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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 24, 1987

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Array THEUBKSSEY
_*#$11
Curious?
see page 6.
McGill mauls
foul fowl
By Michael J. Bryant
UBC head coach Prank
Smith summed up his football
team's humiliating 47-11 Vanier
Cup loss to the McGill Redmen
with one word:
"Intimidation. It's an ugly
word ... but our guys were simply
physically intimidated."
In sub-zero Toronto temperatures on Saturday afternoon the
'Birds were expected to do what
they would never have dreamed of
last September — they were
asked to be the best team in the
country. But they were not.
The award-winning, record-
setting 'Birds were 21 point favorites coming into the game, but
ended up losing by the greatest
margin in the Vanier Cup's 23
year history. Such ridiculous
odds were typical of the media
hype surrounding the CIAU defending champs.
"That's the big thing in the
East? Smith said, "they always
set up the Western team?
The media had much to build
up to : the number one ranked
*Birds were riding a 22 game winning streak against Canadian
universities; quarterback Jordan
Gagner was the first UBC player
ever to win the Hee Crighton
award for Canada's most outstanding college football player;
Frank Smith won CIAU Coach of
the Year, and three other players
were awarded All-Canadian honors.
So what happened to the
mighty WIFL champs?
"Our kicking game totally
self-destructed (Bellefontaine
averaged a dismal 20 yards per
punt)... they met very little resistance from the defense and basi
cally McGill ran through us like a
sieve," Smith said.
On offense the 'Birds accumulated 346 total yards, but only
produced one field goal in the first
quarter by Mike Bellefontaine,
and one Mike Marasco touchdown
in the final quarter.
"The score was not at all indicative of the team," injured UBC
fullback Carey Bymoen said, "...
we're a better team than that."
What happened to All-Canadian Jordan Gagner and the record-breaking passing attack?
Gagner didn't have a bad
game statistically — he completed
20 out 45 passes for 228 yards —
but Air Jordan's flight pattern
landed not one touchdown.
"I just didn't complete the
passes that I had to? Gagner told
The Province.
Although dropped passes and
extremely slippery terrain didn't
help Gagner, in coach Smith's
words, "both teams played on the
same field with the same wind."
McGill used oroomball shoes
to outrun UBC the entire game:
the 'Birds rushed 118 to McGiU's
344, 203 of them by Mike Soles.
"I was surprised at how easy it
was to run against them," said
Soles, who scored two majors and
was voted the Vanier Lcup Most
Valuable player.
UBC linebacker George Petrovas agreed: "you have to give
credit to their offensive line. They
dominated us."
After the game Smith noted
.hat Mike Soles wore no broomball
shoes for the game. Broomball
shoes and All-Canadian awards
don't win national championships,
he said. But physical intimidation certainly does.
Thunderbird fumble was indicative of fowl play in Vanier Cup final Saturday
Foodbank stuck on shelf
By Laura Busheikin
The AMS food bank at UBC
may be canned at the next students' council meeting, but some
critics say the idea never left the
shelf.
Carol Pedlar, past director of
external affairs, said, "the project
died from lack of interest...not
enough people cared about it.
There were only about three or
four people generally interested."
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont said no one was interested in running the foodbank,
so "it sat dormant"
"It was going nowhere. We've
j had no applicants for the foodbank
! co-ordinator position," said
|  Nevraumont.
But   campus   radical   Blair
Longley said the AMS never advertised the food bank position, a
I  charge Nevraumont denies.
Longley said he lias " more
experience as a starv.ng student
than any other studer t, in B.C."
Longley said he would take
the position of food bank co-ordinator, which offers a $400 honorarium but thought his attempts
to apply for the job have been ignored.
Nevraumont said Longley
applied but he was only interested
until he found out it was $400 a
year, not $400 a month.
At their next meeting, students' council will vote on whether
or not to cancel the November 19,
1986, motion to form the AMS run
food bank.
Others in the campus community think that a foodbank is necessary and feasible.
Ray Schultz of The Lutheran
Campus Centre is certain there is
a need for a food bank.
Schultz cited a survey done at
Simon Fraser, an informal investigation a'; UBC and stories collected personally as proof of
student's need.
"Student loans haven't gone
up, and they aren't enough," said
Schultz.
But board of governors representative Simon Seshadri was
sceptical.
"I was AMS president last
year and I was opposed to the food
bank. The AMS doesn't have the
capabilities and expertise to deal
with it and if we were to get involved with it we'd have to conduct
some sort of survey to determine
need. I don't know if anyone would
use it."
Schultz, who has offered to
donate space for the food bank in
the Lutheran Campus Centre,
wants to help the AMS.
"I wanted to coordinate the
involvement of the community
outside campus. There are a number of churches and groups willing
to help," he said.
"The expertise in running and
coordinating it will come from the
community," said Schultz, "and
the AMS would provide the fundraising structure and the
people."
Tenants shafted in "Year of the Homeless"
By Ross McLaren
Almost everybody who goes to
sleep tonight in Vancouver will
have a roof over their head. Only
about 50 to 100 people will sleep
outside in make-shift beds, in subzero temperatures. That's the
good news for 1987, the United
Nations Year of the Homeless.
The bad news is that thousands of Vancouverites live in
hotel rooms without protection
from capricious landlords. These
people often arrive "home" to find
their locks changed or their front
doors removed. These messages
underline a point: if the landlord
wants a roomer out, they're out.
It's that simple.
"Managers often wait until
the day after the rent is paid to
evict their residents? says
Stephen Learey of the Downtown
Eastside Residents' Association.
"They don't have to give written notice or reasons, they just say
'get out'. Then it is a hassle to get
the rent back. People on low income don't have the resources, so
they get exploited." Learey says.
"According to the United Na-
Volume 70, Number 23
tions? Learey says, "a homeless
person is anyone who does not
have security of tenure. There are
approximately 8,000-9,000 people
in Vancouver without tenure?
Ralph Buckley, a member of a
committee which wrote the urban
core homeless survey summary
this year, and past chair of Lookout emergency shelter, agreed
that the issue today is quality of
housing and security of tenure.
"The quality of housing varies. Some hotels are cockroach
ridden and others are clean. But if
the city tells owners of (dirty) hotels to clean up, then rents go up?
Buckley says.
Buckley says the homeless
survey, written by the city's
church groups and charity organizations, calls for increased social
assistance rates and protection for
roomers under the residential
tenant act.
But Buckley doesn't think the
report will have any impact on the
government. "We sent it to the
ministry of social services but they
have given us no input. Of all the
mini stries thev have been cut back
the worst in the last three or four
years. Their morale is not very
good? Buckley says.
"I think the year foi the homeless is a lot of theory but not a lot of
substance. It is not clear in my
mind a hell of a lot has changed
this year? Buckley sayu.
Learey says more social housing is needed so people can live in
"decent housing". And :n the last
few years several social housing
complexes have been built: Columbia Place, Europe Hote', the Ford
Building, and the Jame^; McReady
complex provide clean, affordable,
housing. But if social lousing is
not available, and if you've been
turned out of your hotel room, the
alternative is emergency shelter.
Vancouver has four emergency shelters and on any given
night, especially in the winter,
they will be full, all 200 beds.
David Jones, day supervisor at
Cross Walk, a Salvation Army
emergency shelter, says the
people who use the shelters are
usually alcoholics, addicts or
mentally handicapped oersons.
These   people,   Jones   says,
have either abused their welfare,
and were kicked off, or don't know
they should be on welfare.
Jones says he tries to get these
people "hooked into the system" by
referring people to social services,
getting them on welfare, into drug
and alcohol treatment programmes, and into social housing.
But Jones says "new housing
won't make a happy person. The
problems are not environmental
but things of the heart. Loneliness, unemployment, drugs, alcohol, and loss of contact with other
people are the major problems?
Hotel tenant finds himself out on the street outside Hotel Vicious
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, November 24,1987 CLASSIFIEDS
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
ONE-WAY PLANE TICKET New York-
Zurich, Dec. 12. Female. S200 OBO.
228-8970.
20 - HOUSING
ROOM AVAILABLE in private home near
UBC in exchange for some childcare and
light housekeeping. Call 224-2480.	
30 - JOBS
HAIR IS HAIR DESIGN, 540 W. Broadway,
require p/t receptionist for Saturday and two
evening shifts. Call Rebecca, 879-5435.
MATURE BABYSITTERNEEDED, Wed. &
Thurs., days,Iiveinorout.Phone224-9283.
SELL JEWELLERY at UBC Xmas CraR
Fair - Nov. 30 through Dec. 4, 8:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. daily, 15% commission. Call Annoula
689-4760.	
70 - SERVICES
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00, additional lines GO cents, commercial
• 3 lines SS.OO, additional lines, 75 cents. (10% DISCOUNT ON" 25 ISSUES OR
MORE) Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 4:00 two days before
publication.  SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
85 - TYPING
TRAVEL CUTS is ...
Going Your Way!!
*Student Flights*
♦Cultural Exchanges*
♦Adventure Tours*
*And much more*
Visit the Student Travel
experts on Campus
S.U.B.   224-2344
WORD PROCESSING; A & Y Manuscript
Masters. Essays, reports, theses, scripts,
manuscripts. Spelling, grammar and style
corr. 253-0899.
ON-LINE   TYPING   -   Professional   Word
Processing   at   Sl-25/dble.   spaced   pg
Dwnton. or Rmd. drop-off.    Call  Glenna
277-0410.
ACADEMIC & BUSINESS Word Processing Service, days, evenings, 263-4862.
WORD PROCESSING, Mac Plus, Editing.
Experienced, accurate. Call Jack, 224-0486.
75 - WANTED
PERSONALS
WILL BUY for cash vintage toys & child
related items, 1920's & older, Granby House
Antiques, 733-5533.
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
Write, We Type. Theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, Eves., Wknds. 736-1208.
WHEN TO CALL SPEAKEASY: 1. Mr./Ms.
Wonderful wasn't so wonderful. 2. Feeling a
little lost. 3. Study break. 4. You're in an
"ECT Panic." 228-3700.	
85 - TYPING
WORDPOWER - Word processing - I.B.M. &
Macintosh laser printouts. Student discounts. 222-2661.
50 - RENTALS
ACCESS COMPUTER RENTALS -
255-7342. We rent IBM PC and compatible.
All types of printers, daily, weekly, or
monthly rentals.
_
1TR Mobile Sound
228-3017-»SUB Rm 233
70 - SERVICES
NEW WEST SIDE licensed family daycare,
opening January 4, '88. Two trained early
childhood teachers with infant and preschool background. Has vacancies for infants and 3-5yr. olds. Forinfo call 736-3181
or 224-2578 eves.
TYPEWRITING - MINIMUM NOTICE
SERVICE, essays & resumes, scripts, proofreading, writing/research help. 327-0425.
JUDITH FILTNESS, 3206 W. 38TH AVE.,
263-0351. Experienced and accurate; student rates available.
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING, 201-636
W. Broadway (Micom & IBM PC), $2.00
($2.25/pg. for Laser print) dble. spaced text.
Equations & Tables: $16/hr. Photocopying
876-5333. Visa/Master.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 yrs. exp.
Word proc. & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: Student
discounts. Laser & letter quality printers.
10th & Discoveiy 222-2122.
WORD WEAVERS still on 41st Bus line.
New location #101 - 2258 W. 41st Ave. at
Yew St. Excellent student rates for quality,
custom word processing, aussi en francais.
Tele. 266-6814.
TYPING, QUICK, RIGHT BY UBC, $1.25/
pg., all kinds. Call Rob 228-8989, anytime..
WORD-PROCESSING $2.00/page. IBM or
Apple. DTP also. ComputerSmiths, 3732
West Broadway (at Alma) 224-5242.
WORD  PROCESSING SERVICES avail
able for anything. Contact Connie 731-9579.
FAST! WORD PROCESSOR, $1.75/pg.
daisy wheel, $1.50/pg. draft, thesis rates.
Days/Eves 737-8981.
TYPING? EXPERIENCED & REASONABLE. Spelling & grammar no problem APA
a specialty. Discount rates, min. notice. Kits
area-June-738-1378.
WORD PROCESSING for essays, reports,
and theses, $l/page. Call Sydney for pickup.
324-6670 anytime.
YEAR-ROUND EXP. essay/thesis typing
from legible work; spell/gram corrected
738-6829,10-9 King Ed Bus route.
KER  WORD   PROCESSING   SERVICE.   PROFESSIONAL WORD PROCESSING.
Using IBM-XT with WordPerfect. #1 -158.'    Call Alfie 299-3061.
E. 10th Ave. Call Kerry 876-2895.  —	
I
HOTv^>
FLASHES L^f Music of the
Andes
o
*+***+**tk
Grey Cup Party
Ifyou want to go to the 75th
Grey Cup Extravaganza Party,
this Friday at the Vancouver
Convention Centre, you can buy
a ticket for $15 from SUB room
254 on Tuesday, Wednesday or
Thursday afternoons this week;
or call Tim Bird at 228-3961.
Grupo Mez'Me will play Wednesday November 25 at 12:30 p.m.
in Buchanan A100. The group's
lively Andean music was enthusiastically received at the La
Quena Fiesta this summer, and
they've returned with their panpipe magic! Sponsored by
Hispanic and Italian Studies.
Attention UBC
PHOTOSOC mem-
DerS- There is a groovin',
rock 'n rollin' general meetin' on
Thursday, November 26, at 7:30.
Come to hear Jane Witzel speak,
and to say hi to the two Steves
and the rest of the gang. And
there .1 also be grub and bevvies.
Place: North SUB Plaza, Rm 61.
UBC'S SHOE AND
SPORTSWEAR
forerunners    HEADQUARTERS
IN THE GYM OR ON THE ROAD
NIKE AIR
IS WITH YOU ALL THE WAY
BETWEEN
CLASSES
tUESDAY
Association, for Baha'i
Studies
Baha'i Week continues at the
SUB Concourse, II a.m.-3 p.m.
daily.
Environmental Interest
Group
All week: booth in SUB is
selling 1988 picture calendars
for Christmas. Calendars
[feature endangered wilderness
areas in Western Canada.
JFroceeds to EIG and WCWC.
i
[UBC Personal Computer
Club
MAC Meeting: Noon, Hebb 10.
Meet Roger, the chapter head.
Commodore Meeting: Noon,
Hebb 10. Be there or be square.
IBM Meeting: Noon, SUB 111.
Bring something new.
ATARI Meeting: Noon, Scarfe
1021. All ATARI ST owners
welcome.
(United Church Campus
[Ministry
Informal worship, all welcome.
(Noon, Lutheran Campus
[Centre.
3Pre»Medical Society
Lecture on Radiology by Dr.
Neuman. Noon, IRC #1.
UBC International House
Language Exchange Program:
first meeting for those interested in exchanging a language
ifor another. 5 p.m., International House (1783 West Mall).
Lutheran Student Movement
jCo-Op Supper. 6 p.m., Lutheran
jCampus.Csntre.
Heel
counter:
polyvinyl.
Midsole:
two air units in
polyurethane ^
in contoured
design.
"NIKE AIR MAX COMBINES MAXIMUM
CUSHIONING AND COMFORT
IN A STABLE SHOE."
RUNNERS WORLD
MAGAZINE.
Outside:
solid
rubber
^l        waffle
w —— - ^     design.
10% DISCOUNT TO UBC STUDENTS, STAFF AND FACULTY
3504 W 4TH AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C.  732-4535
WEDNESDAY
[Hispanic & Italian Studies
J12-.30 PM- Buchanan A100.
Amnesty UBC
Bake Sale. 10:30-2:30, SUB
Goncourse.
UBC Socred Club
Membership Booth. 11:30-l :00,
SUB Concourse.
Jewish Student Network &
Progressive Zionist Caucus
Rabbi Philip Bregman speaks
onr Sexual Ethics in Judaism.
J-Joon,BUCHB223.
[United Church Campus
Ministry
fTable Talki The Reality of the
KJospel & the Unreality of the
jChurches* -a discussion. All
welcome. Noon, SUB 212A.
Sociedad Hispanica
{Spanish Club)
Drop-in center. Noon, Spanish
Lounge (3rd floor, BUCH C).
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Gallery Night. 3::J0 p.m.
onward, Gallery Lounge.
United Church Campus
Ministry
Potluck dinner, discussion,
worship. All welcome. 6 p.m.,     !
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Graduate Student Society
Bridge Night. 6 p.m., Fireside
Lounge, Grad Centre.
Cinema 16
Film: R.W, Fassbinder's \
Veronika Voss. 7 and 9:30, SUB j
Theatre.
Maranatha Christian Club
Bible Study. 7 p.m., 1868 Knox i
Rd.
Toastmasters International
Leadership/Public Speaking.
Guests welcome. 7:30-9:30 p.m.,
SUB 215.
Graduate Student Society
Music Night, featuring guitarist
Mike Beddoes. 8:30-11:00 p.m., j
Fireside Lounge, Grad Centre.
THURSDAY
UBC Personal Computer
Club
IBM Meeting: 11:30 a.m., SUB
111. Stephen's fun meeting.
AMIGA Meeting: Noon, Plaza
North. Be there Amigos.
APPLE Meeting: Noon, SUB
215. More on Japanese anima-   |
tion with William.
Psychology Students
Association ' j
Executive Meeting. 11?30 a.m., i
Kenny Building Lounge. i
Chinese Christian
Fellowship I
Small group discussion and '
prayer. Noon, Scarfe 209.
Entrepreneur's Club
Guest Speaker: Public Financing/Limited Partnerships. Noon,
Angus 425.
Inter**Varsity Christian
Fellowship
Michael Green, author/prof at
Regent College, speaking on
"Our Mission? Noon, Woodward:
6-
Pacific Riro Club
Peter Richards on Indonesia.
Noon, Asian Centre.
Political Science Students
Association
John Payne: lecture and slides
on his recent trip to Nicaragua.
Noon, BUCH D121.
CHRISTMAS
FAIR
November 23 -
December 18,1987
SUB Main Concourse
Featuring:
Internationa]
Arts&
CraRs
DEC. 1   DEC. 1   DEC. 1
DEC. 1     DEC. 1
DEC. 1
Make sure you have
all your class notes
copied before
December 1 and
you'll have a week
to study before
exams start.
COPY RIGHT
lower level SUB
-./THE UBYSSEY
November 24, 1987 Committee proposes
exec honoraria change
By R.D. Shore
New recommendations to
council may substantially increase the value of honoraria
awarded to some AMS executives
while leaving the director of finance out in the cold.
The ad hoc committee on executive honoraria presented recommendations November 18 to
students' council to adopt a two
tiered hierarchy with the president on the top tier receiving a
$2200 honorarium and the other
executive members on the second
tier receiving $1800.
But director of finance Don
Isaak feels the new hierarchy
doesn't accurately reflect the duties of each office.
"You can't put a price on responsibility? said Isaak.
"The DOF is responsible for a
$6.5 million budget this year and
the DOA is responsible for four
times as many clubs as a few years
ago? said Isaak.
But director of administration Tim Bird said the honoraria
should be a "balance between a
CSIS Abuses
to be reviewed
Local watchdogs created
By Tu Thanh Ha
MONTREAIXCUP)
Recent abuses by the Canadian Security and Intelligence
Service have prompted the creation of a nation-wide network that
will monitor the agency's activities.
"With all the activities which
have been exposed in the last year
- spies in the labour movement,
monitoring peace activists, falsifying affidavits - it's our view that
this is simply the tip of the iceberg," said network member Don
Stewart.
"There is a need to organise
local groups that will document
incidents in their areas and exchange information across the
country? he said.
The network proposes to hold
public hearings in 1989 when
CSIS will come under parliamentary review - as required by Bill C-
9, the original legislation that created the civilian security agency.
Last September, CSIS director T. D'Arcy Finn resigned after a
federal court revealed his agency
had filed a misleading affidavit to
obtain wiretap authorizations in
1985.
CSIS is also being investigated by the agency's review
committee following discovery
that Marc Boivin, an employee of
the Confederation of National
Trade Unions (CNTU), was a CSIS
informer. Boivin pleaded guilty
this fall to charges that he conspired to bomb non-unionised hotels in Quebec.
According to reports by the*
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the agency has also infiltrated the Canadian Union of
Public Employees, the Canadian
Auto Workers, the British Columbia Federation of Labour and the
Centrale de l'ensignement du
Quebec.
"If we can document enough
abuses by the CSIS of the rights of
activists - and if we can get trade
unions and community groups to
put pressure on the government?
said Stewart, "well hopefully have
cross-country hearings in 1989."
An independent Vancouver
researcher, Stewart was in Montreal to meet civil rights lawyers,
trade union officials and peace
activists. CNTU vice-president
Monique Simard confirmed that
her union had been in contact with
Stewart but declined to comment
further.
Two weeks ago, Nick
Temette, a University of Winnipeg lecturer, became one of the
first Canadian citizens to obtain a
copy of his RCMP file. The documents showed the RCMP had been
monitoring Ternette's involvement with the NDP and various
peace groups for at least 14 years.
In a similar incident two
months ago, two Concordia students were stopped by agents
claiming to be from the RCMP and
questioned about their involvement with a Montreal peace
group.
In September, NDP MP
Svend Robinson told the House of
Commons that CSIS documents
showed at least four agents had
been recruited to infiltrate Canadian peace groups.
According to Stewart, more
than 80 per cent of the CSIS staff
is made up of former RCMP
agents. Before the creation of the
CSIS in 1984, domestic surveillance duties came under the domain of the RCMP.
"They are continuing the
same Cold War mentality of their
(RCMP) predecessors? Stewart
said. The CSIS is simply interfering with legitimate dissent in
Canada."
token reward for service and a sum
which will really help the recipient
finance his or her education."
"Otherwise only those who
can afford to volunteer will be able
to serve and that would eliminate
more than half of the students
right away? said Bird.
The committee also recommended the changes in level be
implemented to affect those executives currently in office.
The report states "this follows
the rationale that since the positions are worth the specified val
ues, those presently occupying the
positions should be rewarded accordingly?
Isaak told the committee that
the directors of administration
and finance should be on the top
tier of the hierarchy with the
president considering how their
responsibilities have increased in
the past few years.
"I definitely agree with
Isaak's position? said Bird, "while
I believe that the vice president
and coordinator of external affairs
can take on as much responsibility
as the other executive members, it
is not in their mandate to do so?
However, Bird said a three
tier system, with the president
alone receiving the highest honorarium to reflect the importance of
the position and the directors of
administration and finance on the
second tier, wouldhave been ideal.
But the committee decided
both directors would receive second tier honoraria. This means a
cut of $400 for director of finance
and an increase of $600 for other
executive members from previously approved figures. The
president's honorarium remains
practically unchanged.
Ironically, it was Isaak's notice of motion to amend the sections of the AMS code dealing with
executive honoraria on October 7
that led to the striking of the ad
hoc committee.
"It's ironic? said Isaak, "really ironic."
UBC's Trina Hewlett (11) on a flight of fancy as Amy Ku (3) looks on in volleyball action against the
University of Alberta Saturday
Intense T'Birds win two
By Victor Chew Wong
Last weekend the UBC
women's volleyball team slipped
into the season's first top-ten
poll then slipped past two rivals
in Canada West action at War
Memorial Gym.
The 10th ranked Thunderbirds faced and defeated the
eighth ranked University of Saskatchewan Huskies in straight
games 15-11,15-5,15-9.
Sonya Wachowski played
the part of statistical prodigy
with 13 kills, 13 digs, and 3 stuff
blocks and was selected as the
player of the game.
"The entire team  was in
tense and played very tough? said
UBC head coach Donna Baydock.
The following evening it was
the one-two punch of setter Amy
Ku and middle blocker Trina
Hewlett that knocked-out the
University of Alberta Pandas in
four games, 15-10,14-16,15-5,15-
7.
Ku's short sets, and Hewlett's
combinations of tips, taps, half-
speeders and spikes sent Alberta
sprawling on the court for much of
the match.
Hewlett rose above Alberta's
double-blocks and exploited
Alberta's defence with precise tips
that found Panda defensive holes.
Hewlett finished the game
with 12 kills and was selected as
the player of the game for the
'Birds.
"At the beginning of the year
she (Hewlett) tried to pound
every ball through, but now she's
starting to think? said Baydock.
"It was very disappointing
loss because we didn't play up to
our potential? said Alberta head
coach Suzi Smith. "UBC played
very well."
The Birds fly to the Sherbrooke Invitational this weekend and face some of the best
teams in the nation.
PHtiSI      The Alma
(" i [/J  Mater Society
J&m)     of U.B.C.
^^&^     SubCetera
Now interviewing for part-
time student position of
Supervisor for SubCetera/
AMS Box Office. Regular
minimum 15 hours per week,
flexible schedule. Cash experience, supervisory skills an
asset.
Please apply with resume,
proof of student status and
course schedule to Room
100K, 6138 SUB Boulevard
(Main Concourse).
wzzzmmzmm
2955 W. 4th Ave
1 Block West of
MacDonald "
736-2726   .
GREAT
West
COIN
LAUNDRY
WASHERS:
50 lb. (For sleeping bags, quilts)
30 lb. (Seeping bags, quilts)
20 lb. (Large loads)
16 lb. (Regular loads)
ALL DAY FRIDAYS^
8 1/2 minutes
free drying
with
student
card
busy bee
ONE HOUR CLEANERS
20°/c
o DISCOUNT
Present your AMS student
card and receive 20%
off your dry cleaning.
(Not valid with any other
promotion and excludes
laundry & leather cleaning).
4480-2 West 10trt Ave.
(at Sasamal)
PH.: 224-4212
When you need copies
quickly and hassle-free, see
us at Kinko's. Our self-
service copiers are very easy
to use and give you the great
quality, inexpensive copies
vou expect.
kinko's
GREAT COPIES GREAT PEOPLE
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
Ubyssey
staff meet-
ing Wed,
Nov. 25,
12:30. Discuss ad
boycott policy, workshops and
BC CUP .
November 24,1987
THE UBYSSEY/3 The University of British Columbia
LATE NIGHT MOVIES
at the Frederic Wood Theatre
COME SEE AT 11:00 PM
** PAT GARRETT AND
BILLY THE KID
Wednesday, Nov. 25
** LEFT HANDED GUN
Thursday, Nov. 26
** BILLY THE KID
VS DRACULA
Friday, Nov. 27
FREE     ADMISSION
These films are a special presentation by the Theatre
Department during Billy The Kid Week
The stage play, THE COLLECTED WORKS OF BILLY THE
KID by Michael Ondaatje, will be performed @ 8:00 pm from
November 18-28
■ LOW LOW PRICES
■ SUPER COPIES
■ FAST SERVICE
■ NO LINE UPS!
AT THE UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2ndFI., 2174 W. Parkway
Vancouver, B.C. Tel.: 224-6225
Mon-ThB-9     Fri 8-6     Sat-Sun11-6
Rugby team
suffers first loss
Entertainment
writers: come
and pick up
your Peace
\lssue stories -
j/'f's your chance
'\to try something different.
\See Laura for
\more info.
PAY ONLY ONE DOLLAR!
with the presentation of this coupon.  Limit one coupon per
customer, to «-r HILARIOUS IMPROVISATIONAL
conu-dv  .% ith the
THEATRESPORTS GANG!
Offer good Wednesday and  Thursday only 8:00 pm
Regular admission $6. Phone 688-7013
Offer expires Dec. 4, 1987.
Back Alley Theatre, 751 Thurlow
Nf       __L      ONE
DOIJAR
MA.DA ir.
The University of British Columbia
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST
Monday, December 7,1987
From 8:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Students who have completed English 100 or its equivalent must attach to the examination booklet
a "fee paid" sticker ($10), which must be purchased from the Department of Finance, 3rd Floor,
Administration Building. (UBC student I.D. will be needed.) Students enrolled in English 100 must
put their section number on the cover of the booklet; no sticker is required. All students will have
to show their UBC student I.D. before entering the exam room and must write in the room assigned.
Students are permitted the use of a dictionary.
1
ROOM AT,T.OCATTON RY SURNAME
AAA-BOU ....
%
 ANGUS 110
BOV-CHH....
 ANGUS 104                              1
CHI-CRH	
 BIOLOGY 2000
CRI-EIZ	
 BUCHANAN Al 06
EJA-FRE 	
 BUCHANAN A100
FRF-GOZ	
 BUCHANAN Al 04
GPA-HAX ....
 BUCHANAN A102
HAY-HZZ	
 CHEMISTRY 150
IAA-JON	
 CHEMISTRY 200
JOO-KOD ....
 CHEMISTRY 250
KOE-LAM....
 CHEMISTRY 300
LAN-LEZ	
 COMPUTER SCIENCE 200   1
LFA-MAB ....
 COMPUTER SCIENCE 201    1
MAC-MCZ....
 GEOGRAPHY 100
MDA-OLF....
 HENNINGS 200
OLG-PGZ	
 HENNINGS 201
PHA-REI	
 HENNINGS 202
REJ-SIM	
 MATHEMATICS 100
SIN-STZ	
 MCLEOD 228
SUA-TON ....
 MACMILLAN 166
TOO-WIK ....
 SCARFE100
WIL-ZZZ	
 WESBROOK 100
The next sittings of the ECT will be held on Friday, 18 March 1988 (6:00 - 8:30 p.m.) and Friday, 22
July 1988 (7:00-9:30 p.m.)
Note: Some faculties will not permit students to register for the 1988-1989 Winter Session unless they
have passed the ECT.
By Jody Woodland
For the second week in a row,
the UBC Thunderbird rugby team
played well on Vancouver's monsoon swept fields.
But this time the 'Birds lost
their first Vancouver Rugby
Union game 12-3 to the consistently powerful Meraloma club.
In spite of the conditions, the
two top clubs in the city produced
a fine, exciting piece of rugby. But
too many whistles by an over-zealous referee stopped the flow of
play, and kept it trom magnificence.
UBC dominated the forward
play, controlling the scrums and
winning almost every lineout.
Peter Kokan played well and took
everything that came his way in
the lineouts.
On three occasions, UBC
came oh-so-close to scoring but
couldn't touch the ball down. The
'Lomas never seriously threatened UBC's goal line. Penalties
and kicking decided the game with
the 'Lomas' Chris Tynan hitting
on four short kicks in the second
half for all of the Meraloma points.
UBC's kicking woes continued in the wet conditions as Bruce
Jordan only connected on one of
his five attempts and Owen Walsh
missed a drop goal attempt.
Pressure from Sean Magee
and Bruce Gray 20 minutes into
the game led to a flyhack into the
end zone. Tynan narrowly won the
footrace with Magee to prevent the
try.
After UBC fielded the subsequent 22-dropout, Pierre Duey
kicked a looping ball into the end
zone with three backs in pursuit.
Once again Tynan stopped the
'Birds, leaping high to take the
ball away and touch it down.
A penalty gave UBC three
points and the lead. The last ten
minutes of the half were even.
Penalties marred the second
half and stalled potentially strong
drives by both teams. Three kicks
inside the 22 and one from 30
metres out gave the win to the
Meralomas.
Despite the loss, coach Barry
Legh was pleased with the effort.
"The forwards played a magnificent game, taking the ball and
driving the lineouts," said Legh.
The downside was giving up six
points on late hits and "our inability to commit the Lorna backs to
tackles and open up the running
game."
Hoop group bags two wins
Last weekend the UBC men's
basketball team travelled to the
prairies to trap Dinosaur and they
caught a rebuilding University of
Calgary team and two wins in the
process.
In the season's first Canada
West game on Friday the 'Birds
dominated and emerged with an
88-71 victory.
J.D. Jackson led UBC offensively with 24 points and Mike
Clarke added 16.
On Saturday the "Birds won
again 82-75 in a more evenly
played game.
Once again Jackson led the
Thirds with 24 points and Clarke
threw in 19.
"Anytime you can go on the
road and come back with two wins
it's a good weekend? said UBC
head coach Bruce Enns.
Next action for the Birds is
this weekend when they face the
University of Lethbridge at War
Memorial Gym.
ENGLISH
COMPOSITION
TEST SEMINAR
"HOW TO PASS"
Guest Speaker:
Ms. Nancy Horsman
FRIDAY, NOV. 27
12:30
Please be seated early. No one will be turned away.
SUB BALLROOM
FREE
4/THE UBYSSEY
November 24,1987 Volleybirds lack consistency
By Victor Chew Wong
If there is one fear last
weekend's action confirmed for
UBC head coach Dale Ohman, it is
that his team is still struggling to
find consistency under pressure.
The UBC men's volleyball
team split their two game Canada
West series at War Memorial
Gym.
On Friday night the seventh
ranked Thunderbirds played with
UBC setter Ryan Kineshanko (6) lines up another kill for Kelly Bukowski (2) in Canada West action on weekend
Women drop two on prairies
the consistency of lumpy cake
batter against the second ranked
University of Saskatchewan Huskies and lost in straight games, 15-
12,15-10,15-9.
In the first game LBC raced
off to a 9-2 start then lost the lead
following a series of unforced errors.
The 'Birds were tied 10-10 in
the second game and 9-9 in the
third, but again, could not rally for
the win.
"We seem to get to the end of a
game and the guys get really nervous? said Ohman.
Greg Williscroft led a futile
Thunderbird attack with 11 kills;
Rob Hill added nine.
In the Saturday evening 14-
16, 15-8, 15-4, 16-14 victory
against the University of Alberta
Ohman's displeasure with his
starting unit was evident.
All of the starters except
middle-blocker Kelly Bukowski
began the game on the oench and
not the court.
"We started the guys who we
thought deserved to play? said
Ohman.
The combination of back-up
setter Ryan Kineshanko and
Bukowski proved a potent one as
Bukowski pounded down 14 kills -
many of them off of short sets.
As the match wore on, the
regular starting unit, except for
leading power hitter Williscroft,
found their way bac_ onto the
court and contributed to the win.
"After Friday I dic.n't feel he
(Williscroft) showed trie leadership he should on the loor? said
Ohman. "It's important for the
guys to realize they can play without him as well."
The 'Birds next home game is
against cross-strait rival University of Victoria on Sunday at 2:30.
By Terri Lynn
UBC women's basketball
team made the University of Calgary Dinosaur's shine this past
weekend as the number one
ranked women's team in the nation handed the "Birds their third
and fourth losses of the season.
In Friday night's game, UBC
jumped to a 30-12 lead in the opening minutes of play. The 'Birds
took the Dinos by surprise and led
by as much as 18 points in the first
half. At the half UBC led 32-29.
The lead changed hands four
times in the second half as the
Dino's regained their composure.
At the seven minute mark the
Thunderbirds crumpled under
Calgary's full court pressure.
Then the Dinos took over and
won by a score of 77-53.
Kim Sauder was the top
scorer for UBC with 15 points,
while Sue MacPherson added 11.
The Thunderbirds managed
to contain Dino forward Veronica
VanderSchee to 15 points.
The previous weekend in
Vancouver, VanderSchee clipped
the 'Birds' wings by netting 24 and
29 points in the season opener.
UBC's lack of leadership cost
them the game; no one stepped
forward in the final minutes of the
game to take control and lead the
team.
In Saturday night's game the
'Birds got trampled under prehistoric peds 86-37.
The women basketballers'
return to action this weekend
against Lethbridge at 5:45 p.m. at
War Memorial Gym.
Swimmers make
splash at College Cup
The UBC swim team returned
last weekend from the University of Alberta with second and
fourth place finishes from the
first ever Canada College Cup,
which featured the top six men's
and top five women's taams from
across the country.
The women placed second with
323 points, behind the University of Calgary with 335, and
slightly ahead of the University
of Toronto with 321. The Universities of Alberta (248), Victoria (136) and Laval (70) rounded
out the list of compe"'tors.
In the men's division UBC
placed fourth with 267 points,
behind Calgary (402), Victoria
(300) and Toronto (278), and
ahead of Laval (259) and Alberta
(255).
DEYONG
Cs^CMtSsimd
THE BEST EQUIPMENT
AT THE BEST PRICES
Party Systems
Dance Systems
Lighting Effects
New Equipment
Full Concert Systems
MENTION THIS AD AND
GET 10% OFF RENTALS
873-3841
271 E 2ND AVE., VAN., B.C.
NEAR MAIN STREET
*
*
*
CHRISTMAS BREAK TICKET SALE
(DEC. 18-JAN.7)
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 25
SUB 205   *    8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.   *
Total of 8 Tickets per person allowed
(any combination allowed i.e.: one person
8 nights or 8 people one night, etc.)
Proper I.D. required for each ticket holder
For more info-call 228-5851
For other dates, tickets on sale as usuai1 at
AMS box office   *    CASH ONLY   *
UBYSSEY Staff Notice: BC
CUP potluck and discussion
Sunday November 29, at
noon, Come talk about the
separation proposal and
plan for the National. See
notice board for details.
GMAT     LSAT     GRE
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
(Law School Admission Test)
(Graduate Record Exam
WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
University of British Columbia
• Includes Sexton text book, lectures and   „■>,
• One year personalized services. A/%
0              • Instructors hold PhD, MBA or LLB.    $}f
CXXlOn Educational Centers ^ call
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION 222-8272
iDD&CLi)    ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
15% Discount
on any Hair Service
(with this ad)
5784 University Blvd. 224-1922 or 9116
| (in UBC Village) Exp. Nov. 30/87
■ 1/2 Blk. away (Buy Now-Use Later)J
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ALL
DAY
SUNDAY,
NOV. 29
\
Come cheer your
favourite team!!
at
Jerry's Cove
Neighbourhood Pub
3681 W. 4th Ave. at Alma
\\*>u
j
November 24,1987
THE UBYSSEY/5 Foodbank fiasco
Students' council should be embarrassed. They
seem unable to follow through with their own
plans. In November 1986 they passed a motion—
unanimously—to create an AMS run food bank. They've
had over a year to bring the idea to fruition and nothing
has happened.
The AMS food bank has never existed except on
paper. And it never will if council passes a motion one
week this Wednesday which will erase the original
motion which created the food bank.
Simon Seshadri was AMS president when the
original motion passed. Now a board of governors
representative, Seshadri says the AMS doesn't have the
capabilities and expertise to create and run a food bank.
But the AMS has proven they can do almost
anything they want.
They can create a typesetting department involving
approximately $50,000 worth of high-tech equipment
and several full-time salaried employees in just one
month.
They can attempt to take over Duke's Cookies using
high priced lawyers in order to reap profits with an
AMS run cookie-and-coffee business.
On a smaller scale, they can organize two work-
study positions to research the mechanics and viability
of an AMS run general store foj* students—an idea
proposed only last summer.
But even with the offer from Ray Schultz, Lutheran
Centre chaplain, to help provide expertise and support
from the non-campus community, council couldn't
organize a food bank, or even a study of the need for
such a service.
Clearly the AMS has the capabilities and expertise—and a lot of energy—for projects that can make
money. But when faced with a project aimed at giving,
their resources dry up.
And support from the student population was
indefensibly weak. No one lobbied for the foodbank.
Hardly anyone volunteered to work on it. And only one
student has applied for the position of co-ordinator.
We all know that times are tough and money is
tight at universities these days. It's a shame that
students—and students' councils—react by using all
their energies for ventures that will profit themselves
rather than helping those for whom things are really
tough.
But perhaps council will vote to keep the food bank.
And perhaps someone will step forward to run it, or at
least to determine if there's a need for it. Otherwise the
food bank will go down in AMS history as an embarrassing failure.
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 24,1987
Thy Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a
member of Canadian University Press. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
A hand clawed at the concrete edge of the balcony outside the
Ubyssey office. A rasping breath scratched "Ross... Rossssss... I'm
baaaack." Ross McLaren, flattening his face into pancake formation
against the cold window pane, gasped in fear and hope. Could it be? he wondered. Victor Chew Wong grabbed Ross in a headlock and told him to stop
worrying — no one, not even Chris Wiesinger, could withstand the long fall
from the balcony. R.D.Shore, massaging lime jello into Corinne Bjorge's
toes, decided that the time was right to confirm everyone's suspicions
about the origin of his leather pants and what he admitted to be his "bizarre
sexual orientations." Lisa Langford, returning from a SAC meeting at the
UBC pentagon of power, poured melted chocolate ice-cream into R.D .'s
ears. Suddenly there was a knock at the door, causing the masthead to
become two paragraphs.
It was Chris. He swept into the room, wresting control of the
masthead processor from the finger-tips of Rick Hiebert by telling him that
♦here were free cigarette butts for sale in the Sub concourse. Rick ran. "See
Rick run," cackled lan Robertson, as Michael J. Bryant wailed "Chris is back
— he survived the fall!" Suddenly strange things began to happen in the
masthead. A papaya loomed ominously, its pulpy flesh threatening to juice
Jody Woodland. A mango stood up and demanded political puree. Teresa
DeBou's virtue was threatened by a very masculine strawberry, whispering
softly into her ear about wanting to spend the night together in a shortcake.
Laura Busheikin, munching a fruit salad, began to gag as the pear on her
spoon cried out in pain and fear as it approached her open and threatening
mouth. Kevin Harris, wearing a pomegranete, meloned in the corner. A
huge pineapple, wearing a pair of Foster-Grant sunglasses, waltzed into the
room demanding absolute silence as it declared itself Pineapple-for-life.
Alex Johnson murmured that it was about time the masthead got some
vitamins, and Peter Francis concurred in a condescending sort of way. "Hail
the Pineapple!" sighed Steve Chan, accustomed to the unusual political
climate of the Ubyssey office. Deanne Fisher, waltzing with an over-ripe
breadfruit, sang happily as Carolyn Sale throttled an orange. Katherine
Monk, observing the strangeness from a distance, mumbled malevolently
about "everyone wanting rights - this is getting ridiculous - fruit rights???"
city desk:
production:
entertainment:
sports:
Corinne Bjorge
^#
Ross McLaren
.?>-.
Lisa Langford
xiSii
Laura Busheikin
w
Victor Chew Wong
^c
>
w__
r-Vii
•J)**
t
Debunking the popular myth of press objectivity
Objectivity is the first myth of journalism.
Reporters influence the outcome of stories
by their choice of people to interview, by the
questions they ask, and by the angle they choose to
follow. It's inevitable.
But what each reporter does, or should strive to do,
is be fair and accurate. The aim should be to air opposing views and respect the readers enough to allow them
to draw their own conclusions.
The second myth is that the commercial press
"objectively" chooses which events and issues to cover.
The choice of news topics and the decision of where
to place items in the paper reflects the biases of the
editors and sometimes the publisher.
Unfortunately the commercial press is usually run
by middle age, middle class, white men—their choice of
news and its placement reflects this.
And money talks, speaking for corporate publishing
giants like Southam and Thompson.
The role of the alternative press, then, is to recognize that a bias exists in the mainstream press, and to
recognize the need to give fair play to the 'other issues'.
The alternative press may lack glitz and glamour,
but people turn to it for relief from commercial press
pablum and to listen to voices the mainstream ignores.
Letters
Painful
paradox
Pain is sensational
in more ways than one.
And in modern times its
elimination seems the
whole duty of man, the
administration of kindness . By this kindness,
truths are hidden, relationships stunted, and
lives destroyed.
With such shortsightedness, the producers of the film "The Silent Scream" decried the
abortive process which
the fetus sensed to be
dangerous and uncomfortable. But is this then
the cruelty? Would the
substitution od sugar
drink for the salt solution ennoble the
operation? Is the babe, a
foreigner, unseen, unheard, unfelt, removed
from consideration because he is so far removed from direct sensation? And is this the
year, the job, the wardrobe foregone to bring
him into the world too
painful to consider? Can
we not live with the
temporary discomfort
by which resources are
maintained, research is
supported, the poor are
fed, and our friends are
encouraged? Let's find
us moral guts.
Anya H age man
Agriculture 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libellous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with identification, to SUB 241k.  Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
Cannabis component of nutritious diet
My figures in my article
on Cannabis in Canada
(Nov, 13) were rather conservative, as the letter from
the person whose name was
witheld points out. Not only
have 50,000 people gone to
jail or "crimes" involving
Cannabis, but also the rate
of convictions per year is increasing. If I abandon the
conservative tone of my earlier article, I can speculate
that, if present trends continue, then more than half of
the criminals in North
America are going to be drug
criminals. Furthermore, a
good case can be made that
it is the very laws against
drugs themselves which
seem to be the main motivation and promotion of drug
abuse. Many authorities in
this field have simply given
up hoping to ever see reason
and humanity prevail, and
instead with black humour
are wondering and waiting
to see how much the present
system can withstand.
While I am at it, I would
also like to give a less than
cautious response to the
sentence taken from the
anonymous author in Law 3
that "Marijuana, along with
other recreational drugs,
are not particularly good for
us."
Ethnobotany that I
omitted from my earlier
article shows that Cannabis
was native to Asia and most
likely to China. The earliest
archeological evidence
shows Cannabis cultivation
to be a very important crop
in Chinese culture. Ancient
Chinese records list Cannabis as one of the "five major
grains". The Chinese used
Cannabis as their most
important fibre source, from
which most of their clothes
and paper was made, as well
as ropes and netting.
We in Canada have
been totally brainwashed to
think of marijuana as a
"drug". It is not. Salt and
sugar are drugs, and so is
any other concentrated
chemical compound. Cannabis is a whole green plant.
When the Chinese
listed the plant as one of the
five major grains in ancient
times, they were not joking.
To the best of my knowledge,
the ancient Chinese civilization had large numbers of
people who for thousands of
years ate large amounts of
Cannabis. After cultivating
large fields, the stems would
be processed into fibre for
textiles, the seeds into oil
and the leaves and flowers
would be a herb to help out a
boring bowl of rice.
Eating Cannabis never
has been proven to be harmful, in fact, the opposite is
more likely the case. Eating
marijuana is nutritious and
good for you!
The only way marijuana can be harmful is
because it is smoked, and
then it is not the marijuana,
but the smoking. This is
where the illegality is influential,   because   it   is   the
criminality and criminal
subculture which aids and
abets the smoking behaviour, which is the way the
death culture perverts Cannabis and creates the medical problems. That Canadians do not have the right to
cultivate Cannabis is especially relevant if we consider
that eating the plant may be
the gardener's goal. The law
that makes a person liable
to seven years imprisonment for garden cultivation
of Cannabis is totally insane! there is absolutely no
comparison between eating
pot and drinking alcohol.
While an overdose of alcohol
is fatal, eating marijuana is
about as dangerous as eating salad.
In conclusion I would
like to point out that there is
a strong correlation in our
culture amongst our recreational drugs that the more
dangerous and consciousness decreasing a drug is,
the more legal and available
it becomes, while the less
dangerous and the more
consciousness increasing a
drug is, the more illegal and
black market availability it
will have. Alcohol and marijuana are at the two extremes of these trends. This
sort of death culture can
easily be understood from
an historical perspective,
but nevertheless the current situation is unjust to a
psychotic degree.
Blair T. Longley
6/THE UBYSSEY
November 24,1987 Canadian editors
debate objectivity
of commercial press
WINNIPEGXCUP)
The media doesn't reflect the
interests of the readers, because it
downplays the interests of
churches, women, labour unions,
farmers and other interest groups,
said the editor of This Magazine at
a recent debate.
Rick Salutin said the commercial press concentrates on interviewing the same group of people
for their stories.
"They seem to assume that
the population of Canada is approximately 85 people? he said.
But Murray Birt, managing
editor of the Winnipeg Free Press,
criticized Salutin's assumption.
"We are ethically concerned
with editing so as to bring out
individual prejudices? said Birt.
"We think affiliation with religious, political groups or unions is
fine, but those philosophies must
not stop a reporter from crossing a
picket line to cover the opposing
side of view."
Salutin however questions
the assumption of media ofjectiv-
ity.
"The press seems to be telling
"They seem to assume that the population of Canada is approximately 85
people," he said.
us we live in a society where people
in positions of power are there
because of merit, that we live in a
real democracy, that the economic
system is a natural force with the
implication that the market never
screws up, and the assumption
that there are no assumptions in
the papers? said Salutin.
Salutin said the media reflects the interests of big business,
and noted a recent increase in
Salutin said the media reflects the interests of big business,
and noted a recent
increase in business
reporting.
business reporting.
"Are you aware that only one
paper in Canada is editorially
opposed to free trade?" he said.
"The press has known about free
trade for two years now, and now
they are talking about how they
are being manipulated by the anti-
free trade groups?
Birt said Salutin's analysis
showed alack of faith in the people
in any newsroom.
"Big business does not cast its
spell over our people," said Birt,
who had earlier saidhe felt the one
section the Winnipeg Free Press
could improve on was business.
Birt emphasized the Winnipeg Free Press' editorial autonomy from its publisher, the Thompson newspaper chain.
"Our editorial policy is produced by a committee including
the editors and the board and the
publisher, yet the editorial writers
consult the publisher's opinion
very rarely? said T-lirt-
UBC BOOKSTORE
MUG
SHOTS.
NOVEMBER
Are you a reader? A bookworm?
A bibliophile? A bibliotaph? Or do you just
ike books?
Answer yes to any of these questions and our
sale is for you!
Enjoy our usual unusual selection of
remainders and specially-priced
books, bargain books and discard
records from the UBC Library, sale-
priced textbooks, and 'hurts' from
some of the finest publishers.
Sale runs from November 14 - 28.
Bookstore Hours
Mon . Tues.. Thurs., Fri.    8
Wednesday
Saturday 9
30 a.m. -5
30 a.m.
30a.m. -5
00 p.m.
30 p.m.
00 p.m.
NOV. 14-28
(Mg BOOKSTORE
6200 University Blvd., Van., B.C. 228-4741
Chocolate Mug Shot
Hot chocoLitc
Shot of Southern Comfort
Top with mini-marshnwilows
Coffee Mug Shot
Hot ht.ick cojlvc
Shot ol Southern Comjort
Teaspoon o/ .si«j_r
Top with whipped cream
HUNGRY? We've got just the formula!
fii
On sale now through Dec. 1, 1987
at 2601 W. Broadway location only
The Full Meal Deal is the best hunger remedy around. Here's what you get:
• A juicy, full-flavo- red Homestyle Single Burger
• Crisp, regular fries
• An ice-cold 12 oz. safi drink
• A delicious 5 o-.. Eairy Queen Sundae
| Drop in to Dairy Queen soon. And treat yourself right.
November 24, 1987
^<£-
THE FULL
MEAL
I      DEAL
$2*99
Dairy
Queen
brazier.
We treat you right!
__■  -___■   BM   ■_■   BOM   ■__!
THE UBYSSEY/7 Ask your Pharmacist
for your FREE        ^j^
1988 WALL CALENDAR.
Save on selected
Christmas Gifts,
Cards and Wraps.
PRE CHRISTMAS SALE
TAMPAX
6Mfwt
Tampons
Regular or Super 30's
$4
39
Barnes Hind
Soft Mate II
Cleaning, Disinfecting Solution or
Rinsing, Neutralizing Solution
$3
89
Phisoderm
Emollient Cleanser
Regular or Herbal 450 mL
$C39
5
BAUSCH &
LOMB
Soflens Cleaning Tablets 24's
SC89
5
Paramettes
Adults Super 120's
$C69
5
11 Vitamins
Plus 6 Minerals
for Adults
/-
Paramettes
ft
Tylenol Sinus
Regular Strength    £/%cq
24 Caplets V^O*»
Tylenol Cold
Extra Strength
24 Caplets
$C79
5
■H EXTRA-STRENCTH X
Tylenol
cold
MEDICATION N D
Non-Drowsy. Daylim. Relief
y^r
FINESSE
Shampoo, Conditioner,
Hairspray (300 mL),
Mousse (150 g)
$069
2
FINESSE
<k
Stanley
Vitamin C 500 mg 250's
$529
Multivitamins 250s
$Q69
3<
Shampoo, Conditioner,
Hairspray     C/^OQ
Alberto Gel
$499
1
Oxford   ^^
Filler Paper $049
400's Metric Ruled
White Figuring Pads
Letter Size, Ruled
89®
Campus Erasable Bond
Typewriter Paper 80's
S099
2
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
RSITY^
VISA
MasterCard
5754 UNIVERSITY BLVD. VAN. B.C. 22*3202
J^k \    (in the Village one block east of S.U.B.)
J
8/THE UBYSSEY
Prescription Service: Mon. - Sat. — 9 am to 10 pm / Sun. 12 noon to 8 pm
November 24, 1987

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