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The Ubyssey Oct 8, 1965

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Array BEEP, BEEP,
Beep, beep
THE UBYSSEY
beep . . . beep
. . .eap
Vol. XLVIII, No. 10
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8,  1965
CA 4-3916
—kurt hilger photo.
SILLY SEASON STRIKES again as sciencemen tank hapless engineer, one of more than
50 combatants who took unwilling swim Thursday in library pool. Dunkings climaxed
noon-hour brawl between the two faculties.
UBC'S BOND
HEADS FACULTY
M(ac) names Healy arts dean
By DICK TAYLOR
UBC's own James Bond has
been appointed  dean  of  the
faculty of arts.
Dr.    Dennis    Healy    was
,    named by president John Macdonald after approval by the
Board of Governors.
Healy served as a British
„   intelligence agent behind the
. German lines in Italy during
Second World War.
He   attained   the   rank   of
lieutenant-colonel in the Canadian army and was awarded
the Order of the British Em-
r    pire for his services.
He has been acting dean of
the faculty since the death of
Dr. Kaspar Naegele in February, 1965.
Naegele died in a fall from
a Vancouver General hospital
window.
Healy came to UBC in 1962
DR.   DENNIS   HEALY
. . . promoted
Problems  unsolved
IRC dissolves self
By  NORM  BETTS
Inter Residence Council
Thursday night.
The Council, which repre-
•■ sented the four campus residences, was formed three year.'
ago to deal with common
problems of resident life.
A meeting in the Gordon
Schrum Commons Thursday
night decided to replace the
IRC with informal co-operation between residence presidents.
Acadia Camp presentatives
were the only council members who opposed its dissolution.
John   Woods,   president   of
voted itself out  of  existence
Lower Mall, explained that
Fort Camp, Totem, and Lower
Mall found virtually no common problems came up during
the year.
"The lack of support IRC
attracted for the last three
years has made it impossible
to do anything if a common
problem did arise," Wood
said.
"The only service IRC did
the four residences was to coordinate athletics," he said.
The council's $108 debt will
be split among the residents.
and was named head of the
romance studies department.
He will now resign this post.
Healy was the unanimous
choice of a 14-man committee
chaired bv-ITBC's former vice-
president Dean G. Neil Perry.
As dean, he will be responsible for the largest faculty at
UBC with a teaching staff of
over 200, nearly 5,400 students
and a budget of approximately
$4 million.
In an interview Thursday,
Healy declined to give a firm
policy statement on the future
of the arts program.
"The faculty has to decide
on academic policies," he said.
Healy said: "Changes which
are brought about without full
faculty support are usually
short-lived.
"All of us in the faculty of
arts have an opportunity, at
this point to set ourselves on a
good course and to bring our
faculty closer to what we believe it ought to be."
Healy also declined to give
his personal opinion of the
1965 Discipline and Discovery
report on changes in the Arts
program.
He was not sure that the
report expressed the feelings
of all the faculty members.
He did say however, that a
committee, under the chairmanship of Dr. Walter Young
of the political science depart-*
ment, will report to the faculty before Dec. 1.
It will recommend an experimental arts program that
may be accepted by the
faculty.
Before coming to UBC,
Healy was dean of the college
of liberal arts and science at
Long Island University in New
York.
Pay fees for
first class
-B of G head
Board of Governors chairman, Mr. Justice N. T. Nemetz,
Thursday came out in favor of abolishing tuition fees for
first class students.
In an interview with The
Ubyssey, Nemetz s£id: "I'm
personally in favor of having
the fees of first class students
paid."
He cited the present method
of provincial government scholarships as being the type of
grant he supported.
In the present scholarship
system the provinial government pays 50 percent of the
fees of first class students and
33 percent for second class students.
Nemetz said financial assistance should also be made
available for out of town students to pay for their liviag
while in Vancouver.
"There should be some sort
of subvention (government
grant) for up-country students,"
he said.
He said the amount of
money for these grants would
be dependent on what the government was willing to do.
"But it should be substantial amounts."
Nemetz said the question of
free higher education was ojie
that should be carefully stud
ied.
"Whether or not it is feasible is an open question."
He emphasized that other institutions besides universities,
such as technical colleges,
would have to be considered.
Nemetz welcomed the proposed formula financing outlined in the Bladen commission report.
Under the formula, universities with a greater advanced
student enrollment would receive relatively more than
those with only first and second year students.
"Such system would help
UBC and universities which
have graduate schools," Nemetz said.
The report's recommendations are based on maintaining
tuition fees at their present
level.
It warns that able students
would be kept out of college
and the quality of higher education would drop if its recommendations are ignored.
"Canada cannot afford not
to invest these sums if we are
to achieve the goals of general
economic growth which we
have set for ourselves," the
report says.
Three knock
Bladen fee
suggestion
The Bladen report's recommendation that Canadian university tuition fees levels remain static drew fire from
three sources Thursday.
The Canadian Union of Students charged the report is ait-
tempting to perpetuate an
obsolete form of student aid.
A CUS press release said:
"The Bladen recommendations
on student aid seek to preserve
the status quo, and, as a result
existing social injustices."
The release objected to the
recommendation calling for
maintenace of tuition fees at
their~present level.
"The Bladen recommendations on student aid are ill-
conceived," the release stated.
Liberal MP for Vancouver-
Burrard, Ron Basford, said
Thursday he is shocked at fees
that students now pay.
"It is reasonable that students resist such fees," Basford
said.
Former faculty association
president Dr. John Norris said:
"Fees are a token payment, and
should disappear.
"Withholding fees is not the
answer to the problem of student financing.
"The majority of the faculty
have their fingers crossed that
the Bladen recommendations
on university financing go
over," Norris said.
FAN FLARE
ON PILL  YARN
(SEE PAGE   13)
Beep-beep back
here  noon  today
TodayisthedayRoadrunner
streaksthrutheAuditoriumand
continouslyoutwitsttiecoyote.
The cartoons start at 12:30
and are only a measly SO
cents . . . today and Tuesday.
Last year, the Ubyssey-
sponsored show was sold out
early and crowded.
This year, The Ubyssey
acquired co-sponsor Pique to
provide manpower to keep
cartoon buffs from climbing
the walls as they yuk it u> mt
eight cartoons full of frantic
antics.
The Ubyssey's staff psychiatrist said Thursday it's a
perfectly normal reaction to
cheer for the coyote after the
first two cartoons, so feel
free to vent your inhibitions
and frustrations. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8, 1965
MIKE'S $10 MILLION
Student vote bait
gets election rerun
It must be election time.
Prime Minister Lester Pearson has again promised $10
million worth of scholarships
to Canadian university students.
The same promise was made
in the 1963 election campaign,
but it was never implemented.
Pearson's statement was released in Ottawa just 24
hours before the unveiling of
the Bladen report Wednesday.
He has had a confidential copy
of the report for two weeks.
The prime minister said $10
million each year for four
years would be divided among
the   provinces   according   t o
population in the 18-24 age
group.
B.C. would receive $825,000
for 1966 under the plan.
The scholarships, said Pearson, would be smaller than
those proposed in 1963. He said
they would be about $500 each
instead of $1,000 each as originally planned.
Pearson also promised federal grants to universities and
said a federal-provincial conference would be called to consider what form the federal
aid would take.
Teach-in tees
off Student
Day series
A teach-in today, Saturday,
and Sunday is the first of a
series of events leading up to
National Students Day Oct. 27.
Other events will be:
Oct. 12 — Gathering of faculties and groups.
Oct. 13—Committee reports.
Oct. 14 — Roll call and response from faculties.
Oct. 15 — Laurier La Pierre
speaks in Brock on "The Lunatic Fringe," and answers questions about coverage on the
TV program This Week Has 7
Days.
Oct. 20—Realist editor Paul
Krassner speaks on "Will Success Spoil Pope Paul?"
Oct. 22 — NDP leader Tommy Douglas in Brock speaks
on education;
Oct. 23-24 — Message, "Why
We are Marching", discussion
of Bladen report, students to
campaign among public at
shopping centres, etc.;
Oct. 25 — Political rally
with Members of parties, candidates or representatives to
air views, chiefly on education problem;
Oct. 25 — Arts news magazine comes out, all committees
report;
Oct. 26 — Last-minute items.
Places and times will be
made available. Co-ordinators
for the events are Gary Taylor
and Charlie Boylan.
Education above welfare
urges Imperial Oil head
CHARLOTTETOWN, (CUP)
— Governments should be
more concerned about higher
education than social service
measures, Imperial Oil president W. O. Twaits said Wednesday.
Speaking at Prince of Wales
College, Charlottetown, N.B.
he said, "The social service
measures we are adopting under federal-provincial sponsorship today are secondary to
the more important benefits
to be gained by upgrading our
total education system."
He said a high education con-
Free Right bid
just PM's   'joke'
You can forget all about
free rides home to vote via
Air Canada. It was all a big
joke, see.
A Canadian University
Press story in Thursday's
Ubyssey said Prime Minister
Lester Pearson had suggested
students try to arrange free
flights on Air Canada to go
home to vote on Nov. 8.
But it was all a joke.
In a later CUP story from
Ottawa a spokesman from the
prime minister's office said
he thought the student who
made the suggestion to Pearson had been joking, and that
the PM had not seriously endorsed the idea.
Are you a candidate for
assistance under the
CANADA STUDENT
LOANS ACT?
Under this Act, each qualifying student may present a
Certificate of Eligibility to the bank branch of his (or
her) choice. Royal Bank, with over 1000 branches across
Canada, offers you convenient service combined with
practical counsel. Visit your nearest branch.
ROYAL BANK
VCF presents
A Three Day Lecture Series
SPEAKER: Francis I. Andersen. M.Sc, M.A., PfcuD., B.D.
Dr. Andersen, from Berkeley California, is a scholar of
wide repute. He has written an extensive list of articles
in scientific, apologetic and biblical fields. "The Bromin-
ation of Monodeuterioraethane", "The Modern Conception
of the Universe in Relation to the Conception of God",
and ''Studies in Hebrew Syntax" are a sample of these
three fields.
Presently, Dr. Andersen is Professor of Old Testament
Literature at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific
in Berkeley.
SCHEDULE
Date Subject
Tues. Oct. 12 "Christianity—Its Authority"
Wed. Oct. 13 "Christianity—Its Intellectual Respectability"
Thurs. Oct. 14 "Christianity—Its Unique Claim"
ALL  Lectures in ANGUS  110 at  12:30
EVERYONE WELCOME
Dylan    -    Dylan    -    Dylan
HIS   LATEST   L.  P.
Now in stock at -
Dylan
THE RECORD GALLERY
Robson opp. Library
Dylan    -    Dylan    -    Dylan    -    Dylan
tent fosters high economic
growth rates.
Incomes reflect productivity,
Twaits said, and each time an
individual moves from the bottom of the education level to
the top, he trebles his productivity.
"Higher education is now
assuming the importance that
an elementary education held
40 years ago," he said.
Each year of university is
worth about $35,000 in the
graduate's lifetime earnings,
while a year of high school is
worth $20,000.
He said there should be
greater accessibility to higher
education and an end to traditional academic isolation.
YOUNG MEN
FRI., SAT. & SUN.
The New Wave Singers
Dave Wiffen
Jon York and Beans Jackson
Anne Mortifee
all at
THE BUNKHOUSE
COFFEEHOUSE
Phone 683-9790
for reservations
WINRAM INSURANCE LIMITED
SPECIALIZING IN REDUCING
SURCHARGED AUTO PREMIUMS
RE 1-5328
1678 West Broadway
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Homecoming Decorations Chairman
Needed to supervise the set up of Homecoming Dance
decorations in the Armouries and Field House; male
or female. Submit applications to Brock Hall, mailbox 81.
Student Court
Applications are open for: Clerk of Court.
Applications should be sent to the Secretary, A.M.S.
Box 54.
University Debating Team Tryours
Apply in writing to Debating Union, Box 31, Brock
Hall. State telephone number. All students are
eligible.    Deadline 4:30 p.m. Oct. 15.
Grad Class
Membership All students in the winter session who
are registered in the final year of a course leading
to a Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members
of the Grad Class.
Election of Executive positions (President, Vice-
President, Treasurer, Secretary, Social Convenor,
Public Relations Officer) will take place FRIDAY,
OCTOBER 15, at 12 30 in the HEBB THEATRE.
Nominators of President will have one minute to
speak for their candidate, and all candidates will
have two minutes to speak if desired.
Nominations are now open for executive positions
and will remain open until 4 p.m., Thursday, October
14.  Put nominations in Mailbox 54, Brock Hall.
Canadian University Service Overseas
Information on CUSO is available in the AMS office
and at International House. Students interested are
asked to leave their names and addresses or contact
International House, for further information. Graduate and Graduating students will be able to obtain
application forms for positions abroad next year.
World University Service
The International programme of Action Committee
meets at noon in the Conference Room, Brock Hall
to make final plans.  Interested students welcome. Friday, October 8, 1965
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 3
BUTf, BUTT, BUTT, "We can't put a handle on the ball," coach explains to nurses'
Panhandlers football team, as they practice Thursday for upcoming classic Teacup
game against home ec Homewreckers.
BURP
SUB pub query
comes up briefly
By   CAROL-ANNE   BAKER
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Will there be a pub in SUB ?
IVY WALLS BULGING
Record registration
jammed into UBC
A record 16,510 students
66 winter session at UBC.
Registrar J. E. A. Parnall
said Thursday the figure was
within 90 students of a 16,600
estimate made more than a
year ago.
"Other factors which have
come into the picture in the
meantime, such as increased
fees and expanded opportunities for higher education, don't
seem to have had any effect
on UBC's growth," Parnall said.
The registrar said enrolment
forecasts were reasonably accurate for all faculties except
education, where registration
for elementary teaching was
down, and commerce, which
added 139 students.
Registration by faculties witfh
last year's totals in brackets
was: arts, 5,376 (5.Q56); commerce, 899 (760); agriculture,
208 (199); law, 309 (275); applied science, 1,276 (1,192);
medicine, 317 (29)3); dentistry,
14 (8); science, 3,119 (2,905);
pharmacy, 148 (143); education,
3,140 (3,168); graduate studies,
1,281 (1,110); unclassified, 220
(157).
have registered for the 1965-
MORMON MINISTER folk
singers. Three Ds', presented
'filth-free music7 Thursday in
Brock.
Grad thesis
fee cancelled
Graduate students have had
a $30 burden lifted from their
shoulders.
The Board of Governors has
approved a recommendation
eliminating the $30 fee for microfilming doctora theses and
publishing them in the American journal of Doctoral Dissertation Abstracts.
The executive committee of
the graduate studies faculty
recommended UBC bear the
costs because of increased fees
for graduate students.
Dr. Ian McTaggart-Cowan,
dean of graduate studies, said
Wednesday: "The service was
previously done by the University of Michigan, which microfilmed the theses and published them."
He said now the Canadian
National Library will do it.
"Although it will cost UBC
$20 per thesis, it was recommended that the fee be cancelled iii an attempt to consolidate graduate charges."
Cut-off here
for Ubyssey
frat rushee
Gordon Taylor, The Ubyssey's fraternity columnist,
gives his account of the final
few days of rushing.
Cut-off time has come.
I've got to reduce from six to
two the number of fraternities
I'm rushing.
I originally signed up for
six fraternities, but on Tuesday, the last night of rushing
functions, I can only attend
functions at two fraternities.
Silent Wednesday follows my
attendance at these last functions.
Until noon, no fraternity
member can speak to me and
I'm allowed to make up my
mind which fraternity I want
to join.
At lunch time the real headache starts. And it's not caused
by the two functions the previous nigtot.
All the rushees meet in the
auditorium. We will be handed
ominous brown folders.
Inside mine will be bids from
the two fraternities I have
chosen. I hope.
I'm given one hour to make
the final choice, but regardless
of the one I choose I'll be sure
of one thing.
I can drink my coffee in
south Brock.
In the presentation of the
Student Union Building budget
to the council, SUB committee chairman Roger McAfee
said 6,000 square feet of space
had been set aside in the basement of the new building for
a "senior student lounge area."
"What is the floor space of
the pub at the Fraser Arms?"
asked first vice president Bob
Cruise.
McAfee said there were no
definite plans for the area
which had been set aside for
future development.
Although final costs wil be
unknown until the tenders
come in, there has been a 25
per cent increase in constructions costs since January.
"The architects feel costs
should rise another five per
cent "by tender time," said
McAfee.
Council approved a motion
to give the alumni 1,200 square
feet of floor space in the SUB
building.
"The alums will occupy the
space planned for the offices
of union director, program director and chef director which
do not exist," said McAfee.
"Also the alums have given
$1,000 a year to SUB for the
past three years and will continue to do this," he said.
Council also approved a motion to add an area in the food
services portion of the building where food will be kept
from the time it is prepared
until the time it is served.
This recommendation was
made by John Porter-Butts,
SUB's hired building consultant.
Construction on SUB is supposed to begin early in 1966.
B.C. Tel. offers TV link
to trustee association
Television may soon link more than 400 schools and
three universities in B.C.
The B.C. Telephone Co. has offered to build and install
a system of cables and microwave towers to link 437 Lower
Mainland schools and the universities.
The offer stemmed from an inquiry last year from the
B.C. School Trustees Association about the feasibility of
such a system. The company reported this week to the
association's 1965 convention.
The company said it would pay installation costs,
with operating costs left to the schools. The schools would
also pay an initial lease fee of $300,000, with the fee possibly rising to $1.5 million.
The company said the trustees should set up an agency
with representatives from each school district and university to press for government aid for the system.
TO COURTHOUSE
Poet probes
deer problem
What is a deer?
That's one of the riddles
facing UBC poet Jamie Reid,
grad studies I.
The problem came out in
such poems as Saturna Island
as Viet Nam where "either you
you or the forest gets lost.
In the first of a series of
Thursday poetry readings, held
4aJ3u 102, 50 interested poets
gathered to hear the surrealist
observations of the beer strike,
the fall of Troy and sheep
paths on Saturna Island.
Reid's objective is to get to
the shape beyond the shape
that is immediately visible—
of a deer, for instance.
He gives statements, using
everyday vocabulary, thus hoping to open a window.
His work first appeared in
the Vancouver monthly poetry
journal Tish, in 1962.
Black tide
ready to go
Support for the march on
the Vancouver courthouse and
the Bayshore Inn on National
Student Day Oct. 27 is mounting.
Bob Cruise, co-chairman of
the Education Action Program
Thursday received nearly unanimous support for the march
at a general meeting of the
science undergraduate society.
All but ten of the 200 sci-
encemen said they were prepared to march.
Only the faculties of forestry
and engineering have officially
voiced opposition to the march.
"What we plan to do is
march to the Bayshore where
a meeting of the Association
of Universities and Colleges of
Canada will be held, and have
our speakers discuss the increase of fees with them.
"It's not enough that we
ask for an increase in aid for
students," he said.
A show of hands demonstrated that no more than one-fifth
of those present were able to
attend university without any
help from parens.
U.S., Soviet
teams tangle
grudgingly
By ED CLARK
Ubysey Sports Editor
The international power volleyball match between Russia
and the U.S. Oct. 16 at the
Memorial Gym is rapidly shaping up as a grudge match.
The Russians, Olympic and
world champions in volleyball,
were scheduled to play the
U.S. Nationals 11 times in a
trans-Canada tour.
But the proud Soviets balked when the U.S. openly announced it would be sending
observers to study Russian
coaching and playing methods.
The Russians said they felt
the Americans would learn too
much from their play — the
Hammer and Sickle didn't want
be scouted too closely.
Russian reluctance has made
one minor change on the program. The Russian women,
silver medal winners in the
Tokyo Olmpics, will play the
Canadian All-Stars.
The Russian attitude is understandable. Although the
Americans, who invented volleyball, don't have too good
an international record they
have been improving quickly.
And the Russians, with their
many Doctors of Sports Medicine, have made their usual
meticulous study of volleyball
and aren't too particular about
having the U.S. copy their
methods. mmsm
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and*Fridays throughout the unWersity
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office. CA 4-3243,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, OCT.  8,   1965
"The tigers ol wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." —Wm. Blake.
He ... Aie
We've been reading that Prime Minister Pearson
has announced, his government will establish scholarships worth up to $1,000 each for 10,000 students for
10 years.
He, he, he.
To think this man believes that the students of
Canada would fall for the same promise two elections
in a row.
Basically, we suppose, he thinks we are stupid. Or
have short memories. Or something.
Ho, ho, ho.
But never ones not give anyone their say, we talked
to a local Liberal type.
And we find these are not exactly the same scholarships Pearson promised last time. No.
It seems the last one were for $1,000. No ifs or buts.
And these ones are up to $1,000.
And it seems last time they were only a promise.
This time, legislation will be definitely introduced in
the next session of parliament (if the Liberals are
elected, presumably).
No mention of how Pearson will overcome Quebec's
claim that such federal scholarships represent an infringement of their rights to educate their people.
(It seems in Quebec are certain colleges, run by a
certain group, which may or may not be universities,
depending on who defines them.)
No mention, that is, except a terse comment that
Pearson does not intend to interfere in any way with
provincial jurisdiction.
But the scholarships are a nice promise, from a
nice man, running a nice campaign.
We would like to suggest, however that he promises
instead to implement the progressive parts of the Bladen
report.
Because although this federal election campaign has
been very funny — with no issues at first, and then
all parties falling all over each other to offer things to
students — every joke comes to an end at last.
And the voters — including students — have the
last laugh.
iwwukt
6-iTS«MK<
World series time
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
CAREFUL
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Regarding the Brock-Ubys-
sey education "action" program which, as far as I know
has not yet been discussed in
these pages.
In Canada today, universal
financial accessibility to higher   education   is   a  necessity,
and elimination of tuition fees
would undoubtedly benefit
students unable to pay them.
It would, however, also enable several thousand more
affluent students to buy sleeker clothes and faster cars with
their summer earnings.
Reduced fees in conjunction
with   more   bursaries,   loans,
' ~tiiy^;"/1' >-'.       ~!"i
t>f'/
,"?*mif:«&s
^.w^^^-^ff^v^^m^mK^m^^^xmi^^^^^^^s &/;?, ra;<
Sweat, buddy, you need the experience
By IAN CAMERON
Everyone is talking about
the poor student and how
hard it is to make ends meet,
and how he has to take out
a loan in order to come back
to university.
And people* also talk about
the fact that there are many
students who make lots of
money, and if they can get
jobs so can everyone else,
and whatthehellis the matter
with kids these days?
So all right, lets talk about
these fortunates. I have a
friend who can be counted
among them. He worked for
four months and made $1,800.
Pretty good, eh?
Unfortunately, he worked
in a planing mill, and his job
was to make sure that no
oversized boards got into his
particular whoziz. So all day
long, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
he stood and stared at this
overgrown breadslicer, and
then went home and flaked
out so he could be ready for
work next day.
And since this mill was in
East Armpit (the name is
changed for the benefit of the
Castlegar Chamber of Commerce) he had nothing to do
on his one day a week off
except get drunk.
The place doesn't even have
a library worthy of the name.
Another acquaintance worked in a box factory. He started out running a schizoid
pharistan (or words to that
effect).
Then he found that he was
also expected to make coffee,
pile boxes, and make sure
that the doors were locked
at night. He wanted the job,
so he continued working for
eight hours pay a day, even
though it took him 10 hours
to do all his duties.
Then there are the suckers
v/ho take selling jobs. No
money, no respect, no nothing
but sore feet and laughs. A
friend worked as an encyclopedia peddler one summer.
He stuck it for three weeks,
making $65 in that time.
Finally he got a door slam-
ed in his face.
He became annoyed, walked around to the back door,
knocked. When the same fellow answered, my friend said
"I hope you're better tempered than the sonovabitch I just
saw in the front apartment."
He quit before they could
fire him next day.
I also tried that racket one
summer. Made lots of money,
but my conscience caught up
with me.
Finally, I got so unhappy
that when some irate citizen
closed the door on my opening pitch I went out and sat
on his steps and started to go
through my sample case.
He came out to see what I
was doing, and I told him I
was making a survey to establish a new airport flight pattern, and since he had voiced
no objection it was going right
over his house.
I also quit before they
could fire me.
The point is that most students waste the four summer
months doing something that
is of no value to them in
later life.
People talk about experience, but most experiences
gained in the summer only re-
enforce something the student knows already, namely
that it pays to get an education.
and much cheaper subsidized
on-campus housing for out-of-
town students, on the other
hand, .would help only those
students who needed help.
Cries for student action
have a heady ring—especially
for those who shout them.
Words such as "protest",
"strike", boycott", etc. often
have the power to undermine
staid, solid, old rational examination of their "raison
d'etre".
Before we rush to man the
barricades, therefore, let's
make sure the cause is worth
it.
Phill Chubb
Engineering   IV
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News    Ron  Riter
Associate   George  Reamsbottom
City       Richard   Blair
Photo    Bert  MacKinnon
Sports    Ed  Clark
Ass't News   Dan Mullen
Robbi West, Janet Matheson
Ass't  City    Al   Donald
Page Friday   John  Kelsey
Managing      Norm   Betts
Features    Mike Bolton
CUP      Don  Hull
Meeting for all new reporters
Wednesday. Working days next
week are Tuesday and Thursday.
Energetic types Thursday were
Robin Russell, Derick Blackie,
Claudia Gwinn, Pat Hrushowy,
Phillipa Steel, Gordon Taylor,
Sheila Dobson, Anne Ratel, Kim
Richards, Gordon McLaghlin, Dave
Peterson, Howie White, Richard
Taylor, Martin McEwan, Joan
Fogarty, Gordon Fidler, Kurt Hil-
ger, Dennis Gans, Joe Varesi,
George James, Colin Byfleet and
Don Kydd. Sji-V*- , pf
Oct. 8, 1965
ON THE COVER: El-Haft
Khoury's harem (he's a four-
wife man). Wives are Lissa
Essamra, Linda El - Mutajasme,
Janet El-Mahbouba, Diane El-
Sahira.
Costumes  courtesy   Watt's   Costumes, Vancouver.
Carpets   courtesy   Ararat,   Vancouver.
Story, PF 3.
Editor:  John Kelsey
Current affairs --- Steve Brown
Science, the arts — Al Francis
Executive    Rochelle Morinis
Drawings-
Arnold Saba, Brett Smaill
Jeff  Wall
UBC has a rotund,
apple-cheeked man with
shaggy head and evil leer
—Murray Farr of AMS*
special events committee.
He's the committee
head who does more for
culture and extra-curricular fare at UBC than all
the departments put together.
But for Farr, UBC
would be a cultural empty
bag.
And he does it on a
tiny budget, which this
year has been whittled
down from insufficient to
insignificant.
Now, Fair's a devious
and crafty man.
He always gets the
most show for the least
cash.
It's methods vary from
level to barely legal to
downright sneaky.
Every deal Farr pushes
through benefits UBC
students at large.
Like last week when
Sonny Terry and Brownie
McGhee jammed Brock
Hall to the gills.
And nobody else would
or could bring next
month's Erichr Hawkins
modern dance company,
or Realist editor Paul
Krassner, coming Oct. 20.
And what happens to
Farr?
Last year, his budget
from the AMS was $6150.
This year, Farr asked
for $7500. He's been cut
to $5,750.
Special events operates
on deficit financing—how
else could Laurier La
Pierre of This Hour has
Seven Days be heard for
25 cents? Terry and McGhee for 25 cents? the
Vancouver Symphony for
25 cents?
The AMS has neatly
knifed its most prosperous, valuable committees
on campus.
Who gets taught?
Why son, everybody
but I'm a busy man
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
You there, lowely student, how dare you ask disturbing
questions about education?
Solid thwacks with the flat of the cricket bat for
those who question God, and the same for you bounders.
It's a personal matter, one you just don't talk about
in public.
You can't question the motives or actions of a university administration — it moves in rarified academic
circles much too complex for you to ever fathom.
You hysterical shouters who oversimplify the problem
by quoting gloom-mongers like H. G. Wells: "history is a
race between education and catastrophe."
You sound like the race is drawing close in our time
andcatastrophe|is out in front by a neck—yours.
And you panicky UBC students leaders, you'rs the
worst of all.
But what about these leaders?
"Student population will double in the next decade,"
they shout.
Any government official has the obvious answer to
this challenge. How are you going to fight sex?
"Where will we find twice the number of teachers
and the money to expand physical facilities proportionately within the next ten years," questions one student
leader.
The friendly politician eagerly leaps upon this query.
"It's simply a matter of calling for unified and responsible
action at all government levels and making national needs
compatible with constitution rights," he explains.
"Do you mean we should stop complaining about
spiraling fees and support higher taxes?" demands another
misled student.
These typically immature students have failed to
grasp the sophisticated and dynamic reasoning of the
amiable politician who at this point must leave to attend
an urgent appointment elsewhere.
argument
|)l 2wo
A helpful university administrator takes the floor to
explain, "Democratic ideals demand that everyone be
given an education and, as a result, too many schools still
offer curriculums set at the lowest, common denominator
to fit the vast majority of students."
Selfishly the students suggest that if the solution to
the financial crisis Is to keep students out of universities
the logical alternative to raising fees (and discriminating
in favor of the rich) is to raise entrance standards.
Politely the administrator points out this solution is
very well for students already at UBC to suggest, but
unpopular with taxpaying parents of most high school
students, who graduate with just average marks.
Seeing their hastily calculated arguments torn so
easily apart by the articulate but kindly administrator,
the desperate students cry out, "If a democratic education
is one in which the starting line, not graduation day, finds
all students abreast then let's give every student the chance
to prove himself."
"A fine idea," exclaims the administrator, "that's
what we're all fighting for—educational opportunity for
all, if they qualify."
"The federal government has recognized the financial
needs of universities as a national responsibility and has
promised to increase the federal grants how given to
every province except Quebec."
Enthused, the administrator goes on to confide: "Free
education is only a matter of time."
In a final attempt to save face* one student smugly
replies, "Now that we've finally been recognized why
doesn't the federal government establish a Canadian office
of education which would safeguard the rights of provinces
in matters of education, yet unite all efforts on a national
level?"
"It's all Quebec's fault," states the unperturbed administrator, "as the guardian of la survivance francaise in
Canada Quebec will not tolerate any encroachment upon
its exclusive rights in education. Federal aid is considered
unconstitutional since education belongs to the provinces
according to Quebec."
Finally convinced of their inability to comprehend or
do anything about the education problem the students
pull in their necks and leave the floor to the administrators and politicians who obviously have the purely
academic problem of education well in hand.
Indeed, it's just a matter of time.
opinion
Yankee profs
created
police state
By ROBERT SCHEER
Then the police charged
the peaceful seated crowds,
causing one of the ugliest
scenes in South Vietnam's
three - month - old Buddhist
crisis. With rifle butts, clubs
and tommy-gun clips, the
cops battered the demonstrators.
Women who had fallen to
the pavement in the first
police rush were savagely
kicked. A young girl had her
head split open with a carbine butt, and as blood
streamed into her eyes, she
was carted away in a police
van.
—Time   magazine
July 26,  1963.
Now that the "mess" in
Vietnam has been neatly
wrapped up and put away,
it seems ungracious and
boring to refer to it again.
IThe sound of the war in
Vietnam is once again a
vague and distant staccato of
small news items about Viet
Congs, government helicopters and Strategic Hamlets.
The war is still as brutally inhuman and senseless,
and it is still America's war,
but it no longer disturbs us.
This is because we are a
people passionate about
packaging and indifferent to
use. We came to object to
the Diem regime because his
"image" had become tarnished.  When  the Rev.  Quang
Due burned himself he destroyed the usefuless of Diem
as a "fighter for freedom
against godless communism".
It was a PR act which
could not be topped, and so
Diem had to go. Exit Diem
and brother Nhu, and we
have with us today a trio
of crew-cut, popular, non-
political generals — and the
war.
This all makes a neat
package and leaves my original quote, about the Saigon police bashing people's
heads in, a bit grisly and in
poor taste: Like some creep
saying that the beautiful
lady who used to be the
dancing Philip Morris cigarette pack was selling lung
cancer.
But she was.
And those Saigon police
were not trained, equipped,
paid and educated to their
Robert Scheer teaches at
the Berkeley campus of the
University of California, He
is foreign editor of Ramparts, a liberal lay Catholic
magasine. and contributes to
the Realist, a far-out magasine emanating from New
York.
Scheer will be in Vancou-
cotrver this weekend to teach
at the B.C. Universities teach-
in. This article is reprinted
from the Realist, March 1964.
civil responsibilities by Ngo
Dinh Diem and his brother
Nhu; they were created by
the U.S. government acting
through a bunch of American university professors.
One of the real rewards
of university training is the
opportunity it provides for
travel. Much of the money
for this travel is provided
by the U.S. government
through such agencies as the
I.C.A. (International Cooperation Administration)
which have a hand in supervising the American foreign
aid program.
The LC.A. pays the bills
and the university sends a
team of professors overseas
to add their knowledge to
the war on want, or com-
To pf 3
Sees More Prof.
Pnn*   _>
T H
Friday, October 8, 1965 More the marrier
Polygamy is fun
By EL-HAJJ KHOURY ever  information  leaks  out
When the former king of is not presented in a broad
Saudi Arabia, Ibn Seoud, perspective, thus leaving the
visited New York he was not reader confused,
permitted to bring more than Another reason may toe the
one of his wives into the outdated information avail-
country, able on the Middle East and
This was in keeping with Islam.   Canadian  books   stil
American law: no man can describe    deplorable    Hving
have more than one wife at conditions in the Middle East,
the same time. which don't generally exist.
Although this incident did A ^rd »*f» is th.e sma11
not cause much controversy number of Moslems in Can-
in the press, it helped ada as compared to tiie total
strengthen the North Ameri- Population: at most here
can notion that in the Middle !Ie. ten thousand Moslems.
East  polygamy is a general Thw  means  *** not ™n*
rj«i,,  polygamy   is a  seueiai 0anadians   Ji^g   the^fcrr-
When I was still new to *unity,  .*°   £et
Vancouver,    having   come knowledge abov
from Beirut, Lebanon, people Of   course,
often asked,  "And  did you people do havc .
leave   your    wives   back r*^e   on   camels,   do   ou—
home?" camel milk, and do wander
In vain, I would say this around the desert
custom  was  no   longer  ob- But    they   are   rapidly
served   except  by   a   small dwindling and will soon become virtually extinct.
/VYlim/\Y| The rest of tIle Population
lilllllIfill have  adopted  to  their  ad-
f vantage  a unique blend  of
both   Eastern   and   Western
minority group; but the same cultures.   These  people  eat,
question was always brought dress and travel  like West-
"P- erns, but talk, think and love
Eventually, I gave up try- in   the   traditional   Eastern
ing to clarify matters.   In- fashion,
stead, I usually replied, "You •     •     •
wouldn't believe it, but by And   to   keep   American
sheer   Lebanese   'awanta'   I tourists   happy,    a   famous
managed to sneak them all hotel in Lebanon is paying
in with me!" three wandering bedouins a
A   gasp   of   astonishment monthly  salary  for   a very
followed, and I would add, special favor.
"You see, I told the Canadian The   bedouins   pitch   tent
Immigration ttiey were my dose to the hotel, and pose
cousins." with   their  camels   for  the
The amazing thing is, many tourists,
believed every word.
Actually, I highly recom- ™^^^^^^m
mend    traditional    Arabian •        • J
polygamy as  a  solution  to MVSlflP
most American marriage pro- UliJlUv
blems.
At least there's no beating araumenf   pf 2
around the bush as to where argument    pf 7
Henry spends his nights. eampus 	
Also, each wife will at last
find fulfillment in trying to dissent     pf 3
be first in the  husband^ dissent   .., pf 5
favors, rather than  in a
career. nostalgia     Pf 5
But there are explanations opinion  pf 2
for the veil of mystery which . ,                                     , ,
it      ■««j ,,     „    ^ opinion    pf 3
covers the Middle East.
Foreign   news   gets   little theatre   pf 7
coverage   in   the   American t(,is weei5  pf 4
and  Canadian press. What-
g_____.
falpk My Coned**
Ralph Daly is still UBC the facts as whimsy, infin-
direcior of information ser- itely less important or inter-
vices, esting than the creative ei-
He frequently writes may- forts of its reporters.
I-correct   letters   to   The _     .„ ,                ..„.    ,.
Ubyssey. He's been doing it .  \ wl11 *ave no *****&.
for two years now. **&** from   any  ™ue   rf
Ralph usually has his sec- The Ubyssey so far this year,
retary type his letters. ln  fmdln«  sub3ects-   I   may
This one. he typed himself. have difficulty, however, in
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir: deciding  each   week   which
Your generous gesture in Particular set of mis-inform-
awarding me a weekly col- atl0n is m0Jft m need of the
umn  reminds  me somehow whimsical facts.
of   the   drunk   who   always Meantime,    you    have    a
makes   sure   he  provides readymade column for next
ahead the hair of the dog he week   concerning   the  more
knows he'll need next morn- major  errors  in The  Ubys-
ing. sey's   imaginative  reporting
The  title is  apt.  My  im- on the university's financial
pression has been right along statement,
that The  Ubyssey  regarded Ralph Daly
Friday, October 8,  1965
>V\YUn\£  ''
MOTHERLY LOVE
Why use the pill?
Try older women
By   MASSIMO   VERDICCHIO
Primitive generations used
to kill older women by pushing them off cliffs; today
they have found them to be
useful for sex initiation.
This humanitarian attitude
towards older women has
strengthened its roots in
fifteenth century Europe.
The youth of that time was
ill at ease shifting from his
mother's tender loving care
to that of the young virgin
next door. His first sexual
experience proved to be quite
unsatisfactory. Goon it became a monotonous nightly
routine.
Then he rebelled against
customs and began to save
all those middle-aged women
who were toeing pushed off
cliffs. He found older women
the median between motherly and virginal love -i—ier
i everybody's satisfaction.
:; The .older woman proved
herself an absolute expert in
sexual vicissitudes tout also
a mother and protectress for
youth,  x
Since then tile word spread
over Europe ani%everybody.
began to save the older women who were being pushed
off cliffs. /
During the Renaissance the
status of the older woman
increased enormously. She
became mistress to young
men and those ftot-quite-as-
old-as-she.
During this time the mistress underwent an intellec-
spending precious time counselling and comforting.
But this historical develop'
ment applies only to Europe.
North Americans seem to
scorn this short cut to mental
and physical development.
They prefer breaking adoles-
ence with the virgin next
door.
In many cases the North
American youth finds hiifi-
self not only on his way to
physical maturity but also on
his way to becoming a father.
The North American artist
also abhors the behavior of
his fellow European. He associates much more with a
preferred artistic group
where he finds inspirations,
counselling, and protection.
Older American women do
not share today's ideologies
nor do they approve of the
abstract thinking and complex expression of today's
artists.
The lovers of older women
in North America are about
as numerous as egg yolk
drinkers. The European influence in this matter drowned in the Atlantic Ocean.
The young continent has
rebelled against its old and
wise counsellor. It mistakenly assumes a cynical attitude !
towards its teachings and re-
futes them as antiquated and
immoral.
North Americans, scorning *
the Oedipus complex, reserve \
their physical drives for more !
illicit and professional game ;
hunting. '
And older women are an i
answer  to  the   problem   of I
over-population. [
tuial revolution. She was, on
the average, well-educated
and took on the task of ma-
tronizing the young artist.
She gave the young man
her body and her bed-time
techniques plus encouragement, advice, protection and
money. She tickled his talent
and spurred him. on to greatness.
She became his first audience and his first critic.
She watched him achieve
fame as an artist, always
praising and applauding her
protege from behind the
scenes.
Recently, the mistress has
died away. Most older women have re-acquired their
previous status of senility.
They are plainly old, presumptuous, irritable, body-
decay conscious, small-minded, conservative, bridge-and-
tea - fanatical, hypocritical
church-goers and absolutely
opposed to any kind of artistic expression.
With their our-generation-
was-better attitude they dismiss and abolish any eventual relationship that could be
created between them and
eager youth.
They prefer a fully-mature
male to the inexperienced
youth, and thus refute any
kind of mental and spiritual
relationship.
This saves visiting the
bank   twice   a   week   and
MORE PROF
from pf 2
munism,   or those  wanting
communism.
It was through an I.CA.
grant of one million dollars
per year that Michigan State
University hooked into Vietnam when Diem first came
to power in 1954. The professors at Michigan had met
Diem when, as an emigre
with no following at home,
he toured the American college/church - group circuit
during 1950-53.
Diem was their man, and
the "miracle" of South Vietnam was simply that he held
the country still long enough
for the U.S. to pour in its
billions of dollars in aid,
weapons, advisers, operators—to buy off the natives,
and when that didn't work,
to frighten them.
Those first few years
were frightening. A communist takeover seemed imminent because of the scheduled elections. It seemed
that most of the people
didn't know or care about
Diem and the Americans
and tended to regard ''red
boss' Ho Chi Minh as the
father of their country.
While the Free Vietnam
government had no intention of participating in an
election which it was certain
To pf 8
See: More More
J)i' 3hre
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7 ■,-to w?
''•^rhY/jWst .even
IN ESPIONAGE: Don't
look now, but chief bookie
Basil Stuart-Stubbs ignored the english department's refusal to put Ian
Fleming on course lists,
and ordered copies of
Thunderball and The
James Bond Dossier. Inside word is the books will
be catalogued under call-
number M 007.
• •      •
INSCRUTABLE:   Latest
brainstorm of Sir Ouvry's
Own Meter Maids is a
crackdown on students
who park at meters, put a
nickel in, get a ticket, and
leave the car there all day.
Nobody touches them because there's already a
ticket on the windshield
(and some sneaks leave a
ticket on the windshield
for three or four days
"free" parking).
New superplan being
rushed through includes an
extra $5 fine for every
hour the guy stays parked there.
And you can look for
another towing boom—the
patrol has just signed a six-
year contract with Fraserview Towing. Let's all
Buck Fraserview.or something.
• •     •
IN DESPAIR: The Immovable Abject, Grecian
yearn Dr. Malcolm McGregor, collared a member of
the downtown press shortly after his diatribe on
journalism up at Frosh Retreat.
"And what do you think
of this year's Ubyssey," he
demanded. "It's great—in
fact, I've been very pleasantly surprised," replied
the downtown scribe.
Dr. Mac turned six
shades of purple, beetled
his bushies, and blurted:
"Well, I think they've been
MOST disrespectful."
Well, when—in 1931—
Malcolm and Himie Kos-
hevoy were collaborating
as Ubyssey sports editor
and features editor respectively (respectfully?),
they thought the paper
was a gas. Things DO
change over the decades,
don't they?
• •     •
INGRATITUDE: Engineers are seething because
somebody in Cece (Dick
Tracy) Paul's or Tom
(James Bond) Hughes' B &
G ranks snuck into the
EUS torture chamber over
the summer, and burned
the redshirts' dunking
tank.     They're    hurriedly
(f 4our
piecing together a new one,
so don't let your spirits be
dampened .... and Big
Red Wheel Art Stevenson
has drawn a moustache on
a picture of Brock co-ordinator Graeme Vance and
captioned it: "First, the
Education Action Program
—next The World." Is that
rain outside, or just heil?
• •     •
INSIDE OUT—The Student union building wheels
have lined up a VERY BIG
name to turn the sod at the
stadium site later this
month. People will flip
their Whigs when they
hear about it.
• •      •
INEPT: The washrooms
in the super new Henry
Angus building alternate
from floor to floor—men's
on 1, women's on 2, etc.
The seventh storey contains all the secretaries for
the commerce and arts
wheels—but guess which
washroom?
• •     •
INEVITABLE:        AMS
steamroller Peter Braund
has warned the world that
unless student council
wheels fell behind his EAP
exercise, "the march could
turn into a golden opportunity for the commies and
socialists." Braund should
know — his election bid
last year was originally
backed by the weirdy-
beardy, ban-the-bureaucrat
B.C.   Student Federation.
• •      •
IN CLOISTER: The registration package of little
cards didn't include a religious preference form
this year, so campus chaplains spent six long days
going through registrar's
information to get your denomination. Two-thirdi of
the students filled in a
specific religion, but the
others included NIL, Zen-
Buddhist None of Your
Business, Myself, Druid,
and one even called himself a Pink Buddhist. The
chaplains said only a handful wrote in atheist or agnostic.
• •      •
INDESTRUCTIBLE:    	
Scene in A-lot early this
week: tow-truck, manned
by driver and one of Sir
Ouvry's fearless sergeants,
in the middle of the maze
of cars and concrete dividers and one-way alleys.
Truck goes forward, backs
up, goes forward again.
Fearless Sergeant scratches head, gets out of truck,
plods on foot through cars.
"What's the matter," student asks tow-truck driver. "Uh, we're lost, we
can't get out of here,"
gulps driver.
m»
%mr
Tampax is available in three absor-
bency-sizes (Regular, Super and
Junior) wherever such products are
sold.
INVENTED BY A DOCTOR-
NOW USED BY MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX INTERNAL MENSTRUAL PROTECTION IS
MADE ONLY BY CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION
LIMITED, BARRIE, ONT.
Canadian Tampax Corporation Limited,
Barrie, Ontario.
Hesse send me in P_u_ wrapper, a trial pack-
*•> «f T-BP-x. I enclose I« to cover cost
of maiUbr Siat is checked helow.
(   ) Mem-*      (   ) sum      (   I'jqMea
Anglicans and United
Come Together
to
A Short Service, Discussion
and Coffee Hour
at
University Hill United Church
5375 University Boulevard
this Sunday, October 10th, at 7:30 p.m.
Speaker:  Rev.  Desmond  Kimmitt,
St.  Anselm's  Anglican Church
Name	
A-dtess.
Chy	
(Please prut)
..Prov..
"Kowowki"   Sole*
and Service
MOTORCYCLES AMD
ACCESSORIES
4395 W. 10th        224-4914
Aut-Wtmllve Accessories and
_ Speed Equip,
at DiscsMHit Prices
Special on:
A/A Mag. ami Chrome
Wheels
1*96  Dotts and
34 noatba to pay
1    %        <Jfm    £\ When   a   suit   is   too   much
\^J ^4»       and    a    sports    jacket    is    not
enough,   wear   a   blazer.
In   it   you   will   be   well   dressed   for
almost any informal occasion.
Dress   it  up  for
informal  business
wear,  dress   it
down  for  casual
wear.   Accessories
make the   mood.
'Lounge Fashions'
all-wool  blazer
until October 31
$3888
Grey flannel-
type   slacks are
your "go everywhere" leisure
slacks. Select slim,
well-fitting slacks,
but not tight ones,
Jtiperial' all-wool
worsted slacks
until October 31
$15°5
A DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORE
University Store
4445 West 10th Ave.
near  Sasamat
Broadway Store
2906 West Broadway
at Mackenzie
Page 8
THE      UfYSSEY
Friday, October 8,  1965 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,  1965
OSBORNE
VS. BANNO
Sports policy hassle
OSBORNE
DEAR MR. BANNO
It was with considerable
surprise and some disappointment that I read your column
of Thursday, September 30th.
My surprise results from-
the fact that I am at a complete loss to see how you
could have read into President Macdonald's remarks
about athletics any judgements about the moral superiority of sports at The University of British  Columbia.
My disappointment is occasioned by the realization
that you must be ignorant of
the news release distributed
to all media by the Information Office on May 10th, 1965.
In it the new position of the
Senate is explained clearly.
Although I am a member
of the Men's Athletic Committee, I am not writing this
letter with the sanction of the
Committee, and I am not attempting to interpret its philosophy.
•      •      •
I am, however, very concerned that you should present such a biased commentary without taking the trouble to ascertain the true position of the University administration and the Men's Athletic Committee.
In view of the achievements
of UBC athletes during the
past decade, your expression
"doomed to athletic ignominy" is, at best, fatuous.
If you and The Ubyssey
want to improve the sports
programme at UBC, and have
some constructive suggestions to make, I am sure that
the Men's Athletic Committee would be pleased to convene a special meeting to hear
your suggestions, and to discuss possible action.
Let me give you an example of a way in which you
can help. A committee has
been established to raise money for the John Owen Memorial Fund which will provide
for one scholarship (or several
scholarships, if enough money
is raised), for a deserving athlete.
I am sure that with the influence of the Ubyssey this
fund could realize enough
money to put into effect the
first of the awards authorized
by the new policy of the
Senate.
ROBERT  F.  OSBORNE
Director School of P.E.
Jayvees go Sunday
The UBC Junior Varsity
hosts the Seattle Cavaliers in
an exhibition football game
Sunday at Wolfson Field. Kick-
off is at 2 p.m.
FREE
Transportation
From  Campus  to
College  Bible Class
at
Broadway
Tabernacle
each Sunday A.M.
Please contact the
Pentacostal Chaplain
Miss Bernice Gerard
or Ken Gaglardi
266-9275
Room 118, Physics BIdg.
BANNO
By   ROBERT   BANNO
It is apparent that your letter was written in a fit of
emotion, Dr. Osborne.
You have obviously ignored
or failed to grasp the main
point of my Sept. 30 article.
The news release you refer
to states unequivocally, "The
continuing senate policy . . .
does not permit the establishment under University auspices of 'athletic scholarships',
designed for the primary
purpose of recruiting selected
players for teams."
Of this stand I was not
unaware and this was precisely the policy I was referring
to in my article.
You would agree, I am
sure, that there is a clear-cut
difference between a positive
athletic scholarship stand like
Simon Fraser Academy's and
our ineffectual, watered down
policy.
•      •      •
It is also apparent that your
conception of what constitutes excellence differs widely
from mine.
It is true that many of our
athletes, especially in rowing,
have attained greatness. We
applaud these people.
We applaud them, not only
for their successes, but also
for their achievements in the
face of UBC's still-reactionery
athletic  policies.
It is also true, unfortunately, that for a school of our
size, with proximity to top-
level competition and to 750,-
000 potential fans, our achievements in general have been
pathetic.
How would our football and
basketball teams, our top-priority teams, fare against
Washington, Oregon, and Ore
gon State, schools equivalent
in size to UBC?
Your measure of athletic
excellence appears to be a
comparison with Canadian
prairie schools.
Do not be lulled into bull-
headed smugness by petty successes against these poor prairie teams.
The standard of sports at
UBC, as you must surely realize, is in danger of becoming
even lower.
For years, the finest B.C.
high school talent has been
siphoned into U.S. colleges.
Now, with nearby SF also
luring away top local athletes
with bona-fide scholarships,
UBC will find its talent supply becoming even more
meager.
College athletics has long
since passed the horse-and-
buggy, "let's play for fun"
stage. It is now Big Business
and you, in your position,
should be aware of it.
EDITOR'S
NOTE
The May 10 news release
referred to by Dr. Osborne,
director of UBC's school of
physical education and recreation, says, in short, that public donations to provide "at-
letic awards" will be permitted for outstanding athletes
who  maintain  good  grades.
These donations, however,
must receive senate approval
and will not be used as bona-
fide athletic scholarships for
the purpose of recruiting selected players for teams.
•      •      •
They will be administered
like any other university
scholarship. In other words,
the athlete must apply for
his award.
To be eligible for such an
award, the recipient must
have and maintain an average
high enough for a conventional bursary.
Even if the student's grades
silp, he is entitled to keep his
grant if, by curtailing his
athletic activities, he is able to
raise his grades.
nktscmmoM
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THE
CANADIAN
UNIVERSITY
New series begins
on CBC AM radio
7:30 p.m. October 11
A survey published earlier this year showed
that full-time enrolment in Canadian universities has almost doubled over the past
five - years. In the 1964-65 academic year a
total of 172,818 students were enrolled in
the 41 universities across the country. The
increased numbers of students, the expansion
of existing facilities and the building of new
institutions all seem to indicate a bright
future for higher education in Canada. But
this growth is attended by a multitude of
problems, not the least of which is financing
the costly business of providing young Canadians with a university education.
In February, 1961 the Canadian University Foundation set up a commission to investigate this and other aspects of the growth
of Canadian universities in the decade 1965-
75, by the end of which there may be as
many as 480,000 students. The commission,
headed by Vincent Bladen, Dean of the
Faculty of Arts, University of Toronto, is expected to publish its findings this month.
The university considered in its social environment and as an institution in a scholarly environment is the subject of a three-part
series beginning this week on CBC radio's
Soundings. Prepared by Gail Crawford and
Elizabeth Maskell, the series, sub-titled The
Canadian University, examines the role of
the President, Senate, and Board of Governors in the running of the university; the
faculty members, how they view their
career, their particular university, the students, and research in their chosen field;
what the student body thinks of curricula
and teachers, and how students feel about
the problem of huge classes and overworked
professors.
Revrintal from CBO Time*
CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
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This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia, Friday, October 8,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
FOREGROUND
Comment:
Readers speak out on Ubyssey s
Wesbrook birth control story
A week ago. The Ubyssey
sent a reporter to the university health service offices in
Wesbrook. in response to a
statement by a health services
oficial that birth control pills
were available to married coeds, but not single ones.
The Ubyssey's single, co-ed
reporter managed—by devious
means — to crack the pill
shield.
Our readers comment:
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
So what? This is my reaction to your reporter's exercise in false pretenses.
Obtaining a prescription for
Orthonovum is nothing. Doctors off-campus are less subject
to unthinking criticism from
the "righteous". They can give
medical aid where it is needed
without the necessity for falsification of documents.
Your reporter has established that the Health Service will
issue Orthonovum prescriptions to persons who are apparently married. Big deal.
Edward R. Powell,
Graduate  Studies.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Did it never occur to you
that perhaps the doctors at
Wesbrook are not the same
conservative old fogeys that
doctors elsewhere normally
are? That maybe they weren't
as thoroughly deceived as you
seem to think? Remember, the
doctor just had to pick up the
phone to cerify the "marriage".
Do you not consider it possible that they have been under delusion (having read too
many Ubysseys) that UBC
students are generally mature
and responsible, deserving of
the chance to exercise some
small control over their fate?
Gary George,
Science III.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In regards to the article on
"Wesbrook pill leak", I feel
that there has been a great
injustice and inconvenience
done to the members of our
university as a result of your
reporter ratting on Wesbrook.
Now, the married person
will probably have to dig up
old marriage certificates or
other such documents to show
to the doctor as a proof of marriage.
The unmarried girl will be
greatly inconvenienced, as becoming pregnant is no asset to
popularity.
In deviating from the general topic, a thought just
struck me: "Are rodents susceptible to pregnancy?" And
if so, 'Do they also squeal of
desperation like the spinster?"
Gary Carter.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In this day and age when a
young man can live a normal
life without worrying about
the consequences of his honorable activities, it is disheartening to see The Ubyssey helping to destroy the wonderful
situation.
The efficient arrangements
with the health service that
some co-eds have may now be
shattered, thanks to you brat.
Imagine the frightening consequences:
"What are you saying . . .
But scientific progress put an
end to that nonsense . . . But
all women take them . . . But
... oh, my God!"
Bill, Arts IV.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The university is in danger
of being closed down as a mental health hazard.
Reasons:
A girl Ubyssey reporter not
only gets birth-control pills,
but reveals how—publicly.
The Early Penitentionary
design of Totem Park is evidence enough the administration will foster the myth that
it is doing its part.
Hence, The Ubyssey (in revealing what we all know)
reinforces the belief that we
are! all fornicators if given the
chance.
Actually, we are a pretty
grubby lot and don't get much
sex (although I knew many
girl Ubyssey reporters before
they became virgins).
Don  Pepper.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Congratulations on your recent articles on birth control.
Sieglinde Stieda,
UBC   Demographic   Society.
GSM   NEWS
PHOTOS FOR TOTEM
Students who plan to graduate during this academic year
and who wish their photographs to appear in the Totem
Yearbook may have their pictures taken on campus by
Campbell's Studios, at their mobile unit which will be
located next to the Stadium. The GSA has reserved the
following date: Thursday, October 14, from 9:30-12:0©
and from 1:00-4:00. Students who are unable to appear
at this time may have their photos taken with students
of other faculties, at the same location, up until October
22, 1965. Thereafter arrangements must be made with
Campbell's Studios.
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It was certainly a pleasant
surprise to discover the progressive attitude of Wesbrook
Hospital regarding the distribution of contraceptives. It
was an equally pleasant surprise to find that there really
are * 18-year-old single co-eds"
at UBC whose thinking seems
to spring directly from the
hypocrisy of past generations.
Is it really worth creating
trouble and embarrassment
for Wesbrook and for the many
young women who sincerely
seek reliable professional aid
just to get a sensational news
article?
Three arts students.
The modern way to see is with CONTACT LENSES
Have them expertly fitted at a reasonable price by
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OVER 2300 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
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RE 3-6727 (by Sears)   HE 5-1160
U. B. C.   FOLK   SONG   SOCIETY
PRESENTS
TOM HAWKEN
In His Final Vancouver Appearance
FRIDAY,   OCT. 8, NOON, BROCK
— and —
YORK and BEANS
"Dirt Returns To Campus"
TUESDAY,   OCT. 12,   NOON, BROCK
BOTH CONCERTS ONLY 25c EACH
Murrag Goldman
"Granville
774
For a touch of diference, drop into our "doorway to a
COLLEGE man's world" and feast your eyes on our sport
jacket selection in ruff'n-rugged imported tweed selections, priced at:
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• Credit Naturally
"Up half a block from BIRK'S Clock MORE   MORE
from pf 3
to lose, one could never be
sure if the populace and the
reds would stand for this. It
became imperative to establish a '1security apparatus"
which could maintain control over the "heavily infiltrated" population.
But official American
agencies (C.I.A., M.A.A.G.,
U.S.O.M.), although there in
force, were limited in the
openness of their activities
by those provisions of the
Geneva agreements which
ruled out increases in the
military power of the two
governments of Vietnam.
This was made more sticky
by the presence of observers
of the International Control
Commission (India, Canada,
Poland) whose reports on
violations of the Geneva
agreements were picked up
by the world's press.
The Michigan State Uni-
' versity professors filled the
gap. Since they were a nongovernmental agency ostensibly interested in education, their actions were not
as carefully observed. And
this was how the professors
of M.S.U. came to train,
equip, finance and otherwise
create the police apparatus
for Diem's police state.
The police-training activi-
)l Sight
ties of the M.S.U. "team"
included the creation of a
V.B.I. (Vietnamese Bureau
of Investigation) modelled
after our own F.B.I, (no underdeveloped country should
be without one), the training
of Diem's own Palace Guard
to prevent the assassination
of this nationalist leader,
mass fingerprinting, identification cards and other security checks on the general
populace, and the reorganization of the national police
force so that it could engage
in para-military activity of
the type noted previously.
Perhaps the most useful
activity of the professors
was the development of a
rural-based militia of 40,000
men which was placed at
Diem's disposal. This latter
activity, being the clearest
violation of the Geneva
agreements, was necessarily
the most clandestine.
In all this activity the
Michigan professors received
money and equipment from
the U.S. agencies operating
in Vietnam and surreptitiously passed them on to the
new military forces they had
created.
This, then, is the record
of activities of a multi-university which shuns the
petty moralizing and social
criticism of cranks like the
late C. Wright Mills, and
whose professors are out
there in the real world with
what Arthur Schlesinger Jr.
calls "the movers and the
shakers". This is a new day
for the university, and it requires new men who can get
out in the field.
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes.
B.C.  UNIVERSITIES
TEACH-IN
REVOLUTION AND RESPONSE
A unique educational experience. The teach-in overcomes the limitations of the classroom to
make possible a free, frank dialogue between professors and students on the crucial issues of
our times. You will have the opportunity to hear experts and committed citizens discuss the
problems involved for Canada, for the West, for the world, in this age of revolution. You will
have the opportunity to get information, to air your own views, to challenge your professors
and fellow students.
ON   VIETNAM:   Representatives of:
The National Liberation Front (Viet-Cong)
The Saigon Government
The American State Department
And local experts.
ON    INDIVIDUAL   RESPONSIBILITY:
Rev. Wm. Nicholls (UBC)
Robert Scheer (Berkeley)
Students.
ON   LATIN   AMERICA:
Cheddi Jagan (ex-PM of British Guiana)
Andres Lockward (Dominican Republic)
Adolf Berle (U.S. State Department)
And local experts.
ON CANADA'S ROLE IN THE WORLD
Howard Green (P.C.)
Jack Austin (Lib.)
Bob Prittie (NDP)
LINUS PAULING WILL ATTEND THE TEACH-IN FRIDAY EVENING   -   Admission FREE
PROGRAMME:
Friday, 8:00 p.m.: Revolution and Ideological Conflict.
Friday, 10:00 p.m.: Linus Pauling.
Saturday, 10:30 a.m.: Vietnam: Revolution and Intervention.
Saturday, 8:30 p.m.: Canada's Role in a Revolutionary World.
Sunday, 9:30 a.m.: Revolution and Self-Determination.
Sunday, 2:30 p.m.: The Responsibility of the Citizen.
Honorary President: President John B. Macdonald, UBC.
Honorary Board: Pres. P. McTaggart-Cowan, SFU; Pres. Malcolm
Taylor, UVic; Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie; Dean F. H. Soward;
Byron Hender (UBC, AMS); Paul Williamson (UVic, AMS).
Sponsors:    Ninety-one members of the UBC Faculty;    Seventeen
members of the SFU Faculty.
Page   12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,   1965 Tough price, Rough laugh
By STEPHEN BROWN
If you can afford the $6 price per couple,
race to the box office for tickets to the
remaining performances of Freddy Wood
Theatre's hilarious revue, In the Rough.
If you can't afford $6, curse yourself for
not going to the student performance Wednesday night — because you have missed
one of the liveliest, funniest, fastest-paced
and best cast revues ever seen here.
Audiences haven't laughed so loud and
long in ages. There was nary a dud in all
27 skits.
It's impossible to single out the best
performer — they all shine, many as never
before, in this show. Of course, they're all
professional actors too, as the theatre department continues its boycott of student
performers.
The show was delayed 15 minutes as
Roma Hearn rushed from an overtime TV
rehearsal, but she was sure worth waiting
for — for both her audio and video. Quite
a girl: great comedienne, good singer and
very scenic.
John Sparks has improved immensely
since his days as a student actor — just a
couple of years ago.
James Johnston, redhead Louise Glennie,
D. M. (Stop the World) Hughes and Norman Young are all at their best, though
Young is too loud at times.
Stubby little Judy Sinclair, who has to
have the funniest face in the world, almost
stole skits like Poets on Poets and the
Tennessee Williams play.
The zaniest, and about the funniest, skit
is the cover-up cha cha cha. The show also
lampoons James Bond, who it turns out is
shot at from all directions "because nobody
likes a smart-ass," and Vancouver, in a
song complete with slides of our incredibly
dumpy downtown.
The near-capacity crowd brought the cast
back six times for curtain calls. And they
would have clapped and whistled even
longer if director John Brockington and
the unfortunately unnamed writers had
been on stage.
Fetch the tallow, Ma—
and Canada trots back
into the 19th century
By NORMAN THYER
Much is spoken these
days about offering aid to
under-developed countries,
and Canadians are all over
the globe spreading their
technical knowledge, for it
is generally assumed that
Canada is developed in comparison.
But is this completely
true? Having come across
many atrocious examples of
design and planning in this
country, I am beginning to
think that Canada, too,
would benefit from aid from
abroad.
Such examples are plentiful in Vancouver, and, indeed, on the UBC campus.
Most cafeterias have a shelf
along the whole length of
the counter, so that customers can slide their trays
along in comfort.
Not so in the Ponderosa.
When this cafeteria was
opened, the shelves were
provided with strategically-
placed gaps. Thus, a customer might be sliding his
tray along nonchalantly —
and suddenly it would fall
through to the floor, dessert,
coffee and all.
Eventually someone decided to do something about
this. So did they fill in the
gaps? Not on your life!—
they put up partitions instead, so now you must lift
your tray every few feet
and carry it. Good exercise
for the arms, though.
Recently a nice 10 ft. wide
footpath was installed between the post office and the
engineering building. It
would be just fine for handling the rush-hour traffic
ibetwen lectures, did it not
lead right into a parking-
lot, where cars are often
parked so tightly that even a
|)l 7even
thin    person    can    hardly
squeeze through.
Houses, too, have their
idiosyncracies. Many apartments near campus lack elementary kitchen equipment
such as a sink.
But the piece de resistance
in one place was the stove.
This scorned the natural
simplicity of a knob for
each heating element, with
low, medium high markings. Instead, it had an oven
knob, and a main control
knob with 8 positions, one
labelled off and the others
numbered 1 to 7.
'This system had to be decoded, using an instruction
sheet. The off position
switched the oven on, and
the other knob positions
brought in various other
combinations. Instruction
No. 2 on the paper explained
position No. 1, instruction
No. 3 explained position No.
2.
If the leaflet was lost, you
were lost too. This monstrosity was a veritable
cook's nightmare. And it
was made in Canada.
Public services are somewhat variable. Admittedly,
some parts of Vancouver
have quite a good bus service, free of diesel fumes—
at a price, of course. But
does this excuse a telephone
company and radio stations
which cannot ibe relied upon
to give an accurate time-
check?
Or a train service from
Seattle which frequently
runs hours behind schedule?
—quite a contrast to the
government - operated railways of Japan, for instance,
which are always punctual.
Perhaps we should have
second thoughts regarding
under - developed countries.
When better efficiency in
some respects can be found
In tropical Africa, Canada
might benefit by getting into
the foreign-aid market as a
recipient.
I
I
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Collecting sport shirts is
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Friday, October 8,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 i
RIOT
By GABOR MATE
A university campus was
invaded by steel-helmeted
riot police last month, its
students and faculty forced
out of their classrooms at the
point of bayonets.
The South Korean government remembered only too
well how the preceding regime had been ejected from
office by student demonstrations two years ago.
In Santo Domingo last
week a student was killed
when a bewildered OAS
sentry fired into a group of
young  demonstrators.
In Greece, students protesting King Constantine's
unconstitutional manipulation of government have
clashed repeatedly with
police during the last two
months.
These incidents are a few
examples of an important
fact of political life in many
campus
countries — the great influence of university students
upon political affairs.
To illustrate the potentially great international repercussions of student movements one needs cite only
the "snake dances" in the
streets of Tokyo, which
forced a cancellation of President Eisenhower's visit to
Japan, or the student demonstrations in Budapest, which
touched off the 1956 revolt
against Soviet rule.
Against this general picture stands the Canadian
campus: somnolent, docile; a
calm, quiet pond in contrast
to the raging, turbulent
rivers of the international
student scene. A malicious
critic might add that the
water in the pond reeks of
stagnation and putrefaction.
No one, of course, is suggesting that UBC students
should desire to be shot,
bayonetted in the stomach,
or incarcerated in black
dungeons. There are perfect-
/f-5 'jFirst, it is pointless to re-
X^-j bel against an authority so
3ip> ujioppressive as to be almost
Jf8?f.'*• non-existent. The rights of
$&££■ > f^e speech demanded by
;*§•!£>■•'T Berkeley students have
;^^Mf ®f?Ter l>een m jeopardy here.
-^5l*yr Indeed, academic and poli-
<%;-.;''. tlcal freedom at UBC is cer-
' c tainly     unsurpassed      any-
,-       where in the world.
Second, the political atmosphere in Canada is so stable
that even federal  elections
fail to generate widespread
excitement.
vv. ,  \Third,    Canada "has    no
il> great domestic issue compar-
f%[able to civil rights in the
|-_ ^|.S.,  for  example.  (Quebec
is far away, and the Cana-
|)f 6ix
Mirror, Mirror on the Wall — by David Mayrs
.  .  . at  UBC  Fine Arts Gallery  until  Oct. 23.
dian Indian is still very
much asleep.)
Fourth, Canada is seldom
directly involved in any
great international controversy. If we wish to protest,
we usually have to be content with rapping Uncle
Sam's dirty fingernails.
In short, we lack a cause.
The few that do have an intense need for protest and
social action are forced to
import or invent causes. An
example was the abortive
attempt to form a UBC
branch of SNCC last year.
. It still remains to be seen,
however, whether it is possible to inspire UBC students to action if a real issue
is present. (The Back Mac
campaign was really only a
momentary outburst of enthusiasm.)
Such an issue does exist
now: the principle of free
universal higher education.
Let no one be fooled that a
mere $50 is at stake. The
average student at UBC
could probably afford that
$50 without too much additional difficulty.
The $50 is only the focal
point of what is a much
greater issue—under existing conditions the universal
right to higher education is
» wjrth* Th«t tiMer the ■'
•Ws^s^#'' ;"s^s«^r^s^s^s4 ' jttfastf' '
ity of students come from a
very low proportion of the
population.
It is no accident that
while most of the graduating classes from schools in
upper class- districts, such as
Churchill and Prince of
Wales, spend at least one
year at UBC, only greatly
reduced numbers make it
from average districts, such
as Kitsilano, and an infinitesimal fraction from schools
in the eastern part of the
city.
Unless it is true that
money is brains, there is a
grave social injustice in our
fair land of equal opportunity.
There is now before us a
valid and worthwhile cause.
The opportunity for action
is here, it is our duty to
seize it.
The fight will require
more than a few desultory
I
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I
I
statements by the AMS. It
will require a politically
mature and inspiring leadership with a clear vision of
the goal ahead and the path
to be followed.
It will require socially
conscious students who understand their responsibility
to struggle for those ideals
which we all profess to believe. Above all, it will demand a united and sustained
effort from us all to transform the outlook of our
society. The universal right
to free higher education is
not yet publicly recognized,
and it will not be recognized
overnight.
Studies made at Berkeley
show one-third of the students supported the free
speech movement and another third were in active
sympathy with its aims and
purposes.
To achieve a similar
ratio at UBC, at least 11,000
of us must be prepared for
action. Are there 11,000 of
us ready to assault society's
outmoded attitudes?
In other countries, students are ready to die for
their beliefs. We have only
to raise our voices in unity
and strength. The challenge
has/been presented. c,^
JQHt power,, tne
Now if you will place
the apple on your
head . . . But before
you do see the . . .
largest selection of
Paper Back Books in
Western Canada at
DUTHIE
BOOKS
TWO LOCATIONS:
4560 W. 10th Ave.
901   Robson Street
Paper Back Cellar
Phone CA 4-7012
Phone 684-4496
Phone 681-8713
Open Friday Till 9 p.m.
things gO
better,!
Loke
Cwm
pitting the books? Take time out for the unmistak-
gjble taste of ice-cold Coca-Cola. Lifts your spirits,
fposts your energy...
.. jtoth Coca-Cola and Coke aie registered trade marks which identity only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
horized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
•*•*-
Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,  196? nostalgia
ZO! wo wot to
GOTOWTCHON,
tllrv^L,LETMEA8t;VOe/l
m^9 COPPlE QUESW)KS!.,t
VOT'S YOUR SERIAL WHK^V
How zociw. 2EcoerrY card?
WHEWPLOtHBNT imsuumk
/7» WRD?2T0pOIT COUNCIL
4? Vatfs sour ^oqw
Pr$?WGttWR
ARM&rAly?^^
(KLKTNES NOW LNIN6
'   \iVH6EElS„lJ
w««*|we
No relief in sight
By DAN STOFFMAN
I thought I had a pretty
good time in high school,
but four years later and just
starting to recover, I realize
I was fooled.
I couldn't possibly have
enjoyed myself in the glaring anomoly of the B.C. high
school.
Our schools, we are told,
exist to prepare the young
to take a useful part in a
democratic society. Yet the
school chooses to perform
this vital function within its
own tight little society, a
society which is the extreme
opposite of the democratic.
Looking objectively at the
high school, one sees a police
state far more advanced than
anything Stalin could have
conceived. Possibly George
Orwell researched 1984 at
one of our local high schools
—one needn't look any further for big brother.
At the school I attended, a
wooden tag hung in every
classroom. This was the toilet tak with which one was
obliged to , advertise that
one's bladder was full, one's
bowels were about to move,
or, occasionally, if one was
female that it was that time
of month.
Neither seniors nor anyone else could use'the toilet
before asking teacher, "May
I leave the room?" Teacher
could, and often did, reply
"No."
Teacher was omniscient,
far better informed on the
state of a 17-year-old's bladder than was the bladder's
owner.
When in the halls for non-
excretory functions, a yellow
slip signed by a staff member replaced the ignominious wooden tag. Astonishing as it seems, it was illegal
in my school to traverse the
halls during class without a
pass.
It would foe fascinating to
learn the inspiration for this
blantantly fascist regulation. Perhaps the identity
cards Negroes must carry in
South Africa?
Or may be the clue is the
color — yellow like the
badges Jews were forced to
wear in Nazi Germany.
We often hear of cases
where Joe Citizen is wronged by the authorities simply
because he doesn't know his
own basic rights. There
should be, but isn't, a required course in high
school setting down these
rights. During the most impressionable years of his life
the student is trained in anything but British justice.
Not only is the student
guilty until proved inawStstt,
but is rarely given theSl*
portunity to defend himself.
If a student is accused-- iof
wrongdoing, anything he
says in his defense is automatically, to the administration, untrue.
Most often penalties) are
assigned on the spot by Staff
members. Perhaps one w*§
chewing gum in the halts
during the lunch period.
One was quite likely to M.
accosted by an unknown
basket - weaving teacher:
"Aha! Chewing gum in the
halls, eh? That's a 313 for
you, my lad."
A 313 at my alma mat#r
meant a detention. A deteav<
tion meant an imbecilic half-
hour after school sititaf
with your hands bebitri
your back doing nothiag
One was forbidden to studfc
one could only sit there 10M
a vegetable.
The 313 was typical of fl$i
school's fundamental pbJlo
sophy: the way to turn ro
adult into responsible adult
citizens is to treat them as
infants.
Take, for instance, if you
can stand him, the home
room; teacher of one 16 to
17-year-old Grade II class, a
tall, effeminate man, who
required his charges to
stand every morning and
chant in unison, "Good
morning, teacher."
Again we see people capable of parenthood, of holding jobs, people just months
away from the responsibilities of the adult world
treated without a trace of
respect, as kindergarten inmates.
Education is widely supposed to be concerned with
the cultivation of taste. My
school, however, insisted on
the threat of punishment,
that its students display
total tastelessness.
The captive audience principle, so entrenched that it
was never questioned, made
tastelessness an inevitable
prerequisite to success.
Taste was enforced from the
top, precisely as in Hitler's
Germany or Stalin's Russia.
During my graduating
year, the administration saw
fit to invite an ''expert" on
employment to address the
male sector of the senior
class, dutifully assembled in
the school theatre for the
occasion.
The orator, a pompous Ignoramus in the noblest Col.
Blimp tradition, began by
addressing personal insults
to some of the students in
the front rows, commenting
on clothes and hair styles.
After some perfunctory
remarks about the technique
of job application, he harangued the group about the
crime of using bad language
in the presence of women.
'IThey don't like it," he
screamed, eyes ablaze.
"Your ladies won't stand for
it. It's a sure road to
failure."
The man was obviously
psychically warped, a pathetic creature who apparently
had never met a woman in
his life, but only an unending succession of blushing,
tight-lipped prigs.
Yet this nitwit was allowed by the administration to
soil the minds of an entire
class with his weird neurosis. School staff led the ovation after this cultural
event.
Of   course   any  audience
with   a   particle   of   taste
—-^buld have reacted to such
Mane tripe in two possible
/^■*nays; raucous laughter with
'      ■iimini   V>oMi-1!nj>   iii   trm m tfitt
savage heckling ,«r
Yet any high school graduate can vividly imagine the
result of such self-respecting
and ultimately tasteful behaviour — at best, corporal
punishment; possibly a humiliating ^apology, delivered
in person to the indignant
orator; compulsion to write
final exams, a month's detentions.
The possibilities were endless.
One was trained to accept,
unquestionably and respectfully, what one was given.
Can anyone wonder why
millions of high school graduates, humbly submit, week
after week, year after year,
to Bonanza and Peyton
Place?
Their high school training,
after all, was eminently successful; their education, the
result   of   this' success,   a
miserable failure.
// you must
be discreet
about it...
By
WULFING VON SCHLEINITZ
Dear M. S. Johnson:
Contrary to whatever M.
S. Johnson may have heard,
the Knights of Columbus did
not hold a candlelight procession and outdoor barbecue in my honor.
If he had properly persu-
ed my articles in last year's
Ubyssey, you would have
found me making fun of the
edicts propagated in the
name of a supreme being. I
neither affirmed nor denied
the existence of such an entity. Hence the appropriate
label is agnostic not atheist
Arguments based on
bible scripture are quite out
of place in questions relating
to birth control since those
of us who do not accept the
authority of such tracts are
not interested in how the
Christians are going to
squirm out of their present
morass.
We want birth controlling
means for ourselves and find
it an unwarranted intrusion
on our personal liberties
when laws proposed, supported and passed by Christians forbid us stability of
mind through sadistic measures.
More important than the
question of planned parenthood, is pure unadulterated pleasure. The ban on
dissemination of birth control information plus materials and therefore sperm, has
the annoying effect of cutting down pleasure by making participants in certain
sexual endeavors, usually
called fornication, play Russian   Roulette.
It is appalling when, in
theory, only married women
are given the opportunity to
obtain pills while their unmarried sisters have to rely
on other cruder methods or
on their partners.
As to the whole paraphernalia called quaintly rubber goods, would you wash
your feet with your sox on?
Personally I am extremely
displeased with those who,
on the grounds that fornication is dreadfully wicked
("If you must, be discreet
about it.") ferUd their «h4k
drea att  fenowleda*  abort
manifestations.
Those who on religious
and other moral grounds
are forbfdden to practise
birth control by the now-
you-do-it-now-you-don't method or to have pleasure
fornicating are perfectly at
liberty to follow their leaders.
By the way, Mr. Johnston,
you lump yourself with "the
more liberal and fundamentalist churches". Or so one
would assume.
I suppose you have followed the dfctum to go forth
and multiply literally and
have been splitting down the
middle ever since.
j>i -'jive
Boy 4 New Gvftor
10% Cash Discount
With Your AJH.S. Card
ARNOILVS PAWNSHOP
986 Granville — MU 5-7517
NOTICE
Don't Forget That
BLUE HORN SUBSCRIPTIONS
Can Be Obtained
Only To This Sunday
The holder is admitted for
a reduced admission of $1.00
ANY NIGHT
Playing To Sunday
PHILLY JOE JONES
FREDDIE REDD
WALTER BENTON
BOB MAIZE
Special Concert 2 p.m. Sunday, Subscription Holders
FREE, Students $1.00 with
AMS.
BLOEH0KN
3625 WLBRCMDHMIY   731-6722
EVE: Please, sir.
KEN: I'm all ready. Got my girl,
and my 100% Shetland wool,
Byford sweater.
EVE: Right
KEN: It's designed by the British
expert in styling, Hardy Amies.
See the fully-fashioned sleeves,
the subtle colour. I've learned to
be discerning from you, Dad.
EVE: It's so soft. Right?
KEN: I can always count on
Byford, and my Dad.
EVE: Oooh! I'm falling.
KEN: Sorry, I'm trying to catch   !
the car-keys. „.„.
this axc/us/v*, ma</« in England,
■■- ;*p- -'"
'IS?':
at b»H»r stores v "1*
uvwywhmn.
Friday, October 8, 1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9 Friday, October 8, 1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
AROUND THE NETS
By RICK HIGGS
Dr. Bob Hindmarch, UBC's
Mr. Hookey, is convinced that
this year's edition of the
hockey "Birds will return the
Hamber Cup to the Thunderbird campus.
There are several good reasons why I agree.
[Hindmarch is a head coach
with the Canadian Amateur
Hockey Association Leadership Institute. As a result he
has a continuous pipeline to
the finest minor hockey programs in Western Canada.
He is also the director of
the British Columbia Amateur
Hockey Association Clinic
Program. Therefore, he has
seen and will see many talented prospects for his Birds.
Many good UBC players
have travelled this route, and
I am informed that more of
ttie same will be in camp this
year.
This university has a fine
winter sports center on campus. Players are now able to
combine the best of academic
and hockey ability. Spectators
will also find it convenient to
attend gamjes on campus.
Two teams will be sponsored this year.
The Varsity Birds will conclude their independent schedule this season against Western Collegiate, local senior
and     intermediate     amateur
The highlight of the season
will be the struggle for the
Hamber Cup against the University of Alberta (Edmonton)
Golden Bears who will undoubtedly provide more than
adequate competition, as in
the past.
There is also the possibility
of several UBC Birds facing
the touring Russian, Swedish
or Finnish national teams.
The Junior Varsity (Jay-
vees) will again compete in
the Pacific Coast Junior
Hockey League which is comprised of local teams of less
than Junior A calibre.
Both teams are certain to be
competitive. Hindmarch's eyes
glint happily at the thought
of those new and returning
players.
NOTICES
FOOTBALL
If you would like to associate with the 'Birds football
team, but lack the playing
ability, get in touch with
Frank Gnup in the Memorial
Gym or Bob McGinn at AM 1-
1878 with regards to being a
manager. You enjoy the same
privileges as the players. No
experience necessary. We will
train you.
GYMNASTICS
Meeting noon Tuesday, room
213 War Memorial Gym. Elections for captain, co-captain;
films of PHbar vaulting.
SWIMMING
All divers and swimmers interested in commencing training are requested to contact
coach Jack Pomfret Athletic
Office, Memorial Gym.
Fall Campus
-SPECIAL-
RAINCOATS
C RO Y D 0 N
BOB HINDMARCH
. . . Mr. Hockey
Four wallets stolen
Four    girls'    wallets    were I
stolen on campus Thursday.
Three were taken from purses I
at the education gym and the |
fourth disappeared from
locker in the home economics |
building.
An RCMP spokesman said the
losses totalled about $40.
ALLEN SOLLY
FROM ENGLAND
Manufacturers   Clearance
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH   WOOLLENS
549   Granville     MU   1-464°
•For classes or just comfortable weekend wear
Cardigans       19.95 Pullover       16.95
2174 West 41st in Kerrisdale
LTD
AM 1-2750
TOMORROW - SATURDAY. OCTOBER 9
TIE SOfllCS tfs.)
THE
wikhI from SEATTLE
AND
THE VANCOUVER PLAYBOYS
in the ARMORIES
For FROSH RECEPTION DANCE
Crowning of the Frosh Queen
AMS Cards presented at Door
Tickets at AMS and at Door
Only $3.50 per couple
Time 9 p.m. — I p.m.
All Students Welcome Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 8,  1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Designer looks at visual world
H. W: Parker, designer
director, Royal Ontario Museum, discusses "The Evolution of the Visual World".
Noon, auditorium, 25c.
FOLKSONG SOCIETY
ITow Hawkin's final Vancouver performance in Brock
Lounge noon today. Admission
25c. Tuesday noon, John York
and Beans Jackson, also in
Brock, also 25c.
VCF
Three - day lecture series
next week by Francis I. Anderson, M.Sc, M.A., Ph.D.,
B.D.
Tuesday '^Christianity — Its
Authority", Wednesday "Christianity—Its Intellectual Respectability". Meetings Angus
110 noon.
DEBATING UNION
Organizational   meeting   for
this year's forum debates, today   noon   Bu.   217.  All  welcome.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General meeting, noon Tuesday,   Bu.   216.   All   welcome.
Special speaker.
PRE SOC WORK CLUB
Speaker Graham Watt, deputy warden of Oakalla, Tuesday noon Bu. 202. First club
social 3:30 p.m. Graham Residence. All members welcome.
DEMOGRAPHIC SOCIETY
General   meeting   and   elections. All welcome. Bu. 202.
ACCOUNTING CLUB
Organizational meeting noon
today Angus 212.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Dancing and social evening
tonight, 8 p.m.
Four  frosh  seats
go by acclamation
Only three of seven positions on frosh council will
be contested in the Oct. 15
election.
Running for president are
Tom Mason, John Wheaton
arid Derek Rendle. For vice-
president are Sue-Ann Sargent and Dou Day.
The only other contested
position is that of treasurer.
James Good and John Kidder are running.
Winning by acclamation
are Patricia Anderson, secretary; Ann Bishop, publications manager; Morris Hoar-
owitz, special events; Sheila
Bain, women's sports; and
Rick   Goepel,   men's  sports.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
* TRADES
ft RENTALS
<r TERMS
ft REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
Dr. Rothstein on "New
Horizons in Library Science",
today noon Bu. 225. Everyone
welcome.
UNIVERSITY  QUAKERS
Meeting for worship, Sunday, 11:00 a.m., Buchanan
penthouse.
STUDENT CHRISTIANS
General meeting The Student Christian Movement Tuesday noon Brock extension 350.
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Hon. John R. Nicholson on
"Housing Policy in Canada",
Friday noon, Lasserre 104.
DANCE CLUB
Get-acquainted dance tonight, 8:00-1:00. New members
and old. Stags-male and female welcome. Admission 25
cents men, 10 cents women.
VCF
Meetings moved from Bu.
106 to Angus 110. First meeting today noon. Rev. Robert
Birch on the subject "Who Is
Jesus Christ?".
WUS
Treasure   Van   meeting   today noon Bu.  2205.
BIG BLOCK
Meeting today noon in back
room women's gym.
-the Anglican Chaplaincy in UBC
-every Sunday at
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
(University Boulevard)
-Kokl £wzhwihi at 9:30 ajn.
Chaplain, Rev. J. Alan Jackson,
Chaplaincy House:
4660 West 9th Avenue
the
spotlight /'J ch...
PHILCO. PSS2 SOLID STATE
STEREOPHONIC AUTOMATIC
PHONOGRAPH
The All New PHILCO
Fully Transistorized Stereophonic Deluxe Record Player
with exclusive foam padded cabinet for added beauty
and protection.
Only   $109.95
10% Discount with presentation of
A.M.S.    Card
1
Complete range of Players,  mono and  stereo from
$49.95   -   $159.95
See these Fine Quality PHILCO
Products at:
Alexander & Axelson
APPLIANCES   LTD.
4558 West 10th Ave.
Phone 224-6811
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up   to  Advanced
Level   -   Segovia Technique
W. PARKER
Recltalitt. 682-109*
GUITAR
All Prices — Fine Guitars Handmade in Spain.
LESSONS:   Classics,   Flamenco,   Folk,  Popular   and   Banjo
Fine Repairs — Accessories
NEW STOCK OF SHEET MUSIC
The MEDITERRANEAN SHOP
4347 W. 10th Ave. Phone: 228-8412
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock  Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8t Found
11
LOST AT TOTEM PARK DANCE,
Oct. 2, UBC jacket (white leather
sleeves), pockets contained personal papers. If found contact
John Hopkins, Acadia Hut 30,
Room   3,   or phone  224-9946.
BLACK KEY CASE, LOST IN
front of Ponderosa Sept. 28. Fin-
der  phone   684-7053.
FOUND: EDWARD TAYLOR'S
English 451 notebook. Call Penny
at UBC Radio, South Brock Basement. 	
FOUND: 3 KEYS (EATON'S) (Mc
Kay Cycle) on chain. Apply
Brock Proctor.
LOST: BLACK WALLET, VICIN-
ity Sedgwick, Wednesday, Reward. Please phone Rick, CY. 8-
0318. 	
LOST: MAN'S RAINCOAT, TAKEN
from Bu. 2238 on 6th. Please Call
224-5675. 	
FOUND IN ENG. 201, NAME MIKE
in case, Diwa Polylog Slide Rule.
Phone  922-3834  after 6 p.m.	
FOUND AT FROSH RETREAT:
One train case with name Dixie
Hall. Also one sleeping bag.
Phone Joanne  988-4775.
POUND: 2nd FLOOR BU. BLDG.—
textbook — "Research Methods in
Social Relations". Apply AMS
publications  office,   Brook   Hall.
FOUND: UPPER "C" LOT ON
Monday, 4th Oct., Ford trunk or
igition key. Apply Publications
Office. 	
POUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
Special Notices
13
FORESTRY WEEK —  OCT.   11 - 16
Watch  For  Special  Events.	
FORESTER'S HARD TIME "UN-
dercut" Dance Oct. 15 PNE Show-
mart Bldg. 8:00 p.m. Buses from
Residences.   All   students   invited.
ONLY SEVEN MONTH TO GRADU-
ation. Next Year's TOTEM will
be nearly 300 pages and Advance
Orders will receive a special 8-
page graduation supplement. Order
now from AMS Business Office,
LOWER MALL RECORD BASH IN
the Ballroom, Noon, October 14th,
12:30-2:30  p.m.    Only  15c.
TOMORROW — THE SONICS vs
The Vancouver Playboys at Frosh
Reception Dance in the Armories.
9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. Tickets at
AMS  and  door.    $3.50  per couple.
YOU'LL HEAR THE TOGGERIES
at Campus a Go-Go! Anybody
North of Seattle will agree that
they're the band with the best
sound around! And they're only
the third of six great reasons for
you to be at Campus A Go-Go!
Tickets go on,' sale today at AMS.
1953    MG-TD,    GOOD    CONDITION,
best offer? Phone 684-7053.
1950   DODGE   FOR   SALE.   PHONE
321-6461.
M.G.A. CONVERTIBLE, WIRE
wheeles. Except, clean condt., $700.
Phone Mike at 263-5995_.
MUST SELL, 1961 SIMCA. DEPEN-
dable transportation, $395, or best
offer. 224-9066 or 731-5009. Gary
or Janet.
Motorcycles
27
1965 HONDA "90", 5500 MI.
Valves and rings done at 4900
mi. Good condition. 434-8246 after
6 p.m.
'64    HONDA
Excellent
legshields,
mets,    two
more. $465.
160    SUPER    SPORT.
condition.     Wlndshierd,
saddle  bags,   two   hel-
rear   sprockets,    plus
John,  922-3497, after 6.
HONDA 90:
offer over
Desperate
TOP   SHAPE.    FIRST
$200   takes   this   gem.
—   922-6731.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters fc Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $M
up. Also Typewriter repair* at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone KB
1-8322.
Typing
43
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
views, and cases typed by qualified typists. From 40c per sheet
including paper, one carbon copy,
and binder. See us for mimeographing, dittos, stencil cutting,
and Multilith master preparation.
We also offer complete editing
and rewrite service — Ardale
Griffiths Limited at 70th and
Granville.  Phone  263-4530.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
BABYSITTER WANTED: ACADIA
Camp. Usually three mornings
every second week. Simultaneous
studying possible. Call CA 8-8026.
FREE ROOM. AND BOARD FOR
female student in exchange for
baby sitting and very light duties.
Day help maintained. Car pool
nearby.   Phone   AM  6-0628.	
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
as taxi drivers. Black Top Cabs
Ltd.,  701  Beach.
Work Wanted
82
Music
63
Transportation
14
RIDERS WANTED, VICINITY 3200
Block, Broadway. Call 731-1991.
20c   a  day   return.	
RIDE WANTED TWO ROAD AND
Steveston Hwy., Richmond, 8:30
classes. Phone Liliane, 277-8189 or
277-3661.
RIDE WANTED TO CALGARY
Friday, will share driving and gas.
736-7001   evenings.            	
RIDE WANTED FROM 63rd AND
Cambie. Please call Cathy, 321-
2482.
EiDK WANTED: NEAR PNE 9:30's
Mon., Wed., Fri., 8:30's Tues. and
Thurs.   John AL 5-8587.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'61 MOD.  SPRITE,  NEW  BRAKES,
tires,  paint.  Also  snow   tires,   ski
rack.  Mowich  253-8876.
ATTENTION    RALLY    FANS!    160
Skoda   Sports   Convert.,   spotless,
new tires, brakes, clutch, etc. 1100
cc. Twin Cart. $500 or offer. BR
7-2012.
PIANO TEACHER REQUIRES STU-
dents, beginners or advanced, near
10th   &  Alma.    Ph.   736-7064.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
Instruction Wanted
66
GERMAN 200 TUTOR WANTED.
Basically for conversation. 224-7592
after 6.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MARTIN      6-STRING     GUITAR.
Phone Craig,   526-6070  eve.
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents.
BALLS & CHAIN! IDEAL FOR
Stags, etc. 15-45 lbs. From $7.50.
FA 1-1776 and AM 6-2869.
Rooms
81
WANTED: ROOMMATE TO SHARE
a two-room housekeeping suite,
your share $35. Ph. RE. 8-5495,
3556 W 1st Ave.
Furnished Houses & Apts.     83
SELF-CONTAINED, FURNISHED
suite. Ideal for one or two students. Phone RE 3-6561, evenings.

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