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The Ubyssey Feb 10, 1966

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 THE UBYSSEY
down with
the
lamb
Vol. XLVIII, No. 47
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY  10, 1966
48
CA 4-3916
Nobody wins election
Chuck quits
as pledged
to Arts US
By CAROL  WILSON
Arts president Chuck Campbell resigned Wednesday, one
week after his executive censured him for firing the editors
of the arts magazine.
He sent his letter of resignation to an undergrad executive
meeting, stating that his censure amounted to a vote of non-
confidence.
He did not attend the meeting.
The censure vote was 4 to 0
with two members abstaining.
Campbell's resignation followed a statement he made
Jan. 31 that if the arts council
voted to censure him for firing
the editors of Consensus, he
would resign.
The controversy arose when
Consensus editors Peter Cameron and Nancy Corbett published a story about board of
governors member Einar Gunderson.
Campbell, on the advice of
AMS lawyer Ben Trevino,
charged that the story was
libelous and moved the editors
be fired.
The rest of the executive
overruled this motion and
Campbell fired the editors on
his own, saying that if the executive censured him, he would
resign.
Ted Swanson, executive
member, said the resignation
was accepted to set a precedent
for future president so they
could avoid putting their positions "on the line."
Derry Burianyk, another
council member, said, "It was a
mistake for Campbell to put
his position on the line.
"Because no directive was
given him not to take unilateral
action, he theoretically could
have fired the editors on his
own, but would have had to be
responsible to the executive for
his actions.
"He tried to force the issue
by threatening to resign. He
didn't think that people would
vote against him, but it backfired."
The position of president will
be taken over by vice-president
Ian McDougall until after the
elections for a new AUS executive Feb. 28.
"I think it is a good thing
Campbell did resign. It is a
point of principle. The executive body must have confidence
in its chief executive," McDougall said.
He said he would not initiate
any new AUS plans.
Consensus will be published
again soon under editors Cam
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Three-way race
for v-p undecided
By AL DONALD
Ubyssey City Editor
The  AMS   first   vice-presidential   election   ended late
Wednesday with the position undetermined after  a complicated series of uncounted ballots and  disqualifications.
As the situation now stands,
— norm  betts photo
BOYLAN DOWNS BUBBLY bought to celebrate election
nobody won. Contest among Charlie, Jim Taylor and Bill
Grant will go to student court for decision on disqualifications, voting irregularities, and other fubars.
MAC PASSES BUCK
No fee increase
if gov't kicks in'
President John
increase next year
through.
"If we get reasonable treatment from the B.C. government there will be no increase,"
he told a student forum Tuesday.
He said the federal government has provided unexpected
additional revenues to the university since the Bladen report.
Macdonald said it was unlikely fees can be lowered in
the next few years because of
"the enormous rate of increase
in costs."
"The federal increase in the
per capita grant to universities
is a dollar short of what was
recommended," he said.
Macdonald says there will be no fee
— if the provincial government comes
City and UBC
to cooperate
The city of Vancouver is
sharing its air with UBC.
It is also sharing its water,
carbon dioxide, fire trucks and
now its inhalators—for $10,000
a year.
UBC fire chief R. W. Rowland expalined the new agreement between UBC and Vancouver signed in October and
recently put into effect.
He said if UBC's inhalator is
out and a second one is needed,
the city will send one out........
any one of he three candidates
—Bill Grant, Charlie Boylan
and Jim Taylor—could win the
race.
In the first ballot, Boylan
polled 1,442, Taylor 1,063, and
Grant 1,044, but before counting began at 7 p.m., returning
officer James Taylor temporarily disqualified Boylan for not
turning in on time a financial
statement of his campaign expenditures.
Taylor said he would hand
the disqualification issue to
student court for a decision.
Former assistant returning
officer James Taylor assumed
the position of returning officer when Jim Taylor—former
returning officer—resigned to
run in the election.
If the student court upholds
James Taylor's decision, the
vote -will go to a second ballot
with the second choices on
Boylan's ballots being counted
for either Grant or Taylor.
If the student court rules
that Boylan was not legally
disqualified, the first vice-
presidency will go to him, providing two uncounted polls
remain disqualified.
In the second ballot counted
Wednesday night, Grant
had the lowest number of votes
and was eliminated. His ballots
were then counted for Boylan
or Jim Taylor.
Boylan polled 1,742 and
Taylor 1,662.
The validity of this vote depends on whether two polls
disqualified by James Taylor
are counted into the final vote.
The two polls, in the auditorium and education building,
were disqualified because campaign posters in the vicinity
were not removed before voting  started.
In addition, advance polls
did not appear Tuesday night
in Lower Mall, the B.C. Institute of Technology and the
education building.
There was no poll until noon
in south Brock.
Boylan said the decision on
his disqualification was up to
student court and would not
comment further.
"I'm happy students voted
for a radical voice on council,"
he said.
Grant said he thought the
disqualification of the two
polls was unfair, but said he
would not like to campaign
again.
(Continued on Page 2)
 SEJE^J^CTJPW,,,,,.
JIM LIGHTFOOT
.  .  new co-ordinator
Lightfoot fits
co-ordinator's
shoe, handily
Engineers may not rule the
world, but one of their members will co-ordinate the AMS
next year.
Jim Lightfoot, engineering
II, won a decisive victory over
opponent Don Wise Wednesday
to capture the office of AMS
co-ordinator for the 1966-67
year.
Election returns gave Lightfoot 2,343 votes of a total 3,818
cast.
Only two of the 19 polling
stations favored part-time
rodeoist Wise.
Wise polled 1,384 votes, as
compared to the 855 he netted
in last week's AMS presidential
elections.
"I made some converts," he
cried.
Lightfoot is currently assistant co-ordinator.
UBYSSEY
CONDEMNED
SEE PAGE 3 Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February   10,   1966
— norm  betts photo
SEEKING SOLACE and finding none, James  Taylor   (left),   returning officer  of  fouled-up
first vice-president election consults with Don  Rosenblum, law  I, and  current AMS first
v-p Bob Cruise. Taylor eventually referred voting mess to student court.
Heart attack
proves fatal
for UBC prof
A UBC assistant professor
of architecture collapsed and
died of a heart attack in his
doctor's officeTuesday.
Hadi Saraidarbour Pendar.
37, was a visiting professor
from the University of Oregon.
He started here on a new
program in August as a first
year design master in charge
of architectural design.
Pendar collapsed in the
middle of a heart examination
in Dr. Alan McNair's office.
The patient was allowed to
rest for 15 minutes after taking the first cardiogram which
appeared normal.
After about 28 step-ups in
the second test, he complained
of feeling funny and collapsed.
He was born in Iran in 1928
and received his BSc at Ottawa. He obtained his Bachelor and Master of Architecture at Oregon University.
ELECTION
Continued  from page 1
"I skipped a week of
classes to campaign," he said.
"I would have won the education vote because that is my
faculty and I campaigned hard
in there."
Candidate Taylor did not
comment on the situation.
AMS first vice - president
Bob Cruise said polling infractions were much greater than
Boylan's failure to turn in his
statement.
He said voters in south
Brock were advised on ■ the
qualities of the candidates by
the polling station attendants.
He said he thought he was
late with his financial statement in last year's election.
"If you can discount a candidate for that minor violation, this whole election can
be discounted on the basis of
voting irregularities.".
Victoria councils
govt brief lauded
By CAROL  WILSON
Student council presidents
from both UBC and Simon
Fraser are in favor of a student
brief to be presented to the
provincial cabinet within the
next two weeks.
The brief, drawn up by the
Victoria College student council, recommends a study of different factors of post-secondary education with respect to
providing requested operating
grants, providing equalization
for out-of-town students and
five year financing for universities.
AMS president Byron Hender said, "The brief is extremely well thought out. It is one
that the government should be
able to give serious consideration to.
"It deals with one area of
concern to a large number of
students, which is the equalization of costs for out-of-town
students," he said.
"This is in line with a brief
the AMS sent to the government last November, which
pointed out the discrepancies
between in-town and out-of-
town student expenditures."
Tony Buzan, president of
SF's student council has
pledged his full support to the
brief.
Law student dead
of gunshot wounds
A second-year law student
was found dead of gunshot
wounds in the basement of
his home Tuesday.
Dead is Arthur Goodman
of 7087 Angus Drive, Vancouver.
Police said he was found
in the basement by his father
after he had been missing
for some days.
They said an inquest into
the death will be held.
REDUCE DEATHS
CUS backs home
for Indian girls
By ANN BISHOP
Canadian Union of Students' western regional chairman
Ed Lavalle Monday proposed in a brief a unique AMS
sponsored co-operative home for Indian girls.
The brief, presented in Monday's council meeting, said that
the home would accommodate
10 to 15 residents.
Vancouver's city coroner esti-
estimates that 20 out of the 500
Indian girls who live in the city
die each year, the brief said.
Such a home would do a
great deal to reduce this number, he said.
Lavalle said the girls come
to Vancouver ill-equipped to
cope with urban life, were unable to get jobs, and constantly
faced racial discrimination.
When asked why UBC students should organize this project and not the Community
Chest Lavalle answered, "We
can see the problem and have
the time and talents to do
something about it. Someone
has to pioneer and no other
group should be doing it more
than students."
Lavelle said if the project is
a success the government will
probably take over its support
and build more homes along
the same lines, all over the
province.
Occupants will contribute
half of the $800 per month it
will cost to run the home, he
said.
The Vancouver Indian Center Board will give another
$100 per month and the UBC
grad class has pledged $2,000.
No fund-raising campaign
will be conducted on campus
but anyone able to contribute
may do so at the CUS office,
Brock extension 258.
The home will not be named
nor the location publicly disclosed, as this is not to be a
public  relations  campaign.
AMS officials
given award
for services
Ten UBC students have received a HAA.
The winners of the Honorary
Activities Award, the highest
honor the AMS can give to
UBC students, have been announced by Mike Coleman,
chairman of the HAA selection
committee.
The HAA is given for outstanding service to the organizational and administrative
activities of the Alma Mater
Society.
Winners are:
Len Brown, sc. IV; Joan
Curtis, arts IV; Judy Gaudin,
arts IV; Bill Harvey, com. IV;
Byron Hender, com. IV; Lome
Hudson, law II; Penny Jones,
arts IV; Dave Parker, for. IV;
Art Stevenson, eng. IV; Graeme
Vance, ag. III.
JUST  ARRIVED
s3
5
FROM    MADRID
Genuine
Spanish
Wineskins
Bad
Boys Ragge Shoppe
315
SEYMOUR
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Canadian Union of Students
C.U.S. Student co-ordinator needed to organize study
group to prepare for the seminar "Identity and Anxiety: crisis of a student generation'' in Waterloo, Ontario, Sept. '66. Apply C.U.S. Office, B.E. 258. Thursday, February 10, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
r*age 3
TAWNY-TRESSED COVENTRY MISS rides again on UBC campus. Parade of patroness
Lady Godiva is annual event for engineers, currently stumbling through engineering
week. Lucky redshirt is Don Allen.  Lucky  horse is Midnight.
POLITICAL  GROUNDS
Profs eye tenure rift
EDMONTON (CUP) — The
Canadian Association of University Teachers is looking into
a faculty-administration dispute with political overtones at
the University of Alberta here.
The refusal of the university
to grant tenure to two assistant
professors of philosophy, Col-
wyn Williamson and David
Murray,, "was made on grounds
which are not normally acceptable in considering tenure" ac
cording to a copyright story in
the university newspaper, The
Gateway.
Wiliamson, a graduate of Oxford now in his fourth year at
U of A, is also editor of Com-
monsense, a journal of social
comment.
The case has been brought
to the attention of Prof. James
Milner of the University of
Toronto law faculty, chairman
of the CAUT's Academic Free-
UBC digs deep well
for demanding fish
By  MARY  USSNER
Drillers are well on the way in drilling a 400-foot well
to make UBC fish well again.
The well is being drilled at
the southwest corner of UBC's
biological science building to
provide fresh, pure water for
scientific experiments.
Minute air bubbles produced
by the present water supply
clog the gills of the fish in experimental tanks and kill them.
These clogged fish gills,
chlorine murders of experimental fish, and mineral deficiency in the city water supply'here urged the sinking of
this well, said Dr. Norman
Wilimovsky, director of the
fisheries institute.
Ideal campus water was decided on after at least four important biological experiments
were ruined.
"If you add up all the costs,
including people's time, the
loss to the university as a result of these ruined experiments is probably in the neighborhood of $40,000," Wilmov-
sky said.
The drilling of the $26,000
well is one of the first steps in
the expansion of the biological
Sqipnces Ijqilclin^.,
East closer
with bridge
UBC students have the
chance Wednesday to bridge
the distance from Vancouver to
Peoria, Illinois.
They will have the chance
by playing bridge in Brock
Lounge at 7 p.m. Monday.
The free trip for two is the
big prize in the annual intercollegiate bridge tournament,
which UBC is entering for the
first time this year.
University bridge players
from across the continent will
play the same pre-dealt hands,
and the top two pairs from
each of eight sections will be
sent to Peoria for the finals
early in May.
Winners are decided on the
basis of the way the hands are
bid and played, and each hand
has its problems.
The event costs $1 to enter.
Regional and campus champions will be announced April
1, and plaques will be awarded
to winners of regions.
dom and Tenure committee
which investigates such matters.
A CAUT spokesman in Ottawa said members of the committee would visit Edmonton
within a week if an investigation were needed.
E. J. Monahan of CAUT said
the association would not comment publicly until an attempt
at private conciliation has been
made, but he observed that
"four or five years is rather a
long time for a probationary
period."
Murray, who has an M.A.
from Dalhousie University, is
in his fifth year at U of A.
Monahan said the CAUT
council could censure the administration, which would be
tantamount to blacklisting, if
the case could not be resolved.
This has been done only once
before in the history of CAUT.
The original decision to refuse tenure was announced Jan.
3, but the tenure committee, an
advisory committee of the university vice-president reconsidered the case at the request' of
the faculty association.
The committee's second negative decision was interpreted
as a virtual dismissal of the
two professors.
A group of senior students
and graduate students submitted a letter on their behalf,
stating that both were excellent
teachers and deploring their
dismissal. Only two students refused to sign the letter.
MAC HITS  UBYSSEY
Lies, distortions
hurt UBC image'
UBC president John Macdonald Tuesday accused The
Ubyssey  of printing lies and distortions  and  suppressing
facts.
He made the charge to 600
students while answering a
student question on fee raises
at the forum in Brock Hall.
The president claimed The
Ubyssey does as much damage
to B.C. public opinion about
the university as any one group
in the province.
PRINTS LIES
"When a newspaper prints
distortions and lies and suppresses the facts—there have
been many cases of this as I
think you all know—and this
goes all over the province,
what is going to be the reaction of the people who read
The Ubyssey?"
Ubyssey editor Tom Way-
man replied Wednesday that
"general statements about lies
are meaningless."
"We like to give honest
criticism and we like to receive
it," he said.
STATEMENT 'UNWORTHY'
"But the undocumented statement like the president's is unworthy of an educator."
Simon Fraser student president Tony Buzan said Macdon,-
nld's statements about The
Ubyssey were "the most irresponsible statements I have
seen in a long time."
Buzan said if Macdonald
continues to make the kind of
statements he made Tuesday,
UBC's image will plummet.
PROTESTS   DESTROY'
In reply to another question
at the forum Macdonald said
irresponsible protests were
those designed to destroy what
has been built at UBC over a
long  period.
"To complain that UBC is too
big and impersonal without
suggesting something better is
to destroy," he said.
Grad student Charlie Boylan
told Macdonald his comments
on The Ubyssey were unfair.
'STUDENTS RALLIED'
"When you come to this university the students rallied behind you," he said. "With the
help of The Ubyssey they campaigned throughout the province and collected 250,000 signatures."
Macdonald said he agreed
with Boylan but the character
of The Ubyssey had since
changed.
"This year there has been a
constant   distortion,"   he   said.
AMS president Byron Hender said Wednesday he agreed
with Macdonald's remarks on
The   Ubyssey—"generally".
FP Publications head Bell
speaks on campus Saturday
Max Bell, prominent Canadian newspaper publisher,
will speak at the Frederic Wood Theatre Saturday.
Bell, is head of FP Publications, which owns the
Calgary Albertan, The Toronto Globe and Mail, The Vancouver Sun, The Victoria Times and Victoria Colonist, The
Ottawa Journal and The Winnipeg Free Press.
His topic will be "Business in the Community."
The meeting at 8:15 p.m. is sponsored by the Vancouver Institute. Admission is free.
Acadia forms
conditions
committee
Acadia Camp residents have
formed a committee to compile
a brief on conditions in Acadia
Camp.
The brief wull be submitted
to housing administration and
food services.
The committee was formed
on AMS first vice-president
Bob Cruise's suggestion.
"Acadia thought they were
going to be included in an
AMS plan as a result of the
AMS residence survey that
they didn't want to be a part
of," he said.
"So we said here is the survey, do what you want with it."
'If you don't get any reaction from the administration,
come to us and we will help
you," said Cruise.
'The brief will be submitted
privately but if there is no reaction from the administration,
steps will be taken to publicize
it," added Cruise.
BLOOD DRIVE total flows
slowly but steadily towards
goal as students bleed for
the Red Cross. Sponsored
by EUS, drive continues until
Wednesday. mnrsstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Soctety, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash. -
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10,  1966
"The responsibility ot the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
Snafu
We think there should be a new election for the
AMS second slate, but it should be one hell of a better
run election than the two we've seen so far in 1966.
In the AMS first-slate elections one week ago, the
poll in the auditorium cafeteria somehow didn't open,
and one in the education building didn't open until noon.
Wednesday's election, though thousands might have
doubted the possibility, has been fouled up worse.
Since we always thought the winner of an election
was the guy the most people voted for, we think the fact
that the count from three polls was nullified is rather
significant, to say the least.
And this applies even though one vice-presidential
candidate's manager didn't hand in a form early enough
to comply fully with election rules.
And this applies especially since the final vote tally
on the first vice-presidential race showed a gap of less
than 100 votes between the winner and loser.
While it is true the whole problem could be shoved
onto the student court, we think it is far simpler to
hold another election next Wednesday.
This is partly in view of the court's proverbial
slowness of operation, partly in view of the fact the
court's decisions can be reversed by student council, and
mostly because both these bodies are full of very human
human beings whose judgment, perhaps, might not be
as fair on this issue as the general students' expressed"
through another full-bore second slate election.
But mostly we think it is far simpler to hold another
election next Wednesday because of the depth, the detail,
the almost beautiful degree of foul-up this Wednesday's
election became.
But, please, let's have next Wednesday's election
run, if not perfectly, at least better.
Let's not have another snafu.
Huzzahs!
Huzzahs to Dr John Macdonald for facing out his
students Tuesday in Brock.
We like a man, who stands up for what he believes,
and is willing to tell the world so. And we especially
like a university educator who takes time to talk to
bis students.
We like to hear a man stand up and say things are
done on this campus in a strict order of priority.
And if he feels the construction of more new buildings has a priority rating which means funds aren't
going to be available to keep the library open 24 hours,
or till 2 a.m. as at Simon Fraser, or till 2 a.m. during
exam times, then we're proud of a man who stands up
and says so.
We like to hear a university president say he is
unable to see why students feel they should be able to
speak with him at set times or all the time, if this is how
that president feels.
And we certainly like to hear a university president
say he doesn't know about certain unfair traffic rules
enforced in the name of his administration, after a student or two complain at one of those chances they have
to speak with him.
We like to hear a university president blame any
poor public image this university has on The Ubyssey,
if that is what he believes.
The fact that if The Ubyssey goes into the home,
those parents who read it will check its statements
against their sons' and daughters' opinions before making
up their minds on "image," is of course, irrelevant.
It must be rather nice for the president to have a
scapegoat around the place.
Only trouble is, now he can never call us good
for nothing.
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IN
THE
"Now that I'm president, Bird Calls will not only show
addresses and phone numbers, but the height, age, and
vital statistics of all girls on campus."
LETTERS
'No comment on team'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I feel compelled to comment on the recent column
called The Cauliflower Ear.
As coach of the UBC Thunderbird basketball team, I am
■with the players two hours a
day, six days a week.
This, I feel, gives me the
right to comment on the abilities and shortcomings of the
players concerned. No one
else has this right.
If your paper wishes to
make derogatory remarks concerning the basketball team,
please direct such comments
to me and leave the players
alone.
Incidentally, regarding the
comment about determination
pills for one or two of the
players, I think it would be
quite refreshing if some of
your sports writers took a few
brain pills.
PETER MULLINS
P.S. You are to be congratulated on spelling Barazzuol's
name correctly.
'COUNCIL $ MONEY'
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
With reference to your editorial of Tues. last, I would
]'k'_ to point out that the student union building committee is not the body handling
SUB finances.
The committee felt that the
project was of such importance that the most important
rtudent group on campus, student council, should handle
the large amounts of money
involved.
Furthermore, all decisions
affecting the project are made
by student council and not the
SUB committee. This method
of decision making was implemented because of the wish
of the SUB committee and
myself to keep student councillors aware of the project
and it was felt that they
would have a better chance of
being informed if all SUB decisions were made by them
and  not  left to  the  committee.
BYRON H. HENDER
President
'WHO'S SMITH r
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
There was an item in The
Ubyssey, Feb. 4, entitled;:
"Smith's tentacles stretch".
This is a misleading headline and it would appear that
someone does not know their
facts. It is assumed that the
Smith to which the headline
refers is Prime Minister Ian
Smith of 'breakaway Rhodesia'.
The article is concerned
with certain South Africans
who fear their . "passports
might be revoked" if they
participate in the seminar.
What has this to do with
Ian Smith of Rhodesia?
It is hoped that the person
who wrote this article will
attend the seminar. He may
then understand that Rhodesia and South Africa are not
one and the same.
ISABEL MILLWARD
Ed. Note: Right. All our head-
writers plan to be there.
'HENDER'S CHARM'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
When Byron Hender remarked that he could solicit
a petition to crucify Mr. Allen,
he basically exposed one of
two (or maybe both) attitudes.
First of all, he may think
that his personal charm is
able to accomplish anything
on campus.
Secondly, he seems to have
an utter and deep disrespect
for student intelligence of
UBC.
If the latter is true, I feel
sorry for Mr. Hender, since he
was elected by the very clods
he so despises.
Thus in effect, he admits to
be the choice of a campus full
of idiots.
Personally, I agree.
GEORGE HOLLO
Education III
1     EAR
By IAN CAMERON
It seems that various people
have found a new sport: calling The Ubyssey irresponsible.
Preside n t
Macdon aid
J says we're ir-
respons i b 1 e.
rRoger Mc-
■ .Afee says
"* J we're irres-
' ponsible. Dr.
McGregor
/says we're
cameron irresponsible.
Now. It seems that everyone thinks UBC is getting a
bad image downtown. Because The Ubyssey says bad
things albout the administration, presumably.
It also seems that SUB is
not doing as well as some
people hoped. This is also because of The Ubyssey.
Also it seems that we are
getting in the hair of the
housing people. Students are
complaining about residences,
because TheUbyssey is making them think about the conditions they live in.
So I was talking to one. of
the Brock types the other day,
and these subjects came up.
"It's not our fault," I said.
"We just say what's going
on."
"Oh, no you don't," he replied. "Everyone says that
you're responsible for the unrest on this campus."
"Does everyone say that ?"
I asked. "Including Dr. Macdonald, and McAfee, and McGregor ?"
"Yes."
"Well, that's impossible, because they all say we're irresponsible."
Dead silence.
Well, it looks like the same
thing to me, and what it looks
like is that these people don't
know their own minds. Either
The Ubyssey is responsible or
it's irresponsible. If it's responsible, then what is everyone criticizing it for ? And if
it's irresponsible, then all this
trouble is not the paper's
fault.
And if you have trouble
in understanding this line of
reasoning, look at Webster's
dictionary, a Ibook that will be
more than happy to inform
you that 'irresponsible' means
'not responsible.'
Meanwhile, I would like to
know if Macs Afee, donald,
and Gregor have quit beating
their wives yet.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News          Ron Riter
Associate George Reamsbottom
City        Al Donald
Photo          Norm Betts
Sports  Ed Clark
Ass't News Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City        . -   -      Dannv Stoffman
Page Friday       - _.   John Kelsey
Managing _____     Ian Cameron
Features      Mike Bolton
CUP Don Hull
In north Brock basement there is
a newspaper office. The newspaper
is called The Ubyssey. It has won a
trophy for newspaper excellence five
years In a row. This is a list of
notables who worked on the paner
Wednesday: Joan Fo^arty, Derick
Blackie, Csrol-Anne Baker, Pone:
Halverson, Bruce Benton, Bert Hill,
Dick Taylor, Val Zuker, Sue Grahs-
by, Gus Ricker, Pat Hrushowy, Bill
Graf, and Mary Ussner, Marilyn Hill
did 'tween classes. Ann Bishop and
Carol Wilson stayed late and rewrote
stories, and genial Stu Gray (Mary's
paramour) was city editor for a day. Thursday, February 10,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Simon Fraser Academy-Revisited
— norm betts photos
TAKING DOWN the top of their convertible in the sunny weather UBC  in enjoying,
Billee Cohen,  ed  IV,  (right),  and  Viki   Hildreth, ed. IV, prepare for a trip to Burnaby's
Simon Fraser Academy for a change of scene.
ATTITUDES
ON   HIGH
All SFA types not moody
By STU GRAY
Does Simon Fraser Academy really have a high
school atmosphere? Only SF
students lcnow for sure.
We thought.
To find out if SFA'ers
found the moods and attitudes of their classmates
immature and of non-university calibre, The Ubyssey
made a random survey of
SFA students.
Conclusion: Not even SFA
students know for sure.
About half thought there
definitely was a high school
atmosphere and half vehemently thought  there  wasn't.
But the survey turned up
almost unanimous praise of
the university's curriculum
and courses, and a loyalty
of SFA-types to their university unmatched by any
fan group outside of the
Huckleberry Hound  Club.
"There's rather a high
school atmosphere," "I don't
feel as though I am in a university when I'm at SFA."
Said Eileen Funk, Ed. I:
"There is a group right out
of high school, but the influence they have isn't too
different from any other university. Last semester was a
bit xonfused, but this year I
think it's great. I wouldn't
change."
Donna Wong, Arts II: "I
was at UBC for a year, but I
think SFU is tremendous.
The semester and tutorial
systems are much better than
the system at UBC. There is
no high school atmosphere
— on the contrary. If I did
change, it would have to be
to a university run like
Simon Fraser."
Pat Wong, Arts I: "I enjoy
myself completely at SFU.
The atmosphere overall is
not really that of a high
school. Anywhere you'll find
a section of the students who
abuse the freedoms of a university.
"I am changing to UBC
next year, but I don't really
think I would if SFU had a
nursing faculty."
Doug McCallum, Arts I:
I like the attitude of the
teachers. They're mostly
young, and their methods of
teaching are great. But there
is an air of apathy when it
comes  to student  affairs."
Kathryn    Allen,    Arts    II:
"There is definitely a high
school  atmosphere   at   SFU.
But I would say it is getting
better."
Thomas Tupper, Arts I:
"I think SFU's fantastic. I
wouldn't change."
Carol Astrom, Ed. II: "I
like everything at SFU. It's
high-schoolish,   but   I   don't
want to change."
Dan Griffiths, Arts I:
"Some of the atmosphere is
a bit high schoolish, but you
have to keep in mind that
there are a lot of young
people out here. School
spirit is high, especially in
athletics."
John Jeffery, Arts II: "I
like it better than UBC. Of
course, I've never been to
UBC. But I wouldn't switch
To me SFU is the preferred
university."
JFTr
MORE
FOREGROUND
See Page 9
FORTY-FIVE MINUTES and 17 miles later, the girls get a
change of weather as well. Here they are bogged down
in the snow in front of Simon Fraser's library, busy putting on their chains in the driving snow.
MORE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Fees  in  1965-66  were  never  like this!
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I have found the answer to
the fee problem!
All we have to do, as is
plainly shown by the attached
receipts, is revert to the standards of the 1929-30 session.
Everyone will be happy!
DOUGLAS J. GYSEMAN
Staff
LETTER POLICY'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
There is a certain part of
your editorial policy regarding letters printed in this column to which I object and
which I believe you should
change.
And that is, your willingness to publish letters which
are neither fictitious nor the
writer's own.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
17592   K.
RECEIVED
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F. DALLAS. &__,„
By publishing letters over
such names as Badminton
Club and Education IV you
attribute particular political
views   to  specific   groups   of
students, most of whom have
nothing to do with the writing
of the letters, and in addition
probably disagree with the
letters' contents.
Even if they did collective
ly write these letters, the use
of such names has the effect
of converting these groups
into political fronts, which
they are not, and should not
be.
It is really unfair to attribute such a mentality to people
who do not sign the letters.
I suggest you follow the
lead of other papers, such as
the Vancouver Sun, which
have a strict, and legally
necessary, policy in. this
regard.
MALCOLM MALLORY
Arts VI
The Ubyssey will print letters signed by a requested
nom-de-plums provided the
actual name, faculty, year, and
registration number of the
writer are also provided. Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, February   10,   1966
-IWILLMOTT CHARGES
— powell hargrave photo
NO, MARTHA, there's no  oil   under  that  there  campus.
Drillers   are   seeking   fresh   water   well   for   bio-science
addition to house exotic fish which can't live on ordinary
tap water.
March slated
The UBC Viet Nam Day
Committee will march in downtown Vancouver March 26 to
protest American policy in
Viet Nam. The march is co-
sponsored by 26 organizations
and various trade unions are
expected to join the protest.
. . . when you see a camel
lurching up an iceberg . . .
You    are    reading    PRISM
international's  new  double
issue.
Authors from here & abroad
U.B.C.   BOOKSTORE
Viet news slanted'
By  ANGUS  RICKER
There is no such thing as
unslanted information on the
situation in Viet Nam.
Dr. William E. Willmott of
the Asian Studies department
told an audience of 200 students Wednesday the truth
about Viet Nam could be ascertained only by reading all
viewpoints and evaluating
them through open discussion.
Speaking in the first of four
weekly lectures on Viet Nam,
sponsored by the Viet Nam
Day Committee and the New
Democrats, Willmott stressed
the unique relationship of nationalism   and   communism   in
Viet Nam.
"In the rest of South East
Asia communist and nationalist movements have tended to
become divorced from one another.
"Only in Viet Nam is the
nationalist movement under
control of the Ho Chi Minh
communist party."
Willmott said this situation
is the result of the interaction
of several factors:
The French colonial policy
of absorbing moderates and
crushing  extreme nationalists;
The resilience of Ho Chi
Minh revolutionary movement
through    its   organization    on
Leninist principles;
The lack of opposition to
communist atheism relative to
other areas of S.E. Asia;
The similarities of Chinese
Vietnamese civil service organization;
The World War Two Japanese occupation of Viet Nam
which united Vietnamese national movements behind Ho
Chi Minh.
VALENTINESI
Remenqber Her With  Flowers
from
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with no letdown in taste
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Kings Thursday, February 10,  1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7
— norm  betts photo
TRANQUILITY can be found a few steps from hubbub
of campus activity. This couple took advantage of Tuesday's fine weather, escaping to cliffs overlooking Strait
of Georgia and Vancouver Island.
Profs back students
for more govt aid
OTTAWA (CUP)—The Canadian Association of University
Teachers, in a brief to governments arising out of the Bladen
Report, has taken a more advanced stand on student aid than did
the Canadian Union of Students.
The CAUT recommendations
call for a comprehensive system of government grants for
all students, covering tooth fees
and living costs.
The faculty group suggests
that such a policy, similar to
that introduced by Premier
Smallwood in Newfoundland,
be introduced at once for first
year students, and extended
later to all years.
Showing marked concern for
university a u t o n omy, the
CAUT advocates provincial
Grants Committees, with
strong academic representation
to stand between governments
and universities, but feels this
is not enough to ensure autonomy.
Therefore it recommends indirect support from governments through students grants,
retaining the fee system and
reducing the amount of direct
grants to universities.
All properly enrolled students   would   receive   regular
payments of specified sums
directly from the government.
The CAUT brief presents statistics showing that 62 per cent
of the total cost of a student's
education is borne directly by
the student and his family,
including in this cost tooth the
foregone earnings of the stu-
den and the full operating and
capital costs of the university.
CHEMISTRY
101   STUDENTS
H you would like the re-,
warding thrill that Chem.
labs can  bring, drop into
THE COLLEGE SHOP
Brock Extension
for your new
"Complete Guide
to
Chemistry 101 Labs"
$2.50
A VALENTINE OFFER ...
Bring in Your Sweetheart (opposite sex)
and this coupon and receive
Two Sundaes of Your Choice
for the Price of One
PETERS ICE CREAM
3204 W. Broadway and Park Royal
OFFER GOOD THROUGH FEBRUARY 15, 1966
Alto get a Free Sundae on Your Birthday
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_____k__
APARTHEID PROBLEM.
End is 'bloody revolt'
The only end to apartheid in
South Africa is bloody revolution, a former member of the
Natal provincial legislature
said Tuesday night.
Alfred Adams, a member of
the governing party in 1947
told 60 students at a Canadian
Union of Students seminar on
South Africa, "There is no evolutionary solution to apartheid.
"I can never see the whites
giving franchise to the Africans," he said. "The only end I
can see is bloody revolution.
This does not mean I want it,
but it ia the only solution."
He said the Afrikaaner government was so firmly entrenched there were only two
English speaking members in
the parliament.
Dal to drop
local WUS
HALIFAX (CUP) — Dalhousie University will drop
its connection with World
University Service of Canada, according to a recommendation by its WUS chairman and its council president.
Jane Massy, WUS campus
chairman, charged the policy
of the national body is faulty,
even though its aims are
worthwhile.
"I feel that the local committee is becoming a collecting agency. As long as the
money reaches Toronto, the
central office seems to be
satisfied," she said.
"WUS is not performing any
useful function on the campus, because funds are used
at the discretion of the national office without communication to the students
who donate hem.
"The students are almost
completely apathetic towards
the operation."
"There is no opposition to
the Volk (the Afrikaan speaking people)," he said. "It believes it will remain in power;
it believes God will keep it in
power; it believes it will remain in power to the end of
time."
This attitude is a result of
the British defeat of the Boers
early in this century Adams
said.
"After the Boer war, the
Boers felt a sense of inferiority.
They had their land taken away
and they were alone.
"But they believed very sincerely that God had put them
there."
Adams said this attitude led
to the apartheid policy under
which Africans may not mix
on any level with whites.
South African student Solly
Essop told the seminar black
Africans were forced to carry
nine identification passes with
them.
The necessity of having to
show passes keeps the Africans
in the mines, Essop said.
"If the pass law is abolished
there will be an influx of
blacks into the towns."
This would result in the
African being able to sell his
labor to the highest bidder and
the mines would close down.
BAY
STARTS   TOMORROW
THE LIST OF ADRIAN
MESSENGER
G. C. Scott, Dona Wynter
plus SURPRISE GUESTS and
THE  LUCK OF GINGER
COFFEY
R. Shaw, Mary Ore — Student. 75c
DELTA
FEB.   11   A   12
HORROR OF DRUCULA
(Adult)
plus
CURSE   OF THE
MUMMY'S  TOMB
plus
THE GORGON
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE — 1966
Effective September 24th, 1965, to April 15th, 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS 3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m:**
SATURDAYS 3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m:**
SUNDAYS 12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
*    Special student admission: 15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — No. 19 & 20.
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION:  Afternoons    —    Students 25c    Adults 60c
Evenings     —    Students 50c    Adults 75c
Skate Rental 35c per pair — Skate Sharpening 35c pair
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
Whatever became of:
Walt Raleigh,
CLASS OF '71?
One of the outstanding botanists ever to
graduate, Walt built his early reputation
on his major thesis "The Care and
Cultivation of Nicotinia for Profit." An
excellent athlete, Raleigh is fondly remembered for an incident which occurred
in his sophomore year. Shortly before the
Big Game, Walt impulsively threw his
football sweater over a puddle which
lay in the path of that year's Beauty
Queen. It was the only game on record in
which eleven of our varsity squad wore
numbers and one a large dirty footprint.
After graduation, Walt went overseas to
spark up the consumption of Virginia
tobacco in England. He was "capped"
for England against Spain on several
occasions. He was finally "de-capped"
after a local scrimmage against a team
from the Tower of London. A monument
in his memory is being proposed by a
local manufacturer of filters.
Don't lose your head over money matters.
A B' of M Personal Chequing Account
is the ideal way to keep your finances on
the straight and narrow. Open yours
today.
Bank of Montreal
THE BANK THAT VALUES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS
Your Campos Brancht
Th* Administration Building:     G. F. PEIRSON, Manages Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, February   10,   1966
PANHELLENIC
PRESENTS
SPRING TEA
On Friday, February 11th, the Panhellenic Association
will hold its annual Spring Tea from 2:30 to 5:30 at
Panhellenic House which is situated in the Southwest
corner of the campus, by the Japanese Gardens. All
girls are welcome, especially those considering rushing
next fall. The tea will provide an excellent opportunity
for prospective rushees to find out just what sorority
life involves. Girls from each of the nine sororities will
be serving refreshments in each room and will
be happy to discuss any questions.
Although most co-eds have heard of the sororities, the
term "Panhellenic" may be unfamiliar. Panhellenic
means "all Greeks." It is the co-ordinating body over
the nine sororities. Every sorority is represented by one
officer on Panhellenic and it is this executive, along
wtih two alumni advisors from City Panhellenic, which
does the administrative work during rushing. Besides
acting as a liason between sororities and the university,
between alumni and actives, Panhellenic provides a
link between the rushees and the sororities. Because
Panhellenic truly works impartially for all sororities,
girls are urged to discuss any problems or questions
with its executive.
OPEN HOUSE
On the evening of February 11th, from 6:30 to 9:30,
the Panhellenic Association will hold an Open House.
Panhellenic House is the home of the nine sororities.
After many years of planning by the alumni, it became
a reality in June, 1960, when all sororities
moved into their own individual rooms. After
having meetings at everything from garages to
warehouses, the new house and lovely location was
a welcome change. Each sorority room is the same size
and overlooks the lawn to the south of the house. The
decor of the rooms was left up to each individual group
who, in most cases, had an interior decorator do the
job. It is amazing how different all nine rooms look,
in spite of the fact they are all exactly alike in structure. These rooms are used for Wednesday evening
meetings, studying, luncheons, bridge games, Song
Fest practises, and just plain relaxing.
Open House is the one opportunity of the year for those
who are not sorority members to visit Panhellenic
House.
A patient song leader admonishes her struggling Song Fest team.
PANHELLENIC ACTIVITIES
Throughout the year, the
sororities are busy with
intramural sports, fashion
shows, Song Fest, service
activities, and social
events such as luncheons,
teas, and formals. In addition to raising money during Mardi Gras for the
Mental Health Association and participating in
the Red Feather Drive in
the fall, each individual
sorority has its own particular philanthropy. Alpha
Deta Pi. for example, is
sponsoring an orphgn in
India; Alpha Phi donates
money and service to Cardiac Aid; Alpha Onuccon
Pi works with the Elizabeth Fry Society at Will-
ingdon School for Girls;
Delta Gamma works the
Blind Students Association; Kappa Alpha Theta
provides volunteer workers
for the Sunny Hill. Children's Hospital.
Susan LeFohn, Mardi Gras Queen for
1966, leans against the friendly Aztec
idol which was part of her sorority's
Mardi Gras skit.
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
Rushing takes place every
fall, and it is a period when
sorority women meet rushees,
and rushees become acquainted
with sorority women and sorority life. In order to join a sorority, a girl must rush. On this
campus, a co-ed must have completed her first year to be eligible to rush. During the summer all first and second year
girls will receive information
about Rush. This news letter will
tell them the date that rush begins and ends, and of all the
functions in between. There will
be a registration form enclosed.
On behalf of the Panhellenic
Association, I extend a sincere
invitation to all faculty and students to come to Open House.
I urge those girls who will be
eligible for Rush next year to
attend the Spring Tea as the
first step  in  joining a  sorority.
Sandra Sutherland,
Panhellenic  President.
Panhellenic House, the  home of the nine-sororities.
(ADVERTISEMENT) Thursday, February 10,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
MORE FOREGROUND
Here's how Acadia campers
cope  with  that oT environment
-'-HSU:
The Ubyssey sent photographer Powell Hargrave deep
into residence czar Malcolm
McGregor's domain for a
look at Acadia campers and
their spirit.
He came back with these
pictorial examples of how the
campers there — as at Fort
Camp — manage the annual
transformation of the 20-year-
old "temporary" army hut accommodation into liveable
places.
A letter to the editor from
Acadia campers Phyllis
O'Brien, Mike Chapman, Dave
Ratcliffe and Chris Andersen
gives a good written example
of this make-the-best-of-it attitude:
'Why do so many students regard Acadia Camp as their
home?
Is it their fellow residents?
Is it the stimulating environment?
Is it the chance for the ordinary "Joe" to be actively
involved in the university way
of life on a campus which is
notorious for its apathy?
The editor of this newspaper, on Jan. 11, 1966, wrote:
"There is something about
living in a barely-converted
army hut that is basically
unpleasant — let alone un-
academic."
However, in a recent interview, Henry Elder of the department of architecture said
the huts (of Acadia) give a
sense of carelessness, which
allows for and stimulates a
sense of creativity.
He said that often, buildings
such as the new residences are
built to serve mass needs and
neglect the needs of the individual.
He said inspiration may be
drawn from chaos; this chaos
is perceived only in the mind
of the beholder—not in the
mind of the creator.
. Possibly this remark allows
us to understand how the
"outside observers" picture
Acadia.
To us, Acadia is a place
where we can control and
mould our environment.'
BLANK WALLS  and   ceiling  don't stay  blank for long as campers cover the monotone
paint job  with gaudy  posters.  And  that  isn't the Jefferson-Airplane up there.
RATFINK   AND   ASSORTED
women'?.H.u.t J8.      -:■■
art   brightens Page 10
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, February   10,   1966
SAYS  THE GEORGIAN
A co-op's the answer
The following article on cooperative student housing is
reprinted from The Georgian,
student newspaper at Sir
George Williams University,
Montreal.
The co-operative system is
the obvious answer to the
mounting problem of housing
students of Canadian universities.
As a non-residence university, Sir George has always
had its eye skinned for solutions to residence difficulties.
The question has been thoroughly considered and discussed with regard to the expansion program and its relative
place in such moves.
Perhaps the co-op idea is
what we need, too. At present,
Campus Co-Op Residence Inc.,
which began in rented quarters in Toronto before the
Second World War, operates
31 residence houses in Toronto
and has aided Waterloo students to build the first new
residence owned and operated
by students in North America.
• •      •
The    co-operative    solution
frees   for   academic   purposes
university capital that might
be tied^ up in residences.
Howard Adelman, 28-year-
old University of Toronto
PhD student, who is executive
director of Co-Op College
Residences Inc., claims that
co-ops save everyone money.
Students save money because co-ops provide accommodation at lower rates.
Municipalities save money as
they do not suffer loss of revenue from the expansion of
tax-exempted institutions.
The provincial government
saves money on both direct
grants for residences, and indirectly through lower student aid requirements and
lower university capital grant
requirements, according to a
Toronto Globe & Mail article
January 22.
The absence of a residence's
luxurious touches and the reduction of the number of
rquare feet per student (which
is approximately two-thirds
that of a residence) help cut
capital costs.
• •      •
The central organization
will develop- properties for its
members and turn them back
to local ownership. The National Housing Act provides
90% of the mortgages at 5%
per cent for up to 50 years,
the remainder being put up
by larger co-operatives, i.e.
Co-op Credit.
Following the payment of
the equity in 10 years, the
ownership reverts to local
campus co-ops. After the
mortgage is paid off in 50
years, it goes to the students
who live in the co-ops. The
residence fees cover taxes,
payments and interest.
The co-ops are democratically run organizations, making
a less demanding student residence than one provided for
by the university itself. The
experience of co-op living, not
to mention the saving, is
worth a lot to young people
eager to assume more responsibilities. Both responsibility
and a greater degree of freedom are afforded the co-op
student.
The capital per campus co
op is about $4,000 per unit.
University residences cost
around $7,000 or $8,000. The
student saves approximately
$200 by living in a co-op.
Taking into consideration
the area in which Sir George
is situated, our financial position with regard to further
construction, and the number
of students who would take
advantage of a residence at
Sir   George,   it   seems   well
worth our while to investigate
the possibility of establishing
a co-operative system here.
It would mean considerable
work on the part of the student body, but the result
could prove to be our salvation. We strongly suggest,
therefore, that both the Stu-
detn Council and the university planning committee give
serious consideration to this
plan.
Durant speaks in perspective
of freedom and responsibility
Worried about freedom ?
Freedom and Responsibility in the University, is the
topic for the fourth in the Perspectives series of lectures.
Speaker will be Professor G. H. Durrant of the English
department. Durrant will become head of the department
in July.
The lecture is on Friday noon in _Sd. 100.
The Perspectives lectures are presented by the Leon
and Thea Koerner Foundation.
Spirited Ontario profs
want Board positions
LONDON (CUP) — A new power structure, with a faculty-
dominated board of governors, is recommended for the University of Western Ontario by its Faculty Association committee
university government.
on
A brief submitted by the faculty says present board members are usually prospective
donors and businessmen whose
names will attract donors.
Completed in November by a
five-man committee, the brief
notes a new spirit in the faculty.
"In a university as colorless
as   this  one is,  with as  little
sense of community and inquiry as it has, the failure of
the administration to respond
to the new faculty enthusiasm
and concern is no surprise."
The report calls for 21 of the
31 members of the board to be
elected by the faculty for
three-year terms, with other
members representing the
alumni, the city and the province.
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental  and  Sales
TUXEDOS - WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAILS - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Range
STUDENT   RATES
McCUISH
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
MON.-SAT.-9:30 le 5:30
2046 W.
263-3610
With this one exception,
GT&E blankets the world of electronics.
GT&E makes no effort to compete
with nature's awesome forces. But
we do the next best thing. We take
the reason for lightning and harness it to everyday tasks.
In that way, we've helped to
make the lowly electron mighty.
And our own capabilities more extensive.
In fact, we've made electronics
an important force in our business.
And branched into virtually all
directions electronics would take
us... communications, radio, TV,
stereo phonographs, automatic
supervision and control, and advanced military systems.
GT&E member companies, such
as Automatic Electric, Lenkurt
Electric and Sylvania, either manufacture the complete equipment
or the electronic components from
which they're built. And at the
same time serve as major suppliers
to other electronic manufacturers
and the communications industry.
You might say that, because of
electronics, GT&E's possibilities
are endless. That's the way it looks
from where we sit.
If you're interested in getting a
complete picture of GT&E as it is
today, ask your Placement Director for a copy of the booklet that
tells the story. Or write General
Telephone&Electronics,730Third
Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017.
GEE
GENERAL TELEPHONE & ELECTRONICS
'?M'?HinO-AK-NMOW--GT_E-SUBSWIAHES Gwwansto Thursday, February 10,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
GYMNASTS, FIGURE  SKATERS
Two for western meet
Gymnastics and figure skating teams will fly together
Friday.
The UBC teams embark by
jet for Saskatoon for the Western Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Association championships this weekend.
The Gymnastics squad placed
third in the championships last
year held at the War Memorial
Gym.
The hosting University of
Saskatchewan crew are touted
as the team to beat.
The prairie gymnasts have
captured WCIAA title for the
past three years.
UBC team members are:
Marie Gyenese, Ruth Johnson,
Irene Robertson, Wendy Sim-
monds and Sharon Hall.
On the ice, the UBC damsels
will defend the title which they
won last year in the Winter
Sports Centre.
Peggy Cummings and Louise
Lind, both excellent skaters,
will be representing UBC in
the senior singles event.
Other   team   members   are:
Birds on ball
for Columbus
soccer meet
The biggest crowd of the
season is expected Saturday
afternoon as the Thunderbird
soccer team hosts the volatile
Columbus Carlings at Varsity
Stadium.
The Columbus team is made
up predominantly of Italian-
born players and has the largest and most flamboyant booster club in the Pacific Coast
League.
Coach Joe Johnson reports
that all his players are healthy
and looking forward to the encounter.
The last time the two teams
met, Columbus narrowly defeated the Birds 1-0.
Columbus forward - centre
Bobby Smith, currently in a
goal-scoring streak, will warrant special attention from the
UBC defence. Kickoff is at
2 p.m.
In junior action, the Tomahawks play their final league
game of the season Sunday and
with a win, can clinch a tie for
second place. Kickoff for this
game is 11 a.m.
Ann Gorman, Sheila McCon-
nachie, Janet Fraser, Claire
Newell, Sandy Guest, Sharon
Mitton, Johanna Rees and
Barbara Low.
WCIAA championships are
the only annual competition
that the figure skaters partici
pate in, but the gymnastic
team holds various intercollegiate meets throughout the
university year in grooming
for Western Canadian opposition which includes the Universities of Alberta (Edmonton
and Calgary).
In spring, brutes
turn to boot camp
All aspiring UBC footballers are invited to attend the
Thunderbirds' spring football camp starting Feb. 21 and
lasting for two weeks.
The invitation is especially
extended to those who have
played in the juvenile and junior ranks.
The camp is to be held on
campus and participants are
asked to turn out only as many
days as classes permit. Workouts will be held five days a
week from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m.
The first three days are for
rookies only with the varsity
team joining the workouts on
the fourth day.
On the last day of camp
there will foe a full scrimmage
between the varsity team and
the rookies.
This is an excellent chance
for players to familiarize themselves with UBC's football situation and the techniques of
the 'Birds' game.
The coaches will also have
Birds pursue
Hamber cup
UBC Thunderbirds hockey
team want the Hamber Cup
back.
The Birds host the Golden
Bears from the University of
Alberta (Edmonton) in a two
game total-goal series Friday
and Saturday night at 8:30 at
the Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre.
The situation won't be the
same as last year, when UBC
was without three key players
for the final game.
As a result, the Birds lost
the series 16-8 after winning
the first game 6-4.
The Birds, this weekend,
hope to duplicate their entertaining 6-3 triumph over the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies in the last home series.
(jetting tUlamed?
Phone or call in for our new "Take
Home" invitation album. For a personal estimate of costs in just 15
minutes, call —
™e card shop
Corner Robson and Burrard MU 4-4011
"PERSPECTIVES" LECTURE SERIES
Professor Geoffrey H.  Durrant
New Head of the Department of English, U.B.C.
SPEAKS ON
"FREEDOM AND  RESPONSIBILITY
IN THE UNIVERSITY"
12:30 Noon — Friday, February 11th, 1966, Education 100
the opportunity of assessing
each player's ability and informing each of his chance to
make the Thunderbirds next
September.
At noon today there is an
important meeting in M-morial
Gym (room 213) for all those
interested in attending the
camp.
Speeey Birds, splash way
to three wins, six records
UBC Thunderbirds are really splashing.
Thunderbirds' swimming team chalked up three wins
in two double-dual meets last weekend.
Friday night at SFA, UBC beat SFA 73-22, but were
beaten by U. of Washington frosh 62-33.
Saturday was more successful as UBC beat U. of
Victoria (80-15) and U. of Alberta (Edmonton) 69-26.
Six UBC swimming records were established.
Bob Walker and Bill Gillespie collected two each,
while Jim Maddin and Bruce Melton set one apiece.
Divers George Fudge and Don Panton showed great
improvement in their form which helped to fortify the three
UBC wins.
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Deadline for submission of entries to
the U.B.C. Annual Photographic Salon
is 5:00 p.m., Monday, Feb. 14, 1966
Rules and entry forms from La 201 or
from Audio Visual Office.
PRIZES: Colour and Black & White
General pictorial & Scientific
Special class for novices
The Bell Bottom Total Look: wonderfully wearable wool knit in a bright
splash of white with navy boldly bordering the skimmer top and bell-
bottomed pants. In total, terribly exciting! At home, terribly fashionable.
Featured now at the Bay ... in sizes 8 to 16. Set 29.95
The Bay  Coliegienne Shop, third   floor
the
OEORGIA ol ORANVILU Page 12
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February   10,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Head em off at Brock
Headhunt at noon. Meet behind Hillel Hut (behind Brock)
at 12:25. Spears and ceremonial dress please.
• •      •
VCF
Missionary on leave from
Japan speaks in Ang. 110 Friday.
• *      *
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Coffee Party at noon is cancelled.
• •      •
EL  CIRCULO
Latin America week. Films
noon in Bu. 100.
• •      •
VOC
Dr. P. Pearson from Economics Dept. speaks noon in
Ang. 415.
• •      •
AFRICAN STUDENTS SOC
Meeting noon in I.H.
• •      •
EUS
Blood drive: Feb. 7-11, 14-
18.    9:30-4:30.   Armory.
• •      •
BRIDGE CLUB
Annual Intercollegiate Campus Bridge Tournament to be
held Monday, Feb. 14, at 7:00
p.m. in T.V. Lounge Brock
Hall.
• •      •
PHRATERES
Don't forget to bake a cake
for the campus-wide cake auction Monday.
^4%
Black Raspberry
(Irridescent)
(« *L"i"t
UNCREASABLE
\ wjk}
LEG COVERS
v£a
Bad Boy . .  .
Blunderbuss
^pp
Bottoms
Slight
(For  Agg
Flare   Pants
es   Information)
Bad Boys Ragge Shoppe
315
SEYMOUR
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
KE*EP
YOUR
EYES
on
VANCOUVER
•
Every year the
Vancouver School
Board
HIRES
many  teachers
directly from
university
•
When the time comes
APPLY
to the
Vancouver
School Board
1595 West 10th Avenue
For  an  interview
call RE 1-1131
EAST ASIA SOC
Noon Bu. 104, two Chinese
films—U.S. Aggressors Get Out
of Vietnam — and—14th Anniversary.      25 cents.
UBC NDP
Meeting noon in Bu.  204.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
Valentine A-Go-Go Dance to
the Escorts Saturday 9:00-1:00
Jewish Community Centre,
41st and Oak.
•      •      •
ROD AND GUN CLUB
Hunting films 12:30-2:30 in
Bu.   214.     Everyone  welcome.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall. Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LIGHT BLUE WALLET LOST —
finder please contact Mary McMaster at AM 1-2724 or turn in at
AMS Publications office. Need
identification
LOST: BLACK LADIES' GLASSES,
brown case; Firday noon, Brock
lounge. Phone TR 4-5557 after _.00
p.m
MAN'S DUFFLE BAG FOUND ON
Hollyburn bus on Sunday, Feb. 6.
Phone CA 4-5479^
LOST: A BLACK BRIAR PIPE, SAN
Remo make.  Please call RE 8-1477
LOST: STAEDTLER-MARS LOG
Sliderule 24 scales. Blue case,
name printed in gold contact.
Ralph   Makinen,   255-9757.   Reward.
FOUND TEXT BOOK IN BROCK
Sat., Feb. 5th. Collect by identifying at Publication office.
H'OOND: WOMAN'S GOLD WATCH,
two weeks ago Wed. Owner may
claim same upon identification.
Phone WA 2-4247 after 6 p.m.
FOUND   RED   MARKING   PEN   ON
Feb.   8.   Phone  987-6639.
Greetings
12
BE ORIGINAL! SEND VALENTINE
and Birthday Greetings to your
friends with a Classified ad.
CONGRATULATIONS TO WHITEY
(the Hawk) on his recent marriage
from  the  sixth  floor boys.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our «ood driving
rates.  Phone Ted  Elliott,  224-6707
VALENTINE A - GO - GO. DANCE
to the Escorts. Jewish Community
Centre. 41st and Oak St. Saturday, Feb. 12, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tickets A.M.S. — $3.00 couple.
Nisei   Varsity   Club.
I SAW YOU TAKE MY BLACK
purse by mistake at 4:00 on Tues.,
Feb. 8 from the library. I won't
take legal action if you hand' it
inlo lost and found with all the
contents. 	
ROCK TO THE ACCENTS IN THE
Lower Mall Ballroom, Wed. 9-1,
Feb. 16th. Just before mid-term
break.  I guess sq,  eh?!! "
SORRY FOLKS! THE SONICS
can't come. But, from Seattle we
have the "Bootmen" and the
"Liberty Party." Also Kentish
Steele and The Shantelles. Only
$1.25,   9-1  a.m.,   Friday!   Armories.
S K I FORBIDDEN PLATEAU,
Courtenay, Vancouver Island. T-tar
will operate Thurs. and Fri. of
mid-term break if numbers warrant. Call Mel, 224-3103 by Feb.' 14
for information.
COME TO THE INTERNATIONAL
Ball, Saturday, Feb. 12th, Hotel
Vancouver Rallroom, two bands!
International floorshow. $5 per
couple. Tickets AMS and International  House.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM CORNER OF
Marine Drive & Balaclava St. in
time for 8:30 classes on M. W. F.
Return about 5:30 every day. Call
Sharon   266-8246.
Wanted 15
PUT THE BEST IN THE CHAIR.
ROMA REES for Agricultural President.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'53 CHEV. 2-DOOR, EXCELLENT
running cond., 2 snow tires, $80 or
offer. Phone Janet, RE 3-2687 after
6:00 p.m.   ."
58 ZEPHYR, EXCELLENT COND.
Low mileage, also '57 Austin, rebuilt engine, A-l cond. YU 8-2980
after 5:30.
FOR SALE: 1955 CHEVROLET V8,
4-dr. sedan, A.T. Bets cash offer.
Phone AM 6-9591.
.MILLMAN MANUALMATIC 1958,
4-dr., top condition, 1965 re-built
motor, one owner, new tires. Terms
to be discussed. Call 224-7374 or
522-1924 after 5 p.m.                	
'61     TRIUMPH     HERALD.     GOOD
running cond.  TR  4-7236,   Walter,
.after 5:30. .    ,'.
Motorcycles
27
305   CC   HONDA,   CHEAP.   PHONE
Dave at 224-0467 evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
ATTENTION ALL SCREAMIES! —
The B. to B.B. on his latest DD —
the Weeds
IT'S   LEGAL   NOW   WHITEY!
Sewing & Alerations
40
GRADUATION GOWNS; SHEATH
dresses; separates. Custom designed and made by European designer. Reasonable prices. 731-2003
evenings.
Typewriters 8c Repairs 42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS. $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
«3
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,   263-4530,
TYPING: 25c PAGE OR $1.95 HR.
West End, 685-5539 eves. Campus
pick-up & deliverey 224-6341 (John)
leave tel. no.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West  Van.
PS:    New   outlet   now   open   close
to   U.B.C.
INSTRUCTION^
Tutoring
64
TUTOR FOR RUSSIAN, POLISH,
Serbocroation. Phone 738-4933 after
7 p.m.
CHEM 101: COMPLETE GUIDES.TO
Chem 101 Labs available now at
the College Shop, Broclt extension.
• Complete with data, procedure,
calculations       and       discussions.
• Helps you to obtain a better
perspective and understanding of
your labs. • If you would like the
rewarding thrill that Chem Labs
can bring, drop into The College
Shop, Brock Extension, for your
new "Complete Guide to Chem 101
Labs",   $2.50.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
STUDENT (MALE) SINGLE,
furnished room, kitchen privileges;
one sharing frig., washroom, entrance — 1 block to shops, buses,
non-smoker.  RE 3-8778.
SINGLE OR DOUBLE ROOM FOR
male student: kitchen privileges,
common room, congenial social
atmosphere: two blocks from gates.
Phone 224-9092.
BED SITTING ROOM. SHARE KIT-
chen and other home privileges.
Faculty or senior student preferred
(female). References exchang'ed.
CA 4-4282.
Room & Board
82
ON  CAMPUS   ROOM  AND BOARD.
Phone 224-9790. "
BOARD AND ROOM. MALE STU-
dent, ncm drinker, non smoker.
224-7174.
ROOM AND BOARD (OPTIONAL).
Near gates, 1st & 2nd yr. male students. Excellent study facilities.
224-1631.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
WANTED — BY MARRIED STU-
dent (2 children) to buy or rent,
on or near campus, 3 bedroom (or
more) house, living room, dining
room, etc., (basement preferred).
Occupancy May or June 1966. Send
particulars   to    1011   Gordon    Rd.,
,    Nelson,  B.C.
Bank
(ADVERTISEMENT)
SUB REPORTS
Lease
Public Meeting  On  SUB
Council   Chambers,   Brock   Hall
Noon  Today
Banking
The banking facilities and arrangements in the new
student union building have come under fire recently
and all efforts to pass on the factual information to the
student body have failed. As a result student council has
authorized the purchase of advertising space so that
students may be informed on the progress of the project,
one aspect of which is the bank.
As it is now planned, the Bank of Montreal will be
the bank in the new union building. All Canadian Chartered banks were asked to bid on banking on the campus
and the Bank of Montreal put forward what student council last year considered the best bid.
As it now stands the Bank will be occupying 6,000
suare feet of SUB space. This provides enough wicket
space for 43 tellers during peak periods, thus obviating
the necessity for the types of lineups now experienced
in the campus bank. The bank will pay the Alma Mater
Society $3.33 per square foot per year for a 35-year
period and will pay the money in advance, in a lump
sum, which will probably be received this September.
This sum of money can be used to reduce financing
charges to the students on the project or it can be in
vested and used for an expansion fund by future students.
The alternative proposal, advanced by another bank,
was as follows: $4 square foot for 2,000 square feet and
no pre-payment. The size of the bank to be put in under
this proposal, only 2,000 square feet, is totally inadequate
for the need, especially considering that all banks in the
university are now having more area than that. The
second point is that a no pre-payment deal does not give
the AMS Hie flexibility of an expansion fund or the possibility of lowering interest charges applicable to the
loan.
At the end of the 35-year period all bank rental,
which should be about $90,000 per year will be paid to
the Alma Mater Society as long as the bank is in the
building regardless of the status of the building at that
time or later.
Lease
The Alma Mater Society has made preliminary investigation into the possibility of leasing the union building site from the university and a first draft of such lease
has been approved by student council. A second draft,
when completed will be printed in full in this space.
The draft agreement calls the following terms:
• 45 year lease with a renewable option for 15
years university provides all services which
amounts to $150,000 per year.
• University provides all janitorial services, security
and shares liability insurance.
• University assumes all fire protection costs.
• University agrees to extend the financial period
to 18 years so as to avoid any further increase in
AMS fee for building purposes.
• University agrees to increase its contribution to
food services facilities by almost $500,000.
• All rental from leased facilities within the building
comes to the AMS.
• At the end of the lease period the University
agrees that the building shall continue to be
used as it has been under the lease.
These are only the rough outline of the terms of the
lease and the lease itself contains more provision which
space does not permit today, but when the second draft
of the agreement is completed it will be published in full.
•      •      •      •
In this space, starting next week, questions asked by
students will be answered. Please write out the question
and drop into the AMS office or the SUB office opposite
the student council chamber in Brock Hall. Both question
and answer will be printed.
(ADVERTISEMENT)

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