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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1987

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 UBC Archives Serial
Vol. LXIX, No. 46
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 17,1987
fsssjssss^S
Today's student faces tough times
By JAMES YOUNG
B.C. students have got it bad.
In the past year, campus leaders
have been talking about soaring tuition fees, record unemployment
levels and punitive debt loads facing
B.C. students.
Cynics complain that students
have always bitched and moaned
and whined.
Maybe so.
But B.C. students are now protesting an economic reality harsher
than cynics realize, with economic
indicators from Statistics Canada
and other sources showing just how
much the total picture has worsened
over the last decade.
Times are tough, and the
numbers to prove it don't lie.
TUITION tny
Ten years ago, tuition fees at
Simon Fraser University, for example, were $428. Now among the
country's highest, fees will increase
further this fall to nearly $1,410, or
about 3.3 times the 1977 amount.
By comparison the cost of living
has risen only about 2.2 times.
"The fee increase comes at a time
when many of our students are in a
dire financial situation, with the
prospect of heavy debt-loads at
graduation, said Torsten Kehler,
university relations officer for the
student council in a submission to
the board of governors in February.
"The extra cost will likely come
out of their food budget as most
other expenses are fixed," he said.
THK >JIS»M!.'M M  ■■'-;
While tuition fees rose more than
three times, the B.C. minimum
wage rose by a constipated 1.25
times, from $3 to $4. If indexed to
keep pace with inflation, however,
it would now be $6.56.
A column in the Peak, the student newspaper at Simon Fraser
commented: "Wouldn't it be nice
to live in an indexed world?"
SUMMER EARNINGS
Studies   by   Roy   Watson,   a
sociology professor and president
of the University of Victoria's
faculty association, show a declining number of students able to
finance their school through summer jobs.
For students returning in 1977,
Watson found that 32.5 per cent of
males could pay for the school year
through summer earnings — but for
the past academic year the figure
fell to 21.6 per cent.
For female students, who must
cope with the structural sexism of
the marketplace, the figures were
lower, dropping from 23.5 to 15.0
per cent.
At the bottom end of the scale,
males who earned less than 25 per
cent of education costs jumped
from 18.8 per cent in 1977 to 34.6
per cent last year. And the rate for
female students leaped from 26.6
per cent to 41.4 per cent.
"Students also reported that their
ability to pay all or a substantial
part of university costs through
summer work was less than in
previous years because summer incomes have not kept pace with
rapidly escalating costs," concluded Watson.
Watson also argued that students
living at home enjoyed significant
financial advantage over others.
"There is an urgent need to provide financial assistance to equalize
the opportunity of those who must
leave home to continue their education — at present such students face
a major financial barrier," concluded Watson's report.
-.."»> *r M* i.i.i'. >I*.,N ■
Earnings of course, are linked to
finding a job in the first place. For
returning students unemployment
rates measured 9.4 per cent in
August 1977, but had nearly doubled by August 1986 at 18.2 per cent.
Looking towards this summer,
actual unemployment in B.C. in
January of this year was 15.3 per
cent — the worst in the country, excepting three of the Maritime provinces. Comparable, although not
identical, statistics give 10.1 per
cent actual unemployment for
January 1977.
For the Vancouver metropolitan
area, the jobless rate in January was
a record 15.1 per cent, leaving
111,000 people unemployed. This
also gave Vancouver the worst
unemployment of 24 Canadian
metro areas with populations over
100,000. But ten years ago, Vancouver ranked sixth of 22 cities.
Victoria hardly fared better,
ranking 23rd of the 24 metro areas,
with 14.6 per cent unemployment.
Despite the record unemployment figures, Joachim Knauf,
metro district economist for the
B.C. and Yukon office of Employment and Immigration Canada,
said students enjoy some advantages in the labour market.
Knauf said students benefit from
lower wage demands than older,
more experienced workers who are
used to higher salaries or who must
support a family.
He also said students may benefit
from the current level of confidence
in the business community, which
has picked up from the "trough of
the recession," but is "nowhere
near the buoyant performance and
outlook in the late 1970s."
"In such a climate, employers
probably do not mind hiring someone for four months — the>
might hire a student instead of a
more permanent employee, because
they are not sure of what will happen eight months or a year down
the road," said Knauf.
With annual global expenditures
of $1.5 trillion or more than the
world spends on the arms race,
Knauf sees tourism as a positive factor in the B.C. economy, and
predicted levels of activity meetng
or exceeding those of 1985, but not
last year's Expo 86 boom.
"Tourism will dampen the expected post-Expo slide — some
positive indicators are cruise ship,
hotel and conference bookings,"
said Knauf.
Asked if students should leave
B.C. to look for work in places like
Ontario, Knauf said: "It depends
on whether you think you have
enough contacts and a place to stay
to make up your costs of moving
and staying there.
"It also depends on whether you
would be successful in finding work
right away — otherwise it is en-
courageable," he said.
Knauf emphasized that current
record unemployment in B.C. must
be seen in the context of structural
problems and the shifting world
economy.
He described the provincial
economy as in a transitioned phase
from the emphasis on goods and
natural resources of the late 1970s,
to the current greater emphasis on
services.
"Structural problems will be here
over the next two to three years —
they will have to be ironed out
before you see a substantial drop in
the unemployment rate to pre-
recessionary levels," predicted
Knauf.
But he cited Vancouver's position
as a trading partner on the Pacific
Rim, the proposal for making the
city an international financial centre, and tourism, as three potential
areas of growth.
srLswy Ait,
To supplement any summer earnings students were eligible for a
maximum of $3,300 of government
assistance in 1977. Indexed for inflation, that amount would now be
$7,225, but is currently only $5,360.
And unlike other provinces in
Canada, this amount is available
only in loans — so student leaders,
such as Marg Fartaczek, chair of
the Canadian Federation of
Students Pacific Region, have been
labelling it "the worst student aid
program in Canada."
To give this a national perspective, a single dependent student in
Manitoba is eligible for up to $7,930
in student aid, comprised first of
$3,465 in  Canada student loans,
then up to $3,465 in provincial bursaries and finally, an additional
provincial loan or grant of $1,000.
In B.C. however, the same student would be eligible for the
federal loan and then a provincial
loan of $2,000; for the $5,360 total,
or $41 less than provincial government calculations for a year of subsistence expenses at Simon Fraser
University.
One promising sign for student
aid is the establishment of a 14
member review committee which
submitted a report to minister of
Advanced Education and Job
Training, Stan Hagen, at the beginning of March.
While Hagen has said the government will be "creative" in the area
of financial aid, he has made no
promises.
Recently, however, he told a
delegation from the Canadian
Federation of Students that
"students should be happy" with
what comes out of the provincial
budget, March 19.
The March 9 throne speech from
the B.C. government promised, for
example, to investigate a tax deductible registered education savings
plan, a scholarship system for high
school students and the provincial
matching of private scholarship
funds.
DFHf iiiAi>
Debt, the consequence of student
aid, is a far more serious issue than
10 years ago. At that time, student
aid officials did not even keep
figures on the debt load of
graduating students.
"It wasn't a major worry then,"
said Dan Worsley, assistant to the
director of awards and financial aid
at the University of British Columbia.
"The interest rates were low, the
average debt load was low, and
students had fairly good job prospects," he said.
With a 1977 ceiling for Canada
. Student Loans of $1,800 per year,
See page 2: STUDIES Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 17, 1987
Studies send students into debt
From page 1
students could borrow only $7,200
for a four year program, or a lifetime total of $9,800. And the remaining $1,600 yearly of aid for
needy students was a provincial
grant.
Although there are no exact
figures available, Worsley believes
the current debt load for graduates
using the student aid program is
about $12,000, although other officials have put it at $15,000.
"I've been talking to three
students"with loans over $20,000 today — they tend to be students
working on a second degree, such as
law, dentistry or graduate school,"
said Worsley.
While Worsley emphasized the
danger of generalizing, since not all
students apply for financial aid, he
said he was now seeing a lot of
students with debts over $15,000, a
figure he termed "quite scary."
At current rates, a $15,000 loan
paid off at the minimum $207 per
month for nine and one half years,
would cost nearly $8,650 in interest.
Worsley said the rising debt load
is due partly to the increase in the
Canada loan ceiling — a maximum
of $54,900 over 10 years — and the
elimination of provincial grants in
1984.
PARTICIPATION RATE
A firm number in the whole student equation is provided by the
participation rate of B.C. students
in post-secondary education.
While B.C. participation has
traditionally been low, estimates for
this academic year put it at the nation's lowest, with 17.2 per cent of
the 18 to 24 year old age group at-
tendng post-secondary institutions.
Newfoundland, with the next
lowest rate, is about 18.0 per cent.
Quebec has more than double B.C.
enrolment.
In the past 10 years, then, B.C.
enrolment has fallen further and
further behind the national average.
In 1977, B.C. was 4.4 per cent lower
than the Canadian average of 19.6
per cent; today it is estimated to be
a full eight points lower than the national average of 25.2 per cent.
At an October press conference
before the B.C. election, Marg Far
taczek, of the Canadian Federation
of Students, analyzed B.C.'s low
participation rate.
"One reason for this is quite simple — education in B.C. is too expensive for the average student.
"The cost of post-secondary
education prohibits many low and
middle income British Columbians
from acquiring further education,
no matter how talented they are, or
how much they desire to learn,"
said Fartaczek.
And foreshadowing ideas now
adopted by some members of the
Social Credit government —
although the translations into
policy remains to be seen — Fartaczek concluded:
"The quality of B.C.'s social and
economic future is ultimately
bound up with the quality of education provided, and the accessibility
of that education."
••*••••••••.
*
*
DEATH PENALTY DEBATE
FOR: Robert Shantz — defence lawyer
.for Clifford Olson.
Fred Bodmaruk — Citizens
United for Safety Et Justice
AGAINST: H.A.D. Oliver— Vancouver lawyer
John Dixon — B. C. Civil Liberties
Association
THURS., MARCH 19th 12:30 p.m.
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The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST
The English Composition Test Will Be Held On
Friday, March 20, 1987
From 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Every student must attach to the examination booklet a "Fee Paid" sticker
($10.00), which must be purchased from the Department of Finance. Fee waived
stickers issued for the September or December examinations are no longer valid.
University regulations state, "Each person taking the exam should be prepared to
produce, upon request, his or her Library/AMS Card."
Students are
permitted trie use of a dictionary
ROOM ASSIGNMENTS
Report to the
room according to your surname
AAA-BZZ
WESBROOK 100
CAA-CZZ
ANGUS 104
DAA-GZZ
ANGUS 110
HAA-JZZ
HENNING 200
KAA-KZZ
HENNING 201
LAA-LEZ
HENNING 202
LFA-OZZ
HEBB THEATRE
PAA-PZZ
BUCHANAN A100
QAA-RZZ
BUCHANAN A102
SAA-SIZ
BUCHANAN A104,
SJA-VAN
BUCHANAN A106
VAO-ZZZ
MATHEMATICS 100
NOTE: The ECT will next be given on Friday, July 17, 1987 from 7:00 to
9:30 p.m., and on Thursday, September 24, 1987 from 5:30 to
8:00 p.m. The July and September examinations are open only to
those students who have credit for English 100 (or equivalent
credit). /••
Tuesday, March 17, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
STUDENTS PROTEST SUMMER Gage evictions.
Children's garden
for adults too
By CORINNE BJORGE
It's still rough boulders and raw
wood, but by the end of April the
Scarfe education building will have
its own playground for children,
with secret alcoves, trees to climb,
and small wooden bridges, to make
the small — feel tall.
Begun in early October by the
faculty of education as a project for
Open House, the agriculture
department and UBC's Landscape
Architecture program quickly
became involved in the planning.
Improved communication, both
on-campus and off, was one of the
first positive aspects of the program, said Gary Pennington, a
joint professor of physical education and education.
Heavy machine operators, high
school students, faculty and university students all helped, according
to Pennington.
"It has enhanced community
relations more than any other thing
I know of," he said.
Phase 1, the framework phase,
will be finished near the end of
March and will cost $20,000.00.
Auctions, book sales and T-shirt
sales have all helped provide funding for the garden.
Savings came in other ways. too.
They cut costs using bricks chipped off old buildings, for the
pathways and by scrounging driftwood they built a fence which gives
the garden a "haunting, enchanting
texture" he said.
Themes from the garden have
been drawn from children's
literature - Charlotte's Web, Alice
in Wonderland, and of course, The
Secret Garden, but as well as being
a place for children to learn and
play, the planners hope, the garden
will be an inspiration for education
students. The garden is also a plan
for students to learn about the role
the environment plays in educating
children, said Joanne Naslund, who
works out  of the education cur
riculum lab.
Pennington said planners attempted to encourage the participation
of as many students as possible, but
education course schedules have
prevented many students from
becoming involved.
Gail Bryn-Jones, a fifth year
education student, while praising
the idea of a children's garden,
criticized the faculty for not trying
to get education students more involved.
"It belongs to the dedication of a
few", she said. "There should have
been a lot more people involved".
Other students questioned the
location of the garden.
Brian Roach, a fifth year education student with a small child said
that he has heard very little about
the garden.
"It may not be a place where a lot
of children come".
But Pennington said two groups
of school children have already
visited the garden and there are nine
daycare centres on and around campus that can use the area.
"It will be a model for schools
and communities", he said.
Housing protested
By PATTI FLATHER
Chanting "Housing doesn't
care" and "Student housing for
students", 20 residents of Gage
Apartments protested Monday
afternoon outside the UBC student
housing office.
The demonstrators, mostly
graduate students and their
spouses, arrived at the Ponderosa
building by 2 p.m. They marched
from Gage Apartments carrying
placards with "Hell No! We Won't
Go" and other slogans written on
them.
The students are angry because
they have year-round programs but
must move by May 31 to make way
for conference-goers.'
They are asking for about 15 per
cent of the 215 furnished suites to
remain available for students, and
argue that UBC can still run a profitable conference business.
But an administration spokesperson said housing will not budge on
its policy because all suites are
booked and because students knew
they had to move out for the sum
mer.
Barry Lizmore, a graduate student in urban land economics, said
the "ultimate protest will be to stay
in after the 31st of May."
Lizmore, whose wife Carol also
attended the protest, said there
should be an inquiry on student
housing's finances.
Panadda Dheeragool, a graduate
student in food sciences, said she attended the protest because she has
had to move twice each of the four
years she's been at UBC.
"I have to move everything I
have with me. I don't have a car to
help out."
A scholarship student from
Thailand, Dheeragool said she can't
afford to live off Campus on her
allowance. She said her bachelor
suite allows her concentration to
study, and does not want to move
to group housing at Fairview Crescent.
But Neil Risebrough, associate
vice president of student services,
said: "There's no question that they
(the students) have to move because
the space is booked. They didn't
read their contract".
Risebrough said conference
revenues help pay for new housing,
and that next year $500,000 of the
debt for building Gage Apartments
will be paid by conference funds.
UBC has spent $38 million in the
last few years, he said, expanding
student housing, and conferences
bring in $750,000 on average annually in revenues.
Risebrough admitted there are no
year-round furnished accommodations for single students wanting
privacy.
He also said the housing designed
for married students with no
children, Acadia Highrise, is now
full with families. But he said in one
or two years, these families will
move to new Acadia Townhouses
and there will be room in the
highrises.
According to 1987-88 figures, for
housing obtained by Gage Apartments residents, conference revenue
will make up $2.5 million of housing's total revenue of $13.2 million.
Funding increase promised
Reprinted From The Martlet
By Jean Kavanagh
Post-secondary institutions may
soon breathe a sigh of relief as there
appears to be good news in Premier
Vander Zalm's first speech from the
throne for B.C.'s universities and
colleges.
Lieutenant-Governor Robert
Rogers read the speech Monday to
the first session of B.C.'s 34th
Parliament and announced funding
will be increased to ensure colleges
and universities are full partners in
the province's new economic process. Economic renewal is the Social
Credit government's top priority as
Vander Zalm sets out to prove there
is substance behind the seven months of style he has flashed before
British Columbians.
The premier's economic priorities
are reflected in the government's
plans for post-secondary education
where the private sector and science
and technology will play major
roles.
"Our advanced education system
will play a hands-on role in
economic development," Rogers
read. "The new economy will demand new skills and new education
programs for our people (and) our
education institutions will be given
tools to do the job," he added.
But the speech made little mention of additional government
money for financial aid.
Private investment or academic
Gotlieb dispels free trade myths
By DAVID FERMAN
"People who throw boomerangs shouldn't live in
glass houses," said Canada's ambassador to
Washington, explaining that the United States also
subsidizes trade and should not be so quick to criticize
Canada, in a speech on the myths and realities of free
trade, Saturday.
Allan Gotlieb, speaking to a capacity audience in
IRC, said the U.S. subsidized the farm belt to the tune
of $26 billion dollars last year and that despite a widely
held belief that the U.S. government does not subsidize industry, "they do, and are quite liberal about
it."
Calling the U.S. the greatest myth maker in the
world, Gotlieb explained the problems he faces with
some  American   and  Canadians   when   explaining
Canada's position of free trade.
"There is a conviction, an idea that has spread
across the U.S. in the last four years, that other countries, including Canada, are not playing fair.'
"This is troublesome and dangerous, not just for
the U.S. but for the whole world," he said.
"So it is important to erradicate and uproot these
myths."
Gotlieb spelled out seven myths and said the
American belief that they are not being traded with
fairly is a new "patriotic sentiment." He said
America's loss of industrial competitiveness is the
reason for this sentiment.
"They are used to being number one. They react in a
very human way; (when things go wrong) they look
See page 8: CANADA
strings are attached to the three initiatives for increasing financial aid:
• the government will pursue the
feasibility of a tax-deductible
registered education savings
plan.
• a scholarship credit plan will be
implemented to allow Grade
eight to 12 students with high
academic standing to earn
credits toward the coast of their
post-secondary education.
• corporate and private scholarship donations will be matched
by the government.
Post-secondary programs will focus
on science and technology as outlined in a new strategy to bring
together universities, the private
sector and government as partners
in research and development. A
Premier's Science and Research
Council will be established with the
co-operation of advanced education
institutions and business.
Responsibility for all science and
technology programs will rest with
the Ministry of Advanced Education and Job Training. Special emphasis will be placed on research in
aerospace, biotechnology, ocean industries, microelectronics and
nuclear research. Education funding will also be increased for independent schools to aid those
"who have in a democratic system,
chosen the independent education
process for their children," Vande
Zalm's speech noted. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 17, 1987
Tech flies South
High technology. The word conjures up images of pocket computers and cellular
telephones. Governments of course love the idea. It gives their speech writers
something to babble about. If they get any embarassing questions, well no one
understands high tech any way, eh?
The plot: government waves magic want, high tech industry starts, money pours
in. B.C. is free of dependence on resources, everybody is happy.
The reality: Boeing originally wanted to locate here, couldn't get government support and moved to Washington. The makers of the Sparrowhawk, a light plane that
before production already had orders, also wanted to locate in B.C. Sparrowhawk
just created 400 new jobs in Washington. Americans love the B.C. government.
Perhaps high tech in B.C. means using a backhoe instead of premier Vander Zalm's
much ballyhooed shovel?
High tech industries are expensive to start. Equipment costs and expected salaries
are somewhat higher than for starting a tulip growing business. Because the risks
are also higher, capital funds are difficult to acquire. Tax breaks and loan underwriting may be expensive at first, however, all those new high paying jobs are held
by taxpayers and will be around longer than the short term cost.
Of course it is desirable that all these new jobs go to B.C.ers rather than to people
imported from Ontario. Therefore unless we want our children to chop wood we
must fund education and couple it to the creation of high tech industry. Too may
students leave the province upon graduation.
This is an education that was subsidized by the people of B.C. and will not benefit
them directly. Current trends in the attitude of the government are toward job
related "streamlining." While this does prepare a person for a job it fails to encourage what is really needed, the ability of students to create business for
themselves.
Only when an entire industry is able to be successfully created in B.C. and run by
British Columbians will we be free of the need to rely on other regions for our
economic success.
Letters
■■■.■■".*■•; _■*■.: "•-.--
Anti-warship activists to stand trial March 17
On March 17, two court cases,
began in Vancouver arising from
charges laid by the Vancouver
Police against activists from the
protest movement to stop the
nuclear armed warships.
The March trial involves a student who was first rammed, then
chased by a police boat while
demonstrating against the U.S. aircraft carrier USS Ranger. In the second court case, Charles Boylan,
Spokesman of the People's Front
has been charged by the police with
the "dangerous operation of a
motor vehicle."
This case arose out of a
demonstration against 5 U.S. warships in Vancouver harbour on July
24. All people at UBC who are concerned about the presence in Canadian waters of U.S. or Soviet warships should attend this trial, starting on Tuesday, March 17 at 10
a.m. at 222 Main Street, in Vancouver.
The charges in each of the cases
are trumped up. In the latter case all
the witnesses and the television
footage attest to the fact that the
Vancouver police cruisers intentionally rammed the little sailboat
just as it was about to cross the path
of the warship a safe distance away.
The boat was forced out of control
and crashed into the side of the war-
Student too quick to criticize
I feel that I must respond to Julia
Denholm's criticism of an article
written about me in the March 6
issue of The Ubyssey. Firstly, I am
in mechanical engineering not electrical engineering. Secondly, as the
PRO for my class, I act as a liason
between the Canada Employment
Center, located in Brock Hall, and
my classmates, informing them of
upcoming job opportunities. This
has absolutely nothing to do with
promoting any kind of image of the
engineers, sexist or otherwise.
As to the issue of arts students,
the question posed to me in the interview was "what do you think of
people getting a degree in arts?".
UBC Debating Society
talks and talks and talks
The UBC Debating Society
would like to thank the students
and faculty of UBC for their support of the debates and speeches for
All letters must be brief and
typed on a triple-spaced,
70-character line. They must be
delivered in person with identification shown by 4:30 p.m.
the Friday before publication
to the Ubyssey office, SUB
241k.
Open House '87. this was our first
exhibition in quite some time and
Debsoc was particularly appreciative of the hecklers and the
enthusiastic crowds outside of the
Student Union Building.
It is reassuring to know that our
campus has diverse interesting activities ranging from athletics to the
performing arts to the art of
rhetoric and speaking.
Colin Lim
UBC Debating Society
president
THE UBYSSEY
March 17, 1987
The Ubyssey is published ~ Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k.  Editorial 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977
On the College Flats of Vancouver all those who mattered waited for the call. "Oh editor, oh editor this
news is growing old. We put our faith in the editor to deliver us a paper in the morn.", sang a
somewhat demented D.R- Wolcomton and Dave Wilkinson in a disjointed but catchy harmony. Dan
Andrews thoughts were on how to avoid smothering a warmly glowing fire so he did not see Svetozar
Kontic escaping through the fog with the meal tickets. Evelyn Jacob and David Ferman did not notice,
they were trying to escape flatland and go have no fun nowhere. With a cackling ultimatum and a sibling in tow Malcolm Pearson escaped leaving a weeping Corinne Bjorge "hunched over a rusty
typewriter. Rumors were travelling about Patti Flather leaving for a more sunny province in the summer
so Jeff Swartz contemplated his upcoming Shogunate and how he could use James Young to illustrate an editorial on capital punishment. Steve Chan having snorted ID-11 one too many times idylly
dribbled on a basketball. The Truth: Chew Wong's 24 inch vertical is really only 24 millimeters.
To this I responded that there was
nothing wrong with getting a
general education, but I didn't
think that an arts degree was particularly useful in the working
world.
Lawyers and teachers are equal
professionals to engineers, but
neither of these careers can be
achieved solely with an arts degree.
As to the comment "selling yourself
short", this was intended to mean
that some people underestimate
their abilities, and do not go on to
achieve all of which they are
capable.
The one really legitimate complaint in the letter was the one involving CASC. This was poorly
presented in the article and I would
like to clarify it. The only CASC
member that I have come into contact with was male. I resented this
man, a non-engineer, telling me
that I was being subjected to sexism
in the engineering faculty, when he
was ignorant of what goes on in the
faculty and in my classes.
In four years at UBC, I have
heard one sexist remark, a slip of
the tongue by one professor, and
everybody hissed.
As to the issue of "companies
would take a guy over a girl", this
statement was qualified by the
words "in small towns". The
employment opportunities in Vancouver and the lower mainland are
completely equal. However, companies operating in small towns are
often not able to provide acceptable
living conditions for female
engineering students and this is the
major reason for not considering
them for employment.
Finally, I suppose the article was
confusing in places and some of my
opinions did sound militant, but I
also think that Julia Denholm was
very quick to criticize.
Mary DesBrisay
mechanical engineering 3
ship. An anti-warship activist was
injured, and the boat was damaged.
The police have not been at all successful in justifying their actions,
and the response of the people has
been to denounce this incident as a
serious crime against the protestors,
and a serious attack on the anti-
warship movement.
Both of these incidents show that
the Canadian state is consciously attempting to persecute and intimidate demonstrators in order to
liquidate the movement against the
warships. The police have been trying to exploit these incidents to try
to "prove" that the demonstrators
are "irresponsible" and "violent".
But who is really violent? It is the
superpowers and their nuclear armed warships who represent a very
real danger to the peace and security of the Canadian people. It is the
superpowers who are committing
aggressions against the world's people. They are militarizing the seas,
the skies and the lands in preparation for all-out war between the
superpowers for world domination.
This is the imminent danger which
the peace-loving protestors in their
dinghies, kayaks, and other small
boats demonstrate against.
The police violently oppose the
demonstrators. They, and the warships they are escorting, are acting
"unsafely" and violently during
demonstrations. The Canadian
state, has its own reasons for collaborating with U.S. imperialism
and assisting the U.S. warships to
come to Canadian waters. The
Canadian state is trying to dampen
the rising anti-warship movement.
The reason is the maximum profits
gained from the war preparations.
The police provocations and the
persecution of the anti-warship protestors is further evidence that the
state is fascizing and militarizing the
country, in preparation for war.
The laying of charges and the
trials of these anti-warship activists
is political persecution. It is part of
the overall attack on the democratic
rights and freedoms of the Canadian people. All those opposed to
these attacks and political persecution should plan to attend the trial
on Tuesday.
Allen H. Soroka
UBC Law Library
Teams bring visible benefits
It is difficult to imagine a group
of UBC students being more
negative towards ouryarsity athletic
teams than the staff of The Ubyssey.
In the fall, our football team scored
an impressive victory against
Calgary in the Western Final. Yet
The Ubyssey writer of the day chose
to spend most of his report criticizing the football team for running up
the score, and then he criticized the
fans for being noisy and responsive
to the cheerleaders.
Later, an editorial criticized the
athletic fee by pointing out that the
quality of the sports is poor, and
there are few fans attending. Now,
after some of our varsity teams have
become very successful, and there
are standing room only crowds at
some of the events, the latest view
of The Ubyssey is that "Winning
isn't everything".
I fully admit that the Athletics
Department should provide some
sort of budget to see how the money
is spent, also, in these days of high
tuition costs, and virtually no student aid, an argument could be
made suggesting students might not
be able to afford a further contribution to athletics.
But don't go after our student
athletes. They are students, just like
you and me. They are not recruited
via high scholarships, and they
must meet academic criteria to continue their athletic career. No, the
prestige generated doesn 't help their
academic career, my academic
career, or anybody's academic
career. But the prestige does bring
school pride, which to me, is a visible benefit.
I am proud to say I was a UBC
student while my football team, the
UBC T-Birds, won national championships in 1982 and 1986. One of
the most exciting sporting events
I've ever seen was in March 1983
when my volleyball team upset
Manitoba to win the national title.
This weekend I'll be watching CTV
from Halifax to cheer my basketball
team, as they battle for a national
title.
It's true, winning isn't
everything. Not all our varsity
teams are winners on the
scoresheet. But seeing my fellow
students doing their best for
themselves, and for our school, is
enough for me to consider them
winners. Support our student
athletes. The deserve it.
Ron Reinhold
med. lab. science Tuesday, March 17, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Swallowing smoke leads to bold, new insights
By LORI EWERT
I'm not a smoker, but I am sorry
to hear smoking is being banned in
public places. For say what you will
about the hazards of smoking, people watching is a favorite pastime
and smokers top my list of "most
watchables" in bank queues, the
doctor's office or when I'm dining
alone.
Imagine this scene: you're in a
bar and the stranger sitting beside
you pulls out his or her cigarettes.
On the other hand, 'Type B'
smokers take long, smooth drags.
They inhale deeply, roll the smoke
around in their lungs, and release it
with a long " Ahhh ..." They like a
cigarette with morning coffee or
after good sex. You'll find these
sensual smokers at resorts like Club
Med and Hedonism II.
Then there are the 'Quitters'
whose every cigarette is "the last
one". These addicts have been trying to break the habit even before
Immediately you're privy to a
wealth of personal information
which can save you time, money
and frustration.
For instance, if a woman smokes
Virginia Slims, don't bother asking
to buy her a drink. She's come a
long way and is not likely to be impressed. Or ladies, if the man seated
next to you smokes Marlboros,
don't expect an intellectual conversation. Instead, try asking him how
things are on the ranch.
The manner in which a person
smokes is also a dead giveaway of
psychological makeup. Chain
smokers smoke quickly and continuously, seemingly unaware that
they're even smoking. They pause
only to cough. These are the 'Type
A' personalities of the cigarette
world: the quantity over quality
smokers who buy cigarettes bulk: in
crates, not cartons.
they took their first puff. To help
themselves quit, they don't buy
cigarettes. Instead, they beg, borrow and steal their gaspers from
other smokers. And, nine times out
of ten, their "last cig" is the only
one left in the lender's pack.
However, 'Quitters' provide a
much needed health service in that
every time they bum a smoke, they
help others cut down.
Smokers' paraphernalia also
reveals personality traits. I offer the
following interpretations:
Cigarette Cases: People who hide
the brand they smoke are paranoid
individuals trying to conceal their
true identities.
Wooden Matches in Box: Those
who like things in boxes are
agoraphobic and need order in their
lives. They probably played with
LEGO as children.
Forest resources ignored
Perhaps the connection between
imminent logging of the Windy Bay
watershed on Lyell Island in the
Queen Charlotte Islands and reduced opportunities for UBC students
is unclear to some people. I think it
is important to point out that it is in
the best interests of all British Columbians, and people all over the
world, that remaining examples of
west coast, old growth rainforest be
preserved for their ecological
significance.
As was pointed out by Scott Mitchell in your last issue, humankind
can no longer afford to exploit
forest resources with no thought for
basic principles of ecological
balance.
Deforestation of rainforests in
B.C. as well as in the tropics
threatens the global climatic
balance, reduces genetic diversity,
causes severe erosion and loss of
topsoil, and above all represents an
act of supreme human arrogance
and greed. The idea that millions of
years of evolution must be denied
for the short term gain of a single
generation is obscene, yet in our
aquiescence we give tacit approval.
The potential of a stable and
healthy economy based on the
recreational value of 'supernatural'
B.C. is yet to be realized, but rather
than work towards this goal, our
society seems determined to prevent
its    realization.
On Thursday the 19th in Law
201, John Broadhead will be
presenting a slideshow of South
Moresby. This is part of an effort to
pressure the government to come
through on its promise of a national
park in the Charlottes. Be there at
12:30 to learn more about this important issue.
Joan Bratty
Arts 2
lf$) CO-OP OUTDOOR
^-'GEAR SWAP & SALES
Here's your chance to get rid of those
boots that seem to have shrunk a
half size or that pack which just
isn't big enough anymore or
maybe pick up some
experienced rain gear.
The Co-op's Spring 87 Outdoor Gear Swap is the answer.
Call 872-7858 for more details.     [
P.S. you don't have to be a
Co-op member to
participate.
Win a
Pentax
Binocular
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a
Pentax Mini Binocular to be given
away at 3 PM the day of the Gear
Swap. No purchase necessary to
win. Binocular is courtesy of
Pentax Canada Inc.
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
Gear Swap
Sunday, March 22, 10 AM-3 PM
428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver
Cardboard Matches: Those who
prefer a fast, cheap light are known
as one-nighi-smokers whose
favorite brand is Lucky Strike.
BIC Lighters: These members of
the nouveau riche are social
climbers with delusions of
grandeur.
14K Gold Embossed Lighters:
These smokers are classy individuals with old money to burn.
Portable Ashtrays: Smokers who
carry ashtrays around with them are
obsessive-complusive individuals
who've taken in the Boy Scout motto "Be prepared" too far.
Cigarette Holders: Smokers
needing to artificially lengthen their
sticks have inferiority complexes
and tend to brag ami/or exaggerate
the truth.
Cigarette Rollers: These smokers
are mostly men who are either do-it-
yourselfers or very cheap.
So the next time you share office
space with a smoker, or are
shoulder to shoulder with one in an
elevator, don't complain about the
Lori Ewert does not smoke but
will accept 14k. gold lighters as
gifts.
GRADUATE TO
Go to tke head aflfce class with
a great-loskiag professional
resuM frosa Kiakos.
kinkd
5706 L'ni\ersitv Blvd.
222-1688
MTH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
abnoxious fumes, feign asthma as
you gasp for breath, or preach the
perils of secondhand smoke. In an
age where you can never be too sure
0) -*■»—-»•■■---■■--■-•--• — ■■-
>
CO
W
d3
who the person next to you really is,
remember: cigarettes don't lie.
They'll tell you more than Sigmund
Freud ever dreamed possible.
FREE
TUDIO
o
GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
• For Grad Photography That Is Different •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1987
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
• UNIQUE FRE^H STYLES FOR 1987 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
2111 West 16th Ave.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
736-7281 or 731-1412.
TUDIO
O
cn
<
CD
DANISH DESIGN
WHITE SHELVING
& CABINETS
$399
WITH THIS AD
OPEN FOR RETAIL
Fri: 11:00-5:30
Sat: 10:00-5:30
INSTANT FURNISHINGS
1817 W. 5TH AVE., VANC. 731-4173
3617 W. Broadway
738-9520
UBC STUDENTS
SPECIAL DISCOUNT
2 for 1      j LARGE PIZZA
I      MEDIUM CHARGE
ON ANY REGULAR PRICED
GREEK ENTREE
Enjoy a complimentary Greek
entree when a second Greek,
entree of equal or greater value
is purchased.
VALID MON.-THURS.
4 P.M.-MIDNIGHT
DINING IN ONLY
■_OFFERJXP]RES MAR.21^1
I
h
Buy any large pizza
and pay for a
medium
VALID ANYTIME
DINING IN ONLY
OFFER EXPIRES MAR. 31/87
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1987 SPRING LECTURES
GEORGE BAIN
Professor of Industrial Relations and Chairman of the School of Industrial and Business
Studies at the University of Warwick, Dr. Bain is a distinguished scholar who has made many
contributions in the study of unionism and collective bargaining. As a member of the Bullock
Committee of Inquiry, he assisted with the 1975/76 Report on Industrial Democracy which
has had considerable impact in Japan and other countries. A native of Winnipeg, he is uniquely qualified to discuss British industrial relations from a Canadian perspective, and Canadian
industrial relations through British eyes.
THE FUTURE OF TRADE UNIONS
Tuesday, March 17 In Room 104, Angus Building, at 12:30 P.M.
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN PRIVATE SECTOR INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS IN BRITAIN
Thursday, March 19 In Conference Room, Law Building, at 3:30 P.M.
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS: Conflict of Cooperation?
Saturday, March 21 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at
8:15 P.M.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 17, 1987
TODAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Amiga general meeting, every Amiga owner'
welcome, noon, SUB 111. Also, topic today:
worthwhile expansion projects for the IBM,
noon, SUB 205,
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
"Reaping the Whirlwind." Slide tape show
about conditions of women in South East Asia
who have to go to Japan to work. Music accompaniment, free, noon, room 803, Asian Centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Letter writing group, everyone welcome, noon,
SUB 224.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Importing and exporting in Southeast Asia, with
lan Robertson, president, Magee Robertson and
Associates market researchers, noon, Asian
Centre Auditorium.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, a1' welcome, nonn Lutheran
Campus Centre
SUB FILMS
Film. "Bonnie and Clyde . slarnruj Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, 9:30 p in SUB
Auditotium.
SUB FILMS
Film   "Barbarella'   starring Hanoi Jane Fonda
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship. a\:. welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre
STUDENT RADIO SOCIETY (CITR FM)
Votinci ro elect the President, Vire-Presiden- and
Business Manager o< CITR, 10 a.m 4 p.m .
SUB 233
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Leuei writing group ali welcome, noon SUB
224
COALITION FOR ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Meenny to drop off petitions, noon. Garden
room of Gtad Centre
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General Meeting: Elections and discission of up-
cominq events, 12'30 p.m., Hennioqs 301
WEDNESDAY
STUDENT RADIO SOCIETY (CITR-FM)
Voting to elect the president, vice-president and
business manager of CiTR, 10:00 a.m.-4:00
p.m , SUB 233.
tween classes
UBC SKI CLUB
Broomball: 4:45-6:15 p.m., rink tl, Winter
Sports Centre.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Noon-hour concert — Elizabeth Volpe, harp. In
cooperation with CBC radio, free, noon, UBC
School of Music Recital Hall.
FASHION CLUB
Organizational meeting, seeking fashion conscious exec's, 12:00 p.m., SUB 205.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Weekly collective meeting, noon, SUB rm. 130.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night — with Doug Schmidt and Anton
Kolstee, 8:30 p.m., Grad Centre Fireside
Lounge.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Atari meeting, find out about the new ST's, 4:30
p.m., SUB212A.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion of sexual orientations, lifestyle and ministry, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery Lounge.
CINEMA 16
Film — "Gertrude Stein: When This You See
Remember me," 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
STUDENT FORUM ON THE B.A. CURRICULUM
Noon-1:20 p.m., Buchanan Penthouse.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7:00 p.m., 1868 Knox
Rd.
THURSDAY
THE PIT CLUB
Dance, win, fly! Dance . . . and you might be
one of the eight nightly winners. Win . . and
you might fly to San Francisco, 8:30 p.m.-1:00
a.m., The Pit Pub.
STUDENT RADIO SOCIETY (CITR-FM)
Voting to elect the president, vice-president and
business manager of CI1R, 10:00 a.m.-noon,
(results at 1:00 p.m.), SUB 233.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
UBC chamber ensembles — John Loban, direo
tor, free, noon, UBC School of Music Recital
Hall.
80T A PROBLEM?
NEED TO TALK?
SPEAKEASY
UBC's Peer Counselling Centre
Confidential Anonymous
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB CONCOURSE
228-3700
DECKMATE BOOTS
Sale
$17
.50
ONE WEEK ONLY!
SALE ENDS MARCH 24/87
M.M.O.S. Inc.
1368 W. BROADWAY 736-3565
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SPECIAL APPLICATION
DEADLINES
The Office of the Registrar wishes to remind students considering applying for transfer of the following deadlines:
Architecture -March 31
Commerce and Business Administration -May 31
Education -May 31
Education Diploma Programs -April 1
Engineering (Applied Science) -May 31
Fine Arts Studio Program -March 31
Landscape Architecture -April 30
Medical Laboratory Science -April 30
Music -May 15
Nursing (Four year program) -May 31
Pharmaceutical Sciences -May 31
Change of Faculty forms are available from the Registrar's
Office, G.S.A.B. Hours 8:30 to 4:00, Monday to Friday.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
"AIDS Seminar," guest speakers: Dr. H, Wass
and Or. M. Weaver, members free, non-
members: 25 cents, refreshments will be served,
noon-2:00 p.m., Wood 16.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Information meetings for Physics students interested in cooperative education, noon-1:3C
p.m., Hennings 302.
NEWMAN CLUB
Annual general meeting: elections will be held,
noon, St. Mark's College, Music Room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversational meeting. Elections for 87-88 executive, noon, International House.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore meeting, let's discuss Donald's
playground, noon, Buch B319. Apple meeting,
find out about the greater new Apple, the IIGS,
noon, SUB 213.
STAMP CLUB
Polish stamp clearance sale, noon. International
House, Boardroom 400.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Death penalty debate — see ad in this paper for
more information, noon, SUB auditorium.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
A talk given by Ken Walters, "Climate for the
Garden. Taking Persona! Responsibility for a
Changing World," noon-1:20 p.m., Buch B225.
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
Very important executive meetings followed by a
novelty competition — all welcome, lots of
prizes, 6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
UBC LAW UNION
Nicaraguan ambassador: Talk on "Nicaraguan
Politics and Perspectives" with question period,
1:00-2:30 p.m., Rm. 101/102 UBC Law Building.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Slide show on South Moresby, and talk by John
Broadhead, noon, Law Building rm. 201.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Terry Lige will speak on "The Dynamic Work of
God Through the Holy Spirit," noon, SUB 206.
HANG GLIDING CLUB
General meeting, new members welcome, noon,
SUB 119.
FRIDAY
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University singers, James Fankhauser, director,
free, noon, UBC School of Music Recital Hall.
Law Students' Annual
TRIKE RACE DANCE
featuring
FRANK FRANK 5
EVERYONE WELCOME
FRIDAY, MARCH 20, 8:00 p.m.
Grad Centre
Ballroom
Tix: $5
at the door
It's time YOU came out to party!!
OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
Career Series for Women
JOB HUNTING
Come and find out techniques for tapping
into the hidden job market.
THURS., MAR. 19, 1987, 12:30-2:20 p.m.
BROCK 106 A, B & C
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phonn Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
COMING EVENTS
30 - JOBS
80 - TUTORING
AN EVENING OF transformational entertainment with ROBERT ANTON WILSON.
Tbe New Inquisition: A skeptical look at
skepticism, 8:00 p.m., Fri., Mar. 20 at the
New York Threatre, 639 Commercial Drive.
Tickets $6/5 at the door.
Seminar: "The I in The Triangle," Mar. 21,
10 a.m.-3 p.m.. Trout Lake Community
Centre, 3350 Victoria Dr. at 17th, $35. Call
874-6467.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
TAKECARE
Quality condoms. Shop in the privacy £>
convenience of your home. Discretion
guaranteed. Prices/box of 12(7% p.s. tax
incl.): Sheik non-lub. $6.50, Sheik lub.
$6.50, Ramses Sensitol $7.50, Ramses
regular $7.50, Ramses Fiesta $8.00; Add
$1.50 shipping each box. Cheque or money
order payable to: TakeCare Personal Products, Dept. U.B. P.O. Box 7520, Victoria,
B.C. V9B 5B8.
COMPLETE SANYO stereo system, immac.
cond. incl. tuner, am/fm tape deck, record
changer & 2 speakers. Orig. price $2400. A
sacrifice at $800, 4 drawer legal size filing
cabinet with lock $200, 3 large indoor plants
(jade, palm, hybiscusl $25 ea., IBM Selectric Typewriter (avail. Apr. 15) $150.
222-3032. On Campus, Gage Apts.
XC SKIS — waxable 190 cm quik-release bindings, used only 4 times, & alum, poles,
$100 obo., also hi-qual. women's sz. 8B
boots, $50, call Robin 876-7744.
MEN'S BIKE - Panasonic (US) 26" 10 spd,
Diacompe brks, Suntour derailleur, $150
obo. call Robin 876-7744.
MARINE BIOLOGIST Lab. Tech: Job
continuous to B.Sc. degree, $10/h, wknds
& holidays, Sept.-April. Full time summer.
1st or 2nd yr. Biology/Oceanography
students call 685-3364. Dr. Marliave.
HELP to edit out, substitute Americanisms in
play. Fluent knowledge of British slangs a
must. Helen 321-0136.
PART-TIME experienced sitter. 2 days/wk.
at my home (8th & Sasamat). Could be full-
time 228-9118.
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. $10/hr.
85 - TYPING
35 - LOST
SILVER DAGGER PIN, mid February
between SUB and Woodward. Reward
732-0419.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes editing. UBC loca
tion. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
PROFESSIONAL   TYPIST.   30   yrs    exp
Wordprocessor cf IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
1     Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 am    10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm 56 228-5496
50% OFF FIRST MONTH
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bus route Tuesday, March 17, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
B-'Birds bruised ;f*
By CHEW WONG
This Saturday at the CIAU men's
basketball finals UBC's hopes of
capturing their first national crown
in seventeen years melted and oozed
between the cracks of the hardwood
floor at Halifax's Metor-Centre.
The University of Brandon downed
the 'Birds 74?66 to capture their
school's first national basketball title.
Althoug the 'Birds played poorly
in the final game — shooting less
than 40 per cent from the field —
they did well to even get to the national finals; a feat no one on the
UBC campus considered possible
back in October when four green
rookies, three college transfers, two
wily veterans, and a partridge in a
pear tree waltzed into the Thunderbird line-up.
"Everyone told us 'another
rebuilding year, another rebuilding
year!' " said retiring co-captain
Kevin Hanson.
It was far from a rebuilding year
for Bruiser (head coach Bruce
Enns) and the 'Birds.
In only his second year at UBC,
Enns coached his team to accomplish what no other had since
1977: they ended with a winning
season, 25-10. They also won two
tournaments (University of
Manitoba and UBC), stole the
Canada West crown from UVic,
won several all-star and MVP
awards, and collected an All-
Canadian award in Paul
Johansson.
"I'm kinda disappointed (about
the Brandon loss)," said
Johansson. "It'll take a couple of
weeks to get over it."
"But I'm sure glad Kevin (Hanson) got a tournament first all-star
award. He went all year without a
lot of recognition."
Aside from all the wins and postseason accolades, it was a successful
season for Enns for another reason.
The the 'Birds began to win, the
crowds began to grow, and suddenly, War Memorial Gym became the
place to take your date on a
weekend.
The Uvic-UBC Canada West
title series was a dream for the
'Birds. Two standing-room only
crowds and two teeth gritin' close
games lodged UBC basketball firmly in the minds of campus thrill-
seekers.
Those two games also proved
that a UBC athletic program could
be economically viable — more
than $10,000 was collected at the
gate for the Victoria series.
And this past week, while the
'Birds were at the nationals in
Halifax, they were still the campus
darlings. During Friday's TSN
semi-final broadcast, in which UBC
faced the University of Winnipeg,
The Pit overflowed with basketball
fans shouting "woo's" and
"yeahs" each time the 'Birds
scored.
But now the dream season is
over. For parting seniors Johansson
and Hanson the end of this season
also marks the end of their university basketball careers.
"It was a fantastic year," said
Hanson, "We should be proud of
our season."
Yes Kevin, you should.
UBC STUDENTS LOSE vision, motor control and crash into wall.
UBC track women triumph
By D. R. WOLCOMTON
One had to fight for it while other
had the title given to her, but UBC
has two more CIAU champions in
this year of athletic triumphs.
Joanne Gapard won the tightest
CIAU 60 metre hurdles final ever
and Jeannie Cockcroft won a jump-
off in the high jump this weekend at
the CIAU track and field championships in Saskatoon.
In the hurdles final Gaspard, the
defending champion, did not lead
until the final metres. Three athletes
cleared the final barrier in unison.
With a lunge that nearly sent her
sprawling on the track Gaspard nipped archrival Leslie Est wick of
McGill University 8.69 seconds to
8.71. For the - graduating UBC
education student it was a personal
best time, beating last year's winn-
"WE'RE NUMBER ONE," cried the UBC basketballers in happier days, when they won the western championship two weeks ago. The 'Birds narrowly missed winning the national title, losing to Brandon in the CIAU final in
Halifax over the weekend. From left to right: J. D. Jackson, Maurice Basso, Paul Johansson, Al Lalonde, Kevin
Hanson, Mike Clarke, Ken Scott, John Carlson, Eric Kristiansen, Gord Matson, Jamie Boulding, Aaron Point, and
manager Stan Wong. Inset: head coach Bruce Enns.
UBC rows on down the stream
UBC crews rowed merrily off to
Vancouver Island for a third time
this month to race Saturday and
Sunday at the Elk Lake Spring Invitational Regatta. About 100 UBC
rowers, varsity women and men,
junior varsity men and women,
lightweight varsity men and novice
women, together with their coxswains and coaches raced UVic,
Brentwood College, and Shawnigan
Lake School.
Notable successes were in the
women's varsity four with coxswain
and the men's lighweight eight,
which UBC won both days.
r
UBC  tads dismal
Saturday proved dismal for all
of UBC's rugby squads. Each of
the four teams lost, including the
varsity Birds who saw their
hopes of finishing second quash-...
ed by a 10-9 loss to Capilano.
Besides the defeat, the Birds
also lost two players to injuries,
Pat Hamilton and Jeff Knauer.
Hopefully, both will be back for
the season's last two important
games.
During the match UBC missed
four kicks and allowed Caps an
easy try due to some sloppy
cover play. That was enough of
a margin for a determined
Capilano squad.
Coach Barry Legh explained
that the Birds playoff hopes are
slim without victories in the last
two matchs which are to be
played on home turf. The Trojans will visit Thunderbird
Stadium this Saturday at 2 p.m.
The following Saturday the Ex-
Birds will challenge in a must
win situation.
UBC's men's novice crews were
strong on the water, winning both
the coxed fours and eight events.
With very close second place standings, the varsity women's eight,
varsity men's eight, and novice
women's crews plan to work hard
for the next two weeks to get in top
spot again.
The next competition for UBC's
crews is the V.R.C. Spring Invitational at Burnaby Lake, Saturday
and Sunday March 28 and 29.
Crews from Victoria and Vancouver Rowing Club will be racing
against the UBC crews in this annual competition.
The first few days of exams will
be tough for the varsity women and
the lightweight men, who will be at
one of the premiere events for the
early racing season for rowing in
North America. UBC's crews will
be racing against crews from all
over the USA at the San Diego
Crew Classic April 4.
ing time of 8.78.
Though all ran personal best
times, UBC hurdlers Leigh Anne
Merlo (9.10 seconds), Lisa
Brumwell (9.18, and Gillianne St.
Rose (9.39) all failed to qualify for
the final, testimony to the strength
of this year's field.
Gaspard was actually ranked second behind Estwick coming into
the meet, and after the heats were
run the possibility of defending her
1986 championship seemed even
more remote. Gaspard had the third
fastest time, but seemed to thrive on
the challenge.
"I would have done anything
possible to win," she said.
To the outside observer it might
have appeared that Jeannie
Cockcroft was doing everything
possible not to win her event. The
long elimination process of the high
jump eventually left Cockcroft, the
1985 CIAU and national champion,
and Shari Orders of the University
of Toronto as the only remaining
competitors, with Cockcroft, suffering from a knee injury, jumping
first.
Both athletes cleared 1.81 metres.
Cockcroft missed her three attempts at 1.84 metres, well below
her best of 1.94 metres. Orders
would win if she could clear 1.84
metres on her last attempt. She
cleared the bar but it shook and fell.
Because both jumpers now had
the same number of misses a jump-
off was held. First, at 1.84 metres:
Cockcroft failed; Orders failed.
Then at 1.81 metres: Cockcroft failed; Orders failed. Then the bar was
lowered to an agonizingly simple
1.78 metres. The exhausted
Cockcroft summoned her reserves
and narrowly cleared the bar. The
Orders, the woman who has almost
had the gold medal, stunned the
crowd by missing, Cockcroft had
won.
"No matter how it happened, I
was glad to win," she said.
In other women's events, the
4x400 metre team (Chris Bjorndal,
Jennifer Mawby) finished third in
9:05.25 but the 4x400 metre and
4x200 metre teams failed to make
the finals. Heather D'Oyley finished tied for seventh in the high jump.
For the UBC men's track and
field team the most notable athlete
of the meet was ironically someone
from another school. Hurdler Jeff
Glass of the University of Western
Ontario, 1984 Olympic Games
finalist, 1986 Commonwealth
Games finalist and second ranked
in Canada behind Mark McKoy,
proved to be the team's nemesis.
Glass was the only runner to beat
UBC's Dave Wilkinson to the finish
line in the men's 60 metre hurdles.
Wilkinson's personal best of 8.11
seconds was not enough to beat
Glass' superb 7.88.
Twenty minutes after the hurdles
final Glass stole another gold medal
from UBC. At the final exchange in
the 4x200 relay final, UBC was in
second place, narrowly in front of
Western. When the leading University of Saskatchewan runner fell,
UBC was suddenly thrust into the
lead. But as UBC's anchor runner,
Steve Dong, and Western's anchor,
Glass, fought for position on the
first curve, Glass struck the baton
from Dong's hand. As a result,
Glass went on to win and UBC's
team (Ed Neeland, Wilkinson,
Talino Bruno, Dong) was relegated
to fifth place. The ensuing appeal
failed because the officials "didn't
see anything."
Later the tired and frustrated
Neeland and Wilkinson managed
only fifth and seventh places in the
60 metre final. In that race a blatant
false start was also missed by the officials.
"It's obvious that the officials
aren't sanctioned by the Canadian
Optometry Associaton," said
Neeland.
In other men's events, Boyd
Mason was third in the pole vault,
an ill Jim Gamlin was fourth in the
high jump, and Geoff Hansen and
Kevin Godden were seventh and
Vicky  Agar,   Anita  Hildebrandt,    eighth in the triple jump.
ATTENTION
UBC SCUBA DIVERS!
Inventory Reduction Sale Now On
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228-3329 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 17, 1987
Asner takes anti-Reagan campaign on the road
By TOBY SANGER
and MICHELLE LALONDE
Canadian University Press
Actor Ed Asner and U.S. president Ronald Reagan have a few
things in common — both are
former presidents of the Screen Actors Guild of America, both are
married to women named Nancy,
and both are deeply concerned
about U.S. involvement in Central
America.
But that's where the similarities
end.
"When I see the horrendous picture that Ronald Reagan and this
administration have woven — the
lies, the misused money and power
— 1 see that the common thread
woven through all of this is the
Reagan administration motto: "It's
easier to get forgiveness than permission!"
"Well, it's time we stopped
forgiving," said Asner, best known
for his Lou Grant character on
television's The Mary Tyler Moore
Show.
Asner has been taking his anti-
Reagan campaign on the road, and
during recent stops at Dalhousie
University in Halifax and the
University of Toronto, slammed
Reagan's policies on Central
America.
Asner said Reagan's covert war
against Nicaragua is designed to
create a paranoia of external
enemies to divert attention from
domestic problems in the U.S.
We cannot concentrate too
strongly on the foreign enemy of
the Soviet Union or else we would
get to the bomb-dropping stage,"
Asner said. "So you create little minions around the world."
Asner has been joined on the tour
by Father Blase Bonpane, founder
of the Office of the Americas and
another celebrated activist for
human rights in Central America.
"The Nicaraguan people and
their revolution have not been well
represented in the United States,"
said Bonpane. "There is no (legal)
justification for attacking
Nicaragua. We have no grievance
against Nicaragua, but we're attacking them, killing them, raping
their women."
Even in the wake of the Iran-
contra arms scandal — "Gip-
pergate", Asner calls it — the
threat of military escalation exists,
Asner said. The Reagan administration's support for the contras, said
Asner, "is like a snake with its head
cut off. Its mouth is still venomous
and its body is still writhing."
Asner first became embroiled in
political controversy in 1980 as
president of the Screen Actors
Guild president, when it revoked an
earlier decision to make Reagan a
"national honouree", because of
his controversial labour policies.
Asner warned of Reagan's
abilities to manipulate public opinion. "He is Disney's last wish, a
product of the media," he said,
comparing Reagan's recent television address of atonement as an example of "infotainment."
"This is a process by which infor
mation is released bit by bit for the
American public so that they can
digest it. But they don't reveal it all
at once because you can't risk
disrupting the people's world view
and our dependence on and confidence in our system," he said.
Asner thanked Canadians for
"being idyllic neighbours to the
north and for being part of the solution, rather than part of the problem."
He did, however, have critical
words for Canada's newly announced and more restrictive
refugee policies.
Canada number one customer
From page 3
look elsewhere. It (the loss of competitiveness) can only be because someone else is not playing fair."
That Canada is a second rank
(trading) partner outstripped by
Japan and Europe is the biggest
myth of all, said Gotlieb. "And two
presidents have swallowed it."
"Canada is the number one
customer to the U.S. in the whole
wide world. No other relationship
can compare with it in size, scope
and quality."
He said Americans fail to
recognize this fact because they
can't believe it. But Gotlieb said he
is optimistic this perception could
change because of U.S. president
Ronald Reagan's acknowledgement
that trade with Canada will be a
high priority in this year's state of
the union address.
Gotlieb also called the belief that
Canada enjoys an enormous trade
surplus with the U.S. an "extremely
insidious myth."
"This myth is out of focus in one
eye and blind in the other," because
it deals with trade as trade merchandise alone and ignores services, he
said.
Gotlieb     complained     that
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