
and their colonies — workers,
students, farmers — were
conscripted or duped into
volunteering as cannon fodder.
The war was a direct result of
the scramble for markets and
colonies brought on by the rise of
capitalism. Imperial Germany was
jealous because it got off to a
late start and in order to get a
bigger piece of the pie it had to
fight for it.
There was little a person could
do if he or she opposed the war.
The various governments
including Canada passed laws
forbidding the expression of
adverse opinions on the causes or
motives of the war.
While the politicians wined and
dined in the safety of the big
cities the workers shot each other
on the plains of Europe.
The Second World War was
more just. Fascism had to be
stopped before there could be
peace and happiness in the world.
But again ordinary people bore
the brunt of the war. The Krupps
and the Rockefellers made
money.
We're not expected to
remember the approximately
1,200 Canadians who went to
Spain to defend the Spanish
Republic against German and
Italian-backed fascists. These
brave men have never received
recognition - from the Canadian
government. Had the fascists been
defeated in Spain the Second
World War might have been
prevented or shortened. But the
western governments, under the
guise of being neutral, seemingly
preferred Francisco Franco's
fascists to any constitutional
government which might lean
towards communism.
Norman Bethune was a
Canadian surgeon who went to
Spain in 1936 to serve the
republican forces. While there he
introduced the mobile blood
bank. Later he travelled to
northern China where he served
the Communist (anti-Japanese)
army until he died on Nov. 12,
1939 from blood poisoning
contracted while operating on
wounded soldiers.
Today Bethune is a hero in
China but is almost forgotten in
his homeland. Why?
Joe Hill, labor poet and I.W.W.
organizer was framed on a murder
charge by the Utah
copper trusts and shot by a firing
squad on Nov. 19, 1915.
Just before his death he wrote
to his friends: "Don't mourn,
organize."
winger Goodwin, a union
organizer was shot in the back
with a dum-dum bullet fired by a
B.C. policeman near Comox while
dodging the First World War draft.
Although he was suffering from
tuberculosis, the mining company
arranged for his draft status to be
changed so that they could get rid
of him. Goodwin is just one of
several labor martyrs in B.C.
The veterans we see strutting
along, their chests bedecked with
medals represent those who were
able to rebuild their lives after the
war ( how many of these were
officers like Lester Pearson who
never had to kill). But thousands
of others in the "skid roads" of
North America came back broken
men — to live out their lives
lonely and forgotten — often with
missing limbs and suffering from
alcoholism, drug addiction and
disease. These men were used,
then discarded like worn-out
boots.
The legions do not speak out
against war or militarism. They
were silent over Amchitka. They
don't oppose the Vietnam war
which is ruining hundreds of
thousands of lives on both sides
because the American government
insists on imposing its will on
another people. By glorifying and
romanticizing war and promoting
a reactionary patriotism the legion
shows itself to be anti-people and
pro-violence.
Why does the legion favor
regimentation and militarism?
Because war is profitable to a few
people. Without the war industry
the American (and with it the
colonial Canadian) economy
would collapse.
There can be no peace in the
world while this system exists.
Bethune wrote: "What do
these enemies of the human race
look like? Do they wear on their
foreheads a sign so that they may
be told, shunned and condemned
as criminals? No. On the contrary,
they are the respectable ones.
They are honored. They call
themselves and are called,
gentlemen. They are the pillars of
the state, of the church, of
society. They support private and
public charity out of the excess of
their wealth. In their private lives
they are kind and considerate.
But... threaten a reduction of
the profits of their money and
they become ruthless as savages,
brutal as madmen, remorseless as
executioners. There can be no
permanent peace in the world
while they live. Such an
organization of human society as
permits them to exist must be
abolished.
These men make the wounds."
Brian Sproule is a former UBC
history student who is a member
of the AMS special events
committee
M.
THE STAR & DIRECTOR OF "EASY RIDER,"
MS OWN LIFE, HLMEJOLAS HE LIVED IT
HEBB THEATRE
NEXT WEEK
Monday - Thursday Only
SHOWTIMES: 7 & 9P.M.
A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATION
— Elia Kazan's —
THE ARRANGEMENT
_ WITH —
Kirk Douglas, Deborah Kerr, Faye Dunaway
FRIDAY 12th & SATURDAY 13th
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 14th — 7:00
50c
SUB
THEATRE Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9, 1971
The CNIB's response
An interview with CNIB director Art McNaughten
The Ubyssey: Sir, what is the CNIB doing about the
grossly incompetent librarian service for the blind, in
particular for the student.
McNaughten: No comment, I mean that involves
personalities and I don't want to get involved there . ..
Q: What about the recreation services for people
. ..?
McNaughten: We are fairly proud of our recreation
service in the CNIB. We have various activities ranging
from team bowling to crochet. I must admit that our
emphasis is on the older people as over 50 per cent of
our population is over 65 years old. We do not have any
services in this field for students because we feel that
they are young and should be self-sufficient in this
regard. The young have a vitality that the older people
do not have.
Q: Does that include other areas or is that a specific
statement of policy for one specific area.
A: I think it applies to all of our areas. Students
should not look to us but to themselves for
responsibility of their own future. That includes
employment, entertainment in fact anything they wish
to become involved in.
Q: What service does the CNIB offer students?
A. Students very seldom refuse anything from the
CNIB ... but today we are the only organization they
can go to if they wish many of the personal exemptions
and deductions that are given to blind people to help
bring their earning capacity up to that of a sighted
person. We are a monopoly because of our long life but
we arc better for it because we can get things for the
blind that they could not get for themselves.
Q: How many placements has this meant since the
new appointment of Mr. Collins as
vocational-employment counsellor last June?
A: Six. I know it sounds like a few compared to the
number waiting but as I said before, this is a hard job.
Q: The students complain about negative attitudes
stemming from the CNIB. What does the CNIB think?
A: We have to be realistic to students at all times
even though the students believe realism to be
negativism, we can not let students continue to live in
castles in the sky, and often students want to go into
fields where no blind student or graduate has been
successful.
Q: Do you encourage as well as discourage?
A: We attempt to be as optimistic as possible in all
valid cases. We are not in conflict with students in any
way shape or form and do not wish to be. At the same
time we realize that all students are frustrated and want
out of established situations. We are doing our best
despite cuts due to last year's Red Feather bust. It is
hard to do things on a shortage of funds.
Q: Does that mean, "While the blind should be
independent they have to come running to you every
time they want something like that?"
A: I suppose it does, yes. Because we are a
monopoly, people, especially the young blind, get
frustrated and say things they didn't mean. There
appears to be no other way out that is useful so they cry
to the newspapers.
Q: What do youdo to resolve their questions?
A: What questions?
Q: What about the employment vocational counsel
they need and currently are not getting. You are their
employment agency, their only way of reaching many
jobs. Manpower won't touch them.
A: I wish Manpower would take over in this
particular field. We have far too much to do and this is
not our job anyway. I feel that the
counsellor-employment position is the hardest one in the
whole CNIB. He must convince employers to take on
what they call bad risks. Employers are also afraid of
blind people, afraid of what they themselves might be
like if they were blind. I think this is a sighted man's
greatest fear. Blindness.
Q: What does the CNIB do to socialize students?
A: Nothing, and shouldn't, as education is a
provincial matter.
THECA
The Ubyssey's Bruce Wilson spent se\
researching the problems of blind sti
at UBC and produced these interview
and photos, as well as the personal
statement below.
Some students on this campus are having problems
getting some of the things that ordinary students accept-
as rights.
These are the blind and partially-sighted students
and they would like to know how they can get out of
the bind the Canadian National Institute for the Blind
has put them in over textbooks, special services and
other things of importance.
The students have a great deal of their lives
controlled by the CNIB and they would like to see some
real changes in attitude on the part of the people in
charge of the CNIB.
They want to see a revitalized library for the blind,
they want a more positive and effective employment
service and most of all they want to be accepted as
intelligent young people working towards a better life.
There are 38 blind students on campus this year.
Most are in arts and a few are in other faculties such as
education, commerce, engineering and rehabilitation.
Unlike their sighted counterparts, blind students do not
use the library services to research material for their
assignments or read the day to day flood of material that
sighted people read.
They depend on the Canadian National Institute for
the Blind for most of their reading material, in braille or
on tape. The CNIB plays a larger role as well in the life
of blind students, in that it supplies them with some
The youm
Thoughts of Crane
Our basic complaint levelled against the CNIB may
not be as serious as was played up in the recent city
news story, but recognizing this, I maintain certain
changes are necessary so that the CNIB can serve the
blind to the fullest advantage.
The first complaint I have against the CNIB is their
all-encompassing power in blind students' lives.
Although a service organization, they effectively control
what blind persons read and, consequently, think. It is
the only agency where they can get required materials
such as white canes, tape recorders and tapes, bus passes,
income tax forms and other concessions the blind are
given "on account of blindness". Yet in this organization
which has garnered so much power, the blind themselves
do not have an effective voice and do not affect the
organization's policy making except as subjects. Of the
30 members on the advisory board only three are blind
and they are over 50 years old.
When I talk about the young blind, as distinguished
from the blind students, I am refering to the group
between the ages of 16 and 39. This is the first
generation of blind people who have the necessary skills
and qualifications to fit into the sighted world. Because
of their lack of voice and power in the CNIB they have
become frustrated and unhappy with their insignificant
role. They are turning against the CNIB when they
should be asking for help. If the CNIB wishes to help, it
will]
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neg Tuesday, November 9, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
;xtbooks, a counselling service, and mobilitv tiaimng.
The CNIB is also an avenue for funds for the
tudents, such as bursaries, special concessions, income
ax deductions and money saving devices that all blind
«ople get. When a blind student is having problems —
ettlng books, paying fees or related problems - he goes
o see a CNIB counsellor. If he goes to anyone else they
end him back to the CNIB.
From the time of a blind person's birth or loss of
ight the CNIB gives him assistance, at his request, in
djusting to the realities of blindness. If the person is
ilinded after leaving home it shields and protects him
or the first months and continues after that to help him
ope in a world designed primarily for sighted people. It
upplies him with books in braille or on tape, with
ecreation facilities as well as with a pass on Vancouver,
/ictoria and other bus lines. It gives him a white cane
nd various other aids and keeps him informed of such
hings as changes in the employment situation and
;overnment grants.
What disturbs the blind students the most is not
vhat the CNIB is doing, but what it is not doing. The
students claim the library service is poor, and
communications inefficient, and they want to see some
real change in these areas. They also want a larger voice
in the policy making of the CNIB. They charge that the
CNIB is so out of date that it may take a shakeup to
effect any change.
What students want the most, and fairly, is the right
to be accepted as intelligent people who just happen to
be blind. They have tasted adult life in their contacts
with other students and now have decided they want to
live a whole life.
blind have no voice'
ibrary head Paul Thiele
: to be prepared to give the young blind a larger
governing their own lives.
ondly, the CNIB library and transcribing service
eared to me to be inefficient, ineffectual and
co-ordinated. Only about 20 per cent of the
is catalogued, and much precious time is lost by
mans attempting to search for books that might
Jit not be there. The librarians have no
onal   training   and   the   transcribers   are   all
J-
s lack of professionalism is hurting those who
on the library, that is, mainly the students.
the transcribers are voluntary they may take as
me transcribing a book as they wish, despite the
t some of these books are desperately needed for
s. Realizing that the library is in very poor shape
'thing or little to improve its services. If the CNIB
to have a good service they are going to have to
)fessional librarians and ask the advice of experts
the Canadian National Library. If they don't the
will   descend   to   even   further   and   deeper
is. *
3 CNIB is also the blind persons' employment
They find work as well as advise the blind
s on fields in which there are good possibilities
ess. My observation is that they are extremely
j   towards   any  initiative  for  involvement  by
students in professional fields such as teaching. They
continually underestimate the abilities and potential of
the young blind and this has had an adverse affect on the
students. They have become afraid to enter new fields
because they know that the CNIB employment
counsellor does not have a high opinion of their
potential. It is in this way that I feel the CNIB is
prejudiced against the blind.
The most important area of disagreement between
myself and the CNIB is over the use of the media to
affect the public image of the blind. The CNIB should go
to great lengths to discourage the picture of the blind as
either supermen or freaks. The CNIB director has often
told me that they do not believe in the use of the public
media in this way. However, until the CNIB actively
attempts to mold public opinion they will continue to
have problems finding employment for the young blind
people.
After all, what person wants to hire a weak kneed,
snivelling idiot — and that is the public image of the
blind - when he can hire a fully sighted, normal person.
The CNIB states that they have a lack of funds for this
kind of use of the media, but the public media is
required by law to supply free time. Why not use this
time to bring about possible change in the public
opinion?
What the blind people do not want is a campaign
that is a continuation of last'year's work. They want to
be shown as they are: Blind people who are fully
qualified, competent and completely adult.
'Victorian
ideals
rule'
"What would you do if it took four or five months
to get required textbooks for some of your courses?"
asks Betty Butchart, one of 38 blind students and 51
partially sighted university students who use the Crane
branch library.
"Sometimes I have to get my readers at Crane to
spend their valuable time reading material 1 have already
ordered from the CNIB library, and then take about 10
times as long to listen to this stuff as it would take me to
read the braille transcription of it."
The third-year arts student was talking while eating
the last of her birthday cake, made by a friend in the
Crane library. "You know, if the CNIB cannot organize
the library and transcription services into a useful aid to
students I don't think they are doing much of a job to
help us and as it is we depend on three or four generous
people to do almost all of the transcribing of material,
and when they want to get to it.
"Because they are voluntary there is no fair way
they can be told to work faster or harder and they do
the material first that interests them.
"If not for my readers, I would be depending
completely on the CNIB library and I would be months
behind already in my studies. Socially the CNIB library
is almost useless as it would be nearly impossible to get
them to transcribe The Sensuous Woman or other
modern works of that nature," declared Betty as she felt
for her watch and discovered that she was late for her
class. She unlatched her white cane, said bye, and
jauntily walked off to class, leaving me with the crumbs
of cake and thought to clear up.
Two hours later 1 was over in Buchanan lounge
rapping with another blind student. In fourth year arts,
she asked me if I wouldn't use her name because "I've
had enough accidental hassles with the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind, without giving them
reason to dislike me and put my needs at the bottom of
their priority list."
This student was angry because she hadn't been able
to get a blind person's pass to "one of the restricted
movies being shown in town. She declared: "It is not
only this pass that is bothering me -but their whole
attitude of superior morality and their censorship of
anything dirty so that we poor students will remain pure
and unspoiled. As long as blind people depend on this
group of near-senile, old-fashioned and Victorian
idealists we will remain uneducated in life. The library
has the same problem and should be taken away from
the CNIB and placed in the hands of the National
Library. Then at least we would be only 20 years out of
date, not 50."
"The number of blind students has steadily
increased year after year and the number of causes of
blindness is increasing, such as drug induced blindness.
"I will not agree that we are a temporary
phenomenon and will go away with time. The young
intellectual blind person is going to be a thorn in the side
of the CNIB until they wake up and give us a voice in
the policy-making and an advisory position on the
council because we are tired of having our lives rules by
only old women, either physically or mentally. The best
thing the CNIB could do would be to become a true
service organization for all the blind and not just the
older, more conservative, majority." Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9, 1971
Vigil awaits Greenpeace
The Greenpeace Too vigil at the U.S. consulate
will continue until the ship returns to Vancouver.
The vigil, which began Thursday night in front
of the consulate at Burrard and Georgia, is
sponsored by the Don't Make a Wave Committee.
"Only about a dozen people are showing up
each evening and we feel that it is important that
people be reminded of the Greenpeace mission,"
Paddy Bergthorson, committee communications
officer, said Monday.
Bergthorson said: "The reason attendance is low
is probably because the bomb blast is past and
people aren't interested any more."
She said she wasn't sure when the ship would
be back.
"We've been trying to contact them all
morning, but I guess it's inside a storm and can't be
reached."
"The ship left Sand Point in the Aleutians at 2
a.m. Sunday," Bergthorson said. "It took them ten
days to get there, but it shouldn't take them that
long to get back."
She said the people at the vigil have not been
harassed by anybody and she encouraged others to
show up at the consulate about 8 p.m., any evening
from today until the ship returns.
Tansar
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4th avenue
IT'S JUST
COMMON SENSE
"The Health Mil" stocks a
complete line of organic
vitamins, minerals, herbs,
organic grains, dried fruits,
juices, health books.
THE HEALTH MILL
3308 Dunbar & Corner of 17th
733-5432
Apathetic majority on the move
Several members of the
agriculture undergraduate society
kidnapped engineering
undergraduate society president
Doug Aldridge Friday before the
disbelieving eyes of several
"typical stunned engineers."
From the EUS office, Aldridge
was taken past "two smirking
university patrolmen" to the
home of one of the kidnappers
and painted aggie blue.
Though Aldridge told The
Ubyssey the aggies were real
gentlemen, both he and the aggies
accused the other of having sexual
relations with a dog at the house.
Aldridge was deposited later
that evening on the floor of the
engineering mixer at Fourth and
Macdonald, still blue and wearing
a straitjacket.
The aggie who engineered the
stunt claimed there was no
motive.
KENNY
representative of Irish
Republican  Army, leading
member, Sinn Fein.
ii1
THE TRUTH ABOUT
IRELAND"
FRIDAY, NOV. 12
12:30
SUB BALLROOM
- Donation —
proceeds to
Irish Struggle
However, AgUS spokesman
Doug Shepherd, agriculture 3, said
it was carried out "to get a little
action going on campus.
Everybody was really apathetic."
The EUS promised reprisal
actions but  declined to indicate
what they might entail.
Aldridge also promised some
action in regards to the apathy of
the university patrol.
"The lack of security on
campus is getting out of hand," he
said.
;agpartua
politique
NEW WINTER FASHIONS
ARRIVING DAILY
1 Block East of Macdonald
2641 W. 4th Ave.
PUBLIC ENEMY
NUMBER ONE!
You know who a drug pusher is,
don't you? He's a peddler of misery
and death ... a destroyer of lives.
When a pusher's finally got you hooked
on drugs, you're his slave for life.
The more you're addicted
the more he'll profit. He isn't
in business for your health but
for the money he can make from you.
So when he tries to push you on to
drugs, turn your back on him.
Turn him in.
Don't become a mark for the pusher.
The,risks you take aren't worth the trip.
For more information, mail this coupon:
Government of British Columbia
Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia
Please send a free copy of ■'GET IT STRAIGHT
some facts about drug abuse."
Name	
Address _
GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
Hon. D. L. Brothers, Q. C, Minister of Education - Chairman Tuesday, November 9, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
IIIIII!l!lilllll!II!IIIIIII!llilflll«
Hot flashes
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Diviner
not all wet
There's water in them thar
pipes.
At least that's what
water-diviner Cliff Brackett told
100 geology students in front of
the biological sciences building
Monday.
Brackett, a 60-year employee
of the Tri-K Drilling Co.
demonstrated his skill of finding
water by holding a three-pronged
branch straight out and walking
around the yard.
Abruptly it pointed at the
ground.
Checks by the geology students
later showed he had found one of
the water pipes leading into the
building.
The long-time resident of
Pender Island's $25 fee was paid
by a collection taken among the
on-lookers.
Solid concert
Solid Comfort, Mike Taylor
and Co. and Doug Vernon will
perform in a concert Sunday at
John Oliver auditorium, Forty-first
and Fraser.
The concert, which starts at 8
p.m., is the first in a series of
concerts     featuring     Vancouver
entertainers. Admission is $1.50.
Mike Taylor and Co., a jazz
trio, will open the concert.
Taylor's organ is well known in
Vancouver jazz circles.
Doug Vernon is a member of
the Simon Fraser Mime Troupe
and a mime instructor at SFU.
Solid Comfort has played
recently at the Vancouver Art
Gallery, SFU and the Old Cellar.
OFY film shown
Under Age, a film produced
this summer by an Opportunities
For Youth group, will be shown
Monday at 12:30 and 7 p.m., in
SUB 215.
The film is the result of an
encounter between UBC students
and juvenile boys on probation in
Vancouver. Admission is free.
Remembering
Nine UBC and community
organizations will attend a
Remembrance Day ceremony
Thursday at War Memorial Gym.
The ceremony will begin at
10:45 a.m. G. F. Fountain,
president of the 196th
Universities Battalion Association,
will address the ceremony and the
scripture passage will be read by
Rev.  W.  S. Taylor, president of
the     Vancouver     School     of
Technology.
The traditional Last Post will
be sounded at 11 a.m., followed
by two minutes of silence.
Doctor honored
Norman Bethune will be
honored Saturday at a meeting of
the Canadian Friends of China
Association.
The meeting, marking the
thirty-second anniversary of the
doctor's death in the Sino-
Japanese war, will hear Bethune's
former acquaintance, past B.C.
labor leader Jack Scott, and will
see the Chinese film Hit at the.
U.S. Aggressors.
The meeting will start at 7 p.m.
in the Fisherman's Hall, 138 East
Cordova.
Yogi speaks
Indian yogi Sri Chinmoy will
speak on meditation and spiritual
philosophy Friday, 8:30 a.m., in
the SUB auditorium.
Chinmoy has lectured at many
North American universities. He
also leads a weekly meditation
group at the United Nations.
,v)>>iA'K<
'*° <~T$f ^ ^.   ^%!
' /    t   *'*'',"
'Tween classes
TODAY
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau speaks on constitutional
reform  in  Canada at noon in SUB
111.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French     conversation     at      noon.
Advanced    students   in   Bu.   3205,
beginners in Bu. 3201.
NEWMAN CLUB
General    meeting   at   noon   in   St.
Mark's music room.
PRE-MED CLUB
Pharmacologist   Drummond   speaks
at noon in Wesbrook 201.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting at noon in Bu. 104.
CUSO
Information     on     the     Caribbean
Islands.   (Don't  forget  to mention
that   Canadian   imperialist  holdings
in the Caribbean are larger than any
other    country).    The    meeting    is
upstairs   in   International  House at
7:30 p.m.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
General meeting at noon, SUB 210.
WEDNESDAY
FOLK DANCE CLUB
Dancing  Wednesday  from  8  to 10
p.m. in armory 208.
VOC
General   meeting at noon in Angus
104.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Cecile   Cloutler   reads   at  noon   in
SUB art gallery.
CANADIAN FRIENDS
OF CHINA
Film from the People's Republic —
The Cock Crows at Midnight — at
noon in SUB 207-209.
LAWSOC
No meeting today.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Meeting and social in SUB 211 from
7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Open meeting with senator Richard
Stanbury at noon.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Wild Angels flick at   7:30 p.m.  in
SUB 125. Fifty cents admission.
ONTOLOGY
Present shock at noon at Bu. 216.
ITALIAN CLUB
Meet at noon on IH stage.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Membership    meeting   at   noon   in
Angus 24.
FREESEE CIVILIZATION SERIES
Noon in SUB auditorium.
UBC WAFFLE
General meeting Wednesday noon in
SUB 211.
FRIDAY
CCF
Personal     evangelism     with    Tom
Fowler at noon in SUB 205.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Sean   Kenny   of   Irish   Republican
Arrny    speaks    at    noon    in    SUB
ballroom.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Beer garden from 4 to 8 p.m. in IH
402-406.
MONDAY
LEGAL AID
Available in SUB 323-234 at noon.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Stuart Affleck of the National
Farmers Union at noon in SUB
auditorium.
FREE FILM SHOWING
CP Rail film
"MULTIPLICITY*
12:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 15,
Rm. 106, Buchanan Bldg.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S. B. Tuxedos
+ D. B. & S. B. White Coats
+ D. B. & S. B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style.
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
4397 W. 10th 224-0034
INTERNATIONAL MARK 9
Climbs Hills The Way
All 10 Speeds Should
See At
INTERNATIONAL BICYCLE SHOP
442S W. 10th Ave
224-3433
SUZUKI-NORTON
71 Year-End
Clearance
Now Here
72 Sample Models
4497 Dunbar
228-9639
5& 10 SPEED DEALER
has a tough, challenging but rewarding career. He works
with the courts, with the offender, and with the
community to help solve one of society's major social
problems — crime.
IF YOU TNINK YOU COULD MEASURE
UP FOR TRAINING WITH THE
B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for more details.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS-MON. To THURS. 11 im. to 3 am.
i FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. -'SUNDAY4 p.fli. to 2 a.m..
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads ate not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day bet ore publication.
Publications Oftce, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
Lost & Found
Typing (Cont.)
40
11
13
LOST K & E SLIDE RULE LIGHT   j
tan case. Name on inside of case,   j
Finder  please  contact  Peter,  732-
6769.	
LOST. I SLACK WALLET KUIDAY,
Nov. 5. Please return Lost and
Found. No ques. asked, owner
desperate  for IPs etc	
LOST: GLASSKS: OCTAGONAL
gold wire .frame in I'Muc. Midi;1,
or between Educ. and McMillan
Bklgs. Ill white case with sold design.  Call N76-3927 alter 5 p.m.
Special Notices 15
WANT TO PLAY IN A CONCERT
band? Former high school musicians and anybody elsei who can
play, welcome. Phone Pete 684-
7750* or Cathie 939-0741.       	
YOUR PERSONAL HOROSCOPE
east and progressed lo eurrcrit
year. $3.00 Fee guarantees return
mail. Send exact time, date and
place ol' birth, to: MIOADOW VALIO
SCHOOL OF ASTROLOGY, Box
14,   Dugald,   Ma.nUoba^
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE LARG-
est selection in Canada of posters
and pop art. Also Jokes. Gifts and
24" x 36" photo blowups from your
own prints and negatives. Enquiries welcome at the Grin Bin, 3200
W. Broadway across from the
Liquor Store. Call 738-2:111.
IS
TEDIOUS TASKS. PROFESSIONAL
typing. IBM Selectric—days, evenings, weekends. Phone Sharl at
738-8745.   Reasonable  rates.	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Quick service
on   short  essays.	
lOh'FIOIENT ELECTIHC TYPING.
My home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate , work. Reasonable
Kates.   Phone 2«:!-5317. ,
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
Travel  Opportunities
Wanted—Information
17
ANYONE WITNESSING OLD MAN
walking into red Datsun Tuesday,
Oct. 28th, 4:00 p.m. (at Cypress
and Broadway). Please phone 736-
6809,   reward.
POSITION AVAILABLE ALMA
Mater Society general office clerk
typist (temporary full time) December 1 '71 to February 29 '72.
Salary $315 to $335 per month
(presently under review). Apply
in writing to Mr. D Wey. Office
Manager, Student Union Building
by November 15th, 1971.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction 61
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
21
Autos For Sale
VW. RXCELLENT CONDITION "-'
completely overhauled. Good tires,
brakes, trans. Phone 738-fioo:: he-
fore 10 a.m. or 0-X p.m. "Vol Sundays.
KNE1SSL WHITESTAR RS. BIND-
ings $75; Blizzard Formel total
bindings $125. Both 210cm. 526-
3378. .	
96 BASS ACCORDION IN! EXOEL-
lent condition for sale. Good
Christmas present. Phone Donna
228-9531   evenings.
ONE FRAMUS 12-STRINGGUITAR
Good condition. Offers considered.
John.   943-5244.
YAM A HA)   12   STRING  GUTTAR  W?
ease. Good cond. $90. Ken. Rm. 153
A.T.O.   224-9700.
LADIES'      NEW "".HiKING     BOOTS
size  7%  $15.  Skis &   Boles. Ladies'
hoots  size  6 'a   $50.   228-9266.
HART   SKISANn   STRt'~TN~HAR-
ness.   Well   used.   Lots  of   life  left.
205   cm.   $15   SUB   14C.
1965 BLUE BTTICK FOUR DOOR.
Comfortable Commuter. $800.00
plus your trade worth $100.00.
Auto France, 1234 Kingsway. Call
873-2454.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
Automobiles—Paris
23
STUDDED SNOW TTRES. HARD-
ly used 5.50x12 whitewall, Uni-
royal. Mounted and balanced, $45.
224-3469.	
I UNTROYAL F70-14 BKLTEI >
wide oval tires, '■', never used; 1 —
50Of tread. Sell all $80.00. 879-4051
after 6,
81
LARGE LIGHT SEMI-FURNISHED
room for rent. Kitchen facilities.
Phone 738-7341 after ? p.m. or 224-
_15_;i1   daytime.
KI'B.VISHETrjiOOM F< >R~Fi'MALK
student. Near UBC (y.. Mk. from
Spanish Bank's). $45.00 per- mo.
221-9386.
Room & Board
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
Photography
31
35
INFORMAL PORTRAITS BY
Carol Gordon. May be taken outdoors. Ideal Xmas gifts. 733-0715
or 7.16-4923.
          82
ROOM   AND   BOARD"" — " $110 MO."
Males.   Excellent   food.   Color TV.
Sauna.    5785   Agronomy   Rd., Ph.
224-9684.                  _
Al o XT HI, Y MIOA LI 'A SS ES~—~ AT
the Deke House. S30.00 — Dinners
weekdays; $40.00—Dinners 7 days/
wk.; $20.00 Lunches r, ,,r 7 days/
wk. 855.00 Combined 7 day Lunch
&    Dinners.    5765    Agronomy.    224-
9691.
Furnished Apts.
Halls For Rent
85
Scandals
37
Typing
40
ESSAYS, ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently. 35c page.
Phone   224-0385   after   5   pjn.   	
ESSAYS AND THESES" TYPED.
Experienced Typists. Mrs. Freeman,   731-8096.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.      86
DEG l~st 4 bI'^DKOOM HOUSE
over 1500 sq. ft. facing park, close
CliC for lease. Ref. required. Ideal
for 3 childless couples or a group
ol? five persons. Separate bedroom
for each. One must assume responsibility.   Phone:   879-8570.   R-llI
WANTED: STUDENT TO LIVE
with two other students on top
floor ol' house. S45.no rent. 970
West  17th.  736-0620.
The Handiest Book on Campus -
BIRD  CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
NOW ON SALE   - 75c Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9, 1971
tW^flager
s$oe tffjoppts
fEABY
NEEDS
BOOTS
Shrum Bowl 'gjrc|s f reeze
and lose game
By KENT SPENCER
CALGARY (Staff) - The University of Calgary Dinosaurs put
the freeze on the UBC 'Bird team, 17-14, on Saturday.
The game was played in four degree weather before 300
spectators at Calgary's McMahon Stadium.
UBC offensive linemen Kyle Raymond, Ron Warner, Jim
Vilvang, Rick Down, and Bob Janzen gave quarterback Jim Tarves
good protection allowing him to complete 17 of 35 passing attempts
for 248 yards and one touchdown.
BRE*r Shoes PCRfHE
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only $33.00
Open Thursday and Friday nites. C.O.D. orders accepted.
Credit and Chargex Cards honored.
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
* "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."
Saturday
The controversy surrounding
the annual UBC-SFU football
game has ended with a decision to
go ahead as planned.
Game time is Saturday at
Empire Stadium and, for the first
time, under Canadian rules.
In the four years the Shrum
Bowl has been played, UBC has
lost three times and tied once.
This record reflects the
different philosophies of football
at the two universities.
SFU emphasizes winning.
Although it is certainly not said,
playing comes before studying.
The pressure is on the players to
win.
At UBC it's different.
"We do studies, then play
football," said assistant coach
Tom Thomson. Thomson cites
"unequal opportunity" between
the universities.
"Because of scholarships, SFU
has the ability to draw better
personnel.
"Their scholastic standards are
lower than ours. Fifty per cent
admits you to SFU."
"The odds are in their favour,"
said coach Frank Gnup.
Last year Simon Fraser was
undefeated. They have lost three
games this year.
Women's sports
UBC's Thelma Fynn led the
women's cross country team
through four inches of snow to
victory Saturday in Lethbridge.
UBC competed against teams
from the universities of Calgary,
Lethbridge, and Alberta.
Fynn finished 19 seconds
faster than the second place
finisher. Cheryl Spowage, Debbie
Collins, and Penny May of UBC
finished sixth, seventh and eighth
respectively.
UBC was the overall winner
with 14 points. The University of
Alberta was second.
In other women's sports, UBC
finished second to the University
of Alberta in an invitational
gymnastics meet in Edmonton,
and second in a volleyball meet in
Victoria.
The Thunderettes travelled to
Seattle and trounced the
Sandpipers 64^3 and 5<M6 in
basketball. Terry McGovern
scored 22 points in each game.
5th ANNUAL
SHRUM BOWL
FOOTBALL
U.B.C. "THUNDERBIRDS"
vs.
S.F.U. "CLANSMEN"
Saturday, Nov. 13th — 8 p.m.
EMPIRE STADIUM
Tickets at Athletic Office — Memorial Gym
General Admission  $2.00    —     Students   $1.00
-tony field photo
BILL GRIST, UBC guard puts the grab on a Calgary ball carrier as
if to say "you ain't going nowhere".
The key to the game was five Dinny interceptions. Don Moulton
cooled UBC off with three interceptions for 132 yards and one
touchdown.
Moulton's third interception went for 72 yards down the
sideline for a touchdown. It came with four minutes left in the game,
giving Calgary a 17-8 lead with John Farlinger's two-point conversion.
But the game was far from over. With 50 seconds left, Tarves hit
flanker Henry Thiessen for a 41-yard touchdown bomb.
UBC then tried an onside kick and the ball rolled out on the
Dinny 31-yard line.
In the next 26 seconds Calgary was penalized for roughing,
"objectionable conduct," and too long in the huddle.
With 24 seconds left UBC linebacker Ted Jung recovered a
Dinny fumble on the Calgary 10.
The official couldn't see who had the ball and awarded it to
Calgary.
After the game Calgary coach Mike Lahuk apologized to UBC
players for the officiating.
The other 'Bird scorers were Brian Holden with a 57 yard single,
Bruce Kiloh with a convert, and Ron Fowler with a touchdown.
Calgary's edge was the two two-point conversions.
The final standings in the Western Intercollegiate Athletic
Association gives the University of Alberta first with six wins and two
losses, Calgary and Manitoba a tie for second with 5-3 records, and
UBC and Saskatchewan a tie for last with 2-6 records.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
Phone 224-6121 Tuesday, November 9, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
'Birds
take
Grads
There are some words which
aren't suitable for use in
describing the 'Birds 79-53 win
over the Grads on Friday night.
Some of these would be thrilling,
exciting, suspenseful, etc. But in
Friday's "sleeper's special", the
'Birds showed how they can
neutralize their opponent's height
advantage.
As expected, the key to the
'Birds win was forward John Mills.
Mills, who at 6'3" is going to be
giving away four to six inches in
height advantage to his opponents
all year, was impressive Friday,
pulling down 10 rebounds and
muscling his way to 15 points, all
of this over the taller Grads.
Stan Callegari, with a deadly
outside shot, collected 16 points
to top the UBC scorers, while Ron
Thorsen, as classy as ever, pulled
down a surprising nine rebounds
and scored 11 points.
Another factor in the 'Birds
win was the amazingly poor
shooting of the Grads who
connected on only 28% of their
Cross-country wins
For the first time in 10 years
the UBC cross country team has
won a Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Conference title.
Running in 4 inches of snow
with the temperature a little
above zero, the team showed
remarkable     adaptability    in
Intramurals
very
BADMINTON final: Bill Ruby
meets -Peter Dennert Wednesday
at noon in the War Memorial
Gym.
SOCCER league games start
Wednesday at noon.
TENNIS finals continue until
Nov. 19.
CURLING bonspiel goes on
Saturday and Sunday. Entry
deadline is Wednesday.
HOCKEY games have been
cancelled this week due to the
holiday.
handling the weather and
tough hilly golf-course.
UBC were led by Pan American
Games silver medallist Bill Smart
who was second to Steeplechase
International Bob Kochan from
Saskatoon. Less than 12 seconds
separated these two at the finish.
Scoring members for UBC were
Bill Smart 2nd, Ken French 5th,
Duncan Klett 8th, Ken Hirst 10th,
and Rick Woods 11th - a total of
36 points.
The University of
Saskatchewan was second with 57
points and the much improved
University of Victoria third with
59 points.
The UBC team leaves for
Fredrickton on Friday to contest
the National C.I.A.U. title on
Nov. 13.
— keith dunbar photo
IS THERE ROOM in rugby for 'long haired degenerates'? UBC's scrappy Spence McTavish thinks so as he
puts the squeeze on his opponent. Sparked by Leigh Hillier's try and the penalty kicking of Ray Banks,
the Thunderbirds defeated the Ex Brits 10-9 in weekend rugby action at Thunderbird Stadium.
shots. The tough UBC
man-to-man defence forced the
Grads to take poor shots from far
out.
The 'Birds open their regular
season Saturday against the
University of Lethbridge in
Lethbridge.
hoop shots
By KEITH DUNBAR
The Ye Olde Grad Game Banquet traditionally precedes the
actual game itself. This year no exception was made.
With the incomparable Norm Watt leading the ceremonies,
this year's smorgasbord catered to a host of former UBC
basketball players, along with the cream of Peter Mullins 1971-72
crop.
A father and son team were prominent on this year's list.
Back in Arts, 1928, a 6'6" guard named Bill Turpin led the
Thunderbirds up the court. Exactly 40 years later, in 1968, an
equally tall son named Jack played centre for the 'Birds.
The elder Turpin took a few moments out on Friday night
to talk of basketball 45 years ago at UBC.
"Because there was not the '10 second' rule, the scores
were much lower than they are today. I remember when I was
high scorer in one game with 8 points. And our foul shots were
very important. We spent hours practicing on them because if
you missed more than a couple you could find yourself off the
team."
Games used to be played in an old gym near City Hall.
Another location was at the old YMCA gym across the street
from the present-bus depot. Now there is nothing there but a
vacant lot.
"Referees seem to call too many chippy fouls today. You
know, a good bodycheck never really hurt anybody."
The Grad Banquet — a great chance for some old friends to
get together and give a quick glimpse into basketball at UBC
before Ron Thorsen changed it all around.
escape
Into The
UNDERWATER WORLD
Scuba Diving
GREG K0CHER: Underwater Sports **
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5 wk. Course - $40.00 NAUI & Navy Certification
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SB Tues. Nov. 16th at 7:30
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Something   NEW
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Drop in and look over our bright new array of
greeting cards, gift wrap, ribbons and bows by
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Christmas cards now on display.
the bookstore
Phone number
228-4741 Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 9, 1971
Enemy within, says McClelland
By BERTON WOODWARD
The Committee for an Independent Canada
is basically anti-Canadian, not anti-American,
publisher Jack McClelland said Friday.
"I am basically anti-Canadian. I want to
hear from Canadians who are prepared to get
up off their asses and work," McClelland said.
"The greatest enemy is within," he said
after saying that the Canadian Chamber of
Commerce has recently declared itself in favor
of free trade in North America.
"It is the Chamber of Commerce and
people of that type we have to deal with,"
McClelland told 100 persons in the SUB clubs
lounge.
He denied charges that the CIC was set up
to combat the Waffle wing of the New
Democratic Party.
"I don't think they should be combated,
they should be encouraged," he said.
"My objection to Waffle is that they want
a socialist independent Canada now.
"I have no objection to their thesis because
the country is moving that way and I support
that idea.'"
But he said he believes it will be ten years
before the NDP is elected and even then it
won't be the Waffle wing.
In spite of former Liberal finance minister
Walter Gordon's position as co-director with
McClelland on the committee, McClelland
claimed the committee has no partisan
politics.
"We have no specific solutions because we
have no partisan politics. This is a time for
people, for once in their lives to get out of
narrow partisan thinking," he said.
On the question of American economic
retaliation to Canadian independence moves,
McClelland said. "We're going to get it.
"Their first concern is money. Second is
jobs to make money," he said.
He assured the audience that he saw "no
connection" between the U.N. China vote and
the subsequent U.S. Senate vote to stop all
American foreign aid.
When the audience laughed he said he was
glad they had.
He said when he told a chamber of
commerce meeting the same thing there was
"stoney silence."
But   he   blamed   Canadians   more   than
Americans for the current situation, in which
"75  per  cent  of all njajor corporations in
Canada     are     foreign-owned     —     mostly
American."
He said Ryerson Press was sold in the
spring to American interests financed by a
Canadian chartered bank.
"We have been financing our own takeover
for 10 years," he said.
However McClelland said he saw little need
for Canadian ownership of foreign
subsidiaries.
"When corporations operate in Canada
they should respond to the laws of Canada
not some other country.
"I think if we do that then we don't need
to buy them back," he said.
McClelland claimed there has never been a
greater need for CIC.
He suggested that President Richard Nixon
be appointed honorary chairman because he
has done more for Canadian nationalism than
anyone.
Classroom Report
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Films showing the working
patterns of New Yorkers in a
wedding ring factory and of
Eskimos were scheduled for the
anthropology-sociology 100
course Nov. 1.
Unfortunately the first film
was poorly made and the sound
system broke in the middle of
the second one making further
viewing impossible.
Many of the professors told
their discussion groups they had
not seen the first film before,
and were unaware of its
deficiencies. They said they also
knew little about the Eskimo
culture and couldn't answer the
questions raised by the class.
This rendered the films nearly
useless.
About 550 students take the
course  with  six professors and
12 teaching assistants to lead the
discussion groups.
"We asked the professors to
take two classes each, but felt
this was too much for the TAs
to handle," Dorothy Smith,
anthrosoc 100 head said
Monday.
This means 25 to 30 students
are in each discussion group,
rather than the usual 15.
"We are also faced with a
limited budget and poor
classroom facilities," Smith said.
Comments from students
indicate they feel the problem
lies more in course content than
logistical problems.
"We are given facts about
different peoples in the different
lectures, and I keep waiting for
the facts to somehow connect
up — but they never do," said
one student who said he wanted
to remain anonymous for fear of
failing the course.
Another common complaint
was the discussion group
activities.
"Our professor tends to
lecture rather than lead the
discussion, and we rarely get a
chance to say anything," said a
student.
Smith said she is aware of the
difficulties in the discussion
groups, and feel the fault lies
with the students rather than the
professors.
"If the students don't speak
then the prof has to, and a
lecture is the result," she said.
Smith said the course was
planned to be a flexible learning
experience    rather    than    a
structured   introduction   to   a
higher level course.
"If the students are
dissatisfied with the way the
course works now we'll have to
review the complaints and come
up with an alternative — and the
only alternative I can see is a
rigidly structured course," she
said.
It is difficult to reach a
balance between the two. The
anthrosoc department has tried
and to a large extent failed.
Perhaps when it reviews the
course content, changes will be
made to strike a better balance
between the two.
BIRD CALLS
Your Souvenir of UBC
The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
BUY YOURS TODAY 7 EC
UBC BOOKSTORE AND SUB #   W
THINK TOUGH !
Zip Zoldot can't stand himself.
Years ago, when he was in college,
he procrastinated away the
opportunity to start a life insurance
program. Today, at 41, he's very
much aware of the many benefits
he passed up. You see, the earlier
you start life insurance, the lower
your premium. And the policy
begins to build cash values while
you're younger. Also, if you wait,
there is the risk of becoming
physically ineligible for it. Or, you
might choose an occupation that
makes you ineligible. Take a tip
from Zip: be tough with yourself
about taking out life insurance.
Now is the best time!
YOUR
NEW YORK LIFE
REPS ON CAMPUS
ARE GOOD MEN
TO KNOW!
Vancouver office of New York
Life is located at 800 - 535
Thurlow St. Phone 685-7364.
— BRAND NAME WATCHES—
AND WATCH REPAIRS
10% OFF WITH STUDENT CARDS
AT
YOUR CAMPUS JEWELLERS
DIAMOND ROOM JEWELLERS
UBC VILLAGE
BESIDE WORLD WIDE TRAVEL
DROP IN
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