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The Ubyssey Jan 16, 1987

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UBC Archives Serid
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 29
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 16,1987
228-2301
Concerts banned in War Memorial
By KATHERINE MONK
All rock concerts have been banned from War Memorial Gymnasium indefinitely due to structural problems in the gym's floor.
The loss of concerts means a loss of
$16,000 for the Alma Mater Society
said Bruce Paisley, the AMS concert director.
Paisley is frustrated at the loss of
the gym as a concert venue because
the concerts program would have
otherwise shown a profit for the
first time in five years.
The immediate cause for program disruptions is "a warping of
the floor, and cracks in the support
beams," said Neil Risebrough,
associate vice-president of student
services. Risebrough was unaware,
however, of the concert ban.
— d(in andrews photo
NEW DEAN OF the Interplanetary Studies faculty Xwqdshkrt Pkmyhugrkrdf is excited about the new courses
studying life on the other planets of our solar system that UBC plans to offer starting this fall. "What really annoys
me," said the planet Necroton native (speaking through an interpreter), "is that the only text ava lable is The
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy'!"
Coverage  reinstated  for visa  students
By KAREN GRAM
International students studying in
B.C. universities are breathing a
collective sigh of relief after the
provincial court of appeal ruled
holders of visas and work permits
qualify for government medical insurance.
"I'm really happy and relieved
about the whole thing," visa student Krisztina Hernadi said of the
early December ruling.
"I was in the hosptial in
December for surgery that would
have cost me $300-$400. I couldn't
have possibly have paid. Now I can
apply for retroactive coverage."
In August 1985 the provincial
health ministry announced visa and
work permit holders would be excluded from the provincial health
plan because they were not considered "permanent residents," but
since visa students must have
medicare insurance the policy forced them to buy private insurance
sometimes costing three times that
of the provincial plan.
Hernadi, along with three other
visa students, and the Teaching
Support Staff Union at Simon
Fraser University challenged the
matter in court, arguing the policy
change was "unlawful" because the
Services Act grants coverage to all
residents of British Columbia. The
only requirement stated in the act is
six months residency.
Former health minister Jim
Nielsen countered that permanent
resident and resident mean the same
in the act.
The court disagreed. In a written
judgement, the appeal judges said
that since the Medical Services Act
uses both terms, the government
cannot claim the two are interchangeable.
The ruling overturned an earlier
decision on the Medical Services
Commission which said only Canadian citizens and landed immigrants
qualified for coverage.
Although the decision will help
visa students in the future, they cannot claim compensation for the
money already paid to private insurers. However, those who incurred medical costs after the
December 10 ruling, but had no
private insurance, can apply for
retroactive coverage for December
and then claim their costs.
Paisley was told the gym could
not be used as a site for concert
dates for the remainder of the
school term by the Physical Education facilities manager. In a
memorandum to Paisley, Justin
Marples said "the school of
Physical Education refuses to book
the facility (the War Memorial
Gymnasium) to any group intending to host a rock concert or the
like."
The memorandum also states
that it was with regret that such a
hard stance be taken, but there was
no alternative "while programs
constantly suffer from the after effects of these events."
When questioned about the
Physical Education Department's
refusal to book concerts, Marples
did not say what the "after effects"
were, but that the structural problems were the main reason for not
allowing any concert bookings, as
the department would be held liable
in the event of any accident
resulting from the damaged floor.
Marples said the decision now lies
"in the hands of Physical Plant" as
to whether or not any more concerts
could be held before the end of
term.
Dennis Haller, Assistant Director
for the Design Division of Physical
Plant, was unavailable for comment.
Risebrough said the decision
ultimately lies with the president's
office, but found Physical Education's decision not to allow concerts
understandable as the building was
not designed for them. Risebrough
said his department would not take
any action until it received an
engineer's report on the structural
stability of the floor.
The loss of good acts and the
resulting revenue has left AMS
director of finance Jamie Collins
upset.
"They (the Physical Education
Department) think the building is
theirs, and they will continue to say
'no' until someone makes them say
'yes'," said Collins Thursday.
Degree declined
By PATTI FLATHER
Even though Jim Pattison announced earlier this week he will
not be accepting his honorary UBC
degree, the issue is not dead, some
students say.
Pattison informed UBC
chancellor Robert Wyman and
UBC president David Strangway
that he will not accept the award at
spring convocation due to controversy and threatened student
protests.
Some students are sending an
open letter to all senators next week
calling for changes to the entire process by which honorary degrees are
given, said Kyong-ae Kim, law 3.
"The university has not
retracted, even if Jimmy Pattison
has," she said after a meeting
Thursday of students opposed to
the Pattison honor.
"Ultimately senate will change
only if there is enough public
pressure," she added.
Student senator Christina Davidson, who began organizing protests
against Pattison receiving the award
because of his business links with
pornography and South Africa,
said she's pleased Pattison declined.
But she said UBC needs guidelines
for awarding honorary degrees.
Senate will be discussing reforms
to the honorary degree process at its
meeting next Wednesday evening,
said the chair of the committee
which recommended the Pattison
award.
Tributes committee chair  John
Dennison said the committee proposes changes to the process in an
interim report to be discussed in
public at the Wednesday meeting.
Part of the comittee met two weeks
ago, he said, after the controversy
concerning Pattison became public.
Senate vice-chair Jean Elder
resigned in protest over the award
and the four other academic women
senate members wrote a protest letter. In the past week the Alma
Mater Society and the Law Student
Association added their voices by
voting against the award.
Jean Elder, an associate history
professor, said Thursday she has no
reaction to Pattison declining the
degree and on what senate does
now.
But she was surprised by how
much support she received "from
friends and strangers . . . people
across the country" for her decision
to resign.
u
Ctsaic wW op«n
By EVELYN JACOB
Although UBC stiH does not have any formal procedures to deal
with sexual harassment grievances, a clinic will open on campus next
week, giving women a place to air their complaints.
The clinic, organized by the Committee Against Sexual Harassment on Campus, which will be run by student volunteers, will provide women with information on how to deal with sexual harassment, and support those with complaints.
"Sexual harassment is invisible because it's not recorded or talked
about?' said Megan Ellis, a member of CASHC. "We don't understand the nature or quantity of it until women speak out about it."
Ellis said she hopes the clinic will help promote campus discussion
on the issue. She said UBC has been particularly "neanderthal" on
formulating sexual harassment procedures and that grievances are
only heard through word of mouth and are not recorded.
"Information is power and the university is aware of that. They've
avoided having complaints recorded?' Ellis said.
But June Lythgoe, director of the Office for Women Students,
is one of the places women have traditionally gone to lodge their
grievances, said although there may have been a time under previous
administrations when sexual harassment complaints were not collected, the attitude of the present administration has been different.
"Even though we don't have a clear mandate on policy, they (the
administration) would expect us to collect information nonetheless,"
said Lythgoe.
See page 2: CONFIDENTIAL Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 16, 1987
CUPE members face vote
By CORINNE BJORGE
After nine months of negotiations, representatives for the major
campus union, CUPE Local 116,
have reached a proposed settlement
with the University Labour Committee which members will vote on
this Sunday.
Ken Andrews, President of
CUPE Local 116 said the committee representing the campus union
would  be recommending without
Confidential
From page 1
She said written complaints are
not always the best solution to the
problem. Because UBC does not
have a formal policy, a woman may
not lodge a complaint because there
is no clarity of the consequences.
She said an informal method using
a mediator may be much more
beneficial to both parties.
She also said the names of the
alleged harassers should be kept in
totally confidential files until proven innocent or guilty.
"It's a messy issue right across
the country. Consequences for the
alleged might be serious even if
they're proven innocent."
Ellis said the clinic will be run by
students so they can retain control
over the procedures.
"It's self help, not professional
treatment. These women are not
sick," she said.
The clinic opens Tuesday from
2-4 p.m. and Wednesday, 3-5 p.m.
in the Women's Centre. Women
lodging complaints should go to
SUB 130 or phone in at 228-2163.
There will be complete confidentiality and nothing will be recorded
without the complainant's permission.
1
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reservations, acceptance of the proposal.
"The parties have reached a good
memorandum of agreement. Now it
depends on the referendum", he
said.
The changes affecting the union,
which covers approximately 360 different job categories on campus,
are essentially financial, said Andrews.
According to Andrews, the settlement outlines a three year contract
which would start in April 1986 and
run through to March 1, 1989. In
the first year a lump sum payment
of $350 per full-time employees
would be paid out with the sum prorated for part-time employees.
As  of March   31,   1987,  there
would be an implementation of a
new schedule A, affecting pay rates,
which would give employees wage
increases through a three-step programme, said Andrews.
According to Andrews, the
overall approximate percentage increase in the first year would be
3.25 per cent. In the second year,
April 1, 1987 - March 31, 1988, incremental pay steps would come into place July 1, 1987 with an overall
estimated increase of 1.95 per cent.
In the third year, April 1, 1988 -
March 31, 1989, the estimated
percentage increase would be 2.88
per cent with a $200 cash payment
pro-rated for part-time employees.
rams
NOTICE
cams.
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
Will  be  held for those seeking  election  in the
upcoming AMS EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 22
12:30 p.m.
SUB Conversation Pit
Throw questions at the candidates and eat your
lunch (or do the reverse if you prefer)
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
ECONOMICS
E.S. WOODWARD
LECTURE SERIES
1986-87
PAUL
SAMUELSON
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE
OF TECHNOLOGY
NOBEL LAUREATE IN
ECONOMICS
SRAFFIAN
ECONOMICS
Thursday,
January 22, 1987 12:30 p.m.
Buchanan Building,
Room A106
THE ECONOMIC
FUTURE
Saturday,
January 24, 1987 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
Woodward IRC,
Lecture Hall No. 2
LAST DAY TO RETURN
YOUR WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS IS...
JAN. 31*
UBC BOOKSTORE RETURN POLICY
Course Books - Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by original receipt)
for full refund any time up to JANUARY 31, 1987 for WINTER SESSION TEXTBOOKS. After
this deadline all course books will be NON-RETURNABLE
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR SALES RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND - NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
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THURSDAYS (3 sessions)  12:30-1:30 p.m. Buchanan B. 212
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12:30-2:20 p.m. Brock 106 A & B
FRIDAYS (3 sessions)
Feb. 27, Mar. 6, 13
FRIDAYS (2 sessions)
Feb. 27, Mar. 6
TUESDAYS (3 sessions)
Jan. 27, Feb. 3, 10
12:30-2:20 p.m. Brock 106 A
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Jan. 6-Mar. 31
THURSDAYS (3 sessions)  12:30-2:20 p.m.
Mar. 12, 19, 26 Brock 106 A, B & C
(See below)
March 12th Judy MacDonald,
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March 19th Caren Durante,
Women Students' Office
March 26th Margaretha Hoek,
Women Students' Office
* Pre-registration is required at the Office for Women Students, Brock 203, tel: 228-2415
 CLIP & SAVE   *\ x^	 Friday, January 16,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
President discusses divestment
By MARY McALISTER
UBC president David Strangway
met with three student representatives yesterday to discuss divestment of university funds from companies doing business in South
Africa.
"Strangway's position is in
favour of divestment, but we
disagreed on the criteria and speed
for divesting," said Brian Bain, an
executive member of the Graduate
Student Society.
The   meeting   with   Strangway,
iflk^j******  *"*
'*'»•*'    <dfc» '
3sr
Bain, Andrew Olal, president of the
African Students' Association, and
Michael Moeti of Students for a
Free Southern Africa, was the result
of a request made by Strangway at
the December Board of Governors
meeting, when a divestment rally
was held. Strangway offered to
meet with three representatives to
discuss the issues of divestment.
"Our main concern is to try and
get the university to take a more
serious stand on divestment than
what they've done so far. He
(Strangway) said that all the
members of the Board are against
apartheid. He made that very clear,
but it's easy for anyone to say
that," said Olal.
In October the Board decided to
sell its shares in two unnamed companies doing business with South
Africa. This decision was based on
the companies' compliance with the
Canadian Code of Conduct for
businesses operating outside
Canada.
"Our contention is that any company operating in South Africa supplies the government with tax
revenue to carry out military pro
grams which enforce apartheid,"
said Bain.
Bain compared South Africa's
apartheid regime to Nazi Germany.
"Anybody would've taken action
against Nazi Germany — a regime
that was an oppressive military force
whose underlying ideology was
racism. I'd like to think that UBC
would be at the forefront of this
campaign," he said.
The Board requested submissions
from seven companies after finding
a report by civil servant Albert Hart
inconclusive. The Hart Report
reviewed submissions from Canadian companies which outlines their
operating conduct in South Africa.
UBC requested submissions
from: Cominco Ltd., AMCA International Ltd., International Thomson Ltd., Falconbridge Ltd., Dominion Textiles Inc., Moore Corp.
Ltd., and Seagrams and Sons.
"The companies themselves
aren't necessarily a good source.
We don't know if they're giving
true or false or misleading information," said Bain.
Olal said "he (Strangway) gave
us the impression there is a second
phase to the Hart Report Commission. He said that the first phase of
submission is done and now and the
university is waiting for the Hart
Commission to report what's going
on now."
"We want the Board to give out
the names of their investments but
they've made the decision to take a
different approach," said Olal.
"He (Strangway) said that if a
company is in the process of
divesting then we don't want to
name them because if we damn
them publicly, that may discourage
them from divesting," said Bain.
Strangway was unavailable for
comment Thursday.
Last year the Board announced it
had $1 million of its $90 million endowment fund in six companies
that are linked to South Africa.
Another $717,000 from the
university's $90 million pension
fund was invested in three companies with interests in the apartheid state.
Students for a Free Southern
Africa will be submitting letters to
all Board members demanding
complete divestment.
Summer program slashed
dan andrews photo
AUTOMATED OUTLINE WRITER manufactured by Science faculty
drives into B Lot while pondering takeover of job of human outline author.
Human Outline writer becomes devout Luddite, decides to sabotage all
machinery starting with Ubyssey typesetting mach
VANCOUVER (CUP) —
Decreased funding for the
Challenge 87 summer employment
program is a particularly raw deal
for B.C., says the Pacific Region
chair of the Canadian Federation of
Students.
Echoing other Canadian student
representatives, Marg Fartaczek
criticized the $180 million recently
allocated to the federal job creation
program as a significant drop from
the $210 million spent in 1986.
"There was an extra $30 million
last year for the census, but now the
federal government has conveniently forgotten about it," she said.
But finding a summer job in B.C.
will be expecially difficult due to the
absence of Expo, said Fartaczek.
"Student unemployment at the
height of Expo was 20.1 per cent,"
she said, comparing this to the national average of 13.3 per cent.
"There's no bright mega-project
on the horizon for work projects
Freedom in Kamloops questioned
By ALLISON FELKER
B.C. educators are upset about a
loss of academic freedom as the arbitration hearing into the firing of
Cariboo College instructor Allan
McKinnon continues in Kamloops.
McKinnon was suspended in 1985
after publicly criticizing the
restraint program and the quality of
education at the college. He then
circulated a memorandum to
Cariboo faculty criticizing the administration in an attempt to gain
faculty support against his suspension. The memo resulted in his firing on December 11, 1985.
John Waters, president of the
College-Institute Educators'
Association of B.C., called McKinnon's firing "excessive" and "unjustified".
"What  he did  (circulating the
memorandum)   falls   within the
Faculty    union's    guideline of
freedom of speech."
He added faculty members
should be able to openly debate,
discuss, and criticize their institution and society at large.
UBC Faculty Association vice-
president Herbert Rosengarten
said, "it's clear that debate and
discussion are essential to education. If they are prevented, it is a
violation of the academic
principle." He added the faculty
association executive had formally
discussed the issue last year, and
that he did not know the entire
story.
Stanley Shapiro, SFU Faculty
Association president, said McKinnon's firing was a problem
demonstrating the limited power of
instructors at the college level.
"If a UBC professor spoke as
honestly and openly as McKinnon
did, he would not lose his job," he
said.
The CIEA is paying for all legal
costs in the arbitration case. Tuesday, Kamloops mediator Merv
Chertkow presented a 66 page
report at the hearing. McKinnon's
lawyer Leo McGrady said the
report was critical of McKinnon's
conduct.
He added "the mediation process
should be designed to get disputing
parties together; instead, it drove
them apart."
However, both McGrady and
John Waters are satisfied with the
arbitration  procedure.   McKinnon
will present his side next week.
College lawyer Peter Csiszar said
he felt it was inappropriate to comment on the arbitration hearing, as
it was still in process. Neither current college president Jim Wright or
past president Charles Brewster
could be reached for comment.
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this year — there's no census
either," she added.
Last summer, B.C. accounted for
25,000 of Canada's 170,000
unemployed students.
Fartaczek was also worried summer unemployment would push
debt loads higher for B.C. students
receiving money from the only all-
loan student assistance program in
Canada. Some students are
graduating from UBC with debt
loads of $20,000, she said.
And because $180 million for
Challenge 87 neglects the effects of
a four to five per cent inflation rate,
Fartaczek said the total number of
jobs will decrease from the 90,000
created in 1986, 11,000 of them in
B.C.
"We are quite concerned about
the lack of consideration given the
program. The funding announcement was made even before the
evaluation of the Challenge 86 program was tabled in parliament,"
Fartaczek said.
Nancy Bennett, regional coordinator for the program in B.C. and
the Yukon, agreed Expo's absence
would likely create a higher rate of
student unemployment, but
qualified the increase as "slight and
not significant."
"The pattern over the last two
years is students are more successful
in finding jobs than five or six years
ago," she said.
Bennett expects B.C.'s to receive
about 13 or 14 per cent of the total
Challenge 87 budget. That amount
is comparable to last year, with
distribution determined by taking
regional unemployment statistics
into consideration, she explained.
Bennett added that of the jobs
created by the Challenge 86 program in B.C. 35 per cent were in the
private sector, while 15 per cent
were in the municipal sector and 50
per cent were with non-profit
groups.
JERRY'S COVE
NEIGHBORHOOD PLB
Minutes away from UBC Campus -**^—
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3681 West 4th (4th & Mma)     734-1205
WELCOME BACK
FREE WORKSHOPS
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
An introductory workshop to teach assertiveness skills.
Four 2 hour sessions Thursdays, 12:30-2:20 p.m.
Commences Jan. 29
STUDY SKILLS
For those who want higher marks this term & need some
help to improve organization, concentration &
efficiency.
Four  1 hour sessions Wednesdays  12:30-1:30 p.m.
Commences Jan. 21
CAREER EXPLORATION—PART II
Researching fields/options. Decision-making model.
Approaching the market place.
Three 1 '/* hour sessions 2:30-4:00 p.m. Mondays Jan.
19, 26 and Friday, Jan. 23.
Workshops are free. Interested students should sign up at:
STUDENT COUNSELLING AND
RESOURCES CENTRE
Room 200, Brock Hall Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 16,1987
Melpomene
O mystic muse of all ink stained editorial wretches tell us:
Why are we here?
Is it to mindlessly procreate and continue our species
endlessly with no care of improvement or enlightenment?
To make piles of money?
To experience the deepest emotional impact in the reflection of divinely inspired artistic creations and to marvel in a
perpetual state of ga-ga at nature's wonders: the rose, a
sunset over snow capped mountains, the Alex Fraser Bridge?
To eat, drink, and get really stoned by sniffing Pam in
plastic alligator bags?
To outlive our enemies?
To perform the Draino test?
To read the complete works of Stephen King, Robert
Ludlum, Harold Robbins and Jackie Collins?
To understand the basis of contract law?
To avoid all confrontation?
To figure out the lyrics of Inagadadavida?
To experience puppy love?
To closely follow the career of Sonny Bono?
•
No my foolish friends, you are here to fill this space.
FANTASTIC f
Mtvtastic /
FAN-A-TIC /
Youth movement seeks serious political debate
The story "Student MP's Play at
Politics (UBC Jan. 13 P. 1) links the
Youth Suffrage Movement's attempts to extend the franchise to six
year olds with the "mock resolutions" of bringing back the Red En
sign as the Canadian flag and a proposed military takeover of Point
Roberts.
Suffrage, the rights of citizens
and the prospect of children having
some political control over their
lives, may seem funny to some, but
it is no joke. However the debate,
by the Model parliamentarians in
the house that day, was a fun one.
The Conservatives got to call the
NDP radicals, the Liberals called
AMS security guards reputation
I feel compelled to respond to the
allegations made regarding the effectiveness of the AMS SUB Security Team because the Ubyssey failed
miserably to get the whole story.
The SUB Security Team is
responsible for patrolling SUB, and
for spot checking functions in the
building on Friday and Saturday
nights when school is in session.
The Security Team is comprised of
six students who are hired by SAC
and are responsible to SAC through
the Security Commissioner. As
Director of Administration, I am
ultimately responsible for the entire
operation.
SUB is a 250,000 square foot
building — the entire area can not
be covered all at one time even with
the full six member team on duty.
Ensuring the security of all areas
every minute of the day is simply
impossible, just as it is impossible to
completely guard against theft from
one's own home. Considering the
resources available to the AMS, our
Security does a very good job.
Unfortunately, the Ubyssey did
not bother to ask me what the AMS
is doing, and Ms. Sugden naively
suggested that the AMS review its
security procedures. Currently,
several major changes to the SUB
Security operations and policy are
under review. Even if these changes
are implemented, however, there
can not be any guarantee that such
random acts of vandalism will occur
again. The GLUBC office is located
in a hallway next to a fire exit. Any
individual(s) who may vandalize the
office can leave quite easily and
quickly without being detected.
As for charges of being slow to
investigate the matter, I must
apologize for giving the impression
of dawdling, but I can assure those
involved that the matter was dealt
with immediately. As was mentioned in the article, the AMS was shut
down over the Christmas break.
Like everyone else, I am a student
who enjoys Christmas holidays;
consequently, I did not learn about
the incident until my return on
January 5th.
In the  future,  if members  of
GLUBC, or indeed any other club,
have   complaints,   I   would   appreciate talking to them about it.
Martin Cocking
AMS Director of Administration
Committee chooses coordinator
The latest story on the foodbank
(Fri., Jan. 9) quotes me as saying
that I was going to choose the food-
bank coordinator and board. In
fact, the coordinator will be chosen
by Selections Committee, and the
board will be chosen by the coordinator and the facilities coordinator.
It also says that "the foodbank
languished . . . (until) November . .
. (because we were) unable to find
an AMS executive to lead the pro
ject." Hold on a minute. As anyone
who was around at the time to hear
me complain knows perfectly well,
although I submitted the proposal
and applied for the job in April, so-
THE UBYSSEY
January 16, 1987
The Ubyssey is puoushed Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"Hi there, this is Robin Bleach and this is Lifestyles of the Disgustingly Rich and Famous. Tonight,
we're going to visit Princess Evelyn of Jacob, the 345653rd in line to the British throne at a evening
soiree that included Allison Felker, Count James Young and Patti Flather and Robert Beynon, the
Duke of Duchess of York. Our top cameraman Dan Andrews will take us through a stunningly
photographed visit to Svetozar Kontic's ancestral hovels in Yugoslavia and then we'll jet to Saudi
Arabia and the disgustingly opulent palace of Shiek Fermani where he keeps Scot McDonald, Mary
McAllister, Malcolm Pearson and Michael Groberman in bonded serfdom and THEN if my disgustingly
nasal, whiny British voice hasn't caused you to toss your cookies or if you haven't slashed your wrists
out of envy towards people who use $1,000 bills as Kleenex, I might even finish this sentencel We'll
visit Corinne Bjorge at Katherine Monk's inherited box seats at the Montreal Forum right after this
message . . ."
"Howdy, this here's Rick 'Mad Man' Hiebert and I'd like y'all to come down to my Ruskin Used Car
Emporium . . ."
meone else was hired. On returning
to school I discovered that it wasn't
happening, so I took the project
over ... in September.
You also say that "Pedlar and
AMS vice-president Rebecca
Nevraumont took it over." Rebecca
did help with the wording and the
procedures of adoption of the constitution, and she did contact Ray
Schultz about the re-starting of the
project, but I don't think it's fair to
say she took it over.
Come on guys, give me a break.
I'm starting to get paranoid.
However, I must thank you for
remembering to mention the benefit
dance happening January 17 at 8
p.m. in the Ballroom. Bands playing will be the Baghdads, Hunting
Party, Roots Roundup and Bruno
Gerussi's Medallion. Tickets are
available in the Main Concourse of
SUB and at the UBC Box Office.
So come along, bring your friends
and your donations of food and
money, and party for a good cause!
Carol Pedlar
AMS External Affairs
the idea absurd and the NDP got to
be self righteous and non-ageist.
Many among the NDP caucus were
long familiar with the reasons
behind the movement and so had
the most convincing arguments.
Alas, these arguments fell on
unreceptive ears.
While most admit: competence is
not a reason to deny anyone the
right to vote Gust look at the adults
who do versus some children who
can't); children won't be too influenced by their parents (they will
be too busy choosing between the
other influences of the media,
teachers, peers, and social climate);
and voting is a right, the right of
citizens to choose people to make
laws that represent their own interests, (with the right to vote them
out if they don't respect the needs
of their constituents) not just a
privilege for adults, women, white
or the land owners before them . . .
the debate still wasn't taken that
seriously.
The plight of the young can only
improve with the political power the
vote affords, and the legal muscle
of our 1982 constitution gives every
citizen the right to vote regardless
of sex, race or age.
Even when they admit there is no
reason for children not to vote,
these budding little lawyer types still
disagreed and wouldn't break party
line to vote with the NDP.
But at least they started thinking.
Thinking is the main reason this
should not be taken as a joke.
While high ups in the Kremlin now
talk of the benefits of democracy
and how a little bit of questioning
authority and standing up for your
rights might just be good for society
as a whole, we in North America
either don't care or don't know
about the political system, which
breeds apathy among students
because of political paranoia
among teachers and school board
officials. So while students
demonstrate for democracy on the
streets of Shanghai, we watch them
on the TV, wonder what they are so
concerned about, and continue
drinking our South African beer.
Yet, when the prospect of letting
children vote comes up, most balk
at the idea and laugh. When only 20
percent of University of Victoria
students vote, no one notices.
When we get used car dealers in
power, no one is surprised. And
when we go off in the next war to
fight for democracy, no one will
know what we are fighting for, or
worse, care.
What I'm getting at is that we
ought to start asking some really
basic questions about what
democracy is, what it means to us,
and how and why we respect
authority.
Only by considering the seemingly absurd, but profoundly rational,
idea of universal suffrage will we
ever get such an important subject
as democracy (not to mention the
rights of children) discussed.
It is unfortunate that those who
play at politics, and those who write
the news, fail to realize this.
Ian Hunter
Youth Suffrage Movement
Club extends invitation
In recognition of the fact that the
majority of Canadians support access to abortion, a small group of
students is interested in forming a
Pro-Choice club on the UBC cam-
If there is something you think
people should know, write us a letter. In order to minimize backlogs,
please keep your ramblings as short
as possible; very long letters may be
edited for brevity. Please keep in
mind that racism, sexism and
homophobia are not acceptable in
The Ubyssey. Letters should be
typed, tripled-spaced, on a seventy
character line, and presented in person, with ID, at The Ubyssey office, SUB 241k.
pus. The club is intended to address
the issues of a woman's legal right
to choose (to continue, or to terminate an unwanted pregnancy),
accessability of birth control information, and the need for sex education.
A planning and organizational
meeting will be held in SUB room
205, on Wed., January 21, at 12:30.
All interested men and women are
invited to attend. Messages can be
left in SUB Box No. 223.
Tammy Soper
Sociology 5
Allyson Jeffs
History 4
Freyja Bergthorson
History/English 3 Friday, January 16, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
UBC needs sexual harassment procedures
By JANET PATTERSON
Nancy is a graduate student. Two
months after she begins her thesis,
she notices her thesis supervisor,
Professor X, is bringing more and
more sexual innuendo into their
discussions. He always closes his office door and draws his chair up
next to her. He insists on seeing her
once a week, in person. One week,
he puts his arm around her in a
"supporting" gesture and slides his
hand down to touch her breast. She
makes excuses and leaves, and
misses the next appointment. Professor X telephones her and insists
that she come to see him so he can
"explain" his action. At their
meeting, he says he is deeply attracted to her and wants to have an
affair. Working on her thesis
together can be "fun", he says.
Mary is leaving her lecture late
one afternoon. Her instructor
comes up behind her, pushes her
against the wall, and begins fondling and kissing her. She pushes him
away and runs. No words are
spoken. She withdraws from the
course, and from the university.
Susan and another student
regularly go for coffee with Professor Y after a seminar. One week,
the other student is away, and Professor Y asks her to dinner. She
refuses and leaves early. He calls
her at home and asks again, saying
how much he enjoys her point of
view in their discussions. He also
stops her in the hall. He gets visibly
angry when Susan continues to
refuse. Susan is upset by his persistent requests and by his change in
attitude towards her as a student.
She stops going to coffee and arrives late and leaves the seminar early*
These are examples of sexual
harassment. Sexual harassment has
been defined in human rights codes
and in policies at other universities
as persistent unwanted sexual attention or sexual demands accompanied by an explicit or implicit
' -MBS AWARDS ~     v
WILLIAM G. BLACK
MEMORIAL PRIZE
William G. Black Memorial Prize — a
prize in the amount of $1,500 has been
made available by the late Dr. William G.
Black for an essay on some aspect of
Canadian citizenship. The topic will be
designed to attract students from all
disciplines. The competition is open to all
students who are enrolled in
undergraduate programs and who do not
already possess a graduate degree. A
single essay topic of general nature related
to Canadian citizenship will be presented
to students at the time of the competition.
Duration of the competition will be two
hours. Candidates should bring their student card for identification.
Time and Place:
SATURDAY, JANUARY 24,
BUCHANAN 104
10:00 a.in.-12 noon
1987
Awards and Financial Aid • Room 50, General
Services Administration Building •
Telephone 228-5111 J
THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE SCHOOL
FOR WIVES
BY Moliere
JANUARY 14-24
Special Previews—
Jan. 14 & 15
2 for the price of 1
regular admission
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Box Office * Frederic Wood Theatre * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
promise of reward or threat of
punishment. Sexual harassment
thus includes all direct demands for
sexual favors together with promises or threats (implied or explicit)
and sexual assaults, such as Mary's.
It also includes touching which may
seem accidental, offensive sexual
remarks, leering or offensive staring
(e.g. at a woman's breasts), and
sexual remarks and behavior which
may "reasonably be perceived to
create a negative psychological or
emotional environment for work or
study."
Behind these definitions, lies a
painful and pervasive reality.
Studies are showing that 30-50 per
cent of undergraduate women experience some form of sexual
harassment from at least one instructor. In one U.S. study, seven
per cent of the women
undergraduatees reported that male
faculty members had made physical
sexual advances (touching, grabbing), 17 per cent had received verbal
sexual advances, 34 per cent had experienced leering and offensive sexual body language, and 43 per cent
had experienced some form of unwanted or undue sexual attention.
The damage that these experiences
cause the victim's development as a
student are often known only to
her. So far, there are no studies
showing how many men are sexually harassed.
Sexual harassment is this pervasive because it tends to be invisible. The victims are both silent and
silenced. Generally, it is only a
more powerful person who can
harass someone less powerful. In
sexual harassment, the harassers are
almost always male; the victims are
usually, but not exclusively, female.
As well, there is often an institutional power imbalance: it occurs in
a teacher/student relationship or an
employer/employee relationship.
With teachers and students, the
power imbalance may be compounded. The student may be new
to the institution, from out of town,
isolated, sexually inexperienced,
shy or naive. The experienced sexual harasser will look for his victim
among the group least likely to
complain.
The victim is silenced also
because the experience of sexual
harassment may raise feelings which
make action or protest difficult.
She may be embarrassed, or, if the
harasser denies that his actions have
a sexual intent, may be uncertain as
to why she is uncomfortable. She
may feel ashamed or feel that it
must have been her fault. More
than anything else, sexual harassment makes the victim feel worthless, that she has no right to complain. There is often an overwhelming sense of powerlessness.
The victim is silenced even more
so by the community. There is a
very real possibility that if she
speaks, she will not be believed. If
she is believed, her complaint may
not be taken seriously. There has
been a long history of sweeping sexual harassment under the rug,
because it is not seen as 'serious.'
However, human rights codes are
recognizing sexual harassment as a
violation of a basic human right,
and, as they do so, more and more
women speak of their experience of
being harassed. As the civil law
recognizes it as a civil harm, more
and more institutions move to
establish procedures.
The University of British Columbia is one of the few universities in
North America which does not yet
have a procedure for assisting the
victims of sexual harassment. At
the moment, there is a presidential
advisory committee which is formulating a policy. It has no student
representation however, even
though students, especially women
students, are the most frequent victims of sexual harassment, together
with employees. Student's views
and experiences must be
represented in any procedure the
university adopts. It must be a procedure which helps the victim of
sexual harassment break the silence
which now oppresses them.
One step towards understanding
sexual harassment on campus is for
women to come forward and speak
of their experiences. A sexual
harassment clinic has been started
this semester, to collect information
on the types of experiences of sexual harassment that women have,
and to refer women to counselling.
If you have had such experiences,
and would like to talk about them,
the sexual harassment clinic at the
UBC Women's Centre, Room 130,
SUB on Tuesdays 2-4 or
Wednesdays 3-5, starting January
21 (or phone 228-2163).
If you are interested in helping at
the clinic, please come to the training session at the Women's Centre,
Wednesday, January 14, 3-5.
Janet Patterson is a third year
law student and was a graduate student rep on the sexual harassment
committee at York University,
which was formed after there was a
rape and no procedures to deal with
it.
Ifomfazy thinks
comes one peacrty idea.
\X/s at Hiram Walker are very
V V happy to bring you our brand
new Peach Schnapps.
Its a clever combination of the
great taste of Schnapps with the
luscious flavour of peaches.
It's great straight or all mixed up.
For instance.you can easily make
a coJd Fuzzy Navel.
Just pour 2 ounces of Hiram
Walker Peach Schnapps over ice and
add orange juice to taste.
Or how about the chilling
experience of a Peaches and Cream.
That's IV? ounces of Hiram
Walker Peach Schnapps over ice
and top it with milk or light cream
Anyway you like it, our new
Peach Schnapps has a cool,
crisp, peachy taste.
And ideas like these don't
just grow on trees.
NewHham'Vvalker
Peach Schnapps.
Taste the Difference.
■\
3t. «SL
£\v some peachy
recipe ideas
write Huam Walker
Schnappk
RO. Box 2343.
Department R
Brampton. Ontario
L6TM Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, January 16,1987
Friday, January 16,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
"I can't fix a bomb. Who the hell
is responsible for this?" One
character says it in Act 2, but one
can also hear those words coming
out of the mouth of director
Kathleen Weiss at the first rehearsal
of Brides in Space.
This is one of those terrible shows
where the characters are so shallow,
the plot so contrived and needlessly
complicated, and the humour so
predictable, that the audience
members develop one of those relationships born of mutual trauma,
and does social service, laughing
where the laughs go and applauding
at the end.
Playwright Peggy Thompson has
a fixation with menstrual and
pregnancy jokes, coupled with the
conviction that lesbianism
represents some kind of moral accomplishment.
The humorous premise is that in
Canada, in the year 2010, there are
48 women for each eligible man.
Play shakes the dead in space
The government of Canada
discovers the planet Eros which is
an all-male planet that needs
women. Three Canadian women
are sent to Eros as brides.
stage
Brides in Space
By Peggy Thompson
Directed by Kathleen Weiss
Waterfront Theatre
until January 31
Enroute, however, one develops
a lesbian relationship with the CBC
reporter who is going along to
report, a second finds sexual
satisfaction from a metal robot with
a metallic tubular extension, and
the third, a very masculine, tough,
Maggie Thatcher type, expresses no
sexual interest in anything at all.
There is no  question  that the
premise is funny, and promising.
But it is never developed, and in- ,
stead the play relies on a series of"
one-liners, the premise simply being
the first joke.
And the one-liners are perhaps
the most embarassing, unfunny,
cliche lines in the history of English
theatre. Here is a top five list; the
best of the worst:
5. "I wonder how the Erotics will
act towards women; erotically,
or neurotically."
4. Sally: I don't think it's time to
hear any Miss Canada jokes
Karin: Okay (aside) Did you
hear the one about Miss Canada
and the aliens?
3. What do you do when you have
your period in space?
2. I'm sorry, I don't know what
came  over  me.   (aside  to  audience) I must be premenstrual.
And the award for having uttered
the most embarassing line in the
history of English theatre goes to
Christine Willes who, after having
her body expand with pregnancy on
stage, regards her body and says:
1. "Oh my God, my breasts are
leaking."
On the success side, Ken MacDonald's low-budget set has the feel
of one of those old, low budget sci-
fi movies.
And there is one funny line. Here
it is: "It's like a Canadian novel:
everyone dies in the middle."
Who knows why Tamanhous artistic director Kathleen Weiss, who
directed this thing, chose to end her
first season so. Her first two plays,
The Haunted House Hamlet and
Neverland: The Adventurer of
Peter Pan and Wendy, were innovative, interesting, and very
entertaining. That this piece has
been produced is inexplicable.
The humour isn't clever enough
to be funny, and the play isn't camp
enough to be funny. But it's bad
enough to be inadvertantly funny.
But even if you're into the
sadistic pleasure of watching the
hideously bad, unlike equally bad
films, here you have to watch real
live people do this stuff. Human
pathos must win out, you just start
feeling sorry for them.
Russian avant-garde
By NORMAN RAVVIN
"/ measure myself against the
Russians, that's fair. I have here a
clipping datelined Moscow, four
young people apprehended strangling a swan. That's boredom."
— From Donald Barthelme's
See the Moon?
What pass between West and
East, in the way of cultural exchange is limited, for the most part,
to mutually critical news coverage
and the odd commodity for export:
Iowan wheat or the Russian Lada.
At Calgary's Glenbow Museum an
export of another sort has been on
exhibition since mid-November.
Referred to as "the only avant-
garde movement ever to emerge
from contemporary Russia," SOTS
(short for socialist) ART
represents the work of a group of
ten Russian emigres, now living in
New York. What is similar about
the work of these artists, and makes
their  combined  effort  a  sort  of
manifesto on its own, is their
satiric, half-nostalgic use of the
icons and style of Stalin's official
artistic enterprise — Socialist
Realism.
On first walking into the exhibition the artworks might be mistaken
for official Soviet propaganda:
shadowy busts of Lenin and Stalin
Brel breathes, again
By PETER BURNS
The return of the Jacques Brel,
tripped-out-on-life musical to the
Arts Club Theatre produced many
smiles Friday at its sold-out opening.
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Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and
Living in Paris
Directed by Mario Crudo
Arts Club Granville Island
Those who fell in love with the
original 1972 production relived the
magic of Vancouver's first big hit,
and those seeing it for the first time
received a fine introduction to the
French song-master's bittersweet
lyrics and melodies about life and
love.
Some complain that Jacques Brel
comes around a little too often (this
is its second reincarnation in less
than a year), but the resurrection of
this play is certainly a welcome addition to any year's program.
The cast of Leon Bibb, John
Payne, and the sisters Mortifee
(Ann and Jane) brings new life to
Brel. The European flavours from
Paris to Amsterdam, the characters
from sailors to whores, combine in
emotionally charged pools of
enlightened insight and melancholy.
The flowers and romance of the
sillier songs are in dramatic contrast
with the more moving, brooding
song, Amsterdam, the tale of the
sailor who spends his guilders on
fish soup and prostitutes.
Leon Bibb, from the original
cast, performs with a remarkable
depth of emotion. His voice
trembles and surges as he steps into
characters and makes the live. He is
the indicator of how viti acting
abilityis to bringing excellence to
this review of Brel's songs.
This is the problem with John
Payne, a new-comer to the show
but whose musical experience includes last summer's Only in Vancouver. Payne can sing well, but his
performance, limited in its emotion, falls short of Bibb's mark.
Ann Mortifee, also from the
original production, brings an exciting seductive flavour to the show.
And her sister Jane, who just finished a run on Don Messer's Jubilee, is
also in fine voice, and has a keen
sense of character.
The small Parisien set, with
French windows and the band in
shadow behind the window, is simple and effective in allowing the
songs to be the focal point.
Another Jacques Brel revival,
another Arts Club hit. It's predictable, but then again, it's good.
Fidel couldn't break him
By RICK HIEBERT
A survivor of the brutal Cuban penal system has written an extremely
powerful and moving book about his 22 years in Castro's Gulag Archipelago.
Against All Hope
By Armando Valladares
Published by Alfred A. Knopf
1986
print
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Armando Valladares' book Against All Hope is the account of his experiences during his imprisonment. Valladares, who has been called
"Cuba's Solzhenitsyn", documents the nether world of the Cuban slave
labour system in its full nastiness, revealing it through his visionary prose.
Valladares was arrested in 1960 for making comments against the marxist
tendencies of Castro's revolution. A police interrogator told him, "It's true
— we have rto proof, or rather no concrete proof, against you. But we do
have the conviction that you are a potential enemy of the Revolution. For
us, that is enough."
Valladares is neither mawkish, sentimental nor martyr-like. Rather, he
tells his story in a objective fashion, revealing that hs has a strong gift of
picturing life in imprisonment so that the reader can see the evils of this
system.
Violence is common in the Cuban penal system, and especially directed
against the prisoner arrested for his political beliefs or activity, writes
Valladares.
He tells the story of the camp commander who brought his dog to executions by firing squad so the dog could lick up the blood left on the ground.
<*<eV*>
He tells of the death of his friend Carrion. When wounded and caught
during an escape attempt, he begged the soldier not to shoot him. Later
Valladares heard that the soldier told his friends in a bar about the episode
and had said "Imagine, and me just itching to try out my R-2 (rifle) for the
first time!"
The harshest example of brutality is the story of Robertico, the 12 year
old boy sentenced to imprisonment until his majority for firing a military
commander's pistol into the air. Robertico would cry at night, Valladares
records, yelling "Get me out of here! I want my mother!" The ward head
took pity on the boy and forbade the soldiers beating him with bayonets
and chains. They were to beat him with braided ropes instead.
Cuba, like all communist regimes, uses slave labour on an extremely
widespread basis. Valladares records the struggle of those attempting to
refuse to clean out a cesspool by hand, or to work in a rock quarry without
any protective equipment.
Prisoners were fed hot sugar water, cow rectum, rice with worms crawling through it, and waste meat intended to be fed to cattle (the prisoners
called it "dog vomit").
Valladares also tells of the widespread torture in Cuba's penal system.
There are the infamous "blackout cells", where prisoners are put into the
dark for years at a time or the "drawer cells", where prisoners are stuffed
into a space of two feet by five feet.
Valladares, contracting a nerve disease due to his malnutrition, spent
most of the 70's in a wheelchair. He writes that his strong personal faith in
Christ, originally embraced out of desperation, enabled him to survive.
"Because of my situation, it seemed my life would necessarily be a life of
resistance, but I would be sustained by a soul filled with love and hope," he
writes.
Against All Hope is a majestic book that describes both the nether
reaches of man's depravity and the summit of man's courage and
goodness.
glower from large, lacquered canvases; golden-haired cupids read
'The Manifesto'; and there is a
great deal of red about. Deep carmine swags of drapery dominate the
foreground and background of
paintings, half drawn, seeming to
reveal the glorious new Communist
reality.
Posed among neo-classical columns, sometimes refigured as centaurs or boldly chiseled like mountains, Stalin and Lenin appear, at
first glance, as the god-like
creatures that the propaganda of
the 'godless' state has cast them as.
gallery
Soviet Avant-Garde Goes West
Calgary Glenbow Museum
Until January 23
But there is room, with such an
obvious and highly serious array of
images and gestures, to turn the
whole enterprise on its head. SOTS
ART plays in the iconic twilight
zone where there is slight difference
between mythic figures and comic
book heroes, between official vision
and vapidness. There is a sense
though that beneath this satiric play
is a deep attachment and yearning
for the culture that is being
caricatured.
The SOTS artists produce a pop
culture, created by the meeting of
official Soviet forms and an ir-
reverance that is unwelcome in
Moscow. The first and only public
exhibition of the movement's founding members — organized in a
field on the outskirts of Moscow —
was 'closed' when government
bulldozers destroyed the artworks.
In the paintings, sculpture and
video that appears in the Glenbow,
most of which were conceived in
New York City, humour rather
than polemic is the prevailing
response to such an unwelcoming
cultural heritage. And by no means
does their immersion in American
culture lead the SOTS artists to
abandon their heritage. As the
movement's leaders, Komar and
Melamid observe: "It's only in
America that we have really
perceived ourselves as national Russian artists."
For the SOTS artists Western
culture is not the panacea for Soviet
totalitarianism. It is the platform
from which a new Soviet national
heritage can be enacted. By resurrecting the Socialist Realist mode,
these artists force the reconsideration of an era whose burial was
forced in order to erase from common history the embarrassment of
Stalinist policies.
What is effected by this reconsideration of official symbols and
myths is a form of nationalist expression that is wary of its own
pomposities and prejudices, and includes what the serious business of
nationalism never includes:
homour.
It is humourous — ironic at least
— that such perspective can be
gained by Muscovites once they
have lived in the mecca of Western
culture. The appearance of such
nostalgic and nationalistic yearnings points to a different kind of
boredom: American style. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 16, 1987
Pownall remains the autocrat
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
The blustering autocrat appears
to be the role Leon Pownall was
born to play. Last year it was
Undershaft the arms merchant in
UBC's Major Barbara. Last summer it was Henry VIII at Stratford,
and tomorrow night it's, according
to Pownall, "one of the unholiest
tyrants that ever existed."
interview
with Leon Pownall
acting in
Master Class
By David Pownall
Directed by Walter Learning
opens tomorrow night
Pownall's in town for the Vancouver Playhouse's Master Class,
written by his British cousin, David
Pownall. "I met him as a child."
In Master Class, "Stalin summons Shostakovich and Prokofiev
to the Kremlin and tells them
they're not writing the music people
want to hear." Pownall, of course,
is Stalin.
"The play deals with the delicate
subject of the legislation of art," he
says, "the minimizing of talent."
He points out that Master Class
has an unusual requirement of its
actors. "All four actors have to
play the piano."
Although all the actors have had
rudimentary training, a piano coach
was brought into rehearsal, and
"Peter Howarth Prokofiev has
been practicing for months.
He says the rehearsal process has
been intense, "all four actors are on
stage all the time."
Pownall's last incarnation at the
Playhouse was as the director of
last season's Goodnight, Disgrace.
"I think since Goodnight, Disgrace,
and I haven't seen it all, I don't
think there's been anything as provocative" as Master Class.
Pownall, who marks his 25th
year "in the business" next year,
began his career in a Hamilton high
school, "We didn't do musicals, we
did Shakespeare. I did Romeo and
Petruchio." He auditioned for the
Stratford Festival right out of high
school, and got in. "I played
Hotspur in Richard II. I was 21."
Pownall says that since then, he's
never been out of work, except
when he's wanted to be.
The heavy-set actor/director/
writer is as overpowering in person
as he is on stage. He dominated
the stage as Undershaft in last
year's Frederic Wood production of
Major Barbara. Arms flailing, he
stormed about the stage, admonishing the cast and audience on
the enormous morality of international arms merchants.
In person, the flailing arms are a
little less active: but one holds a
beer glass, the other a cigarette. He
punctuates his thoughts by shaking
his hand quickly beside his head
and launches into a criticism of
regional theatres like the Vancouver
Playhouse.
"It would .appear-to me that the
regional theatres are working under
the financial gun of doing things to
do good box office. The things they
do seem to be short-term
solutions."
He believes that more quality,
thoughtful plays would be produced if theatres returned to a system
of acting companies, where the same
group of actors perform all the
plays in a theatre over many years.
"The artists reside in the community. They must have an
understanding of the community. If
the artists relate to the community,
then the community falls in line
with that stable of artists."
He considers the tendency of
Vancouver theatres to do well-
known, banal plays symptomatic of
the lack of companies, "They find
something that works (financially)
and say, let's do something like that
again."
He allows that audiences do want
to see shows like Brighton Beach
Memoirs, "But then they'll come to
see the same group do Shakespeare.
They become interested in what
your artists do." He would like to
see theatres take more risks, and
build a regular, loyal audience, "if
you develop your product and the
consumer has an awareness of the
product, they'll go for it."
Pownall's experience of theatre is
not limited to the mainstream. In
the early seventies, "I was asked to
work with convicts." He directed
five seasons of shows at Matsqui
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prison, "It was one of the hottest
theatre tickets in the lower
mainland."
Pownall was the director, the
prisoners the actors, musicians, set
builders. They did Of Mice and
Men, The Homecoming, and Bertolt Brecht's Threepenny Opera,
"It was a very raw production."
He left because he burned out, "I
found I was spending more time in
prison than the convicts — they'd
get out on weekend passes."
Three years ago he became artistic director of the new summer
theatre festival in Nanaimo, and
directed the first production of
Vancouver playwright Michael
Merer's Goodnight, Disgrace, a fictional account of the relationship
between novelists Malcolm Lowry
and Conrad Aiken.
The play was a critical success,
and represented Pownall's belief in
the need to take risks and produce
new playwrights — such as himself.
Two years ago the Vancouver
Playhouse produced Pownall's own
monologue in which Pownall
played Dylan Thomas. And he's
just finished a new play, called Foul
Mouth Frank, about a character
mentioned in Shaw's Saint Joan,
which he will be looking to produce
in the near future.
Women 'Birds ranked tenth
By LOUISE PANZIERA
The UBC women's volleyball
team is ranked tenth in CIAU standings after finishing sixth in a
Manitoba Invitational tournament
over the weekend that saw the top
four teams in Canada competing.
UBC lost to Winnipeg, last year's
CIAU champions 15-11, 15-6, and
were defeated by Manitoba, the
silver medal CIAU champions,
15-10, 15-12.
UBC's third loss was in the semifinals against the Manitoba Games
team 15-11, 15-3, 12-15 and 15-4
were the scores. The Manitoba
Games team have been playing
together for the past two years and
are known for maintaining an excellent defensive game.
UBC coach Donna Baydock said
the experience was good because it
put UBC's offensive play to the test
in what proved to be an intense
match.
UBC had two wins in the tournament beating Dalhousie 15-8, 15-9,
and Regina in the semi-finals 15-11,
15-13, 12-15, 15-4.
Against Dalhousie Rhonda Sampson made nine digs in the match,
Trina Hewlitt proved to be an
obstacle for the Dalhousie team as
she made five stuff blocks and
Sheila Jones led the team in kills
with eight.
In the semi-final match against
Regina, Heather Olafsson and
Christiane Martin performed excellently with nine blocks each.
Heather also had fourteen digs,
while Sheila Jones had thirteen kills
and Rhonda Sampson eighteen.
UBC   is   working   on   a   new,
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
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,:  Opposite Chevron Station
quicker offensive style of play that
power hitter Rhonda Sampson is
using to her fullest potential.
Rhonda impressed many coaches
this weekend with the help of setter
Vikki Lalari, who also performed
well adjusting to the new style of
play.
Donna Baydock said overall the
tournament was good for her team
as it served as an eye opening experience.
UBC was able to watch some excellent matches being played by
some top Canadian teams that carry
a lot of experience with them.
Write for
The Ubyssey
8«si
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Winning can be easy... First Draw Jan. 29
Drop entry forms obtained at    (J II CI I P-i    Restaurant into
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4497 DUNBAR AT 29th AVE.
PHONE: 222-9922 Friday, January 16,1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
vista
stage
Tha School for WIvm, by that exciting
contemporary playwright Moliere, at the
Freddy Wood Theetre, by the UBC theatre
department (228-2678). A typical Freddy
Wood production which renowned critic Jennifer Lyall tears apart elsewhere in this ish.
Jan. 14-24 at 8 p.m.
Maeter Cless, By David Pownall, at the
Vancouver Playhouse (Hamilton at
Dunsmuir, 872-8622). January 17 to February
Mat 8 p.m.
Jaques Brel Is Alive and Well end Living
in Paris, a cabaret of the poet's works and a
safe production for the doomed-to-be-dull
Arts Club Theatre Granville Island
(687-1644). To February 14 st 8:30 p.m. Monday to Friday, 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Saturday.
Turning Thirty and Pushing Forty, two
one-woman shows by ac
tress/playwright/hack Cheryl Cashman, at
the Van. East Cultural Centre (1895
Venables St., 254-9678). Universally panned,
but for some reason everyone's talking about
it. Forty, January 16 and 17 at 8:30 p.m., and
Thirty, January 17 at 6 p.m.
Brides in Space, by Peggy Thompson, the
most turgid, repellent sci-fi since Flesh Gordon, which renowned critic Michael Grober-
man tears to shreds elsewhere in this issue. At
the Waterfront Theatre. Granville Island
(1406 Anderson St., 686-6217). Until January
31st, at 8:30 p.m. 6:30 and 9:30 p.m. on
Saturdays.
Romona and the White Slaves, by the
Dark Horse Theatre gang, at the Firehall
Theatre, (280 E. Cordova St., 689-0926). Until January 24 at 8 p.m. No performance
January 19.
Coward Cabaret, based on the moving,
seminal works of that brilliant composer, Noel
Coward, at the Arts Club Revue Theatre on
Granville island 1887-1644). It'll run 'till it stops
bringin' the bucks, at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays at
6:30 and 9:30 p.m.
music
Jazzmanian Devils, at the Venue (932
Granville St., 684-VENU). January 16 and 17
at 7 p.m.
Rockin' Fools, at the Venue, January 20
and 21 at 7 p.m.
Madeleine Morris and World Service,
Town Pump (Gastown, 683-6695). January
16 and 17.
Qroovaholics, Town Pump, January 21.
Wesley Foster, principal clarinetist for the
VSO, featured in the VSO's Musically Speaking, at the Orpheum (280-3311/4444).
January 17 at 8:30 p.m. and Jan. 19 at 7:30
p.m.
Saul Berson Jazz Quintet, at the
Classical Joint (231 Carral St., 689-0667).
January 16 and 17 at 10 p.m.
Change of Heart and Guests, from
Toronto, at the Arts Club Theatre (1181
Seymour St.). January 16 and 17 at 10:30
p.m.
film
Cactus, a film by Paul Cox, starring Isabelle
Huppert and Robert Menzies, at the Van East
(7th and Commercial, 253-5455). Until
January 22 at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Othello, starring Lord Larry, January 20 at
12:40 and 7 p.m., at SUB Auditorium.
Ferris Bualler's Day Off. at SUB
Auditorium, Jan. 16 to 18 at 7 p.m. and 9:30
p.m.
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man,
January 21 at SUB Auditorium at 7 and 9:30
p.m.
galleries
Tactile Values: Cenedian art from the
VAG Collection, at, of course, the VAG (750
Hornby St., 682-5621). Until April 20, so
there's no rush.
The Fertile Hand: Ceremonial Art of
New Guinea, at the Cartwright Gallery
(1411 Cartwright St., Granville Island,
687-8266). Until February 22.
Facsimilles, by Reid Shier, at Artspeak
Gallery (101 — 1045 W. Broadway). January
17 to February 6.
campus countdown
CITR   •   UBC   Radio   •   FM102   •   CablelOO
tt ARTIST
1. Billy Bragg
2. John Zorn
3. Shriekback
4. Housemartins
5. Kraftwerk
6. Fishbone
7. XTC
8. Trouble Funk
9. This Mortal Coil
10. The Jazz Butcher
Hear the Countdown
ALBUM
Talking with the Taxman About Poetry
The Big Cundown
Big Night Music
London 0 Hull 4
Electric Cafe
In Your Face
Skylarking
Say What!
Filigree & Shadow
Distressed Soul
in The Pit every Thurs., 8:30 p.m.
Cheers to... brian
olham
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Perfectly Simple. Simply Perfect.
Three calculators from Texas Instruments.
They're easy to use and there's one
to make your everyday calculating tasks
simple.
Each one features a sophisticated solar
power system. That means you're not going
to be let down by batteries when you can
least afford it
In a nutshell, the three calculators you
see here reflect what we believe calculators
are all about: they're fast, they're efficient,
they're reliable and they're easy to use.
We're sure there's one for you.
To start with there's the TI-31 SLR which
performs the 63 most used scientific and
statistical functions, including the algebraic
operating system.
But if you're into more advanced math,
statistics or computer sciences, you
should be looking at the TI-36 SLR, or the
TI-37 Galaxy.
The TI-36 gives you a total of 89 functions. It can convert figures from one
base to another and performs mixed calculations. It also has a 10 digit/2-exponent
display that shows 13 mode or status
calculations. The TI-37 Galaxy has all this
plus it can handle integer or fraction
calculations. And it comes with a hard
plastic carrying case.
So if you're looking for a calculator that's
simple to operate and perfect for what
you want it to do, think two letters, TI. -
and visit your Texas Instruments dealer.
What could be simpler?
Texas ***
Instruments Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 16,1987
tween classes
TODAY
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
"A" tournament, aH day. War Memorial Gym.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
European   handball   postponed   until   5:30-7:30
p.m., Osborne Gym.
UBC 8QUA8H CLUB/CYCLING CLUB
Bzzr garden, 2:00-7:00 p.m., SUB party room.
SUBFILMS
Ferris   Buelter's   day   off,   starring   Matthew
Broderick, 7:00 and 9:00 p.m., SUB auditorium.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Fund raising against apartheid, 8:00 p.m., Grad
Student Centre Lounge.
UBC ASSOCIATION FOR BAHAI STUDIES
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 12:00 p.m., 2490 W. 2nd Ave.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
Meet v. University of Calgary Dinosaurs. Two of
the best swimming teems in Canada going at it
head to head, 10:00 a.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Work party — with refreshments,  10:00 a.m.,
Jericho Sailing Centre.
MONDAY
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
General meeting, noon, Grad Student Centre.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, 5:00-6:00 p.m., SUB ballroom.
SUBFILMS
'The X-rated version of "Flesh Gordon," 7:00
and 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE TORY CLUB
Meet Canada's minister of defence, Perrin Beatty, 3:00 p.m., SUB 119. Also, dinner and video,
"Native   Indian    Prophecies,"   6:00   p.m.,   at
Shahram's, for address call 224-3696.
SATURDAY
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Club dinner-party by invitation only, s1 for
members, $2 for non-members, 5:00-8:00 p.m.,
2734 Fairview Crescent, UBC.
SUBFILMS
Ferris Bueller's, "Pay Off," starring Matthew
Broderick, 7:00 and 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
"A" tournament final at 7:00 p.m., all day. War
Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD RUQBY
McKecknie trip game v. Vancouver Island reps,
2:30 p.m., Thunderbird Stadium, UBC.
THE UBYSSEY
Constitution meeting, 2:30, 2831 Quebec St,,
(12th and Quebec), everyone welcome.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion service, 10:00 a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Wuchte's open forum for IBM enthusiasts, noon,
SUB 212A.
TUESDAY
UNITED CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship service, all welcome,  noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
SUBFILMS
Laurence Olivier in "Othello," 12:40 and 7:00
p.m., SUB auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Anson's Amiga Activists, regular meeting, noon,
SUB 111.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
All  invited  to  the  Warren  Fong  show,  seots
available for IBM people, noon, SUB 205.
hot flash
The next CIAU games coming up
for the UBC women's volleyball will
be against Alberta and Saskatchewan. Until then UBC will be
hosting their own forty team
Thundervolley Tournament.
Although UBC is not participating,
it's still an event in the volleyball's
circle social calendar. Twenty-four
men's teams and sixteen women's
teams from B.C., Quebec and
Washington will be competing all
day Friday and Saturday. After the
8 p.m. finals Saturday night, UBC
is inviting everyone to buy tickets
for their "tacky tourist" social.
Tickets are five dollars apiece and
can be purchased at rooms 226 and
216 at War Memorial Gym.
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1987-88
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C.
students. Successful applicants will be required to live in the
residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions
are available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at the
Front Desk of each single residence area: Totem Park, Place
Vanier, W.H. Gage, and Acadia/Fairview.
Applications will be accepted from January 5 to January 16,
1987 at the Front Desks of the Single Student Residences, or
at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
EVERYONE WELCOME. . .
GREAT GOLF! BEAUTIFUL CLUBHOUSE! FABULOUS FOOD!
THE ALL NEW PUBLIC
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
An Outstanding Public Course and Cluhhouse
The West Point Dining Room
features
Sunday Brunch     Luncheon Buffet
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
reservations
suggested
(Monday through Friday)
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
224-7513
The Thunderbird Lounge at the University
Golf Club is pleased to present its Fall
Entertainment Schedule by presenting:
DUFFY NELSON
Fri.-Sat., Jan. 16-17-8 p.m.-12:00 a.m.
We can honestly say we have the best prices in town!
SZgmfe     University Golf Club
^flPPaMe-:     5185 UNIVERSITY BLVD.. VANCOUVER. B.C.
•pm|fijSW» Banquet & Office Phone: 224-7513
'^F^mwEci*? Pro Shop Phone: 224-1818
•••ittjvfr*"
hot flash
Stop talking about Food Banks
pleasel Go have fun, have drinks,
and raise money instead. On Saturday the 17th (that's tomorrow) the
Sigma Chi's and External Affairs
present the first UBC Food Bank
Benefit featuring Vancouver's own:
Roots Roundup, Hunting Party,
Bruno Gerussi's Medallion, and The
Baghdads.
METRIC LOG SCALING
COURSE
QUALIFIED INSTRUCTION
for B.C. (Coastal)
metric log seal i no exams
Commencing January 31,1987
for 16 WMhendo — Fee $600
UmHed enrollment
SOUTH COAST SCALING
BUREAU LTD.
738-1541
JJ\ic
FACULTY OF LAW
Information Presentation
If you are contemplating attendance at Law School
at Victoria or elsewhere in the fall of 1987, come to
an information presentation hosted by Professor
Lyman   Robinson,   Chairman   of  the  Admissions
Committee.
1987 Admissions packages and LSAT Applications
will be available.
Brock Hall 106
Tuesday, 20 January, 1987
at 1:30 p.m.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
■■^^t^. Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
-3-9 Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS	
FOOD IRRADIATION - A PUBUC HEALTH
CONCERN? A forum sponsored by Agora
Food Coop. Sun. Jan. 25, 7 p.m. 17th &
Dunbar. For further info call Greg 731-0894.
NUTRITION AND EXERCISE AWARENESS GROUP sponsored by School of
Rehabilitation Medicine, Thursdays, Jan.
22- Feb. 12, 7-8:30 p.m. Interested persons
call (6-8 p.m.) Cathy 222-1847 or Tracy
261-3280 by Jan. 20.
25 - INSTRUCTION
INTENSIVE HANDS-ON instruction in word
processing (WordPerfect, WordStar,
Word). 2 per class. Wordpower 222-2661.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by graduate of Juilliard
School of Music. Morning & early afternoon lessons arranged at your home.
321-4809.
BUST LOOSE!
to Mexico
Come celebrate the end
of final examsl
1 week from $489.
2 weeks from $599.
434-1279
30 - JOBS
10 - FOR SALE — Commercial
TYPESETTER P/T for weekly near University. Layout exp. an asset. Speed and accuracy essential. Phone editor 228-1155
days, 738-0653 evenings.
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED to care for 2
girls (1 & 3) & do light hsekeeping. Required 3-5 times/wk., 4 hrs./day. Flexible
hrs. Kerrisdale area. 261-3565.
VANCOUVER
FUN MARKET
"A   FLEA   PLACE   TO   SHOP'
703 TERMINAL
east of Main St. Skytrain Stn.
8-4 SAT.. SUN., HOLIDAYS
'Bargains
•Bikes
•Clothes
•Furniture
686-0666 Info & Bookings
Free Admission With Ad
35 - LOST
UBC AREA: MALE DOG, Husky Keeshond.
Black & white, bushy haired. 12 yrs. old.
Reward offered. If seen or found call
733-4498.
LOST: brown paper accordian portfolio,
film script & photos inside. Ph. 736-3198.
40 - MESSAGES
CONGRATULATIONS to the new Alpha
Delt initiates. Everyone else must be green
with envy.
65 - SCANDALS
11 - FOR SALE - Private
SHERWOOD TUNER-AMP.. Altec speakers. Excellent condition. Teak finish. Great
buy at $350. 228-0804.
1976 DATSUN B210. One owner, AM/FM.
All records, great transportation. Asking
$700. 261-7079.
"MOVING   EAST"  APARTMENT  SALE.
Quality items. No junk. Ste. 902 - 4660 W.
10th Ave. Sat. & Sun. Jan. 17 & 18.
12-4 p.m.
NEAR NEW H.P. 12-C calculator $135 OBO.
Texas Inst. B/A II calculator $30. 641-4646
weekday mornings.
HOME STEREO SYSTEM  FOR SALE  -
Pioneer receiver, Eds speakers, AGS turntable, $175. Call 224-4049.
15 - FOUND
"SET OF KEYS" on Jan. 14 at W. 13th Ave.
Blanca. Please phone 224-0972 and
describe.
20 - HOUSING	
DUALITY 1 BEDROOM basement suite
near UBC. $495. Cable/utilities included.
N/S 228-8460.
A 'TOAST" to our neophytes. Ha Ha Ha Ha.
Ace
70 - SERVICES
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
presents
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, JAN. 18
following the service,
An address by
Archbishop Ted Scott,
former primate of
Anglican Church of Canada
Everyone is We/come
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
RESEARCH PAPERS
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Time and Improve Your Grades!
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
►213-477-8226
Ext.
49
Or. rush $2.00 to: Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave #206-SN. Los Angeles, CA 90025
Custom research also available—all levels
EXCELLENT EDITING SERVICES. Professional editing for readability, organization.
Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547 or 327-4761.
USE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
70 - SERVICES
CRISIS PREGNANCYI Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests.)
UNIT I CO-OP NURSERY: under 3 daycare
has spaces available for part or full time.
Located on UBC campus. Open 8a.m. to 5
p.m. Phone Monday to Friday 228-3019.
PENTACARE DAYCARE has limited # of
openings for children 3-5. Behind daycare
gym on Acadia Rd. 228-5420 (days),
224-3078 (eves).
75 - WANTED
JAPANESE-ENGLISH translators required
by international consulting company on
project basis. Send resume (mail replies only) to: Attn: Mr. B. Konar, 821-810 W.
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. V5Z 4C9.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED - Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
WORDPOWER- editing, proofing & word
processing — Custom, self-serve in eves.
Stud, rates. 3709 W. 10th at Alma.
222-2661.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a professional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc.
$2/pg for word processing, $20/hr for
editing/writing. Hand in work you can be
proud of I 324-9824.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordproceasor El IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U &del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333 M/C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    U-
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227 24
hours.
TYPING? YOU BETI Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
26 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Professional elec. typing, fast, accurate,
reas. call Jan 271-6755 R.mond.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
tech. equations, letters, resumes, bilingual.
Clemy. 266-6641.
TYPIST WILL TYPE essays, theses, etc.
for $1.00/page. Paper supplied. Call
224-4834. Friday, January 16, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Students don't talk sex
By ROBERT BEYNON
A large number of students have
pressing sexual concerns but few
will discuss them, a recently released student health services study
reveals.
A study performed in March
1985 indicates most student
respondents, male and female, have
serious sexual concerns ranging
from painful intercourse to mastur-
ba*ing too often, but few will
discuss these concerns with a doctor.
"We (health sciences staff) are
very used to talking about sex to
young people and it doesn't bother
us in the least," said health services
director Dr. Percival Smith. Many
students have incorrect street
knowledge regarding sex, he said,
and need some good advice.
Women who filled out the questionnaire were concerned about
painful sexual intercourse (24.4 per
cent), orgasm (24.6 per cent), getting a sexually transmitted disease
(38.6 per cent), being infertile (20.9
per cent), becoming pregnant (52.1
per cent) and methods of birth control.
Men who filled out the questionnaire were most concerned about
premature ejaculation (26.3 per
cent), masturbating too often (19.9
per cent), infrequent intercourse
(21.1 per cent), getting a sexually
transmitted disease (41.1 per cent)
and methods of birth control (52.4
per cent).
During March 1985, 1,325
students visiting health services
were asked if they would fill out the
questionnaire. Of those students,
650 actually completed the form,
250 males and 400 females; approximately 50 per cent of the members
of each sex that attend the clinic
during that month.
He added that women are more
open about their sexuality and concerns than men.
"Men have more uptightness and
problems than women. Women
find greater humor in sex," he said.
"You have to be careful not to
make light of sex with men."
Smith said the service deals with
very few serious sexual dysfunctions
although many students ask for advice on particular aspects of sex.
Approximately two students a year
approach health services with
serious sexual dysfunctions and are
sent on to Shaughnessy Hospital's
sexual unit.
Gays, said Smith, have a higher
rate of sexual dysfunctions because
many have difficulties accecpting or
realizing that they are gay.
Examples of serious sexual
dysfunctions are men who cannot
keep a penis erect or women who
feel nothing during intercourse.
He added that men still regularly
come to the clinic with gonorrhoea,
while no women do. Men will go to
a prostitute to prove to themselves
they can have intercourse before
beginning a sexual relationship,
Smith said, which results in these '
cases of gonorrhoea.
Most students, men and women
have only one partner who they are
sexually active with, he added.
Smith said health services is often
asked about frequency of intercourse between a couple. Couples
should have intercourse as often as
they want to he said.
"Some people make love three or
four times a day; that's normal.
Some people make love once a
month; and that's normal."
AMS Speakers & UBC Debating Society
present
1
DOUG COLLINS
-^K^fiSKY           vs.
^HARRY RANKIN
(Please note change of debater)
in a debate about South Africa
Fri., Jan. 23 — 12:30 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
All Welcome
party a little, party a lot
earl's place
10th Ave/Trimble
tel: 222-1342
fresh, fresh food
partyroom seats 15-40
>un. -Thurs. 11:30 a.m. - 11:00 pm./Kri. & Sal. 11:30 a.m. - midnight
rv3
.•.4
HBASF 90
TRUE CHROME AT THIS PRICE!
Larry's Not Kidding!!
EXTRA 10% OFF
WITH AMS CARD
II
CASE OF 10
$25
/AWARENES
2053  WEST  41st   AVE.
VANCOUVER
263-0878
1986-87 BUDGET FOR THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
INTRODUCTION
Every student enrolled in a credit course at U.B.C. automatically becomes a member of the Alma Mater
Society. The A.M.S. is a large and diverse organization which provides a comprehensive array of student
services. Often the A.M.S. provides the services that the University is unwilling or unable to provide.
Each year the A.M.S. collects a fee of $32.50 from all full time U.B.C. students, and a proportionate
amount from part time students. From this fee, $15 is allotted for capital building projects such as a
daycare centre. Student Union Building expansion, south campus barn renovations, athletic facilities,
etc. $4.50 is allotted to support the major costs of the U.B.C. Intramural athletic program. A further $0.50
is used to sponsor two U.N. refugee students here at U.B.C. The A.M.S. is left with $12.50 of the original
$32.50 to subsidize our many service organizations and student government. The breakdown of student
fees reflects the traditional support g'ven by J.B.C. students to campus activities.
There are some items in this year's budget that should be highlighted. No increase is expected in the
amount of student fees collected. As a result, the A.M.S. cannot afford to allocat more than $5,000 to
the C.I.T.R. High Power Reserve. However, the A.M.S. has increased its allocation to the A.M.S. Student Bursary Fund from $2,500 to $11,500. It is expected that all fund raising efforts for this fund will be
matched by the B.C. Government through its Funds For Excellence program.
This year, the Copy Centre changed its name to Copy Right and moved downstairs to a larger site.
Revenues from this operation will be down as a result of purchasing more equipment. Snack Attack,
Tortellini's and A.M.S. Word Processing Centre are starting their second year of operation and are doing
as well as can be expected. The budgeted loss for Tortellini's is directly attributed to the $31,000 expected to be collected by C.P.A.C. as rent (7'/2% of sales). By the third year of operation, Tortellini's
sales volume should grow at least to the point of break even. This year, the A.M.S. has become more
committed to the renovation of the Student Union Building. Two examples are the renovations of the
Conversation Pit and the new Copy Right location. Both areas are expected to be well used by students.
Equipment such as perlick units, overhead projectors, etc., purchased by the Storeroom, and the Commercial Bookings Department, will be available for the use of student clubs and constituencies.
Overall, the A.M.S. continues to provide, and to expand its services to students. One of the few problems that the A.M.S. does face, is the amount of time and effort that Students' Council members must
commit to organize and promote the variety of activities that the A.M.S. sponsors. As a result of time
constraints, some worthy new projects must be ignored. In some activities the benefits to students are
unelear and the responsibility for these activities is more appropriately the University or the Alumni
Association. It is time for the A.M.S. to do some long range planning, with a review of current projects.
Some projects may have to be modified in order to meet their objectives.
The A.M.S. is in a unique position envied by student societies across Canada. It has the lowest student
fees ($12.50 per student), but provided in 1985-86 the equivalent of $25.55 to subsidize service organizations and student government. In addition, the A.M.S. is the second largest employer on campus and in
1985-86 returned to students over $896,256 (or $38.33 per student) in the form of wages. The expansion
of A.M.S. business operations over the past six years in response to the demands and requirements of
students has made this possible. The A.M.S. is a non-profit society where the revenues derived from
business operations are used to subsidize other services. The A.M.S. is committed to providing quality
service to students at a low cost.
I would like to thank this year's Budget Committee — Colin Erb, Milton Kiang, Peter Lankester, Doug
Martin, Karen Nishi, and Rebecca Nevraumont (Chair), for their patience and perseverance. As well,
Simon Seshadri was a valuable member of this year's committee.
Sincerely,
James F. Collins
Director of Finance
REVENUE
Fees
Investment
Building
Commercial Bookings
Copy Centre
Games Room
Gallery Lounge
Pit Pub
Snack Attack
Tortellini's
Vending
Subcetera
Summer Film Series
Used Bookstore
Word Processing/Temporary Personel
Total Revenue
Non-discretionary Allocations
A.M.S. Bursary Fund
Art Fund
C.P.A.C. Reserve
Intramurals
Refugee Student Fund
Registration Photos
SUB Management Reserve
SUB Renovations & Replacements Reserve
Total Non-discretionary Expenses
Revenue Subtotal
Less Constitutional Margin (5% I
Total Discretionary income
SUBSIDIES
Student Government:
Aa Gallery Committee
A.M.S. Bursary Lottery
A.M.S. Women's Committee
External Affairs
Gays & Lesbians
High School Conference
Homecoming Committee
Job Link
Ombudsoffice
Programs
Speakeasy
Student Administrative Commission
Students' Council
Volunteer Connections
Publications:
Ubyssey
Inside Ubyssey
Summer Ubyssey
Publications Administration
C.I.T.R. Radio:
C.I.T.R. Radio Station
C.I.T.R. Disco
C.I.T.R. Discorder
C.I.T.R. High Power Allocation
Ancillary Operations:
Business Office
Food Er Beverage Administration
Stores
Whistler Cabin
Workshop
Total Expenses
Net Income
A.M.S. BUDGET
1986/87
Budget
760,000
103.000
132,550
62,500
0
58,700
10,200
11.000
3,100
115,9001
2,400
5,500
1,322
330
121,732)
1,112,970
11,500
1,500
350,770
105,230
11.692
6,000
11,692
10,000
508,384
604,586
30,230
574,356
1985/86
1986/87
Actual
Budget
2.182
2,090
0
0
4,397
2,100
2,597
4,602
0
590
1,995
500
8,301
2,870
11,482
10,833
800
1.085
25,125
18,880
4,579
3.320
21,474
30,992
77,161
68,709
950
950
69,038
81,672
5,219
6,185
6,543
9.831
0
0
72 647
67,449
115,049)
(14,9201
901
(5)
5,000
5,000
242,202
242,300
0
0
0
0
23,888
28,900
0
0
671,432
573,933
423 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 16, 1987
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS April 30, 1986
Balance Sheet April 30, 1986 (With comparative figures for 1985)
ASSETS
LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS
Current assets:
Cash and term deposits
Accounts receivable:
Publications advertising
Sundry accounts and advances (Schedule 1)
Accrued interest (Schedule 2)
Inventories
Loans to student society's and other
organizations, current portion (Note 2)
Prepaid expenses
Total current assets
Investments, at cost {market value — $9,400
1985 - $58,925) (Schedule 2)
Total current assets and investments
Loans to student societies and other organizations,
non-current portion (Note 2)
Art Collection
1966
$    396,117
1966
GENERAL FUNDS
359,723
Total general funds assets
Student facilities, at cost less
depreciation (Note 3)
30,479
54,816
2,078
184,513
24,323
32,213
12,526
151,441
23,900
596
44,000
976
692,499
625,202
9,775
59,775
702,274
684,977
1,023,889
444,800
1,165,497
444,800
2,170,963
2,295,274
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and accrued charges
Due to clubs and societies (Schedule 3)
Construction contract holdback payable
Total current liablities
Special purpose reserves and provisions
(Schedule 5)
Total current liabilities and reserves
Retained income, per accompanying statement
Contributed surplus — Art Collection
Total general funds liabilities and surplus
$    627,244
168,696
795,940
1966
704,144
154,849
198,740
1,057,733
797,350
660,359
1,593,290
1,718,092
132,873
132,382
444,800
444,800
2,170,963
2,295,274
STUDENT FACILITIES
4,821,510
$6,992,473
5,078,804
7,374,078
Loan from General Fund (Note 2)
Equity in student facilities (Schedule 7)
Commitments (Note 4).
938,374
3,883,136
$6,992,473
1,085,719
3,993,085
7,374,078
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure
Year ended April 30. 1966
(With comparative figures for 1986)
Revenue:
Student fees
Aquatic Centre levies
Refugee Student levy
Grad class fees
Graduate Students' Association levies
Undergraduate Societies fee levies
Investment income
Business operations, net (Schedule 8)
Used Bookstore
Rental income
Sundry
Non-discretionary allocations:
Aquatic Centre
Refugee Student levy
Grad class fees
Graduate Student's Association
Intramural fees
Undergraduate Societies fee
levies, including special levies
Registration photos
S.U.B. Art Fund
A.M.S. Bursary reserve
A.M.S. Bursary reserve —rentals
Capital projects acquisition reserve
Management reserve
Repair and replacement reserve
Discretionary allocations:
Special purpose reserves and
provisions (Schedule 5)
Expenditure:
Student government (Schedule 91
Publications (Schedule 101
C.I.T.R. Radio (Schedule 111
Business Office (Non-business portion
Whistler Cabin (Schedule 12)
Excess of revenue over expenditure
1966
1965
$ 756,824
758,336
5,121
120,433
11,567
-
29,736
28,676
4,242
4,842
115,774
111,247
115,947
94,584
206,446
276,117
1323)
1,531
7,795
6,468
17
2,551
1,253,146
1,404,785
$    -
4,397
11,567
—
29,736
28,676
4,242
4,842
104,258
105,364
115,774
111,247
5,419
5,514
1,500
1,500
2,500
2,500
7,795
6,468
348,648
352,079
12,668
12,871
11,595
655,702
9,458
644,916
597,444
25,500
759,869
116,036
162,737
80,857
58,158
242,202
27,499
571,944
571,453
173,753
81,588
87,915
250,760
49,109
643,833
643,125
491
708
Statement of Changes in Financial Position
Year eneded April 30, 1966
(With comparative figures for 1985)
GENERAL FUND
1986 1985
BUILDING FUND
1966 1966
Source of funds:
From operations:
Excess of revenue over expenditure
Increase in special purpose
reserves and provisions
Decrease in investments
Decrease in working capital position
Decrease in loans to subsidiary
organizations, net
Buildings:
Loan from General Fund, net
Aquatic Centre levy
Capital Projects Acquisition
Committee levy
Application of funds:
Increase in loans to subsidiary
organizations, net
Decrease in special purpose
reserves and provisions
Increase in working capital position
i        491
136,991
50,000
117,708
708
1,214,912
$    305,190
305,190
1,215,620
1,069,719
145,901
1,085,719
4,397
647,211
1,737,327
Buildings:
General Fund loan:
Principal
Interest
Cost of acquisition of student
facilities
$ 305,190
1,215,620
4,193
204
1,732,930
1,737,327
Schedule of Student Government Expenses
Year ended April 30, 1986
(With comparative figures for 1986)
Student government expense:
Council:
Constituency aid
General
Job Link
External affairs
Student leadership
Handicapped Access Committee
Homecoming Committee
Student Lottery
Student Directory
High School Conference
S.A.C:
Travel grants
Special projects
General
Election
Art gallery
Service organizations:
Speakeasy
Volunteer Connections
Women's committee
Summer Films Series
Ombuds office
Programs:
Coordinator
Concerts
Orientation
Speakers
Special events
Video/ Program
Total student government expense
1966
2,400
72,943
12,391
2,647
1,234
8,301
(25)
1,995
101,886
3,915
2,060
9,836
5,560
3,867
25,238
4,476
950
4,341
(146)
790
1986
2,335
55,232
12,087
6,761
2,037
(1,953)
4,509
305
4,339
85,652
4,425
2,427
14,037
11,353
1,777
34,019
2,653
910
4,389
(659)
1,270
Publications
Year ended April 30. 1986
(With comparative figures for 1985)
1986
1986
10,411
22,430
(1,656)
880
3,710
1,509
(1,671)
8,563
36,530
8,874
587
(782)
310
25,202
45,519
$ 162,737
173,753
Expenditure:
Administrative
Salaries and benefits (Summer)
Bad debts
Distribution
Sales commissions
Printing
Photography
Mailing
Honoraria
Telephone
CUP membership fees
and conference
Stationery and supplies
Staff meals
Sundry
Student handbook (Inside)
Revenue
Alumni — W. Gage grant
Display advertising:
A.M.S.
Local
National
Classified advertising
Subscriptions
Student handbook (Inside)
Constituency publications
Excess of expenditure over revenue
$ 56,099
43,761
4,670
7,602
2,382
3,235
8,246
8,375
5,100
5,550
149,401
149,139
1,380
1.029
1,775
1,604
1,472
1,500
2,852
4,935
19,636
20,133
956
1,047
3,381
3,431
899
1,020
29,749
34,485
287,998
286,846
1,000
17,994
111,887
26,051
8,850
147
41,212
1,200
22,688
97,729
29,476
7,531
274
45,836
524
207,141
205,258
$    80,857
81,588
C.I.T.R. Radio
Year ended April 30, 1966
(With comparative figures for 1966)
C.I.T.R. Radio:
Salaries & Benefits
Administrative
F.M. Equipment
Conference
Social
Music Department
News Department
Sports Department
Office Operation
Production Department
Engineering Department
Board of Directors
Membership
Miscellaneous Revenue
Engineering/Promo Revenue
C.I.T.R. Disco:
Salaries & Benefits
Administrative
Shindig Prizes
Promotion
Equipment
Miscellaneous Revenue
Disco Revenue
Shindig Revenue
C.I.T.R. Publications:
Salaries & Commissions
Administrative
Press Costs
Miscellaneous Revenue
Advertising Revenue
Excess of expenditures over revenue
1986
1986
$ 41,119
40,744
7,097
11,179
11,594
31,186
1,838
5,595
399
(3)
6,504
6,302
8,783
7,804
625
407
621
129
298
500
6,652
2,530
48
58
(4,069)
(3,384)
(6,603)
(512)
(2,600)
5,687)
72,306
96,848
14,921
15,966
2,158
4,460
1,102
—
776
642
220
2,059
(75)
—
(30,742)
(36,862)
(3,409)
-
(15,0491
(13,735)
7,092
3,530
1,319
1,776
24,821
19,743
12,763)
(1,466)
(29,568)
(18,781)
901
4,802
$ 58,158
87,915

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