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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 11, 1977

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Array He came, he saw, he left
By HEATHER WALKER
VICTORIA — Education
minister Pat McGeer attended
only one hour of an all-day meeting
held here Monday between his
department and 30 student representatives from different B.C.
colleges and universities.
McGeer left the meeting, which
began at 10 a.m., at 11 a.m. to
attend a cabinet meeting. While at
the meeting, McGeer presented a
brief history of the education
department's funding situation and
then professed to answer questions
put to him by student representatives.
McGeer's answers were
repetitions of earlier statements in
some cases and refusals to comment in others, but he provided no
new information.
Asked by UBC representative
Dave Van Blarcom if he was opposed to student representation on
university governing bodies, as he
RCMP make
beer night
drunk busts
By TED DAVIS
The arrest of three students for
drunken and disorderly public
behavior following a recent
commerce students' beer night
underscores the problems faced by
local RCMP members in dealing
with campus liquor functions.
The three students spent four
hours in the Vancouver city drunk
tank after being picked up outside
commerce hut M-27 following a
first year commerce beer garden
Jast Thursday.
■-' Corp. Dave Patterson, temporarily in charge of the university
RCMP detachment, said Monday
the students were picked up when a
routine patrol noticed a drunken
crowd outside the building
swearing and shouting obscenities.
He said the two constables
arrested the three rowdiest
students.
"As far as university is concerned, it wasn't an out-of-control
crowd," one of the students
arrested said Monday.
The three were driven outside
the University Endowment Lands,
where they were handed over to
Vancouver city police.
Patterson said he discussed the
incident with executives of the
commerce undergraduate society
and accepted a formal apology.
Patterson said co-operation with
the police and reasonable self-
imposed controls were the main
points of the understanding
reached with CUS. There has been
no previous trouble with CUS, he
said.
The RCMP would prefer to not
interfere in any campus drinking
functions providing the organizers
of the functions themselves
maintain reasonable controls, he
said.
But he said the Canada Liquor
Act gives police the power to refuse
or cancel special liquor permits,
such as that held by the CUS, in the
case of infractions of the act.
The constables investigating the
Thursday beer bash found at least
five major infractions of the act,
Patterson said, any of which could
have caused it to be shut down.
He said there were minors within
a licenced premise, minors in
possession of alcohol, intoxication
in a public place, people causing a
disturbance in a public place, and
patrons in a licenced premise while
the holder of the licence was absent.
Patterson said organizers of
drinking functions should ask the
police to handle those who become
too drunk or obnoxious, if only to
allow other participants to enjoy
themselves undisturbed.
See page 2: STUDENTS
was while in the opposition,
McGeer said:
"Some think it (student representation) has worked well. Others
think it has worked badly. I have
no plans to change the Universities
Act at the present time." He would
not give his own opinion on the
question.
Asked if he was considering any
changes to the Universities Act,
McGeer only said he could not
discuss legislation before it is
introduced.
McGeer said he was "happy"
with the Universities Council and
thought it was working within the
legislation which had established
it
McGeer was also asked if he was
planning to "wind down the pure
humanities" at UBC in light of his
interest in increasing vocational
and technical training, but only
said he had made no statements at
that time.
McGeer said his department'is
considering a new Colleges Act,
but added he did not yet know when
the act would come before the
House.
McGeer was also asked if he
planned to renew the $7.5 million
grant given to the three public
universities last year. He repeated
his earlier statement that the grant
was a one-time grant and would not
be repeated.
McGeer also repeated his
frequent statement that any tuition
fee increases would be levied by
individual institutions, not by the
provincial government.
He said universities have "other
sources of revenue" than the
provincial government and their
utilization of these other sources
was up to the institutions.
THF URYSfFY
Vol. LIX, No. 34       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY IT, 1977
228-2301
If the universities followed an
education department suggestion
to change their fiscal year to accord with the government's fiscal
year, McGeer said, they would
know how much money they would
get before they began to spend it
and could budget accordingly.
"They set their own budgets,
priorities and contracts," McGeer
said. "Any interference here by
government would take a lot of life
out of the institution."
McGeer refused to give his
personal opinion of student representation on college councils
because, he said, his answer would
be interpreted as showing what
would be in the new Colleges Act.
Pressed by B.C. Students'
Federation co-chairwoman Punam
Khosla, who told McGeer his
statement would only be seen as a
personal opinion, McGeer said:
"No, it wouldn't. It would be in-
Seepage 5: McGEER
GETTIN'   EM   WHILE   THEY   LAST,   students   wait   in   line   in
administration building basement to pick up student bursaries, loans
, —doug field photo
and grants, then trek three floors up and deposit money into coffers of
university as second instalment of tuition fees. Easy come, easy go.
Vander Zalm, a family man
By RALPH MAURER
Human resources minister Bill
Vander Zalm has criticized a
Vancouver legal aid society for
offering couples advice on how to
obtain a divorce.
In a Nov. 16 letter to attorney-
general Garde Gardom, concerning the government-funded
Vancouver Community Legal
Assistance Society, Vander Zalm
writes: "Why should we be aiding
divorce through this particular
society when the ministry of
human resources is doing all it can
to try and keep families together
because maintenance of these split
families is our greatest concern."
Vander Zalm, whose past targets
include bilingual cereal packages
and divorcees, also criticized the
society on three other points. In
the letter, he also:
• questions whether the society
should act as lawyers for a group of
Burnaby citizens opposed to
widening Boundary Road on the
west side of Central Park;
• questions the involvement of a
society lawyer in "a consideration" of the application form
used by human resources ministry,
and
• criticizes the society for
representing an individual trying
to get more money out of the
Unemployment Insurance Commission.
Hie letter asks Gardom to look
into the four items "and let me
have your comments." Neither
Gardom's office staff nor Vander
Zalm's office staff were able to
determine Monday if the letter has
been answered.
David Mossop, one of two
lawyers mentioned in Vander
Zalm's letter, said the provincial
government provides $40,000 of the
Vancouver Community Legal
Assistance Society's $170,000 annual budget.
He said it is a non-profit society
funded by various levels of
governments  which  offers   free
—doug field photo
LAW STUDENT AL VISRAM . . . reads Vander Zalm letter
legal assistance to various community organizations not able to
afford lawyers.
He said the provincial government was familiar with the society
when the $40,000 grant was made.
He is the lawyer representing the
Boundary Road Citizens' Committee, about whom Vander Zalm
writes: "How is it that a Burnaby
citizen's group suddenly needs
legal representation over a
political matter and decision."
Mossop said the society has "just
advised the group what the legal
requirements are for widening the
road," and had not offered any
political advice.
He said the society is also investigating, on behalf of a client, if
questions involving racial or
cultural background, appearing in
a job application form used by
Vander Zalm's department,
conflict with the B.C. Human
Rights Code.
He said he does not understand
Vander Zalm's comment to
Gardom: "I am sure you will agree
that the action of the society is
strictly a political 'push'." Mossop
said society directors are meeting
this week "to decide what the letter
See page 2: LETTER Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1977
Students arrested
From page 1
He said the police would rather
intervene only where excessive
rowdyism is permitted or condoned.
One   of   the   three   students
Letter
From page 1
means" and to draft a reply to
Vander Zalm.
Mossop said Vander Zalm's
fourth point referred to a case in
which a woman, with the help of a
society lawyer, is appealing the
Unemployment Insurance Act
which states that a woman may not
receive UIC benefits during the
last eight weeks of pregnancy and
the six weeks following pregnancy.
He said the woman, and society
lawyers, are contending that
although pregnant the woman was
able and willing to work and thus
qualified for UIC.
Mossop said the case was heard
Monday and the judge reserved
decision.
Of that case, Vander Zalm
wrote: "If there is an overpayment
of benefits, how in the world can we
directly or indirectly be paying a
lawyer to fight for someone who
has been overpaid?"
Mossop said the society obtained
a copy of the letter from an
unidentified source a few weeks
ago.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
arrested alleged unfair and brutal
treatment by the RCMP constables
and said he thought they kneed
another of the students in the groin.
Patterson however could not
confirm this and said no official
complaint had been made to him.
He said he told the three at a later
meeting how to proceed with an
official complaint.
He said the three arrests were
made after the students were
ascertained as being in violation of
the law, and the constables were
permitted by law to use any
necessary force in order to protect
themselves or police property.
He said the student concerned
had continued to be abusive and
destructive while in the police car,
even after the constables and the
other students told him to control
himself, and the constables
probably feared he might smash
one of the windows of the car.
Patterson led a raid on Totem
Park residence in November that
was called improper by housing
officials because police entered
private rooms.
An unofficial inquiry by detachment head Sgt. Al Hutchinson was
launched but the results have not
yet been released. Patterson
described the raid as "a question of
misunderstanding of local policy."
NOMINATIONS ARE BEING
ACCEPTED FOR
STUDENTS COURT
AMS Student's Court is the final arbitrator of any
student's, club's or undergraduate society's disputes
with one another or with the AMS. Members of the
court meet when required. The term expires in Sept.,
1977. Any interested persons please leave your name,
student number and phone number with the Secretary
of SAC, Room 248, SUB by Friday, January 21.
John Swainson,
Secretary-SAC.
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
Women's Intramural Program
Schedule of Events 1977
EVENT
Basketball
(for second term)
Ice Hockey League
(for second term)
Fun Hockey League
(for second term)
* Badminton
Bowling
League
Volleyball
Curling
Soccer
* Racquetball
Tournament
* Sign up on posted
** Check drawsheet i
DEADLINE
DATE
Friday
Dec. 3
Friday
Dec. 3
Friday
Dec. 3
Friday
Jan. 14
Friday
Jan. 21
Friday
Feb. 14
Friday
Feb. 18
Friday
Feb. 18
Monday
Feb. 28
ACTIVITY
DATE
Monday
Jan.10-Jan.24
Thursday
Jan.13-Feb.24
Thursday
Jan.13-Jan.27
Wednesday
Jan.19-Feb.9
Tuesday
Feb. 1-15
Monday
Feb. 7-14
Saturday
Feb. 26
Thursday
Feb.24,Mar. 3
Tues.-Thurs.
March 1-3
COMPETITION
DATE TIME
Double
Elimination
Leagues
Recreational
Double
Elimination
Leagues
Leagues
Double
Elimination
Double
Elimination
Double
Elimination
7:30-
9:30
7:30-
9:30
7:30-
9:30
5:00 -
7:00
7:30-
9:00
7:30-
9:30
All
Day
12:35
Noon
5:00-
9:00 p.i
FACILITY
Memorial
Gym
Winter Sports
Centre
Winter Sports
Centre
Gym A
SUB Bowling
Lanes
Memorial
Gym
Winter Sports
Centre
Memorial
Field
Winter Sports
Centre
schedules outside the Intramural Office,
n Office for your starting times
Co-Recreation Intramural Program
Ski Trip to
Whistler
Volleyball
Volleyball
Ski Trip to
Cypress Bowl &
Hollyburn (Downhill
or Cross Country)
Ski Trip to
Cypress Bowl &
Hollyburn (Downhill or
Cross Country)
Wednesday
Jan. 19
Drop in
Drop in
Wednesday
Jan. 26
Wednesday
Feb. 2
Saturday
Jan. 22
Thursday
Jan. 20
Thursday
Jan. 27
Saturday
Jan. 29
Saturday
Feb. 5
CANCELLED
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
-9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Memorial Gym
CANCELLED
CANCELLED
Badminton
(Doubles)
Drop in
Thursday
Feb. 3
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Curling
Friday
Feb. 4
Saturday
Feb. 12
10:00 a.m. -
6:00 p.m.
TWSC
Ski Trip to
Cypress Bowl &
Hollyburn (Downhill
or Cross Country)
Wednesday
Feb. 9
Saturday
Feb. 12
CANCELLED
Volleyball
Drop in
Thurs.
Feb. 10
7:30-
9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Ski Trip to
Cypress Bowl &
Hollyburn (Downhill
or Cross Country)
Wednesday
Feb. 16
Saturday
Feb. 19
CANCELLED
Volleyball
Drop in
Thursday
Feb. 17
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Spring Football
Friday
Feb. 18
Tues. Mar. 1
Fri. Mar. 11
12:35
Noon
Mclnnes Field
Ski Trip to
Whistler
Wednesday
Feb. 23
Saturday
Feb. 26
CANCELLED
Badminton
Drop in
Thursday
March 3
7:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Spring Golf                                                                          Sunday                     1:00 p.m.                         University
Tournament                                                                              March 6                                                                  Golf Course
1. SPRING FOOTBALL - FLAG FOOTBALL: 4 men and 4 women make a team, QB must be a woman.
2. GOLF TOURNAMENT: Men and women as a team - play the same ball alternating shots.
3. SIGN UP ON POSTED SCHEDULES OUTSIDE THE INTRAMURAL OFFICE - Rm. 202 - War Mem. Gym
Men
I'S
Intr
amuri
al Pro
gram
Pre Registration
for Second Term
Hockey
Friday
Nov. 26
Thursday
Jan. 6
Evenings
TWSC
Volleyball
Friday
Jan. 7
Monday
Jan. 17
Evenings
Gym A & B
Bowling
Friday
Jan. 7
Tuesday
Jan. 18
7:30-
10:30 p.m.
S.U.B. Lanes
Basketball
Friday
Jan. 7
Wednesday
Jan. 19
Evenings
& Noons
Memorial Gym
* Badminton
Tournament
Friday
Jan. 28
Sat. & Sun.
Jan. 29, 30
10:30 a.m.
-4:00 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Wrestling
Thursday
Jan. 27
Weigh-in
7:30 p.m.
Bout Start
8:00 p.m.
Memorial Gym
Curling
Bonspiel
Friday
Jan. 28
Sat. & Sun.
Feb. 5 & 6
All Day
TWSC
* Snooker
Tournament
Friday
Feb. 11
Sat. & Sun.
Feb. 12 & 13
All Day
S.U.B. Games
Area
Rugby
Tournament
Friday
Feb. 25
Sat. & Sun.
March 5 & 6
Daytime
Thunderbird
Park
Track & Field
Championships
Thursday
March 3
12:35
Noon
Harry Logan
Track
Hockey Finals
Thursday
March 3
As Scheduled
TWSC
Nitobe Basketball
Tournament
Mon. - Thurs.
March 7-10
As Scheduled
Memorial Gym
* Sign up on posted schedule outside the Intramural Office — Room
308 War Memorial G
ym
** Check the posted schedule o
utside the Intramural Office — Roorr
308 War Memorial G
ym
1. Please note all Ski Trips are CANCELLED.
2. Registration for Men's Volleyball, Bowling
Please contact Men's Intramurals office.
and Basketball may
still be possible afte
registration deadline date. Tuesday, January 11, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Bitter strike at Laval U. ends
QUEBEC CITY (CUP) — A
strike by professors at Laval
University here, which cancelled
four months of classes for 25,000
students, has been settled.
After 18 months of bargaining
and a 16-week strike, the faculty
union voted 85 per cent Dec. 23 to
approve a university contract offer
which provides a 34 per cent salary
increase.
The university, which closed
during the strike, reopened last
week. Students were back for
registration Monday, and classes
begin today.
To make up class time lost
because of the strike, students will
attend two 13-week terms ending in
early July, instead of finishing
classes as usual in mid-April.
The strike, one of the longest and
most bitter at any Canadian
university, was filled with charges
and counter charges by the union
and the administration.
Union representatives charged
the Laval administration with
attempting to remove academic
freedom and faculty involvement
with university decision-making,
and the administration responded
by charging the union with illegal
picketing and strong-arm tactics.
In a recent interview, union
president Joel de la Noue said the
union gained a grievance
procedure, job security, a sabbatical leave system, a salary
structure and greater input into
departmental assembly decisions.
He said that under the new
contract, grievances about tenure,
promotions and non-renewal of
contracts will be arbitrated by an
internal committee chosen from
nominees of the union and the
university.
The union had complained that
the former committee, chaired by
the university vice-rector, hadn't
fairly considered a grievance from
several professors whose contracts
were not renewed.
The new contract also provides
for full job security, de la Noue
said. Tenured professors cannot be
fired under any circumstances and
must agree to changes in job
descriptions.
It also ensures that positions
cannot be removed without
department approval, he said.
During the dispute, the union
complained that Laval's lack of a
salary structure led to considerable variation in salaries
between professors of similar rank
and experience.
The university lacked minimum
and maximum salaries and had no
rules governing salaries.
The new contract, said de la
Noue, established a salary
structure which will  integrate
professors according to rank and
experience.
A 34 per cent salary increase was
also negotiated, he said.
He said the contract establishes
departmental committees to
discuss working conditions, hiring
and assigning of departmental
tasks, in response to union complaints that professors didn't have
enough input into university
decisions.
Yet, despite wage increases in
the contract, the union has an
$800,000 debt for strike pay during
the four-month strike.
Donations from faculty
associations at other Canadian
universities are expected to contribute about $70,000 to the debt,
said de la Noue, but the remainder
of the debt will be paid by the
union.
He said the union will increase
dues for the next 18 months so each
Seepage 8: RESEARCH
Kenny 'should explore'
tuition hike possibilities
WALLACE . . . attacks UBC teaching hospital . .
Senate's budget committee has
advised the university administration to consider increasing
tuition fees if the provincial
government cuts back education
spending.
A committee report to senate in
December noted that the education
department has told universities
they should not expect any increase in operating funds this year.
The report says tuition fees have
not increased in 10 years and "the
percentage contribution to the
budget from tuition fees has fallen
from approximately 30 per cent in
1965-66 to about 10 per cent in 1975-
76.
"Committee members present at
the meeting unanimously
recommended that the president
should explore the possibility of
increasing student fees," it says.
New hospital a luxury
The report says a decision by
education minister Pat McGeer not
to renew a special $4.5 million
grant to UBC this year will cause
severe budget constraints in 1977-
78.
McGeer says the grant, received
by the university in the spring of
1976 to make up for a discrepancy
between the province's fiscal year
and UBC's salary contract year,
was a one-time affair and will not
be repeated this year.
Because of McGeer's decision,
the university will have to consider
other sources of funding or consider budget cuts in all departments and faculties, the report
says.
"Even if both actions are taken it
is difficult to see how to prevent
further erosion of the academic
quality of the education we offer
students at UBC."
Student law senator Gordon
Funt, a member of the budget
committee,  said a consensus is
forming on the committee, on the
senate and in the university administration that tuition fees will
have to be raised if the provincial
government does not grant an
increase in UBC's operating
budget this year.
He said the university has no
choice but to raise tuition fees, so
the Social Credit government in
Victoria must take the blame if
they go up.
The report says that, because of
increased costs and an inflexible
budget the university is faced with
the problem of "how to provide
sufficient funds to continue to
maintain the library collection, the
equipment and supplies budgets,
and the level of operation of the
computing centre."
The report says administration
president Doug Kenny has asked
all faculty and department heads
to prepare contingency plans in the
event there is no increase in funds
from the provincial government.
B.C. Conservative leader Scott
Wallace said Monday that if the
provincial government builds a
240-bed teaching hospital at UBC,
there will likely be cutbacks in
existing university programs.
Wallace told about 100 people in
SUB that the $50 million hospital,
recently approved by UBC senate
and board of governors, will ab
sorb operating funds that could be
used in other areas of the
university.
He said the government is being
inconsistent by offering to build an
expensive hospital and double the
size of the medical school, and at
the same time cutting back on
other areas of university
education.
Competition stiff for
would-be volunteers
More than 40 men have volunteered to test a new male contraceptive at UBC's student health
centre, program director Morton
Warner said Monday.
The contraceptive program
involves monthly injections of two
hormones designed to reduce the
sperm count enough to create
temporary sterility in the male.
The tests are part of a worldwide
series administered by the World
Health Organization. It is the first
series of tests of the contraceptive
on humans.
Warner, an assistant professor of
healthcare and epidemiology, said
that of the 40 men who volunteered
for the program, about 10 have
already been declared unsuitable
because they live out of town or
were considered medically unsuitable.
He said 80 or 85 applicants will be
needed to ensure that the 24 men
needed for the testing program are
appropriate for the tests.
He   said   applicants   must   be
between 30 and 40 years old and
take a test ensuring they are
fertile. The screening process for
volunteers also includes the
signing of a consent form and an
interview.
In Toronto, the other Canadian
city in which testing of the contraceptive is taking place, participants are mainly graduate
students and professors at the
university. Warner said he expects
volunteers for the UBC program to
be graduate students and
professors also.
The program is slated to begin in
mid-February. Volunteers will
attend a preparatory clinic every
two weeks for three months before
testing begins. After testing
begins, volunteers will go to the
clinic once a month for injections
and once every two weeks to have
their sperm counts checked.
It has been estimated that it will
be about 10 years before the hormones are marketed, perhaps in
pill form.
The construction of the medical
school will improve the quality of
medical education at UBC but the
money could be spent better
elsewhere, Wallace said. "A new
hospital here is a luxury."
The government should use the
money allocated to the UBC
hospital to build facilities for
senior citizens who need special
medical attention, Wallace said.
He said medical students would
get better training if they were
taught in hospitals where they
would be exposed to a wider cross-
section of the general population.
Wallace said there should be a
radical review of the education
system in B.C. at all levels. He said
useless courses like high school
guidance courses where "kids sit
around and self-analyze themselves and all this kind of crap"
should be eliminated.
Wallace said the provincial and
federal governments should get
together to deal with the issue of
Indian land claims. He said more
discussion is needed about land
claims and some of the claims are
legitimate.
Wallace said his role as the only
Conservative MLA in the B.C.
legislature is to "present a rather
more reasonable and positive
approach than the government or
the opposition."
He said B.C. politics are too
polarized. People vote "with their
eyes closed and tongues bitten."
Wallace said the main issues at
the next sitting of the legislature,
which begins Thursday, will be
unemployment, the economy and
labor-management problems in
the province.
and urges review of education system -matt klng photos Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1977
What did they expect?
So Pat McGeer made only a cameo appearance Monday
at a day-long meeting between education department officials
and B.C. student representatives. As Gomer Pyle used to say,
"Surprise, surprise, surprise."
What did they expect? After all, the meeting was held
Jan. 10 because McGeer was too busy to meet with the
student representatives (we hesitate to call them leaders) on
Nov. 9, National Student Day, and postponed a Dec. 13
meeting because, suposedly, the date conflicted with exams.
If that didn't tip the student reps off to the fact that
student issues are low, low priority for McGeer, nothing
would.
The student representatives — at least those representing
the National Union of Students and the B.C. Students'
Federation — went into that meeting with high hopes,
actually expecting a day-long discussion of education policies
with McGeer. They were disappointed.
We hope they learn the obvious lesson. Sitting down and
talking with McGeer isn't going to accomplish anything. Mass
student action — rallies, letter campaigns, strikes — are the
only things that will. The student reps should become
student leaders and start applying their energy where it will
be effective, instead of trying to set up meetings with
bureaucrats, meetings at which nothing is accomplished.
About that letter
Bill Vander Zalm's recently-disclosed letter makes it
embarrassingly clear that the man simply doesn't have the
brains for the job of human resources minister.
If Vander Zalm objected to divorces because of the
unhappiness they indicate, his objection to divorce
counselling would be merely illogical, because making
divorces harder to get would not actually produce happier
marriages. But Vander Zalm is concerned with money.
"Why should we be aiding divorce... when the
ministry of human resources is doing all it can to try and
keep families together because maintenance of these split
families is our greatest concern," he states in the letter.
Anybody who would increase unhappiness to save
money is a dangerous fool. Vander Zalm doesn't understand
life; he's out of his depth and should resign.
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Letters
Aldridge alleges inaccuracies in pool story
Re your article on the indoor pool
in Thursday's Ubyssey, a number
of factual errors should be
corrected:
1. The pool was first proposed in
1912 (at the time of the Sharp-
Thompson plan for the university
campus at Point Grey), not 1972.
The current effort was proposed in
November, 1971.
2. The original proposal (June,
1972) called for $925,000 from the
students, $925,000 from the administration and the remaining
$925,000 from private sources, not,
as you say, from government
grants.
3. At the time of the November,
1974 referendum which saw the
students confirm their $5 per year
commitment by a 71 per cent
majority, the estimated cost of the
pool was $4.5 million, not $4.7
million as you state.
The difference may seem trivial
but the first figure refers to a
completely finished pool while the
second (and current) estimate
does not provide for about $520,000
worth of facilities which had
originally been included in the
design. The cost increase over the
19724 period you refer to is consistent with the prevailing level of
inflation in the construction industry.
4. The $768,333 received from the
federal and provincial governments is not, as your article states,
"considerably less than the
$925,000 pool organizers had hoped
to raise from the two governments." As stated above, the latter
target was originally set to include
all private sources along with
government grants.
If one adds the $131,000 figure
mentioned in your article to the
government grants, the total of
$899,333 is already very close to the
original estimate. As you correctly
point out, several key fund raising
efforts have not yet been launched.
5. The $925,000 student contribution will have been entirely
spent when stage one of the pool is
complete. The $5 fee will be used to
pay back both the principle and
WhambamthankyouZalm
The Social Credit government in
Victoria has shown us consistently
good government since taking
office in December, 1975. I was
particularly impressed with Bill
Vander Zalm's proposal to enforce
a three month "cooling off" period
for couples thinking of marriage.
The effect on the province's
divorce rate would be
unquestionable.
In his conservatism, however, I
think Mr. Vander Zalm may have
overlooked another, more obvious
program.
What he should have proposed,
was a 24-hour waiting period for
any couple, homo- or heterosexual,
wishing to make love. This would
not only stop the need for expensive research on birth control,
but would have profound effects on
the ever-worsening VD problem in
B.C.
Hotlines could be set up in major
centres across the province, with
toll-free numbers for our northern
citizens, for couples to phone when
they feel the urge. They would then
have their names and addresses
taken (along with the time of the
call to ensure that the full 24-hour
moratorium was observed) and a
special permit would be delivered
to their front door the next day.
I think this program more
closely reflects the spirit of the
human resources minister's
concern. Since most of the anguish
of marriage originates in the
bedroom, causing people to reflect
on what they are doing will get this
province's economy back on its
feet.
Not until then can we pursue The
Good Life.
Stuart Lyster
arts 4
interest on a $650,000 loan obtained
by the AMS to make this contribution. The fee will continue to
be collected until this loan is
repaid, not as you state, until the
$925,000 is collected. With an
average enrolment of 20,000
students and an interest rate of
10.25 per cent, the loan will be
repaid in about 10 years.
6. Students will have access to
the pool at all times when it is
operating, not as the article
claims, only 14 per cent of the time
it is available. Students will have
free access to a one-third section of
the pool for nine hours every class
day. During other times they will
pay the current public swimming
admission charges.
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 11, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue.Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Heather Walker Is missing!" shrieked Ted Oavls and Sue Vohanka at
deadline time. Paul Wilson, Steve Howard and Ralph Maurer rushed around
the office looking under typewriters for the absent reporter. Kathy Ford,
Sheila Barnes, Marcus Gee and Doug Rushton tried to lift a
lollipop-wielding Chris Galnor In a hernia-inducing attempt to see whether
he had accidentally sat on her. Verne McDonald offered a pipe containing a
noxious-smelling substance to Matt King, assuring him that smoking It
would relieve cramps, If he ever got them. Geof Wheelwright and Doug
Field chased Scoop the Fearless Newshound under Mike Bocking's desk,
but the mischievous pup wouldn't drop Tom Barnes, who was the only
person who knew where Heather was.
7. Your article claims that
students have "no control over pool
policies." In fact, the management
committee for the pool will have
six members, three appointed by
the administration and three appointed by the AMS.
This is the same structure that is
used at the winter sports centre
which you falsely claim is "controlled by the administration." It's
true that UBC pays for maintenance costs in both the winter
sports centre and the new pool, but
the AMS retains 50 per cent control
of the operational policies of both
facilities.
8. My salary is not $17,000 a
year.
Doug Aldridge
campaign director,
UBC Aquatic Centre Fund.
Some of your points are well
taken. Others aren't. To wit:
1. A pool was first proposed in
1912. Not the pool. In fact, you
admit in point 2 that the original
proposal was completed in June,
1972.
5. To most people, there isn't
much difference between saving
up $925,000 and paying off a
$925,000 loan — except that the
latter costs more. If you are
correct, students will be paying $5
a year until the late 1980s, several
years longer than we predicted in
the story.
7. You neglect to point out that of
thethree AMS delegates to the pool
management committee, only two
may be students. The third must be
a member of the off-campus
community.
8. True, your salary is not
$17,000. That was last year. It's
even more this year.—Staff. Tuesday, January 11, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Without satisfactory answers
McGeer leaves meeting early
From page 1
terpreted as what would be in the
act."
McGeer was then hastened away
to the cabinet meeting by his
executive assistant Jim Bennett,
and did not return until 4:30 p.m.
for the wrap-up of the conference.
His most definite answer was a
commitment to support in principle an investigation into federal
and provincial education finances
and goals, proposed by the BCSF
and the National Union of Students.
McGeer was then replaced by
deputy education minister Walter
Hardwick, who said he could only
stay for a further 15 minutes before
leaving for a Vancouver meeting.
Many delegates at the meeting
were concerned with vocational
school funding and provision of
compulsory student fees at
vocational schools.
Vocational school representative
Garth Brown read an 18-page brief
on the concerns of vocational
students to the delegates and
associate deputy education
minister Andy Soles.
The brief recommended increased training for vocational
school counsellors, wages for
vocational students taking time out
from jobs to improve their skills,
and that vocational school administrations should collect
compulsory student fees for
student unions.
Without these fees, student
unions cannot exist at vocational
schools, Brown said.
A meeting was later arranged
for the end of January or early
February between vocational
school representatives and the
ministers of education and labor.
Requests for information from
the Goard report on vocational
training were rejected because the
report had been given to McGeer
only Monday morning and had not
yet been made public.
An afternoon workshop on
financing led by associate deputy
education minister Jack Fleming
mainly involved a rehash of
material discussed in the morning.
But Fleming did say the
education   department   was   not
considering instituting differential
fees for international students,
which have recently been imposed
by governments in Alberta and
Ontario.
"Our current view is an international, global one," Fleming
said. "We are not prepared to put
up financial barriers at this time."
But, he said, the department
might consider differential fees in
the future "if we see a great influx
to the extent that it would deny
access to our own people."
McGeer presented delegates
with two press releases near the
AMS pays polls
This year, for the first time, the Alma Mater Society will pay student
poll workers for the administration-run elections of students to senate
and the board of governors positions.
In past years the administration paid the workers to collect ballots at
polling booths, but this year they are paying only for the printing of
ballots, the major expense of the election.
AMS president Dave Theessen said Monday the cost of paying poll
workers is usually less than $100. Poll workers have traditionally been
paid two pit tokens an hour, but this year they may have an option of
demanding cash, he said.
Registrar Jack Parnall last year refused to allocate money for
payment of the poll workers but then backed down and gave the AMS
$150.
The AMS said then that because the administration runs the elections
it should pay all the costs.
Theessen said the AMS decided to pay the poll workers this year
because the registrar had threatened to open only three polls on campus
Jan. 19. The AMS wants 10 polls open so more students have a chance to
vote, he said.
According to the Universities Act, the registrar is responsible for
running senate and board of governors elections.
end of the conference, one announcing the start of an extension
of student aid and the other announcing a seven-member committee to "assist in upgrading
services to B.C.'s post-secondary
students."
The committee will advise the
ministry's student services
branch, the news release said.
Members will be chosen by the
education department and will
include two students, two college
representatives, one university
representative and two representatives of the education
department.
The student aid extension, called
a work study program, is
described as "a program to
provide part-time on-campus
employment for students in need of
financial assistance."
The  program   is   funded   with
$80,000 not given out in grants and
loans by the Canada Student Loan
Plan and is expected to provide
jobs for 100 students.
Jobs are not to exceed 15 hours
per week and are intended to be
connected with the student's field
of study.
In a press conference following
the meeting, BCSF spokesman
Ross Powell described the conference as frustrating and accused
the education department of
"shoddy treatment" of the student
representatives.
"It is too bad the minister didn't
take time out to talk to us after
postponing the meeting," he said.
The meeting was originally
scheduled for Dec. 13, but was later
postponed until Monday.
BCSF spokesman Bill Bell said
the meeting was "a start," and
"the first time a meeting of this
magnitude has taken place."
ician
49c
EXTRA
* ANY GRADIENT * PHOTO-SUN
* ANY COLOR * PHOTO-BROWN
* PHOTO-GRAY       * KALICHROME
Come in and experience good old-fashioned Service!
UFO - Christian Dior - Silhoutte - Actuell
 44 Water St., Gastown       C81-6626	
A great meal should never end uMhthe bill.
A good joke.
A little more music.
Meeting a friend by chance.
All are just a few of the ways
most people end their meals at the
Spaghetti Factory.
And what meals to begin with!!
Our crispy, garden-fresh salads
get everything off to a good start.
Some freshly-baked sour dough
bread?
Naturally.
And, of course, for the main
course, the dish that put our name on
the door: spaghetti.
Not your ordinary strung-out,
usually over-cooked excuse, but a
glorious plate of semolina-rich,
mouth-watering pasta.
You can choose from 6 tasty
sauces to top off this delicious dish.
For our regulars, who demand a
change of pace, we also offer veal
parmigiana or an 8-oz. sirloin steak
with a side of spaghetti or home fries.
And when it's time to "pay the
piper" (our waiters will also accept
what's due), you'll have another
pleasant surprise.
If you've limited yourself to just
one meal, your grand total could
come to just $2.25.
And that's something you can
enjoy!!
In fact, you can enjoy just
about every nice, true and delicious
word people say about the Spaghetti
Factory.
One visit will have you saying
them too.
Hefty sandwiches at lunch.
Fully licensed. Group reservations
available. Open daily.
53 Water Street, Gastown,
684-1288
50 8th Street, New Westminster,
524-9788 Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1977
Coastal
pollution
With oil tankers sinking left
and right, people are concerned
about pollution of the world's
coasts.
In a UBC-sponsored Westwater
lecture, environmental consultant
Wolf Bauer will speak at 8 p.m.
Thursday in the Centennial
Museum at 1100 Chestnut about
the conservation of coastal shores.
Hot flashes
Bauer will describe shore
resources within the marine,
riverine and estuarine coastal
environments of the Pacific
Northwest. He will also make
suggestions about how the area's
rich resources can be preserved
and protected.
People's law
How do you deal with the huge
corporations   which   pollute   our
rivers,       lakes,       streams       and
atmosphere?
The Vancouver People's Law
School is offering a free course on
environmental law which may
help you answer that question.
The course, will be held Jan.
24 to 27 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
at the Vancouver Public Library.
Instructors are Tim McKenzie of
the West Coast Environmental
Law Association and Craig
Patterson.
'Tween classes
TODAY
MY JONG  KUNG FU
Practice,  new members welcome, 5
p.m., SUB party room.
UBC KARATE CLUB «
Self-defence    class,    7:30    to    9:30
p.m., winter sports complex, gym E.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
Organizational  meeting,  noon, SUB
211.
SKI CLUB
General  meeting, noon, Angus 110.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 205.
UBC CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
AQUA SOC
Tony   Farell   will   speak   and  show
slides, noon, SUB club room.
WEDNESDAY
FREESEE
Free film series. Civilization, noon,
SUB auditorium.
SAILING CLUB
General   meeting   and   film, T-shirts
available, noon, SUB 205.
COMMITTEE FOR THE DEFENCE
OF HUMAN RIGHTS
IN CHILE
Film, To the People of the World,
music by Chilean singers, discussion,
noon, SUB 207.
ECKANKAR
Discussion, noon, SUB 211.
BAHAM CLUB
Informal discussion and talk, noon,
SUB 215.
THURSDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Dr.   Chan Gunn on the practice of
traditional Chinese medicine in
China today, noon, Bu. 106.
FILM CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 247.
JAPANESE LANGUAGE CLUB
Organizational meeting for people
who want to practice their Japanese
noon, International House 406.
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Mike Poutney, speaks, noon, Chem.
250.
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
8, YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
L.S.AX
WEEKEND
REVIEW COURSE
intensive 20 hr.seminar classes
call 669-6323
CANADA
TESTING
.«——■————.
Classes Now Forming
iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii
t
THE MINISTRY OF LABOUR
ANNOUNCES THAT
JOB APPLICATIONS FOR
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
WITH THE
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
ARE AVAILABLE AT
UBC
When: January 10-19
Time:    9:00-430
Place:    Office of Student Services,
Ponderosa Annex F
r'SH  COlM'
Provincial Youth Referral Office
Employment Programs
British Columbia Ministry of Labour
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
J
13 3 G]E]E]G]G]E]G]E|E]G] G]G]G]E|E]G] ggggE]gB]ggB]ggggBjG]E]E]E]B]|Cj'
1       CANDIA TAVERNA        I
(3 FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY 13
^ Call 228-9512/9513 IS
IE) ig
[§ 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m.-2 a.m. |]
IS BlalalalalslslsBBBlaBlalaBBIsBIalalsIala BlalsBBIslalglalatalsIs [&j
FREESEE
Sponsored by the
Office of the Dean of Women
With the support of
The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
SIR KENNETH
CLARK'S
CIVILISATION
Second Term -
Continuation of Film Series
SUB AUDITORIUM
EVERY WEDNESDAY
12:35 - 1:25 p.m.
JANUARY 12 - FEBRUARY 16
All Students, Faculty and Staff are invited.
FREE FREE FREE FREE
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advatice. Deadline is 1-1:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
ECKANKAR — Path of Total Awariwss.
"The sun that never sets is visible
to ttae naked soul and my music is
audible to the spiritual ears only."
Paul Twitchell, "The Tiger's Fang."
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE, Tues.,
Jan.  11, 7:00 p.m. S.U.B. 213.
FREESEE: Office of the Dean of
Women film series Civilisation starts
again tomoorow. Every Wed. 12:36
p.m.   AUB  Aud.  Free.	
10 — For Sale — Commercial
35 - Lost
A  LADIES'  Seiko Watch was lost Friday   afternoon.   Please  call  Pattl  at
433-4506.
40 — Messages
COMMUNITY SPORTS
RACQUET STRINGING
Very low rates. Excellent workmanship. 24-hour service, plus exceptional prices for racquets. Call 733-
1612. 3616 West 4th Ave. Open 10
a.m.
THE GRIN BIN largest selection of
prints and posters in B.C. 3209 W.
Broadway (opp. Super-Valu). 738-2311.
11 -
For Sale
— Private
MUST   SELL.   Stereo.   Dynaco   St
$470, Dynaco PAT-4 $80, KLH-5
Phone  224-9545,  ask  for Don.
400.
$350.
1»71    FORD.   P.U.
tested. $1300. o.b
Standard   V8.   City
.o. 874-9832, evenings.
15-
Found
20-
Housing
WANTED; Room or rooms in a coop house near UBC for Feb. 1st.
Call 228-9352 days,  non-smoker.
WANT TO spend some time helping
people? New applications are being
accepted this week at Speakeasy.
Stop by our desk and ask for an
application.
50 — Rentals
70 — Services
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
TYPING — fast and accurate. Live
close to campus. Please call Susan,
738-0498   or  734-1463.
EFFICIENT,   SELECTRIC   TYPING,   my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates. 263-5317.
CAMPUS DROP-OFF for fast accurate
typing. Reasonable rates. Call 731-
1807 after  12:00.
EXCELLENT   TYPING.   Neat,   accurate
anl   fast.   Reasonable   rates,   922-4443.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER
Rent  cabin day/week.  732-0174 eves.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, January 11, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS
Bears defeat basketball 'Birds
By PAUL WILSON
The UBC Thunderbirds
basketball team dropped into third
place after losing two weekend
games to the University of Alberta
Golden Bears.
Doug Baker led the Bear assault
on the UBC squad scoring 32 points
in Saturday's game. The previous
night he set an unofficial Canada
West league record when he scored
48 points.
"Baker is amazing," said 'Bird
coach Peter Mullins Monday.
"He's put a lot of points on the
board against us in past years but
he was always inconsistent. That's
the surprising thing, he just kept
right on scoring the whole game
long."
At half time the Bears held a
slim 42-39 lead, but came out
running in the second half and
quickly increased it to nine points.
They hung on to take the game 84-
77.
Ralph Turner led the 'Birds in
scoring with 18 points, all on field
goals. Turner shot a consistent 56
per cent and picked up two
defensive rebounds. Bill Berzins
scored 16 points. Jan Bohn potted
14 points and pulled down 10
rebounds.
In addition to Baker's 32 points
Alberta got help from Steve
Panteluk for 12 points and eight
rebounds. Pat Rooney managed 10
points and hauled down nine
rebounds.
In Friday's game the Golden
Bears defeated the 'Birds 93-86.
During the game UBC's 6' 11"
centre Mike McKay was sidelined
with a knee injury. Rookie Rob
Cholyk took McKay's place but
fouled out after 12 minutes had
gone by in the second half. Ed
Lewin followed him out in the
fourth quarter.
Scoring for the 'Birds were
Berzins who shot 67 per cent for 19
points. Bohn potted 21 points and
grabbed nine rebounds. David
Craig added 17 points and four
rebounds but turned the ball over
to Edmonton six times.
Baker took 37 shots, sinking 21 of
them for a consistent 57 per cent
shooting average. He led the Bears
with 48 points and seven rebounds
while turning the ball over twice.
Hockey 'Birds beat Huskies
The UBC Thunderbirds hockey
team strengthened its hold on
second place in the Canada West
hockey league by defeating the
Saskatchewan Huskies in two
home ice games, Friday 7-4 and 8-0
Saturday.
Saturday night the 'Birds
dominated the third period of the
game, scoring five unanswered
goals.
"It may have looked easy on the
scoreboard but it took a lot of hard
work," said coach Bert Halliwell.
Much of the credit for the win can
be placed on a line switch Halliwell
made, inserting Bill Ennos between wingers Marty Matthews and
Jim Stuart. On the other line he put
Peter Moyls at centre between
Grant Cumberbirch and Danny
Lucas.
Moyls grabbed two goals early in
the first period to start the 'Birds'
scoring and later added another.
Singles were scored by Matthews,
Doug Tottenham, Derek Williams,
Rob Hesketh and John Dzus.
Ron Lefebvre recorded his
second shutout of the season
making 34 saves.
The game was marred by a fight
between UBC's Tom Blaney and
Saskatchewan's Roy Kemp during
the presentation of the John Owen
Memorial Trophy to the 'Birds
following the game.
"After we shook hands he said,
'Just wait until we get you back in
Saskatchewan, you won't have a
face left,' so I figured, why wait
until then," Blaney said Saturday.
Friday night the 'Birds came
from behind in the third perio J to
tie the game at four goals each to
force an overtime period.
During the 10-minute overtime
period the 'Birds outplayed the
Huskies and won the game.
Williams scored for the 'Birds at
6:21, followed by goals from
Matthews and Lucas.
The other 'Bird goals were
scored by Cumberbirch, Stuart and
Ennos who added two.
The 'Birds' next game is in
Edmonton when they play the
Golden Bears Friday and Saturday
Caesar's Palace
Coiffures
Professional Hairstyling
(Formerly
Gabriel's Village)
OPENING SPECIAL
PERMS & COLORS
224-7514
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2154 Western Parkway
night. In their last meeting the
'Birds dropped both games, 5-4 and
3-2.
Canada   West   hockey   league
standings:
W L   Pts.
Alberta 8   2   16
UBC 7   3   14
Saskatchewan 3   7    6
Calgary 2   8    4
Rooney hit for 19 points and added
nine rebounds.
Though Baker destroyed the
'Birds' defense they did well offensively during the game shooting
51 per cent and picking up 38
rebounds.
At Victoria the Vikings upset the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs in
two successive games, 85-55 and 71-
70 to move into a second-place tie
with the Dinos. Victoria's Lee
Edmondson picked up the winning
basket in Saturday's game with
two seconds left. Edmondson's
weekend total was 59 points.
In Saskatoon the Huskies picked
up their first two wins in eight
starts by defeating the Lethbridge
Pronghorns in two straight games,
99-68 and 89-83. The wins ended a
30-game losing streak for the
Huskies, whose last win was Feb.
7, 1975.
The 'Birds' next game is 8:30
p.m. Friday when they play the
University of Victoria Vikings in
War Memorial Gym.
The junior varsity basketball
team picked up three wins over the
weekend.
Saturday the JVs defeated the
Columbia Bible Institute 93-76.
Adam Yawrenko scored 17 points
and hauled down 15 rebounds. John
Doughty scored 14 points and
Barry McKay added 12.
Friday the JVs defeated a strong
team from Vancouver Community
College after two overtime periods,
86-83. Yawrenko was again the top
point getter scoring 32. Marc
Adilman and Darryl Clark scored
10 points each.
The JVs hosted the College of
New Caledonia from Prince
George Thursday night. They
easily defeated them 74-51.
Yawrenko again led UBC with 18
points.
The next JV game is 4:30 p.m.
Friday in War Memorial Gym
when they play the University of
Victoria JVs.
Canada West basketball league
standings:
W L
F   A   Pts.
Alberta
6   2
695 655   12
Calgary
5   3
592 588   10
Victoria
5   3
580 556   10
UBC
4   4
670 580     8
Lethbridge
2   6
557 666     4
Sask.
2   6
607 666     4
MEN'S CURLING
PLAYOFF
to decide UBC's
rep. rink in
C.W.UAA. Champs
at Lethbridge
FEBRUARY 24 - 26
Entry Fee-$10.00
Entries close JAN. 21
Forms available
at Athletic
Office in Mem. Gym
or at Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre
WHEN YOU LOOK GOOD
SO DO WE . . .
K"^
PRESCRIPTION
OPTICAL!
J
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1977
Computers — serious business
By CHRIS GAINOR
They aren't playing space war at
the computer centre any more.
The game was so popular, UBC
computer centre director James
Kennedy says that people doing
serious work on the computer were
left without time to use it.
The popular game, which
featured space ships zapping each
other on UBC's only graphics
terminal, a special picture tube, is
one of many games played on the
UBC computer.
And computer games are an
important part of at least one
course, computing science 422,
-Kennedy said.
The course, by the way, deals
with artificial intelligence. But
Kennedy said this does not suggest
that computers can think, but only
that computers can do intelligent
things.
Intelligence?
"I don't want to get into whether
a computer thinks or not. That
connotes different things to different people," said Kennedy.
An important part of artificial
intelligence research is
programming computers to use the
English language and carry on
conversations, he said.
Some students use the computers
for serious but unauthorized
purposes such as typesetting
theses.
The university has not
specifically banned this practice
until this fall, Kennedy said. Next
year, students will be charged if
they use the computer in
production of theses.
Producing a thesis on the
computer allows easy correction of
mistakes, saves the cost of a typist
and results in neat, good-looking
copies.
Computer time is budgeted in
computer dollars and is allocated
to different departments, and to
faculty and students through the
departments, Kennedy said. About
1,000 faculty and 1,500 students
have access to the computer.
"The computer operates widely
as an academic service like the
library," Kennedy said.
Students who do not have the
important computer identification
card use the computer with special
ticket cards which are fed into the
computer. Until recently, he said,
students used tickets which were
phased out because of the cost of
posting a ticket taker at the door of
the student computer terminals.
About 2,000 students use the
tickets to get into the computer.
UBC's computer, an IBM 370
model 168 computer, was built in
1973 and 1974, and now resides in
the newly named computer
sciences building, formerly and
better known as the civils building.
Renovations
Extensive renovations are going
on inside to make it the computer
science building in name as well as
in fact, but Kennedy admitted one
of the hardest jobs is getting people
to accept the new name.
Kennedy, who founded the
computing science department in
the late 1960s, and who still teaches
in the department, said the
relationship between the department and the computing centre is
"approximately the same as the
library and the school of librarian-
ship."
It is a simile he employs often.
"The computing centre operates
widely as an academic service like
the library."
The UBC computer serves its
clients from terminals around the
JOHN JUNG ... takes output from computer terminal
V w ■■»«»* w ■ m ^«    a    a    a     •>«•■»»*•*   WU *>f*M h     •■«*■■■    W IIIUM lb I      lb 1  I I I II IUI
Research projects hit hard
by Laval university strike
Cmm omf 1 of the  Laval student  association    deterioration nf shiriv and
From page 3
professor will pay about $600 extra
in dues to cover the debt.
Laval rector Larkin Kerwin said
the university suffered considerably because of the strike. He
said research was hit especially
hard, because many projects,
notably in agriculture and
forestry, had to be cancelled and
done again after the strike.
He added the university faces a
deficit this year because of extra
expenses during the strike. Expenses include paying full wages to
support staff during the strike and
paying professors extra to teach
extra classes to complete the
school year.
Kerwin said a study done for the
university showed that at least 90
per cent of Laval students will
return for the next two terms and
another five per cent will return in
September. He said the decreased
number of students will mean lost
revenue for the university.
Andrew Wake, a representative
of the Laval student association
which supported the professors'
strike, said the faculty struggle
was the same as that facing
students.
The student association supported the strike first in solidarity
and later unconditionally. Wake
said both students and professors
are being attacked by Quebec's
education department by budget
cutbacks,    centralization   and
deterioration of study and working
conditions.
He added that students were not
supporting the professors because
faculty were asking for benefits
themselves or because students
would gain direct benefits.
"We're not looking at them as
our protectors. They're fighting for
themselves — we're fighting for
ourselves," he said.
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO REMIND STUDENTS
THAT THE
Second Instalment Is Due On Or Before
FRIDAY, JANUARY 14,   1977
KARL HALLIN . . . works on program
-matt king photos
campus and also from portable
terminals which can be connected
from the user's location by
telephone.
Businesses and individuals can
use the computer, but at a price
somewhat higher than what
commercial firms charge.
Kennedy said this policy allows
full access to the computer, paid
for by the taxpayers, but gives first
use to the university.
"With the computer dollar
valuations (charged to all users),
not too much work is put on the
computer," said Kennedy.
"The   general   scheme   is   to
control services so that enthusiasts
don't get carried away."
What about people using the
computer on their own time for
non-university or non-research
purposes?
"My attitude is like that of the
librarian, you don't know what
they're doing with the book when
they've taken it out."
But he warned that people
breaking into other peoples'
computer files and using other
peoples' computer time must
overcome a tight security system
and face criminal charges if
caught.
TA pay issue
A move to cut the pay rate to non-graduate student teaching
assistants at Simon Fraser University by 32 per cent was deferred one
month at SFU's December board of governors meeting after protests by
an ad hoc committee of teaching assistants.
Daniel Birch, SFU associate vice president for academics, who made
the cutback recommendation, said the motion was withdrawn until
February's meeting to allow time for graduate and non-graduate TAs to
provide input.
Birch admitted that not enough discussion had taken place before the
recommendation was made.
"I am contacting spokespeople for the TAs, informing them of a
meeting of the board, faculty and organization committee on Jan. 25 to
discuss the recommendation," Birch said.
Birch had earlier said about 10 per cent of TAs would be affected by
the recommendation, which would see a TA with an MA or the equivalent
teaching an average course load of four tutorial hours, lose $860 per
semester — a 32.3 per cent cutback.
A TA with a BA teaching four tutorial hours would lose $685 per
semester — a 31 per cent drop.
Graduate student TAs would not be affected by the salary reduction.
Birch gave an explanation for his recommendation in a memo to SFU
administration president Pauline Jewett: "Some portion of the graduate
TA stipend is an award equivalent to a fellowship and a teaching assistant
is not a graduate student and is, therefore, not entitled to that portion of
the stipend."
Birch had said earlier the reason TAs have been paid the same as
graduate TAs was due to "a lack of clarity in TA policy and the lack of
consistency in its application."
Jewett had said in December: "I know it is a cutback, but we looked
closely at TA rates around the province ... the TA hourly rate at UBC
was lower still."
TA representatives were not available for comment. The motion to
cut salaries will be discussed again at SFU's February board meeting.
TUESDAY - FRIDAY    8 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. NIGHTLY
SATURDAYS    7 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. NIGHTLY
HAPPY HOUR FRIDAY 8 - 9:00 p.m.
FAMILY HOUR SATURDAY 7 - 8:00 p.m.
MAIN FLOOR - SOUTH END - S.U.B.

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