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The Ubyssey Nov 7, 1972

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Array Eastern boycott hits student union
By THE CANADIAN
UNIVERSITY PRESS
OTTAWA — Delegates from
44. Canadian universities and
community colleges
established a new national
student union Sunday, but not
before Quebec and Maritime
representatives had walked
out.
Creation of the National
Union of Students/Association
Nationale des Etudiants
followed three days of
protracted, and sometimes
tedious debate on a constitution proposed by a four-
member steering committee,
set up at a previous conference
at Windsor, Ont. last May.
But the fledgling
organization's . future is uncertain because potential
members     must     conduct
referendums on their campuses before being allowed to
join. Although a few student
student councils had already
authorized their delegates to
join the new union, only Simon
Fraser University has conducted the necessary
referendum.
Delegates authorized the
central committee or NUS
executive to solicit grants from
potential members to finance
its formative stages.
The conference was perhaps
the largest gathering of
Canadian student council
representatives since the
dissolution of the old Canadian
Union of Students in 1969.
The Quebec-Atlantic
provinces walkout occurred
after delegates reached a
bitter impasse over methods of
membership in the new union.
Quebec representatives, who
came from the English
speaking   universities   and
some English and French
community colleges,
demanded representation
based on region. Loyola, which
introduced the proposal,
wanted all NUS delegates to be
appointed by regional student
unions, with all five regions of
Canada having equal voting
power. They were especially
adamant that their
representation come from the
growing Front des Etudiants
du Quebec, rather than from
individual institutions.
The Loyola proposal drew on
the example of FEQ where
Quebec is divided into six
regional government bodies.
The regions elect a maximum
of 100 delegates to a general
assembly, but representation
is not based on population.
Montreal has about 60 per cent
of the students but only 30
assembly delegates and other
regions have at least 11.
The Quebec delegates
contended that the method
prevents one power bloc from
controlling the organization.
Each region must meet before
an assembly meeting to
develop positions scheduled for
discussion at the assembly.
The proposed constitution
called for representation from
See page 8: WEST
IT'S NOT THE BAY muses tired shopper, but the Alma Mater Society craft shop
and co-op bookstore located in  SUB basement   has all kinds of groovy stuff like
—ad dubois photo
books you can actually afford and scratchy records and magazines and far out
love beads and for those of you with strange tastes — leathers.
AMS gives NUS $1,000
By KEN DODD
The Alma Mater Society has tentatively donated $1,000 to the
development of the new National Union
of Students.
The allocation of funds was approved
by AMS representatives at the
organization's founding conference this
past weekend, in Ottawa.
This was done as a show of good faith
in th*e future of the union, AMS external
affairs officer. Teri Ball. said Monday.
Monday.
The motion must pass through
council before the funds can be
released, however.
UBC is the only university which has
yet indicated it will release such funds
at this time.
Ball said 10 to 15,000 dollars are
needed over the next six months to
cover operational costs. This would
include the hiring of an executive
secretary to act as a co-ordinating
person.
Eventually the organization plans to
apply to the federal government for
funds as well, she said.
Once the NUS begins to function the
bulk of the costs will be borne by annual fees paid by the students of
member student councils she said.
The exact fees haven't yet been
established but "they won't be more
than 20 cents per student," said Ball.
Each student council's membership
must be approved by a referendum of
its students.
Ball said she won't ask for the
referendum to be called until the exact
fee is established. This should be
known by the end of January.
Ball said she was disappointed in the
conference. She said it was poorly
planned and often chaotic, with much
bickering between delegations.
Eventually the delegates from
Quebec and the Maritimes walked out.
She they were interested in the union
but because of internal problems were
not prepared to join at this time.
Quebec students are planning to go
on strike next week because of a
dispute with their department of
education over compulsory classroom
attendance.
The Maritimes are trying to get their
own regional organization off the
ground and felt the national
organization would conflict with their
present interests, Ball said.
Eventually a constitution was agreed
upon by the 28 universities and community colleges remaining.
It was decided that the organization
would meet twice yearly, in spring and
fall. The sites of the conferences will
rotate in order to promote national
fcinity, she said:
A central committee of 10 people, one
from each province, was elected, as
well as three members at large. B.C.'s
central committee representative  is
Michael Warsh of SFU while Ball is a
member at large.
Ball said it was felt another conference was needed while the current
student's councils are in power. This
will probably be held February 8-11, in
Regina.
The central committee will finalize
the time and place at their meeting in
Vancouver during the Christmas
break, she said.
"It may take another year to a year
and a half before we have something
functional with everybody represented," Ball said.
Despite the limited results of the
weekend conference she said she felt
the organization would succeed.
"There is a great need for a national
organization of this kind and we aren't
as far apart from agreement as it may
seem," said Ball.
"Everyone is still afraid of what
happened to CUS," she said. "We have
to establish a trust and faith in each
other. Then we'll succeed." Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1972
Classroom report
By JOSIE BANNERMAN
A wise somebody once said it
is much nicer to look at one
picture than to listen to, or
read, 1,000 words. Therefore
the two-part pictures here are
photosynthesis.
Professor Charles Beil told
the Biology 102, section 8 class
about photosynthesis at 1:3C
Monday in Wesbrook 100. Beil
is a guest lecturer on loan from
the botany department.
Photosynthesis is basic to
life. By this process plants
produce carbohydrates from
carbon dioxide and water.
Animals eat plants, and people
eat both.
Beil said photosynthesis can
be divided into two processes.
The light reaction, which canl
be broken down further into)
cyclic and non-cyclic
photophosphorylation. The|
product of cyclic;
photophosphorylation     is|
adenosine triphosphate,
familiarly called ATP. Non-
cyclic photophosphorylation
involves the production of
nore ATP, and the transfer of
alectrons to nicotinamide
adenine dinucleotide
phosphate (NADP) to form
NADPH2.
ATP and MACPH2 are both
high energy compounds
because they store energy
from sunlight. They are both
utilized in the dark reaction for
the production of sugars, said
Beil.
Cyclic and non-cyclic
photophosphorylation both
happen on the lamellae of the
chloroplasts because that's
where the light is.
AUCC report needs study
TORONTO (CUP) — The Association of
Universities and Colleges of Canada decided
Wednesday a report it had commissioned on
university research needed more study by both
governments and the universities.
The final session of the AUCC conference
heard reports of workshops on various topics
included in "Quest for the Optimum", a report
on rationalization of university research, but
left all substantive issues to its board of
directors.
University of Manitoba president Ernest
Sirluck said a majority of members in his
workshop on planning research accepted the
necessity for more planning of research in
unversities, as suggested by the report.
"A less substantial majority found the
report was not workable in large established
universities," Sirluck said.
Another discussion group on research and
teaching   in   graduate   studies   and   the
humanities, recommended researcji funding be
examined by the federal government.
In the same workshop, Queen's University
engineering dean R. J. Uffen chastized
universities for downgrading undergraduate
teaching.
"Canadian universities must revise their
research policies and devote the same attention
to undergraduate teaching and reflective
inquiry as they do to frontier research and
graduate teaching," he said. His recommendation was similar to one in the report.
A workshop on social responsibility in
research agreed the peer system is still the best
way to evaluate research. But, as former Trent
University president T. H. B. Symons reported,
the group thought more study was needed on
alternative methods of evaluation and on
research structure, guidelines and procedure.
Symons was a key policy advisor to the
Progressive Conservative Party's recent
federal election campaign.
c
The dark reaction is concerned with the transformation
of carbon dioxide in to carbohydrate. "The dark reaction
doesn't have to happen in the
dark," said Beil. "It is just
called the dark reaction
because it doesn't require light
to happen, but it can happen in
the light.
"The dark reaction you will
recall, utilizes the light energy
stored in ATP and NADPH2.
Beil lectures quickly. This is
good if one's homework is
done, and bad if it isn't.
However, he draws
diagrams, writes out the big
words and makes frequent
references to the text. One does
get a second chance.
Students in Biology 102
section 8 have three hours of
lectures a week (MWF: 1:30
Wesbrook 100) and a three-
hour lab.
Lab and lecture topics
sometimes coincide, but not
always. This term in the lab,
students have been studying
the functional anatomy of
plants and animals.
This means they have been
dissecting, or examining
prepared dissections of plants,
frogs, turtles and dog fish to
find out how various systems
such as digestive, circulatory,
vascular, locomotive and
support have developed to
enable the plant or animal to
survive.
Very interesting.
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OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. Tuesday, November 7, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Seale backs SMC
Nov. 18 day of
anti-war protest
—sucha singh photo
CYCLISTS TAKE NOTE, muses enquiring Ubyssey reporter Gary Coull, on the depths of faulty bike
path construction. Ditch, located on Chancellor Boulevard route is the one which almost broke
medical  student Howard Goldman's back.
By GARY COULL
U.S. Black Panther chairman Bobby Seale endorsed the
student mobilization committee's call for an international day of protest Nov.
18 against the Vietnam war.
Seale was the keynote
speaker at SMC's first national
conference last weekend in
Toronto.
He arrived in Canada under
strict security and was asked
to leave immediately after his
speech.
The conference was held to
formally organize SMC and to
plan the Nov. 18 day of protest.
Two representatives from
UBC, Stuart Russell and Dick
Tennant, both in arts 1, attended the conference with a
$150 Alma Mater Society grant
plus funds they raised on
campus.
Russell said 17 universities
and eight high schools were
represented along with the
Vietnam mobilization committee and the women's
coalition for abortion repeal,
Young Socialist organizations.
Four Vietnamese students
spoke on the Thieu regime and
the necessity of continuing
protests, he said.
Other speakers included
McGill political science
professor S.J. Noumoff, author
of How to Make a Killing
and Claire Culhane, author of
Why is Canada in Vietnam?.
Noumoff's report concerns
Canadian economic in-
volvment in Pentagon aid.
Russell said President
Nixon's peace proposals were
discussed and the conference
felt the proposals were
political ploys.
"Nixon favors a nine-point
proposal whereas we want a
one-point proposal: out now."
He said Lyndon Johnson ran
as a peace candidate as did
Nixon yet the number of bombs
has been steadily increasing.
"We don't trust Nixon
because he has made peace
incentives before. We feel he is
a war worker not a peace
worker."
Russell said the conference
did not come out in favor of
McGovern either.
"The only solution is through
the anti-war movement.
"Even China and the Soviet
Union are letting the Vietnamese down," he said.
Russell said even if Nixon's
peace proposal was signed
before Nov. 18 the protest
would take place to re-enforce
the movement.
The movement is outlined in
an action proposal SMC coordinator Barry Godson
presented which was endorsed
by the national conference.
Among the proposals is the
total immediate unconditional
withdrawl of all U.S. forces
from Vietnam; an end to
Canada's complacency about
the war and getting Canada
out of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization, North
American Air Defence and the
International Control Commission.
Russell said the purpose of
SMC in the future will be to
educate the people about the
war.
"For example we don't want
Canadian troops to act in any
peace capacity in Vietnam
after the war ends. Most people
would think this was a good
idea but we would only be
puppets to the U.S."
Russell said he believes the
conference represented a
majority of Canadians and
Americans.
Therefore they are pressing
the New Democratic party to
come through with their
policies of ending the war and
Canada's complacency.
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
One of the more recent innovations on this campus that
is geared to separating the
student from his professor is
the inadequate elevator service in the new Buchanan
tower (MacMillan-Blodel
Building, junior).
It must be conceded that
John Young,former Arts dean
and designer of the building,
has never been very interested
in the great flock of undergraduates who will use the
building, but really John, this
is too much.
Before the building was
constructed, the Otis elevator
company, who were to be the
suppliers of the elevators ran a
simple computer program to
see what the projected needs of
the building would be.
The results of the study
showed that five elevators
should be installed.
The result of John Young's
planning: three elevators in
ihe middle of an alienating
foyer.
In addition to the in-
convience of the slow elevator
service, there are some safety
factors which have been
shaved to the margin.
What if some poor professor
is asleep on the top floor when
the fire bell goes?
Does he/she punch the
elevator button and wait for
half an hour?
Does the university have an
appropriate fire ladder to
reach the top floor of that high
a building?
"I'm paranoid about jumping out of a 10th storey window," commented economics
graduate student Robin
Hanvelt yesterday, "if only I
were on the seventh."
One outside observer
suggested that the university
build an artificial mountain
beside the building with little
tunnels going to each floor
level. Besides being a good
access route to upper floors it
would provide a winter ski
slope and also help to hide one
side of the building.
Seriously, a temporary
solution for the traffic jam in
the building would be to make
one of the three elevators an
express to the top floor.
A A  i  i  I i  1-i  i ,i
Another solution might be to
add the two missing elevators
to the outside of the building
since installation of the two
inside would now be very
costly.
The erection and execution
of this building has been from
start to finish a visual
statement that there is no long
range planning on this campus.
Both the physical plant and
the academic content of the
campus are subject to the
whims of a few of the powerful
and are done without the
consideration of the many
individuals involved.
The construction of the
Buchanan   tower   and   the
i ■ (   I  i i i X 1 -;«■•i,;,«-l '■»■ Vii   i'.i  %■ i   i' I'.-r i
mm
subsequent scattering of
several social science
departments only contributes
to the isolation of these
departments from each other
and re-enforces the need of
programs such as Arts I.
* * *
The Hudson's Bay company's latest promotional
gimmick borders on consumer
fraud. The 'cheque' below
looks like a $100 gift. All you do
is sign the back of it, right?
Wrong!
If you look at the small print
on the back you find that if
signed you are more or less
required to buy $100 worth of
stuff from the Bay.
Allan McGavin, a director of
the Hudson's Bay Company
and chairman of the UBC
Board of Governors, should be
ashamed of his participation in
this venture.
Hopefully he will publicly
rebuke Peter Buckley,
Western region general
manager of the Bay and
perpetrator of this nifty little
scheme.
I can only imagine that the
Bay's business must have
dropped off considerably of
late for them to sink to these
depths. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1972
National
disaster
The new national student union is a disaster.
The National Union of Students as it was named this
weekend in Ottawa, is also a farce. It has no representation
beyond Ontario's eastern border.
A "national" student union shouldn't exist if it can't
get through its founding conference without alienating
about one-third of the country.
Quebec and the Atlantic provinces walked out of the
conference about half way through when an equitable
solution could not be found for membership criteria.
The conference should have ended there. Out of the 51
universities attending only 39 were left and they were from
Ontario, the Prairies and B.C.
How this organization can claim to have a national basis
is beyond us. It makes no sense at all.
In fact, the whole concept of this organization makes
no sense.
Following the first conference last May the organizers
said the organization  would  be non-political  and would
avoid the controversial course taken by its predecessor, the
/now defunct Canadian Union of Students.
/        That   statement was  itself a  political  statement.   By
/ saying   they   would   avoid   politics   and   concentrate   on
! academic problems the organizers were taking a political
\ stand.
What kind of a life-span would a student union that
/   professes to offer only service and to avoid politics have?
Not   a   very   long   one   judging   from   the   most   recent
conference.
A   national   student   union   has to  be political.  The
\    problems facing students are political.
Lack of student loans and financial aid from the federal
government, faculty tenure, course evaluation and university
accessability, to name just a few of the problems the union
hopes to deal with, are political problems.
These political problems can't be adequately tackled by
a group of bureaucrats who can't even stay together long
enough to decide membership criteria.
What Canadian students need is a union that is willing
to face up to the political realities of Canada and students.
We think the new student union should be renamed the
Benevolent Order of Bureaucrats Who Don't Want to Upset
the Apple Cart.
Letters
Speed
I have read with great interest
your consumer column, by
Vaughn Palmer, in which the
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics
course is taken to task.
I do not pretend to the
expertise of your writer, being
presently just in the fifth week of
this same course; however, I have
seen enough to satisfy me that,
while there are undoubtedly many
"graduates" who have done no
more than merely triple their
reading speed, there are, on the
other hand, many who have
broken through the psychological
barrier   and   who  have  retrained
their brains to cope effectively
with dynamic reading.
In saying that the guaranteed
increase in reading speed (three
times) can be obtained by other
means, Mr. Palmer is probably
quite correct. However, he misses
the point. To achieve the
break-through to the fantistic
speeds which can be and are
attained requires a lot of bloody
hard work over several months. I
fancy that he was not equal to
this, and would strongly suggest
to your readers that they talk (if
they are interested) to some
people who have succeeded,
rather than accept the word of a
self-confessed failure.
In   closing,   I   note   that   Mr.
THS UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER  7, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
Stunning victory of the Pango Pango Paper Tigers over Dry Hump in the
Kosmic League was announced by sleazy goaltender Kent Spencer. Others
participating in the 23-37 trouncing were Gary Coull, Lorri Rudland,
Randy Rudland, Steve Morris and star quarterback Roger MacNeil..
Disinterested non-spectators: Ken Dodd, Sucha Singh, Bernie Bischoff, Jan
O'Brien, Art Smolensky, Josie Bannerman, Karin Nielsen, Ed Dubois,
Vaughn Palmer, Mike Sasges, Sondra Marshall Smith, Maurice Savaria,
Doug Higgins and Simon Truelove.
Palmer mentions the course
offered by the Centre of
Continuing Education in reading
improvement. I have no doubt
that this is a first class means of
improving one's reading ability,
but I suspect that Don Mosdale is
quite correct in saying that it does
not compare to the Evelyn Wood
system. In quoting prices, all Mr.
Palmer has done is to bring to our
attention something that we all
tend to forget, namely that this
university is very heavily
subsidized by the taxpayer.
Personally (and I speak as one
who definitely does not have
money to throw around) I think
that the Evelyn Wood course is
well worth the money.
Hal Revill
law 3
Forgotten
Somewhere along the line it
seems to have been forgotten that
a headline and lead sentence have
a dual purpose — they should not
only attract the reader's attention
but also give him/her an accurate
view of the event being discussed.
In lecturing on the condition
of Jews in the Soviet Union, I was
not arguing they receive special
preference. Quite the contrary.
I was making two points: 1)
That the Jews in the Soviet Union
are placed under special burdens.
Much more than other groups,
they are discriminated against in
regard to university admission, job
promotion, and cultural activities.
2) That while Jews suffer certain
special difficulties, it still should
not be forgotten that all
manifestations of national striving
— whether by Ukrainians,
Latvians, etc. — are severely dealt
with by the regime.
In only one area have Jews
received something like special
treatment. For complex reasons,
the regime has been more willing
to let Jews leave the country. But
even this may now come to an
end with the imposition of exit
taxes.
Paul Marantz
assistant prof
political science
Typical
Re: John Andersen's article on
the election held last Monday.
It was the work of a typical
high school student who fancies
himself as having literary talents
and journalistic ambitions. I am
surprised he condescended to
write for you — he is obviously
out of his element.
I question his political
perception. In particular, his
comment that "The Maritimes' as
usual four years behind the rest of
the country, appeared (my
emphasis) to show an early trend
to the Liberals". Had he a bit
more perception and a little less
B.C. bias, he would have noted
that although the Conservatives
lost three seats in the Maritimes, it
was   not   the   Trudeaumania   of
1968. It was in fact British
Columbia that was four years
behind the times, ie.: a resurgence
of Conservative strength and a
decimation of Liberal ranks, a
phenomenon which occurred in
the Maritimes four years ago.
In closing I would recommend
you find a more perceptive
political commentator for he next
election ... perhaps one with a
little less regional bias and a little
more maturity.
Hendrick Van der Linde
Unusual
Why are letters addressed to
the editor(s) when they are
written for the readers and, you
don't give a damn whether said
editor reads it or not? (preferably
not; just prints it!)
A commonplace occurance of
having an essay returned became a
most unusual incident for me the
other day. I quickly flipped
.through each page and saw that
there was a fair amount of
constructive criticism. Slowly my
soul started to go numb as the
realization hit me; I couldn't find
the mark! I became very upset
because my traumatic Herculean
efforts hadn't been recognized or
rewarded with one of those
invaluable numbers or letters. The
whole exercise of writing seemed
meaningless if I wasn't gonna get a
letter-grade! Then, the thought
crept back into my conscious that
nobody got a mark for this_
particular exercise.   I started to Tuesday, November 7, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
climb out of my wallowing apathy
as it became more acceptable to
me that we had all got the same
mark. After a few minutes more, I
began to feel close, real close, to
all the people in the room. I felt
that I was sharing learning with
them, each to the best of his
ability but, none the less equal.
My feelings remained unspoken
and I don't know if anybody
shared them; I hope they did! I
felt closer to that group than to
any group I have ever entered, all
because for a couple of hours we
were judged the same. That mark
was a great tonic for many of the
ailments so commonly found on
this campus.
Frank Tichler
arts 3
Criticism
Re: Page Friday
I would just like to voice my
opinion in regards to your movie
reviewer. I'm afraid that I have
wrote to you about his views on
Woody Allen's movie "Everything
You Wanted to Know About Sex
But Were Afraid to Ask and his
criticism of your movie review
techniques.
I went to see the movie The
Other last weekend regarded it as
one of the best "shockers" I have
seen in a long time, and I feel that
is not only comes close to a fast
Hitchcock thriller but maybe even
ranks as equal with it.
Even in the title of your movie
review you mention that the show
contained gore. Well I don't
consider myself to have better
than average eyes, but there was
not one drop of blood actually
shown on the screen, even with
the number of deaths involved.
And speaking of the number of
deaths, your review mentions that
eight people die. Again, My eyes
are no better then anyone else's
(thought I'm beginning to doubt
the sight of your movie critic) but
there were not eight people killed,
there were only six deaths.
One more point you made
about the movie was that there
was no subtlety, and that the
viewers knew what was going to
happen all the time. Your critic
mentions that this is bad and
doesn't give a shocking or
frightening effect, but on the
contrary, because I knew what
was going to happen, I sat in the
theatre (in the dark with only my
girlfriend to hold onto!) terrified
until the 'shock' took place, and
then only then could I breathe
easy again.
As your last student moviegoer
mentioned, tastes vary greatly
from person to person, so if
you're going to try and review a
movie (and I hope you continue
to) try and give both a pro and
con approach. If you can't do
this, then take your petty little
reviews and shove them up your
cinemascope!
Jerry Fischer
science 2
More
criticism
I realize it is more difficult to
sound clever and intelligent when
you are not taking potshots at
something. I also respect your
right not to like something. But
couldn't you have left John
Huston's "Fat City" alone?
First, you judged the film by
its attendance. What's next,
judging it by its advertising?
You call the movie boring. I
honestly wonder whether you're
talking about the same film. For
the life of me, I cannot think of
one single part of the film that
was boring. Your entertainment
standards must be rather perverse,
if they applaud the spectacle of a
gigantic breast cavorting on the
screen but reject a poignant,
realistic drama. Comedy is not the
only genre that entertains.
What's all this horseshit about
realism? To deny the value of this
particular attitude is to
downgrade some of the finest
films ever made. And this Falstaff
nonsense. Surely even you know
the differences between twentieth
century cinema and Elizabethan
drama.
You call the characters in "Fat
City" dull and corny. Wake up,
Clive. The film is probably the
first to portray the boxing world
with real depth, unhampered by
threadbare cliches.
Letters
On top of all this, you cop-
out. You start out with "banal,
boring and empty" and end up
with "sensitive, boldly honest,
and faithful to those it portrays."
Really, Clive, if you can't say
anything intelligent in your
reviews, what's the point of your
writing them?
Very sincerely,
Ryon Guedes
arts 1
Torture
Sehr geehrter Herr und geehrte
Frau!
Big Brother has invaded the
tranquility of the UBC campus. I
refer, of course, to the unmarked
automobiles prowling the university byways.
I do not object to unmarked
automobiles, but if they come
equipped with 2 to 4 heavy-duty
loudspeakers and two robot-like
occupants, one who operates the
aforesaid vheicle, the other who
operates  the  microphone which
amplifies the aforesaid operator's
voice into a raucous roar of the
most obscene phrases imaginable:
"Get your tickets for Macbeth;
only $2, $3," and on and on and
on.
Not only does this racket
disturb the peace, but it is also a
grave imposition upon the
thoughts and speech of those
individuals who happen to be
talking while these vehicles creep
by and commit their atrocious
acts. The library no longer is the
quiet haven for the serious student, but becomes a torture
chamber. In the words of the
immortal Anon: "remember what
peace there may be in silence."
Mit freundlichen Gruben,
David Mattison
grad 5
R.W. Sargeant
pharmacy 1
Shrum
(Regarding   Gordon   Shrum's
lecture to the gears).
The Visit of the
Great Ecologist
The man who drinks Tordon 100
Comes to Civil Engineering 201
and he explains
That we should work really hard
all the time
to stimulate the neurons in our
brains
but the most important thing in
life is to have fun
AND I WONDERED
AND HE ASSURED US
that things were getting better all
the time
EXCEPT THE NDP
the fare is a quarter, not a nickel,
not a dime
ON A B.C. HYDRO BUS.
And he told us to leave our lights
on all the time
ELECTRICITY IS CHEAPER
than higher  insurance   rates for
high rates of crime
AND THEN HE RAN
OUT OF TIME.
John E. Dumbenbaker
fe @Gd@§k°]
Hoechst Research
Safety
Early perception of danger
points and easy identification of
traffic signs so that their messages can be instantly recognized, are two of the greatest
problems of road safety.
The fluorescent colours now
used to mark highways often
fade after a short time. But
Hoechst research has developed persistent fluorescent
dyestuffs which have the valuable attributes of maximum
lightfastness and striking visual
impact. The qualities of these
dyestuffs improve identification
of highway danger spots, men
working, traffic signs, railway
crossing and unlit roads. In fact
there is an almost inexhaustible
number of identification uses.
This is a major contribution by
Hoechst to future road safety.
Increases Highway
Ahead through systems
thinking
The new fluorescent dyestuffs
are the result of Hoechst
know-how and experience in
many fields. They are the
product of collaboration between physicists and technicians engaged in research into
dyestuffs and plastics.
Systems thinking is the
Hoechst strategy. Research,
development and product experience in many areas are
concentrated on the solution of
specific problems.
To keep ahead — to solve the
problems of today and tomorrow — Hoechst employs
10,300 people in research and
development with a research
investment of more than 1 50
million dollars.
Helping Build Canada
Products and ideas from
Hoechst have touched and improved the quality of people's
lives in every area around the
world, in a hundred countries
on six continents. As an affiliate
of the worldwide Hoechst organization, Canadian Hoechst
Limited has a full century of
research and achievement to
draw upon. In Canada, Hoechst
is an autonomous company
employing Canadians to serve
Canadian needs.
Hoechst in Canada concerns
itself with supplying both the
present and future needs of
Canadians. The range of products and services covers the
spectrum through industrial
chemicals, dyestuffs, plastics,
printing plates, human and
veterinary medicines, pharmaceuticals, and textile fibres.
Hoechst products and services,
Hoechst techniques and
know-how in these fields,
combined with a large international fund of experience, have
given the company a reputation
for expertise which takes constant striving to live up to.
Hoechst thinks ahead.
REG T M HOECHST.
HOECHST
Canadian Hoechst Limited
4045 Cote Vertu
Montreal 383, Quebec
40 Lesmill Road
Don Mills, Ontario Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1972
Hot flashes
Fiji hurricane
help sought
The student committee for Fiji
h jrricane relief is soliciting
clothing and cash donations for
the 50,000 victims of the Oct. 24
hurricane and floods in the Fiji
islands.
They will accept contributions,
starting noon today, at a booth in
the SUB foyer.
Talks continue
C. B. Macpherson, University
of Toronto political scientist,
concludes his series of lectures on
the life and times of liberal
democracy, noon, Wednesday and
Thursday, in Buchanan 104.
Titles of the last two lectures,
part of the Cecil H. and Ida Green
visiting professor series, are the
Mid-20th        Century        Model:
Equilibrium Democracy, and The
Emergent Model: Participatory
Democracy.
Stevenson talks
Sharon Stevenson, published
poet and former Alma Mater
Society executive, speaks on a
socialist perspective on women's
liberation, 7:30 p.m., today, in
SUB ballroom.
Admission to the lecture, this
week's class in the women's
studies program, is 25 cents.
Cet a i
Theatre graduate students will
audition actors and actresses for
roles in four original one act
plays, 7 p.m., tonight, in room
112, Frederic Wood Theatre.
The plays written by B.C.
creative writing students will be
produced for a Freddy Wood
festival of one acts.
Tween classes
TODAY
ANTHRO-SOC
Martin     Silverman     on     symbolic
anthropology, noon, Angus 415.
NEWMAN CLUB
A     Catholic    student     group     on
campus noon, SUB 105B.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
LTC, 7 p.m., SUB 215.
VOC
Meeting, noon, Angus 104.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Karl   Burau   on  Freud,   Reich,  and
Vangguaard, noon, SUB 111.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Sharon     Stevenson     on     Socialist
Perspectives on Women's
Liberation,        7:30        p.m.,       SUB
ballroom.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square    dancing,    noon-2:30   p.m.,
SUB 207-209.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist and soup, noon, Lutheran
Centre.
CANOE   &    KAYAK   CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
SAILING CLUB
Racing rules, noon, SUB 205.
WEDNESDAY
FREESEE
Civilization,   noon,   1:35,  2:20 p.m.
Free, SUB ballroom.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist and soup,  noon Lutheran
Centre.
AUCM    executive    meeting,    4:30
p.m., Lutheran Centre.
ONTOLOGY CLUB
Ron    Polack   on   consciousness   of
purpose, noon, Buch. 216.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Meeting, noon, SUB 211.
5:30    p.m.,
THURSDAY
PHOTO-SOC
Aquacolor     demonstration,     noon,
SUB 241A.
NVC
Meeting, noon, SUB 211.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Meeting,   8   p.m.,  1962 Acadia Rd.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Supper,    value   game,
Lutheran Centre.
CCF
Galatians, noon.
WARGAMERS
Practice for war games tournament,
noon, SUB 119.
Avalon   Hill   board   games   7   p.m.,
clubs room.
FRIDAY
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting,   noon,   grad   centre  board
room.
SKY DIVERS
Meeting, noon, SUB 205.
NDP
Meeting, noon, SUB 117.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Speaker:   B.C. Association of Social
Workers, noon, SUB 105B.
SATURDAY
SAILING CLUB
Regatta     Party,     8     p.m.,     Dave
Agnew's House.
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S.U.B. FILM-SOC PRESENTS,
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Thurs. & Sun. 7:00
Fri. &Sat 7:00 & 9:30
Nov. 9-12
f.U.B. Aud. 50c
The Canada Manpower
department is sponsoring Tuesday
night talks on creative job search
programs again this year.
The first three-hour talk begins
7 p.m., today at the Vancouver
Vocational Institute auditorium,
Pender and Cambie.
Manpower reports 80 per cent
of the people who took the course
last year landed jobs.
Szasz talks
Thomas Szasz, controversial
University of Syracuse psychiatry
professor, will speak on Madness
is Metaphor 7 p.m., today, in the
SUB auditorium.
Szasz is an author of several
books opposing involuntary
commitment and the standard
medical formulation of mental
illness.
IL CAFFE
Pizza Party, 50 cents refreshments,
8:30 p.m. I.H. cafeteria.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Discussion  on Genetic Engineering,
9:30 p.m. Campus Centre.
Worship, 10:30, Campus Centre.
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Publications &ffice, Room 241 S.U.B.. UBC, Van. 8, B.C
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Rides & Car Pools
14
TWO GIRLS NEED RIDE TO UBC
by 8 p.m., Kingsway and Fraser.
Phone 872-1832.
Special Notices
15
"THE POINT TO SHINING POINT
drivers endurance rally." If you
have a convertable sports car come
and race (or your life. For information contact Rm.  100A in SUB.
LOST (STOLEN?) CAR KEYS &
briefcase, Thursday night at
Sports Arena. Borrower (?) please
return. Information Desk, S.U.B.
No hassle, I need my notes!
ESSAY AND BOOK MANUSCRIPTS
edited by retired publisher for
grammar, syntax, spelling, punctuation, clarity. 263-6566.
NO. 5 ORANGE STREET, MAIN AT
POWELL is having a Junk Contest! JUNK! Like stop signs, airplane wings, toilet seats, and as
original as you can get, cuz If we
pick your junk as a winner, you
too can win a dinner for two at
the White Lunch, a Free Bus Ride
to Burnaby, a gift certificate at
the Army & Navy, and many other
swell stuff. What will we do with
this Junk you ask? We're going to
plaster our walls, ceiling, and all
available places with it so that you
can point to a wrinkled stained
bedsheet for instance, and proudly
tell your friends "I did that."
So, starting when you want, start
bringing it in. Bring as many
as you can, but securely tie your
name, address and phone number
to each piece, so we'll know who
to contact. And don't forget, we
got second, third and fourth prizes
too, like 2 dinners for 2 at the
White Lunch, and 5 Free Bus Rides
to Burnaby. OKAY?
EDITING SERVICE — ARE YOU
bugged by double negatives? Do
you suffer from verbal flatulence?
My forty years experience may
help you. Let DAN MURRAY
gather your dangling participles.
Phone 733-2337 for term papers,
theses, reports, etc.
$75 FOR 75<
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS  TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT
Councils Travel Service, Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-011L
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'69 VIVA DELUXE, IMMAC, 2-
door, 4-speed, radio, whitewalls,
2 new snows, extras, city-tested.
$950. Private. 266-9009, Mark.
1959 JAGUAR D.O.H.C., 3.4 LITRE
sedan. Automatic trans. Good
leather. Top shape. F78-15's snows
on rims. Asking $1000. Call Chris
at 681-0579 after 5 p.m.
Automobiles—Parts
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
u tjtf Hens; ano gutter
Camera*
DIMENSION
LENS SALE
28 mm F.2.8, was $95.10
is 77.20
35 mm F.2.8, was $62.95
is 50.50
135 mm F.2.8, was $73.99
is 59.40
200 mm F.3.5, was $89.25
Is 71.30
Many More Lenses to Choose From
While Quantities Last Only
3010 W. Brdwy.     736-7833
Scandals
37
C-90 CASSETTES WITH PLEXI-
glas case. Buy minimum of 6 at
$1.50 each — get 3 FREE! Guaranteed against defects. Pickup point
on campus can be arranged. Call
732-6769.
Typing
40
TYPING! ! —ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
ports, etc. — Reasonable, 3 years
exp. — Good location, 2nd & Burrard.   Phone  Sheri — 732-7823.
ESSAYS, THESE, ETC. EXPERT
enced. Elec. typewriter, carbon
ribbon. Reasonable rates. 738-8848.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
PROMPT. EFFICIENT TYPING
(electric machine) of theses, essays,
examination papers, etc. Phone:
688-4027.
TYPING — FAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays, Papers. Theses. 41st and
Marine  Drive.   266-5053.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
Theses, etc.  Mrs.  Brown,  732-0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
POSITION AVAILABLE IN A BOY'S
Club working with 5-7 year-olds,
three afternoons per week 3:30-
5:30, $75 month. For more info see
Bob  Freer at  Speakeasy.
INTERESTED  IN  SELLING?	
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for the Ubyssey? This
part-time job offers an opportunity
to grain experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Reliable
2nd or 3rd year business-minded
student who will work hard for 10
or 12 hours weekly is needed. Must
have transportation. If interested
apply to Publications Office, Room
241,  SUB, after 2 p.m..
Work Wanted
52
DON'S MOVING & HAULING, 2636
West 11th Ave. 738-0096. Serving
Kerrisdale, Dunbar & Greater
Van.   area 24  hr.  service.  Insured.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
63
MISCELLANEOUS
FOB SALE
71
VOLKL SKIS 215 CM. NEVADA
bindings. All new. Cost $300, will
sacrifice. 266-5781.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BASEMENT ROOM FOR RENT 4214
W. 15th. $50. Share kitchen. Call
224-3737 for detail*
Room 8c Board
82
CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD, 5785
Agronomy Road. Sauna, color TV,
good food, recreational area. Phone
224-9684.
Communal Housing
85
ROOM    FOR    RENT    IN    HOUSE
with  two females.  Available now.
876-1501. Irene or Dent
ROOM FOR RENT, FRB3NDI.Y
shared house for girl or couple
(fourth year-r). 10th & Macdonald
$35-40. 731-3962.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, November 7, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Mutiny hurts team
Grid hands aban
II
By KENT
Heading into their final'
league game Saturday, the
Thunderbird football team is
sorely depleted following the
loss of several key veteran
players.
Abe Vanderhorst, Ken Ar-
.thur, and Nick Zuccaro have
left the team in what amounts
to a bitter squabble with the
coaching staff over game time,
coaching moves to try players
at new positions, and specialty
team play.
Vanderhorst, in his fourth
year and a starter at defensive
end, has quit the team over a
dispute involving the coach's
decisions not to play him
regularly.
SPENCER
Citing "hurt pride" in his
decision to quite, Vanderhorst
was known throughout his
career as a tough, solid, hard-
■ hitting player — just the type
that the team needs.
At the football awards
banquet last spring he was
awarded the "most inspirational player" award.
Certainly his ability and experience leave a large hole to
fill.
Joining Vanderhorst in
leaving the team was utility
man Ken Arthur, a player
coach Frank Gnup describes
as "a good man for us to
have".    Arthur    played    a
n ship
FRANK GNUP... faces mutiny.
SPOR TS
In hockey:
'Birds falter, then die
Game results
The University of Calgary
Dinosuars were lucky to win
the Hockey Canada Regional
tournament played at UBC on
the weekend.
Aided by a UBC collapse in
the semi-final round Saturday
night, they edged into the final
game against Lakehead
University for the Sunday p.m.
championship game.
And in the final they were
outplayed by a hustling
Lakehead team but managed
to win 5-3 by scoring two goals
in the last two minutes of the
game.
In the championship game
both played cautious, tight-
checking hockey. Calgary led
1-0 after the first period but
Lakehead. fought back in the
second to deadlock the game at
1-1 going into the third.
HOCKEY
Friday
Calgary 7, Victoria 3.
Saturday
Lakehead 6, Alberta 5.
Calgary 6, UBC 5.
Sunday
UBC 6, Alberta 6.
Calgary 5, Lakehead 3.
FOOTBALL
Seattle Cavaliers 32, UBC 23.
BASKETBALL
UBC 83, Grads 78.
In the final period both teams
scored twice before Calgary's
Ron Gerlitz broke in alone on
Lakehead goalie Noel Smith
and scored from close in.
Calgary's final goal was
scored when Lakehead coach
Henry   Akervall   pulled   his
Trojans bombed
By PETER MacQUEEN
The Thunderbird rugby team
confirmed the opinion
Saturday that they are a
championship team be beating
the Trojans 33-0.
The scrum finally played as
a unit, and deserved the tries
they worked so hard to get. The
backs played adequately with
some sparks of brilliance but
definitely needs some work for
the big games in the weeks to
come.
It took awhile for the 'Birds
to get on the scoreboard but
Ray Banks' penalty goal after
30 minutes was a welcome
sight. Bob Jickling's try five
minutes later on a bruising
eight yeard run made the score
7-0 at the half.
The 'Birds ran the Trojans
ragged in the second half with
a concerted attack that just
wouldn't let up. Scoring tries
for the 'Birds were Gareth
Hendrikson, Leigh Hillier,
Doug Carr, newcomer Charlie
Beamon, and a second one by
Jickling.
The second team Braves
were treated with a visit by the
rugby team from the Notre
Dame University at Nelson.
Unfortunately for Notre Dame,
however, they were a bit too
green for the Braves as they
fell 52-0 to a very strong Braves
team.
rushant
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number of different positions,
including back-up centre,
guard, and linebacker on
defense.
Arthur's reason for quitting
— not enough game time and
too many positions to learn to
play. His absence leaves the
'Birds with little 150 pound
Eddie Chan as back-up centre
to Jim Vilvang.
Also quitting the team was
Nick Zuccaro of Notre Dame, a
starter at running back but
relegated to the bench after a
stint at defensive linebacker, a
position he had trouble learning to play.
Zuccaro and Len Suitt of
Vancouver College had been
offered $200 scholarships each
by the UBC Alumni
Association in an effort to lure
two or three top high school
goalie with one minute left to
play. Calgary's Tom Wiseman
scored into the empty net.
In Saturday's other semifinal round Calgary was very
fortunate to beat UBC. The
'Birds skated to leads of 4-0 and
5-2 before Calgary came back
with three goals in the third
period to tie the game.
After eleven minutes of
overtime, Calgary winger
Wayne Forsey beat UBC goalie
Fred Masuch cleanly on the
stick side to notch the win.
In Sunday's game the 'Birds
again skated to a big lead
before Edmonton came bak to
tie the score at six-all. UBC led
the Bears 6-2 with only four
minutes to play. Edmonton
then scored four goals in less
than three minutes.
Neither team scored in the
sudden death overtime period.
The game was not well
played with both teams skating
in fear of body contact, the
hardest hitting being the back
slapping after a score.
The UBC collapse in the final
minutes of the game was unfortunate but the lackadaisical
attitude of the team when it
had the lead and the spotty
goaltending cost them dearly.
In the preliminary game
Friday night, Calgary knocked
off Victoria 7-3.
football prospects to UBC each
year.
Since the scholarships were
conditional on playing out the
full year, neither player
collected as Suitt has also quit.
At the start of the year the
'Birds also lost defensive
tackle Brian Murphy, a starter
all of last year with college and
semi-pro experience. Murphy's reason for quitting also
involved lack of game time.
The 'Birds may also have to
scratch left linebacker and
place kicker Bruce Kiloh from
the line-up, who was injured
during a kick-off return in
Saturday's game against the
Seattle Cavaliers. The severity
of his injury, a charley-horse,
was not immediately known.
Reserve quarterback Kirk
Smalley has also left the team.
738^9520   738-1113'
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and SUB
Infojrmation^ublic^^ Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7,  1972
West favors school vote
From page 1
individual institutions based on
two votes per school. Most
delegates from the west and
Ontario favored the plan, but it
was amended to a modified
population formula after the
Quebec-Atlantic provinces
walkout.
The Atlantic province
participants wanted
representation from provincial
organizations, with each
province having equal voting
power.
The Atlantic provinces said
the organization could become
controlled by Ontario and
Quebec under representation
by population.
They said insufficient attention would be paid to
Atlantic region problems. They
also claimed representation by
institution would result in too
unwieldy a body.
After being voted down
overwhelmingly (16-73-8)
Friday night, the Atlantic
delegates supported the
Quebec proposal, but it was
defeated Saturday morning by
a vote of 27-54-11. Each institution at the conference had
two votes apiece.
A compromise then began to
emerge as Ontario and B.C.
delegates appeared willing to
allow each province the right
to appoint its delegates to NUS
as it chose. A measure to allow
schools to give their regional or
provincial associations their
proxy votes gained wide
support and was eventually
passed.
Although delegates came
close to agreement on methods
of delegate selection, the
conference floundered over the
allocation of delegates to
various regions and provinces.
Just after the Quebec
proposal for regional
representation was defeated,
the University of Guelph introduced a motion declaring
both institutional and regional
appointment were valid
methods of delegate selection.
Most delegates from west of
the Ottawa River hoped that
this, along with the proxy
voting proposal, would sufficiently appease Quebec and
the Atlantic provinces.
The two dissenting regions
immediately caucussed.
Delegates     were     sharply
rushant
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divided on whether the new
proposal was acceptable. Then
Carleton University student
council president Bruce
Cameron, who served on the
national steering committee,
entered the caucus room with a
compromise proposal.
The proposal, which
originated with some B.C.
delegates., would have united
the delegates because the
Quebec-Atlantic province
caucus gladly accepted it. Its
failure amid angry
recriminations wrecked NUS
as an initially Canada-wide
organization.
The Cameron plan would
have allowed each province to
determine its mode of
representation but would have
divided the size Of representation as follows: six per cent
to each of the four Atlantic
provinces, 20 per cent to
Quebec, 20 per cent to Ontario,
seven per cent to each of the
three prairie provinces and 15
per cent to B.C.
Immediately after the
Saturday lunch break,
delegates overwhelmingly
approved the Guelph
declaration. Cameron then
introduced his plan, but it was
immediately attacked for
giving over-representation to
the Atlantic provinces.
"If the Maritime provinces
are going to get 24 per cent of
the votes, then I wonder if they
are willing to pay 24 per cent of
the fees," Susan Geason,
administrative assistant of the
University of Toronto part-
time student council said.
The University of Alberta
threatened to withdraw if the
proposal passed. The Prairie
delegates, who had strongly
rejected the regionalism
concept, caucussed and
produced a plan for modified
rep by pop — one vote for
every 5,000 students in an institution  or  fraction  thereof.
The Atlantic province
delegates angrily rejected this
plan and McGill and Bishop's
Universities made a counterproposal which the Prairies
and many Ontario and B.C.
delegates found equally
unacceptable. The plan called
for a 100-member
organizational assembly of
which 30 delegates would be
chosen on the basis of three per
province, and 70 would be
allocated by provincial student
population. Cameron accepted
it.
Chairman Dan Boisvert
from Loyola University ruled
the McGill proposal out of
order. Cameron challenged the
chair but the ruling was upheld
49-19, with 20 delegates' votes,
mostly from the Atlantic area,
abstaining.
At this point Dawson community college from Montreal
walked out, saying: "This
conference has proven to us
that the federal concept of
representation within the
present boundaries of Canada
cannot permit democratic
process."
Amid considerable uproar
and confusion, Cameron's
original percentage proposal
was rejected andi the Prairie
rep by pop plan accepted.
Tom Leroy of St. Thomas
University in Fredericton,
N.B. then walked to the
microphone and read a biblical
quotation, referring to the
decay of civilization. When he
finished the delegates
representing the six Atlantic
province schools at the conference walked out together.
All Atlantic schools appeared willing to negotiate
further and said they would
return to their student councils
to discuss it. An Atlantic
province student union conference will be held Nov. 18-19
in Charlottetown and the NSU
will be on the agenda.
Immediately after the
eastern walkout, most of the 11
Quebec delegations left.
Chairman Boisvert left with
them to be replaced by Alma
Mater Society treasurer David
Dick.
In a controversial move,
they added a bylaw which
requires one-half of all NUS
standing and special committees be composed of
women.
Only 24 institutions were left
when the constitution was
approved. The walkouts cut the
size to 39 from 51 and other
schools left to catch trains or
catch the attractions of Ottawa.
BE CRITICAL OF
SPEED READING COURSES!
Ever Investigoted speed reading? Moybe now'i the time. And
when you do, be lure to ask about other things besides speed
—like unaerstanding, retention, concentration. Obviously you
have to enjoy and remember what you read or there's ■not
much point in Increasing your speed. Sure speed's important.
Some people do read>mony thousands of words a minute but
that's not all there Is to It. Come to a free demonstration by
the world's most honored reading school — and be critical.
ATTEND A FREE MINI-LESSON
U.B.C. Room 205 - S.U.B.
Thursday, Nov. 9 12:45
Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics Institute
556 W. Broadway - Nov 9 - 8 p.m.
GRADUATES:
TAKE    ADVANTAGE    OF    YOUR    LIFETIME    MEMBERSHIP   AND
ATTEND THE FREE CLASSES AND THE WORKSHOPS.
Evelyn Wood Beading Dynamics
Soons»red by Dynamic Learning Centre (B.C.)
556 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.      Call 872-8201	
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