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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 12, 1988

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Array the Ubyssey
Board
Tuition
balances budget
to jump in fall
By Corinne Bjorge
UBC's operating budget will
maintain its 15 per cent level of
student financing next year, but
tuition fees will have to rise five
and a half per cent to keep up, if
the board of governors pass the
proposed budget next Tuesday.
But the increase in student
fees will be in "relevant proportion" to other sources of budget
revenue,   said   UBC   president'
David Strangway yesterday.
Last year's improved student
loan program matched with a
greater provincial commitment to
funding post-secondary education
will help keep student fees propor
tional, said Strangway.
And that "relevant proportion" is echoed in the funding formulas of other universities across
Canada, he said.
"In every province except
Quebec, the kinds of percentages
(of operating costs that students
pay) are very similar? he said.
During a lunch hour question
and answer period with Strangway yesterday, some students
questioned the funding ratio of
the university, saying a greater
percentage of the operating
budget should be picked up by the
province.
Student board of governors
representative Simon Seshadri
said the provincial government
should be doing more. "The real
key to this equation is the
government....there is not enough
financial aid," said Seshadri.
Strangway said that while
increasing government funding is
essential, the percentage of the
operating budget that students
pay "is not a policy decision."
Society has to decide what costs
students pay, he said.
Strangway also said that the
tuition increases were not an accessibility question.
"I believe the B.C. system is
at its capacity? said Strangway.
And since "it costs about $6,000-
7,000 for a student (to attend
university), should a larger percentage of students be given a
place?" he asked.
Byron Hender, UBC's director of awards and financial aid,
said that the increases would be
compensated for in the loan program and would not affect a majority of the students.
"I don't know that the percentage increase is out of line?
said Hender. "The provincial student loan programme recognizes
the cost of increased tuition."
Hender said, however, that
there will be a small percentage of
students not receiving student
loans who will be more directly
affected by the tuition increase.
It will put increased pressure
on bursary funds, said Hender,
but we try to keep a "reasonably
steady amount of money available? he said.
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont said that the
administration's recent removal
of roughly half of the bursary
funds to cover general operating
costs may cause problems with
the new tuition increases.
"With the tuition increases,
students will have to find more
money? said Nevraumont. They
will be turning to the bursary
funds, and "I don't think (the
administration) has considered
the cost of administering all these
awards."
Toxic waste poisons shellfish
charges Greenpeace report
By Greg Davis
The Harmac pulp mill near
Nanaimo is discharging a dangerous level of dioxin into the water
endangering humans who eat
seafood caught in that area, according to a recent scientific test
by Greenpeace.
Renate Kroesa, toxic projects
co-ordinator for Greenpeace, said
the chlorine used in the bleaching
of pulp contains the most toxic
form of dioxin, TCDD, which
causes cancer. Shellfish and bottom fish are especially prone in
accumulating poison.
Greenpeace found the Harmac mill to be discharging between 50 to 100 tonnes of chlorinated compounds per day, with the
level of dioxins at 10 parts per
trillion. These were the results of
a test carried out by professor
Christoffer Rappe of Sweden, who
is a specialist on dioxin analysis.
Nancy Scott, public relations
officer for the MacMillan Bloedel
company, said the dioxin levels
resulted from polychlorinated
biphenyls (PCB) released from
the sawmills. PCB residue, virtually insoluble in water, accumulates in fat tissues of living creatures, and is potentially carcinogenic. The company plans to
eliminate the use of PCB by the
end of March.
In the Greenpeace press release, Kroesa stated an alternative method Canadian mill companies should adopt.
"Today, the majority of Swedish mills profitably use an alternative, oxygen-based bleaching
process. Canadian companies,
such as MacMillan Bloedel, must
follow the Swedish example and
spare our environment from further degradation, and ourselves
from further poisoning? Kroesa
said.
Greenpeace is also concerned
that Canadian mill companies are
reluctant to make major environ
mental adjustments to their
operations because of the high
costs involved.
MacMillan Bloedel does not
intend to adopt the oxygen bleaching process as practiced in Sweden.
"Our research does not prove
that the chlorine bleaching releases dioxin. Until there is more
research done we will not switch
to oxygen, as we are not sure that
is the route to go," Scott said.
The B.C. government, which
allows pulp mills to monitor their
own discharge, remains uncommitted to any immediate action.
VOLUME 70, Number 29
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 12,1988 Between
NOTE-. "Noon" = 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
UBC Film Society
Classic SUBFilms: "Death of a Salesman,"
starring Dustin Hoffman. 12:40, 7-00 and
9:45 p.m., SUB Theatre, Student Union
Building.
Jewish Students' Association/Hillel
Welcome Back Lunch. Noon, Hillel House.
UBC Personal Computer Club
IBM Meeting: Noon, SUB 211. Come one,
come aH to the first IBM meeting. Topic:
Word Processing; MS Word, WordPerfect,
Wordstar 2000, etc.
MAC+, Commodore: Noon, Hebb 10. Welcome back.
AMIGA: Noon, SUB 111. The Adventure
Begins!
ATARI:  11:30-12:30,   SUB  212A,   ABAQ
TIME.
Art Therapy Associates
Children's Art Therapy Group. 3:30-4:30
p.m., 3309 Dunbar at 17th.
Lutheran Student Movement
Co-op Supper. 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
United Church Campus Ministiy
Potluck dinner and program. All welcome. 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Maranatha Christian Club
Bible study and discussion. 7 p.m., 1868
Knox Rd., UBC.
Walter GageToastmasters International
Public speaking/leadership meeting. Guests
encouraged. 7:30-9:30 p.m., SUB 215.
UBC Dance Club
Starting weekly ballroom dance lessons for
beginners. 8 p.m., SUB Ballroom.
WEDNESDAY
Travel Cuts
Travel talk: East African Safari. Noon, SUB
205.
Psychology Students Association
General Meeting and sweatshirt pick-up.
Everyone welcome. Noon, SUB 207/209.
Recreation UBC
Disc Sports Course (Frisbie). 12:30-2 p.m.,
Osborne Gym A.
AMS Integrity In Action Club
A talk by Susan Maranda: "Listening: the
basis ofintimacy." Noon, BUCH B214.
UBC Circle K Club
Come find out about our District Board
meeting in Bellingham. Noon, SUB 111.
Graduate Student Society
Music: live, with dynamic classical guitarist
Stephen   Boswell.   5:30   p.m.,    Fireside
Lounge, Grad Centre. Free.
ALSO: Bridge, 6:00 p.m., Fireside Lounge,
Cn\d Centre.
THURSDAY
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship
General Meeting. Noon, Chem 250.
UBC Personal Computer Club
APPLE Meeting: Noon, SUB 215. Hear
Minmei sing.
Chinese Christian Fellowship
Video: Dr. Chuck Swindoll: Godliness - Can
you ever get too much religion? Noon, Scarfe
209.
East Indians Students' Association
Welcome BackMecting. Noon, BUCH B221.
Pacific Rim Club
Speaker: Blair Flood - "S.E. Asia: Importing-
Exporting." Noon, Asian Centre.
Law Union Students' Association
Ken Smith of Smith & Hughes will speak on
Bill C-34 (Quarantine legislation). Noon,
Room 169, Law Building.
Pre-Dental Society
Guest speaker: Dr. Johnson, club founder,
will talk about prosthodontics. Come out and
be informed. Noon, Wood 5.
UBC Stamp Club
Trading mania. Noon at UBC International
House boardroom.
University Christian Ministries
"Isn't Christianity a crutch?" Join us as Robb
Powell speaks on this topic. Noon, SUB 111.
AMS Cycling Club
General Mee ting.Noon, Hennings Building,
Room 301.
International Ascended Masters Class
Video Presentation: "Dr. Alejandro Bolands
on Nicaragua: The Untold Story." Admission
$1.00. Noon: Wood 6, Instructional Resource
Centre.
Environmental Interest Group
General meeting and video. Noon, Geography Rm. 239.
Graduate Student Society
Masterpieces   of film   with   Lynne   Stop-
kewich:   "Despair,"   directed   by   Rainer
Werner Fassbinder. 8 p.m., Fireside Lounge,
Crad Centre. Free.
JIM TAYLOR
of The Province
speaks on sportswriting at The
Ubyssey office 241k, Wednesday
2:45 p.m.
Hot
Flash
The UBC Graduate Student society is presenting a new musical
series on Wednesdays 5:30 to
8:00 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge
in the Grad Centre. The series
begins with Stephen Boswell,
classical guitarist playing on the
13th and 20th. He'll be performing works by Praetorius, Ro-
drigo, Albeniz, Granados, Greek
folk music, Bach works for solo
instruments and the Partita No.
7 by S.L. Weiss, as well as some of
his own compositions. Everyone
is welcome: admittance is free.
Ubyssey Arts
writers:
W©    are    now    having
regular meetings Thursdays at 12:30 to decide
what goes Into the paper and how and where
i It is laid out. Now Is your
chance   to   have   some
i input. Also a chance to
I air grievances, learn lay
out  and     debate endlessly on the meaning of
art and life. SUB 241k.
Classifieds
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00,
additional lines 60 cents, commercial - 3
lines $5.00, additional lines, 75 cents.
(10% DISCOUNT ON 25 ISSUES OR MORE)
Classified ads payable In advance. Deadline
4:00 p.m. two days before publication.
Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
DEKE HOUSE 5765 Agronomy Rd.
- room and board
- best rates on campus
- laundry facilities
- call Johnathcn at 222-2561
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
1 0 healthy Caucasian males (20-45 yrs)
smokers (1 pack'day) are needed for a drug
study (3 weeks) involving drug intake and
blood sampling. An honorarium of $210
will be paid for the complete study. For
details, call Grace, UBC Fac. Pharm. Sci.,
228-6772.
05 - COMING EVENTS
TRAVEL TALKS #3
"A lunch hour series"
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13
EAST AFRICAN SAFARI
Slide presentation by
TRECK HOLIDAYS
12:30-SUB ROOM 205
Presented by
TRAVEL CUTS
GOT THE RESIDENCE BLUES? Rooms
available now - on campus location, great
food, all meals provided, fiee parking, pay
TV. Contact Fred or Rusty at 224-9866.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD in exchange
for light housekeeping and babysitting.
Phone 738-8209 (Point Grey area).
30 - JOBS
A NIGHT TO REMEMBER 1988
Graduation gowns from Weddings by
Michele. Tuesday, Jan. 26 at 8 pm VIVA.
Tickets $10 incl. Food & Drink at 6:30
avail, at 2608 W. Broadway & 2574 W.
Broadway & the AMS ticket office.
PART-TIME SALES
STACY'S FURNITURE is expanding again!
We have several positions available forsru-
dents or grads interested in beginning a
career in sales. Applicants should have a
professional attitude, an aptitude for sales,
and excellent communication skills. We
offer above-average earnings, flexible
hours, and comprehensive sales training.
Please forward a resume to:
Mr. Francis
STACY'S FURNITURE
7731 Aide-bridge Way
Richmond. B.C.
V6X 1Z9
(No phone calls please)
EARLY SPRING HAY FEVER
SUFFERERS (over 19 yrs.).
Participate in a West Coast antihistamine study. Please call before
January 31st for further information.
576-6555.
85-TYPING
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
70 - SERVICES
NEW YEAR SPECIAL: AM/FM stereo
receiver and two 40-watt speakers: $150
(OBO). Excellent deal! Henri: 737-0512
(eve.)
MOUNTAIN BIKE, 9 months old, exc.
condition, fenders, rack, suntour AG
gearshia, $345 OBO. Tel. 732-3438.
1980 DODGE ASPEN S/W 6 cyl auto, grey
with red interior. 176,000 km, good cond.
SI,500 OBO. 224-0346.
15 - FOUND
FOUND: CALCULATOR in bookstore
locker #13. Claim by phoning 682-7192.
TRAVEL DISCOUNTS
Toronto $ 199.00 rt.
Mo_tr_J J 259.00 rt.
Edmmton $   99.00 rt
Calgary $   99.00 rt.
Vic_n«  $  69.00 rt
S_i Fran-oco $ 225.00 rt.
Loo Angeles $279.00 rt.
Lon-on $698.00rt
PACKAGES:
Puerto V«U_-_
(7 mteo)  $ 509.00
D___il_i
(7 rates)   $ 629.00
Ir—.pa
(7 mteo)  $1099.00
Reno
(4 nites) $ 269.00
Vegas
(4 niteo) $ 329.00
Ski Tahoe
(4 mteo) $ 359.00
VENTURE TRAVEL
736-8686
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
write, we type. Theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds., 736-1208.
WORD-PROCESSING $2.00/page, IBM or
Apple, DTP also. ComputerSmiths, 3732
West Broadway (at Alma) 224-5242.
FAST! Word Processing $1.50/pg. daisy
wheel, draft copy provided, overnight
orders welcome. 737-8981.
WORD WEAVERS - 41 st bus line, upstairs
at 101-2258 W. 41st Ave. Faculty and
student rates for quality, custom word
processing. FAX. Translation and
transcription in major languages. Thesis
specialists on multilingual terminals.
Specialite en francais. Japanese & Chinese
document preparation available. 266-6814
TYPING - NO NOTICE REQUIRED.
Essays, theses (low price), resumes.
Editing and research assistance. 327-0425
(before 10 p.m.).
SUPERB WORD PROCESSOR -120 wpm,
excellent spelling and grammar, good
quality printer. 733-0688.
75 - WANTED
20 - HOUSING
ROOM AVAILABLE IN SHAUGHNESSY
- close to bus route. Non-smoking, quiet
female preferred. $225, utilities incl. Ph.
733-1343 after 9 p.m.
MATURE N/S PERSON required for child
care & light housekeeping, Wednesday &
Thursday, 11:30-5:30 & possibly Fridays. 2
girls, 4 and 7 (Vic. 1 6th/Arbutus). Phone
738-9937 on wkends or after 6:30 wkdays.
Need a resume printed?
Thesis or term paper?
How about a document on a floppy disk
(IBM or Mac) to be printed?
Need graphics? Need a poster?
AMS Desktop Publishing
Department
228-6681
for all your printing needs.
Totem
week sizzles
TOTEM PARK RESIDENT'S ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES
TOTEM WEEK JANUARY 15-22
EVENTS:
Friday, Jan. 15 - Beer Night, Totem Park Ballroom, 8:00 pm - 1:00 am
Saturday, Jan. 16 - Scavenger Hunt
Sunday, Jan. 17 - Pholo Banner Night
Monday, Jan. 18 - Sale at Czisars (Magda's)
Tuesday, Jan. 19 - Totem Pit Purge
Wednesday, Jan. 20 - Car Rally
Thursday, Jan 21 - Water War, Flag War
Friday, Jan. 22 - Sunday, Jan. 24 - VICTORIA INVASION
For further information contact Erik, 224-9045.
Losers dare to be boozers
Finally a solace for UBC students. A refuge from the courses and exams, papers an people which make the hallowed
halls of a fine institution into hell-filled halls of a stress-filled yuppie- factory. If everyone would take a step back, they would
realize that a sales position at Xerox is not everyone's end-all.
For those of you who are tired of GMATs, LSATs, deadlines, membership criteria, pushy people and pretentious pimps
running ridiculous clubs, lighten up and join the majority;the UBC Losers Club. Remember there are 75% below the top 1/
4.
"The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation."
H.D.Thoreau, Walden.
Take a break and afford a couple laughs. The SECOND LOSERS CLUB BZZR GARDEN is this Friday, January 15,
3pm onwards in the SUB Partyroom. (I.Q.s will be checked at the door.) Whmers are welcome to come and protest and
rudeness will be tolerated.
Future club events include a second international bowling tournament ( Lhe first on Dec. .'* '-'. 's an unprecedented
success), and an official guided bus tour of Surrey, are planned for Jan/Fcb. Dave says, "'even v; >■•.■!■ ; 'here s victory and
in mediocrity, excellence."
P.S.  Ken Armstiopi;, Arts !, please come out on friday and show all of us peons how you 'shoot ;■'? ihe stars'.
Dave Wilton
Brent Watkins
UBC Losers Club
2/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1988 Thunderbirds invade UVic
By Victor Chew Wong
Dig out your UBC sweats,
your face paint, and your best blue
and gold wig, because the rebirth
of the Victoria Invasion is slated
for the January 23-24 weekend.
The Invasion, a joint venture
between the AMS and the athletics
department, is designed to promote the UBC-UVic basketball
rivalry and will be a weekend of
folly for 300 fans in the capital city.
The $75 cost of the package
deal will include transportation to
and from Victoria, accomodations
for two nights, and tickets for both
of the UBC-UVic games.
"We've secured 300 tickets
from the University of Victoria for
both games on the weekend," said
AMS director of finance Don Isaak.
"Any fan who buys a package
will also become a charter member
of the Thunderbooster fan club
and will recieve a commemerative
certificate, a Thunderhead cap,
and an eight page souvenir tour
brochure? said Isaak.
Although Isaak is the major
promoter of the event he doesn't
take credit for the idea.
"The seed was planted by
(Bob) Hindmarch who said "we
should get a bunch of kids together
and go over like we used to.'"
"We used to have a thing
called the Victoria Invasion that
centred around basketball in the
1940's? said director of athletics
Bob Hindmarch. "I just mentioned
to Don (Isaak) the fun we used to
have and Don went ahead and
started organizing it.
UBC head basketball coach
Bruce Enns is also a strong proponent of the iea.
"I was not one of the people
involved in the generation of it (the
idea) but it is creating a lot of
exitement? said Enns.
"As excited as I am about the
Victoria Invasion, I'm going to be
pretty disappointed if we don't sell
out at home the weekend before
when we host Victoria? he added.
There will be a pre-trip party
in the SUB Ballroom on Friday is a post game party at the UVic
January  22  and  the  chartered Commons Block free for UBC stu-
busses will begin loading at 12:00 dents.    Look for ticket sales to
p.m.. Also included in the package begin today at the AMS box office.
Thunderbirds (l-r) Al Lalonde, Perrie Scarlett and Kevin Parkinson pose
with Invasion general Don Isaak (under the soon-to-be-famous Thunder-
head cap). mandel ngan photo
Roll over Ogopogo...
tell old Nessie the news
By Katherine Monk
It was a sunny afternoon
in J939 and Mrs. M. Tildesley
held what might have been the
last bite of a cucumber sandwich to her lips, when her
friend Mr.Duncalfe shouted
"Caddy!", and pointed to a long
greeninsh-yellow log, moving
very fast westwards. Mrs.
Tildesley found time to put
down the remnants of her picnic lunch, pick up her pen, and
draw what she believed to be a
sea-monster.
This is not some unpublished
bit of an E.M Forster novel, but
just one of the approximately one-
hundred reported sightings of a
sea monster called "Caddy".
"Caddy" and other "large unidentified marine animals" are the
hobby of UBC's head of oceanography and cryptozoologist Paul
LeBlond.
"It's much less flaky than I
had imagined? said LeBlond.
Nonetheless, scepticism prevails
whenever the subject of sea monsters is brought into the public eye,
said LeBlond.
"There are a number possibilities and theories in dealing with
these sightings. Either they're all
hallucinations, that the person is
seeing something else, or that they
really are seeing a sea-monster?
said LeBlond. But the people who
have seen them are absolutely
convinced of their authenticity,
LeBlond added.
LeBlond has not seen the
monster himself, but added that as
far as he was concerned, there is
something out there, and he still
looks for it.
"Caddy", so named for the
location of her sightings in
Cadboro Bay, has been seen
from Oregon right up through
to Alaska with the most recent
sightings recorded right here
in English Bay.
Although descriptions
vary from sighting to sighting
"Caddy" appears to have a long
neck, a horse-like, or giraffelike head, and red or "soft black
eyes", apparently depending
on her mood.
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JANUARY
13,14, & 15,1988
The
•Chron/c/es-
*      I UNIVERSITY   OF  I
S-JTo     0    Q    0     (T
,^|M     H JsL-jIb
Floyd Had a plan tb guarantee
graduating at "Hie tap ok his claw.
Is your life solitary, poor,
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Maybe we can help,
join the Ubyssey
Staff meetings Wed @ 12:30
SUB 241k
Hcc^JLeaA "IT
SUB huJaZc^xaa^k
72:30 - 7:30 p*K
January 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/3 Happiness Is finishing early on Ubyssey production night!!
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M-TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11 -6     Great Copies. Great People.
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Women's Centre
Sexual
Harassment
Clinic
1 st Volunteers' Meeting
Friday, Jan 15, SUB, Rm 130
All Interested Welcome
Michael Jordan aint got nothin' on tongue waggin' Jon Hammer (9) of UBC
Hoopsters steal
win from third
ranked Huskies
By Victor Chew Wong
One thing the UBC men's
basketball team proved this weekend against the third ranked University of Saskatchewan Huskies
was that the unranked 'Birds can
beat the best and lose to the best.
On Friday night in Saskatoon,
UBC upset the highly ranked
Huskies 87-78, then were
humbled the following night 114-
92.
Friday's game was a total
team effort for UBC with every
member of the travelling squad
registering in the scoring column,
and six players hitting double digits. Perrie Scarlett led the UBC
pack with 14 points.
Perennial All-Canadian Byron Tokarchuk led the Husky attack but was held to 20 points by a
stingy UBC defence.
"We played a little smarter
than they did? said UBC head
coach Bruce Enns.   "It wasn't a
great game - neither team played
well, but we controlled the tempo."
Saturday's game was a messy
affair in which Saskatchewan was
given 48 free throw attempts by a
slap-happy UBC defense. The
Huskies retaliated by handing the
'Birds 35 attempts.
One positive outcome of the
game was the resurgence of struggling Alan Lalonde who threw in
21 points for UBC behind J.D.
Jackson's team leading 23 points.
Byron Tokarchuk netted 26 for the
Huskies.
The loss sets up a showdown
between UBC, the second place
team in the Canada West standings, and the mighty UVic Vikings
who sit atop the Canada West race
and the national rankings.
The first shootout in the UBC-
UVic double header will happen
this Friday and Saturday at War
Memorial Gym. Both games will
be broadcast on CITR.
Women split
games in
Saskatoon
The UBC women's basket-  ]
ball team kept alive their Canada West play -offhopes by splitting a weekend series with the
University of Saskatchewan.
The 'Birds opened the Saskatoon stand Friday night with
a 74-67 victory, then dropped
Saturday's game 66-54 to the
Husky women.
"I expected that if we won
the first game then we should
have won the second? said UBC
head coach John Ritchie. "But
we're happy to come away with
the split."
Daphne Armstrong led the
UBC attack Friday night with
17 points. Sue MacPherson
netted 13 for the 'Birds the following evening.
The win and loss puts UBC
in a tie with the University of Alberta for fifth spot in the Canada West race. Both teams trail
fourth place Saskatchewan by
two points for the conference's
final play-off spot.
INSTANT FUNDS!!
PROCESS YOUR STUDENT LOAN AT OUR STUDENT UNION
BUILDING BRANCH BETWEEN JANUARY 4th — 22nd AND YOU
CAN OBTAIN YOUR STUDENT LOAN FUNDS ON THE SPOT.*
Bank of Montreal
"Doing more for You"
"Subject to Qualifications
4/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1988 Swim-birds swamped
by Albertan teams
The UBC swim team recorded
good individual performances but
bowed to their powerhouse Alberta rivals in team competition
during two dual meets this weekend in Edmonton and Calgary.
In Friday's meet at the University of Alberta, the UBC
women's team defeated Alberta
66-31, while the Thunderbird men
lost 64-29.
UBC co-coach Ken Radford
cited road weariness as the reason
for the poor performance - the
'Birds had just returned from a two
week training camp in Phoenix,
Arizona before the Alberta meet.
"It was a successful camp in
terms of fitness training and training times," Radford said. "Expec-
' tations were very high going into
Edmonton."
Although UBC performed
poorer as a team the next day at
the University of Calgary meet,
some individuals recorded national qualifying times.
Calgary's men's and women's
teams beat UBC 75-22 and 72-25
respectively.
Individual swimming that
shone through the Thunderbird's
lacklustre team performance included UBC's Janet Oakes'. Oakes
qualified for the national meet in
the 50 and 100 metre freestyle
with respective times of 28.3 and
1:01.3. And Anne Martin's 100
metre breaststroke victory (1:17.2)
over national team member Susan
Atkey of Calgary was also a highlight.
Radford was pleased with his
team's performance despite the
team scoring.
"You have to remember that
we're going against full-time
swimmers (Calgary) with national
experience? Radford said. "UBC
trains only six months a year, and
for us to be competitive that says a
lot for the people involved."
This Friday at 7:00 p.m. the
university swim team hosts the
University of Washington in a
dual meet at the aquatic centre.
Ski team glides to victory
The UBC ski team captured
the first place trophy at Whistler
in the opening race of the season
this past weekend.
In a competition-heavy field
on Saturday (including the University of Washington, Washington State, Pacific Luthern, Puget
Sound, Western Washington, and
Simon Fraser) the 'Birds faired
poorly as most skiers fell in the
slalom event.
But on Sunday the UBC team
found   redemption,   dominating
both Alpine and Nordic events.
UBC's David Buckley and
Anne Taciuk each won their respective races in the giant slalom.
The UBC men's relay team captured first place in the 3x10 kilometre race, while the women's relay
team placed second in the 3x5 kilometre race.
On Monday, UBC's Terry
Delong finished first in the 15 km
Nordic event to insure a Thunderbird overall first place finish.
Volley-birds capture fourth place
The UBC women's volleyball
team should move up in the national rankings after a fourth
place finish at a competitive University of Manitoba Invitational
tournament on the weekend.
In the bronze medal game, the
ninth ranked Thunderbirds lost to
number four Laval, 3-2 in a well
played match.
Sonja Wachowski led the UBC
offence with a weekend total of 41
kills; Trina Hewlett added 38 and
Mikki Mallette tallied 28.
UBC's starting setter, Amy
Ku, was selected to the tournament all-star team.
^ £^^Kfe^ ____■
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WITH EARLY BIRD
BOOKING REDUCTIONS,
SAVE UP
TO $275.00
WITH CONTIKI & AIR CANADA
BOOK AND PA Y IN FULL BY FEB. 5, 1988 AND
YOU WILL RECEIVE GREAT SAVINGS
Our new 70 page 1987/88 Europe & Britain Concept Camping & Hotel Tours Brochures are now available. With over 20
holidays to choose from, they offer the most extensive
product line ever.
From $46 a day including accommodation, breakfast and
dinner daily, transportation, sightseeing and a great range of
extras.
SEE TRAVEL CUTS FOR
YOUR NEW BROCHURES.
RESERVE NOW!
TRAVELCUT5
Going Your Way!
U.B.C. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Center
6066 Thunderbird Blvd. - UBC Campus
228-6121
228-6125
Squash - Racquetball Contracts
- We will be offering four month contracts for January 18th '88
through to April 29th '88.
- These will be a one court a week contract with no reduced
fee's.
- Courts will be issued strictly on a first come first serve basis with
payment required in full.
- Special rates available only on presentation of valid student AMS
card or faculty/staff card.
Contracts Can Be Booked On January 15th,
Starting At 7:30 am, In The Lounge At...
The Winter Sports Centre
6066 Thunderbird Blvd.
Office: 228-6121
228-6125
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
for A.M.S.
Executive Positions
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
Close of Nominations:
4:00 pm, Tuesday, January 19
Nomination forms can be obtained and then returned to the A.M.S.
Administrative Assistant, SUB 238.
UBC'S SHOE AND
SPORTSWEAR
HEADQUARTERS
NIKE AIR PEGASUS.
FOR THE RUNNER WHO DEMANDS
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10% DISCOUNT TO UBC STUDENTS, STAFF AND FACULTY
3504 W 4TH AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C.  732-4535
January 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/5 Prisons don't
work
To simplify things, let's ignore the atrocities of the solitary confinement cells in
Oakalla prison. And let's put aside the problem of a prison system based on corruption,
sadism and fear. Instead, let's ask the question the public forgot to ask, and the one the
commercial media ignored: does throwing
men and women into jail actually ensure
public safety?
In one sense prisons successfully perform
a necessary function by segregating the
physically violent, those who cannot safely
live side by side with the rest of us. But this
rationale in defence of prisons doesn't hold
for the roughly eighty per cent of prisoners
whose crimes are not violent.
Prisons do not rehabilitate. They promote
violence and breed anger in a group of people
forced to live under repressive conditions. The
same people then return to society and lash
back.
There are a number of alternatives to incarceration. Most put the criminal back in a
community setting and involve her in victim-
restitution. Some attack the root of the problem and ask for efforts to be directed at dealing with unemployment, the class structure,
racism and sexism. Thousands of studies have
been done, both by the government, and by
private organizations as to which direction
these alternatives should take. And even more
than the studies, the facts—unacceptable
prison conditions, the number of offenders returning to prison for a second, third, or fourth
time, growing crime rates, and the staggering
cost of maintaining a prison system—speak
eloquently for the need to establish alternatives.
Prisons do not rehabilitate. They
promote violence and breed anger in
a group of people forced to live under repressive conditions.
But government, in spite of all this evidence, and in spite of the many reports they
receive, take no action to create constructive,
humane, and effective alternatives to the
prison system.
Why? Because dismantling the prisons is
politically unpopular. Prisons employ tens of
thousands of people and avoid the high unemployment, inflation, housing and health care
problems that a release of so many prisoners
would bring. These are not adequate reasons
to maintain a status quo that clearly is not
only ineffective but detrimental to public
safety.
The onus is on the public to pressure the
government to start dismantling the systems
and look for viable alternatives.
THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of
Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k
of Ithe Student Union Building. Editorial Department,
phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Lingeringin the Pit, Deanne Fisher stuck french fries up her nose
as she watched Katherine Monk, Greg Davis, and Martin Dawe guzzling numerous draft beers. Back in the office, Corrine Bjorge put on
Laura Busheikin's favorite Boney M record, thereby forcing Ross
McLaren and Victor Wong to start brake dancing. Mike Gordon,
exasperated at the evils of technology, was banging his head against the
computer screen as Derek Craig and Mandel Ngan looked on in horror.
Kyoko Oka, Elynn Richter and Chris Wiesingcr merely giggled in
nervous confusion. Kevin Harris, Steve Chan, Peter Francis, Alex
Johnson and Robert Beynon ran out screaming.
city desk:
features:
entertainment:
sports:
Corinne Bjorge
Ross McLaren
Laura Busheikin
Victor Chew Wong
VfdKTWeil .   .
fl,MW>fcT<v/W'
Qe<\ wi-Vf. A, 1       '\ A J I
fyo/y)   Ham   I  $&to6Hi'ck ... Tr\4)rrried^tudenh.
keep uf ttf'rh imporhn-f issues-
Letters
Philosopher
responds to
economist's
criticisms
David Li (Jan. 8) misunderstood my philosophical
position on decriminalization of marijuana, and again
asked me why our present
laws are coercive. Mr. Li
believes these laws are
"...maintaining the integrity
of the majority..." But any
law designed only for this
purpose is coercive to the
extent that it limits the freedom of the minority. Dope
smoking is a right because it
does not harm others, and
this right should be respected. Mr. Li's beliefs are
unfocussed; marijuana laws
are coercive because they
compel the minority of
smokers to stop.
In considering the possibility of marijuana jaws
similar to those regarding
alcohol, Mr. Li demonstrated his ignorance: "...I
personally haven't heard of
cops apprehending people
who sell alcohol to minors."
I've heard. The friends, relatives, jailers and judges of
those who have been caught
have heard...
Mr. Li thought that the
government could not retain
control of the marijuana
supply if dope laws resembled liquor laws. But I
foresee that the production
of marijuana would be similar to that of alcohol: companies would grow it and the
government would tax it.
The legalization of marijuana would produce a lot of
taxation revenue which
would free the police to
chase criminals.
Mr. Li's arguments cannot justify the present severe and unwarranted marijuana laws.
Randy Reiffer
Philosophy 4
Makeup fetish
pernicious
Waiting for an interview
at the employment center I
found myself face to face
with a female student whose
pleasant ireatures were
coated with an overdose of
BCTV/Oakalla editorial
slammed
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue, tetters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise, tetters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatiocal mistakes. Please bring
them, with identification, to SUB 241k.  tetters must include name, faculty, and signature.
irresistible than cosmetically enhanced beauty.
I would like to pretend,
however, that looks don't
count. I am aware of an unfortunate habit in myself
and many men which makes
us evaluate a woman, the
moment she enters our perceptual field, as to whether
she is attractive. A certain
hard-to-define threshold of
physical appeal seems necessary to trigger a man's
interest. All that really matters, for the majority of men,
is whether a woman is above
or below the threshold.
The hard truth is that
some women, and some men
as well, fall clearly below
this threshold of physical
appeal for members of the
opposite sex. They feel the
brunt of lookism when it
comes to romance, and in
countless   other,   subtler
Upon reading the
Ubyssey editorial for January 8 on the interview of
escaped prisoner Terry
Hall, it amazed me how
seriously this publication
took BCTVs cynical and
ill-considered rationalizations. Your Cabbage-Patch
Naivety was incredible,
and it surprised me that
you didn't take the attorney-general's incoherent
explanation just as seriously. Oliver North step
aside — according to your
editorial, it seems that the
media now has free reign to
trample on ethical standards in pursuit of "high-
stakes" issues. But let us
not mistake what that issue actually is in this instance. In BCTVs case, it
was not an issue of the
expression of "human liberty, dignity, etc? Where
cameras are denied access,
however wrongful that
may be, there is still the
opportunity to communicate the outrage in other
forms, for instance, print.
Obviously   our   student
newspaper was not aware
of that opinion. Not surprisingly, BCTV was
equally oblivious to an alternative approach.
Clearly they were more
concerned with "heroics"
than the issue itself. Ironically, if the media had
exercised its "editorial
opinion" with the same
moral outrage a little earlier, there might not have
been the "need" ( as Mr.
Hall saw it) for an escape.
In short, the media
has every right to investigate the "amoral" or criminal elements in our society. In no respect does this
differ from their right to
question, say, our Premier.
But serving the public's
right to know does not
exclude the members of
the media from their
larger duty as responsible
citizens. It seems that in
the pursuit of theatrics,
the press seriously ignored
the public welfare in this
case.
Peter Shklanka
English 3
makeup. I had forgotten all
about it until I got a call
from a woman friend. She
had been cruelly teased at a
party and felt furious and
humiliated.
The practice of "lookism" - judging people by
their looks - is analogous to
sexism or racism in its unfairness. And the obsession
with fashion and makeup
may be partly to blame for it
and leads to a vicious circle.
Because of lookism, many
women try to make themselves more attractive
through fashion and makeup which in turn focusses
attention on women's bodies
and thus reinforces lookism.
What specific reasons
make many women at UBC
hide their glowing young
faces under a mask of make
up? I asked and got various
comments: to bolster their
self-esteem; to enhance
their sex-appeal; and perhaps to look their best for
romantic opportunities.
Why must women bolster their self-esteem
through makeup when men
need not? The obvious an
swer is that conforming to
our cultural beauty standards makes a woman feel at
ease. But perhaps she
should question this cultural standard. In any case,
the attempt to conform slavishly to cultural beauty
standards always betrays,
rather than covering up, a
fragile self-esteem.
Many women want to
look their best for romantic
opportunities. Makeup may
help them entice men who
want a woman's face to conform to some magazine
stereotype of beauty, but
even when it helps, it entices
in a superficial way and creates an illusion which may
backfire when the men discover the real face behind
the mask.
On the whole I think
some women overrate the
impact of makeup on intelligent, sensitive, liberated
men. The best way to entice
such a man is not to show a
tawdry exterior, but to become a cheerful person who
has something to say. Natural charm and emotional
warmth    are    far   more
ways.
Although I have have
rarely found a woman ugly
who was lively, thoughtful
and warm, I won't deny that
judicious use of makeup may
sometimes, in their case,
make a crucial difference.
What I deny is that the
needs of a small minority
can justify the obsession
with makeup and fashion in
our society today.
Current beauty standards are perversely manipulated by the (male dominated) fashion, cosmetics
and pornography industries. Only an idolized few
can completely measure up,
and with advancing age
even they land on the scrap
heap. It is sad when even
educated women at UBC fall
prey to the brainwashing
performed by the media on
behalf of fashion and cosmetics companies.
The obsession with
fashion and makeup is, I
think, pernicious and demeaning. It fosters and endorses lookism; it raises rivalries among women to
absurd heights; it often
makes them measure their
self-worth by their looks; it
turns women into sex objects
in the eyes of incurably
naive men; it makes the aging process harder to accept;
and it squanders women's
time money and possibly the
health of their skin.
Kurt Preinsperg
Grad Studies
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1988 Overdosed on
Letterman and Opus
A cynic speaks out on tuition hikes
Tuition fees are going up
again. So what else is new? President Strangway addressed the
campus and only one three-hundredth of the student population
went to listen. So what else is
new?
No, this isn't another rant
against student apathy. Even if
the whole campus had been at
Strangway's address, I don't think
it would have made any difference;
Strangway convinced everyone
there that their presence was redundant, and that we were merely
fools, optimistically trying to avoid
the inevitable.
One student asked if there
was anything we could do as students to help ourselves—perhaps
by screaming into the provincial
government's deafened ear for
increased funding. If Strangway
answered this question, it was
beyond my realm of understanding. All I could make out was that
we shouldn't appear too self-interested. Well,ifImaybesobold,how
should we appear? Self-deprecating? Maybe I could flog myself
openly, set myself on fire, declare
myself a martyr, hope for canonization, and put myself through
school as a ward of the
Hagiographer's society.
It seems that sarcasm is the
only tool left to me. I suffer from
the same lack-of-convictionitis
which seems to plague my fellow
students.
A friend of mine insisted I
should really care about what's
happening. "Education should be
free!" she raved. I picked my nose
and let her talk. Her mouth looked
pretty neat as she twisted around
such polysyllables as "accessabil-
ity,   responsibility,  and  govern-
Freestyle
mental obligation". Why should I
care? My parents pay for my education.
I think my problem is that I
don't know what's happening. I
tried, but it all seemed so distant
and unintelligeable that I was lost
in the "it's-a-tough-question"s and
"we've-made-a-lot-of-improve-
ments". At least some of the people
who were present knew what was
going on, namely the AMS president Rebecca Neuvraumont. But
then again, I guess that's her job.
She knew that the administration
had removed funds set aside for
student aid, in order to "balance
the budget". President Strangway
squirmed and reluctantly scoffed
something into the microphone
along the lines of "well, maybe we
didn't publicize the fact that this
money was there for student bursaries?
Dr. Srivastava, vice president
of student and academic services,
held his hands together in an act
which I construed as prayer, and
said that his office was always
open to students. By the way,
where is his office anyway? Somehow, I think even if I found my way
there, I wouldn't know what to say.
"Gee, you know, I think I'm paying
too much for an education which
I'm getting in order to satisfy the
demands of the world around me.
Do you think I could get a good job
without the piece of paper conferred on me in May? Will the
twenty-five thousand dollar debt
load carried by one-third of the
students be worth it ail after the
fifteen years of paying it back?"
Heck! I guess I'm a cynic. But
what I am is nothing more than a
grotesque version of the people I
see around me. I refuse to believe
I spawned this psychic virus all by
myself; somewhere along the way I
have been infected. A pubescence
of MAD magazines, and a young
adulthood of David( Letterman,
Doonesbury and Bloom County
have not helped me any. I can see
myself grinning as nuclear arma-
geddon becomes a reality..."at
least roasting marshmellows
won't be a hassle..."
Is there any solution? That's a
tough question, but in the words of
Strangway, "...at least we've made
improvements?
Katherine Monk is a Ubyssey virus
who has evolved into a reality
spewing amoeba.
to the proposed
tuition increases
Drop this form off at the
Old Administration Building, Room 107
or phone president David Strangway at 228-2121
- Community Sports -i
Blow
Out
Sale
All Hockey Sticks,
Pants, Gloves
and Pads
should read
20% OFF
(Note: The January 8th advertisement in The Ubyssey was wrong due to
publishers error. We apologize for any inconvenience this caused.)
m
Open 9:30 am - 6:00 pm - Saturday - Wednesday
9:30 am - 9:00 pm ■ Thursday and Friday
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612
January 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/7 Large Selection of Specialities on Order
t^Bitisserk ^ordeawe
PASTRIES CAKES BREADS
\J
and Wedding Cakes
3675 W. 10th Avenue
(Alma Place)
Vancouver, B.C. Open Tuesdays to Sundays
731-6551
ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
10 SESSIONS-$39
Wolff system
(On Regular Beds)
5784 University Blvd.
| (in UBC Village) 1/2 Blk. away
WITH THIS AD
224-1922 or 9116
Exp. Nov. 30/87
(Buy Now-Use Later)
_b
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF
STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1988 - 89
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C. students.
Successful applicants will be required to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions arc available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at the Front Desk of each single student
residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier, W.H. Gage, and Acadia/
Fairview.
Information Meetings: 6:30 p.m. in the Residence Commonsblocks -
January 12 at Totem Park; January 13 at Place Vanier, Janurary 14 at
Walter Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 4th to January 18th, 1988
at the Front Desks of the Single Student Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
4 Wednesdays beginning January 13
4:30 - 6:30pm SUB Room 130
Do You Need To Change
Or Does He?
(a workshop on self-esteem for women in
difficult heterosexual relationships)
SPONSORED BY THE UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Registration: Office for Women Students
Brock Hall - 203     $20 for 4 weeks
Subsidy available
For more information:
Ronni Richards - 732-3388
TANUKI
JAPANESE
RESTAURANT
LUNCH
FROM
$3.00  '
11:30 am
- 2 pm.
EVENING SPECIAL
5:30 -11:30 pm
$6.50
ALL YOU CAN EAT
CHICKEN TERIYAKI
1246 GRANVILLE ST. downstairs 688-7895
Vicious   axe   murderer
mutilates Acadian youth
WOLFVILLE,  N.S.  (CUP)  The
most morbid crime in the annals of
Acadia history was discovered
when the mutilated remains of a
young body was found on the Acadia campus. It was an axe slaying.
The deed took place as near as
officials can deduct, around 3:30
p.m. Eastern Standard time, in a
large bush situated about 600
yards northwest of one of the orchards at Acadia.
The scene was one that would
turn the stomach of even the most
hardened criminal. Parts of the
young body were strewn everywhere within a 5-foot radius of the
actual scene of the crime. It was
obviously the work of a sadist.
Parents of the victim were
destitute and the inhabitants of
the Valley have demanded that
the criminals be found and justice
realized.
Detective Chief of Wolfville,
Ezra Wheatcroft of the Homicide
Squad released a statement which
reached us just at press time. The
hardened   criminal   had   been
found.
The statement said that "the
dastardly criminals were not local
thugs. They had been imported
from large cities."
"The victim? cried the Chief,
with tears streaming from his
eyes, "is now standingin the Union
Building. A grim reminder that
trees should not be destroyed."
Reprinted from The Ubyssey January 15, 1952
Big business supports free
trade deal with USA
by M ELAN A ZYLA (CUP)
Canadians should not succumb to the intellectual terrorism
of passionate anti-free traders,
says Canada's foremost spokesperson for Canadian big business.
Tom D'Aquino, president of
the Business Council on National
Issues, said Canadian business
has matured and must now survive the test of open competition
with the U.S. if it is to survive.
D'Aquino is the spokesperson
for the leaders of Canada's 150
major companies.
D'Aquino said the partisan
nature of the free trade issue,
combined with a degree of media
bias, has steered the debate away
from the necessary "dispassionate
enquiry" that leads one to a pro
free trade conclusion.
He said contrary to popular
belief, BCNI was not "wooed by the
Americans? but had approached
U.S. Vice-President George Bush
about enhanced trade in 1983.
Admittedly, the free trade
agreement does not guarantee
access to the U.S. markets, but
Canada did not ask for a guarantee, he said. Instead, the agreement ensures Canada's right to
compete for American markets
without facing mounting protectionist barriers.
D'Aquino is confident Canada
will "come out a winner" in open
competition.
The world economic community is looking at the agreement
carefully, he said, because the dispute settling mechanism and the
exemption of the service sector
from negotiations are both ground
breaking achievements in international trade relations.
Canadians shouldn't underestimate what has been achieved
D'Aquino said, and Canadians
should feel ashamed of inter-provincial trade barriers because regional fragmentation of industry
makes it uncompetitive.
Jim Taylor,
Noted local sports writer will pontificate on his
professional pastimes in the Province to all and
sundry who care to gather in the Ubyssey office.
Cocktails: 2:30 Mezzanine level
Seminar: Wednesday at 2:45 p.m. SUB 241 k
mm awards
Attention
B.C. Student Loan Recipients
Equalization Payment Recipients
If your BCSAP Notification of Award shows that you should be receiving a B.C. Student Loan in
January 1988, and you have not yet picked up your BCSL document, PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU
MUST CALL AT THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE TO CLAIM YOUR AWARD. You will be required to
present photo ID such as a student card or driver's licence. The signed B.C. Student Loan document
must be taken to your bank to be cashed. You are reminded that second-term tuition fees must be
paid in full by January 15.
If your Notification of Award shows that you have an Equalization Payment due in January, you
should report to Room 60 of the General Services Administration Building to pick up your cheque.
If you did not return a completed Statement of Personal Responsibility to Victoria in the fall, the
Ministry of Advanced Education will be withholding your Equalization Payment cheque until your
statement is received and evaluated.
The second instalment of a Canada Student Loan may be obtained by having a Schedule II signed
in the Registrar's Office. The signed schedule should then be taken to your bank.
The Registrar's Office is open on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. It is located on the second floor
of the General Services Administration Building.
Awards & Financial Aid • Room 50, General Services Administration Building • Phone: 228-5111
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 12,1988

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