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The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1966

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 Wi UBYSSEY
apple
\
Vol. XLVIII, No. 15
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  FRIDAY,  OCTOBER  21,   1966
Librarians
to survey
check-outs
By KRIS EMMOTT
UBC library plans a new
kind of survey.
Students will be asked to fill
out questionnaires dealing with
library problems sometime in
mid-November.
The questionnaires will be
distributed in libraries at entrances and check-out points,
and at polling stations throughout the campus.
The questions, drawn up at
a Wednesday meeting of the
student-staff library committee, will seek student opinion
of library conditions and services.
The survey will also show
what libraries are most heavily used and in what fields library materials are relatively
weak.
The library committee also
announced plans to discipline
students for library offences
such as theft by asking them
to work in the library.
The alternative would be referral to student court.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs noted the library has
many requests from organizations wishing to put up posters
in the building.
"I hope we can get a bulletin
board like the one outside the
administration building to
erect outside the library," said
Stubbs.
"It would be seen by many
people in that location."
—powell hargrave photo
B.C. HYDRO POWER STATION looms 30 feet behind new
$1 million psychiatric wing of health services complex.
UBC psychiatrists are worried patients will jump fence
for untherapeutic shock treatment. Hum from station will
also bother inmates.
EDUCATION  DE-EMPHASIZED
CUS pastes cabinet policies
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students has
blasted the federal and provincial governments on the eve
of their talks next week on
higher education finance.
In a letter sent Friday to
federal ministers and provincial representatives, CUS president Doug Ward hit the federal government for its "lack
of emphasis on the priority of
higher education"  in Canada.
The student leader said CUS
looks on next week's Ottawa
meetings "with considerable
trepidation", and condemned
both levels of government for
their attitudes toward education.
"We fear the shifting of responsibility between federal
and provincial governments
for the Canada Student Loan
Plan represents the kind of
buck-passing which will continue   to  thwart   attempts  to
meet education needs," Ward
said.
He called the federal government's postponement of
further financial assistance to
students "but one example of
the governments lack of emphasis on the priority of higher education."
The CUS president said his
organization regrets the federal-provincial talks will go on
behind closed doors.
"The Canadian people have
tolerated endless secret discussions the substance of
which reaches the public eye
only as rumors or guarded
press statements which have
tended to confuse rather than
clarify the issues at stake."
The letter urges both levels
of government t o declare
themselves on the priority of
support to higher education
and then work out constitutional problems within whatever framework is later established.
It asks governments to "de
dicate themselves to ensuring
that our institutes of higher
learning will be open to all
who can benefit from them."
The federal-provincial talks
begin Monday in Ottawa.
dangerous
to patients
By TOM MORRIS
The consultant of UBC's health services centre charged
Thursday that loud hums and high voltage from a B.C.
Hydro station will disrupt services in the centre's new
$1 million psychiatric unit.
Lloyd Detwiller said the station, located 30 feet from
the psychiatric unit, makes too much noise and is dangerous
at its present location.
"There's a large magnetic
field around the power station and this could disrupt
electrical equipment in the
unit,"  he said.
"The   loud   hum   from   the
power   station   could   also  be
dangerous   to   patients,"   Detwiller said.
LAND RENTED
B.C. Hydro rents the station
land at the end of frat-row for
one dollar a year.
The psychiatric unit is part
of the new Health Science
Centre.
Construction began on the
unit about a month ago and
plans are going ahead unimpeded.
The expected date of completion for the unit is July 1,
1966. But L. J. Bayly, buildings and grounds superintendent, claimed the power station will take two years to be
moved.
"It's bad  looking and hazardous to people in the proximity,"  Bayly said.
CONSULTATION
"The whole problem has
been under discussion for the
last year and plans are before
the board of governors now,"
he said.
A Hydro spokesman said
Thursday costs of moving the
station  would be too high.
"We have been in consultation since August with the
UBC administration but I
can't say if a solution has been
found,"  he said.
David Hickman, an architect for the psychiatric unit,
said it was highly desirable
that the power station be moved.
"We need ground space for
patient care, the station makes
a lot of undesirable noise, and
its power constitutes a hazard
to the patients."
"Some patients might want
to climb the hydro fence and
jump on the power lines,"
Hickman said.
"Also the two buildings will
be so close that access to them
by fire fighting equipment
will be greatly restricted," he
said.
"We have been waiting on
the negotiators but they have
been moving damn slowly,"
Hickman said.
Suicide rate
higher than
evident
UBC's suicide rate is keeping pace with the rest of Canada.
UBC psychiatrist Dr. C. J.
Schwarz said this week UBC
is "generally similar in its
mental health problems to
other   Canadian   campuses."
Dr. Schwarz was commenting on a report in the U.S.
student magazine Moderator
that suicidal tendencies on
U.S. campuses are greater
than imagined.
Dr. Schwarz said: "We see
just under three per cent of
the student population — we
should see five per cent."
In a similar age group of
the general population or non-
studenets of college age, the
rate is 11 out of every 100,-
000.
Dr. Schwarz estimated the
suicide rate on university and
college campuses as 26 out of
100,000.
FOR HOMECOMING
Pep meet rocks gym
By BO HANSEN
The never-never world of beauty queens,
bugles, and the ibig noise happened Thursday
noon all over War Memorial Gym.
"How much noise can you make at the
count of three?" asked two MCs—radiomen
Fred Latremouille and Roy Hennessey.
Only response came from engineers who
jumped up and down, clapped their hands,
and made noise.
Peter Braund was introduced.
"Take it off, take it off!" rocked the gym.
Dean  Blythe  Eagles  received  the Great
"for
Trekker award as everyone joined in
he's a jolly good fellow."
Cheerleaders yelled "B-I-R-D-S" and kicked up their legs. Everyone cheered and
whistled.
Queen candidates strolled the length of
the gym to the stage.
Engineers gasped in disbelief, aggies sang
Old Macdonald, phys ed shot off blanks and
balloons, eduction sang Mickey Mouse, lawyers did cartwheels, and ATC threw stolen
computer cards.
A computer centre spokesman said the
cards were worthless.
All was happy in the kingdom of Zog. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  21,   1966
OFFICERS NEEDED
Feds set to snare grads
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
The new federal department
of manpower and immigration
is setting its snares for UBC
grads.
Bill Shellard, personnel administrator with the department, said Thursday 500 university graduates from across
Canada are needed as employment service officers.
"We need a wide range of
graduates," he said, "from arts,
commerce, business administration, social sciences, and
other faculties."
But don't leap too quickly
into the manpower net —
there are other requirements.
Because the job involves interviewing    and    counselling
Sst! Wanna
get your
back wet?
UBC has joined the Conference on Inter - American
Student   Projects.   (CIASP).
CIASP is an American-Ca
nadian college organization
founded in 1960 at Yale University.
It works toward the community development of Mexico and the personal growth
of CIASP members through
this  development.
Each summer a selected
group of students from the
United States and Canada
takes part in two eight-week
programs  in  Mexico.
Interested students can contact Fred Richard at St.
Mark's college or 266-5870 for
further details.
job-seekers, Shellard says candidates must be energetic and
tactful.
"The candidates must also be
prepared -to move to any place
in   Canada,"  said Shellard.
And if you're moving to Ottawa, expect to learn French.
The government's objective is
civil service bilingualism by
1975.
It will provide free French
courses for transferred employees.
"We have competitive pay
scales and intensive on-the-job
training," Shellard said, "and
there is no discrimination towards women."
Students wishing more details should see the UBC student services office. Recruits
will be interviewed starting
Nov. 1.
Multi-disciplinary
health
services
By BONI LEE
Integration is proceeding at full speed at UBC's health
services complex, says the dean of medicine.
Dr. J. F. McCreary told 200
pre-med students in Wesbrook
Wednesday: "Teamwork is the
new concept in medicine."
He said the chief goal in
medicine today is a greater
integration of various health
professions.
"There is a new responsibility for the doctor," McCreary said. "He will be head
of a team of nurse, sociologist,
pharmacist, psychiatrist, dentist, and dietician."
He said there must be coordination and integration in
the teaching of health and
medicine in undergraduate
years.
He said students in health
and medicine must be knowledgeable of their inter-relationship with each other.
"The most important thing
to do is to throw everyone
together  in an undergraduate
ARMSTRONG & RE A
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices.
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
• KERRISDALE   41at at YEW
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
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8:00 & 9:30 a.m. Holy
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11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
"HANDICAPPED LIVES"
Communion
11 a.m. Dedication Service
"CASUALLY YOURS"
7:00 p.m. TALK-BACK - St. Anselm's
DEATH  OF  PRAYER
HAROLD  MacKAY JIM McKIBBON
GRAD PHOTOGRAPHS
NOW BEING TAKEN FOR '67 GRADS
MOBILE STUDIO  LOCATION:
STADIUM OCT. 20 to 31
ARTS STUDENTS ANYTIME
Hours — 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Don't Delay — No Appointment Needed — No Cost
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CAMPBELL STUDIO
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program,"   McCreary  said.
He said three new methods
will be used in preparing students for integrated health
and medicine:
All health and medicine un-
dergrads will take general
knowledge   subjects   enmasse;
Student will come in con-
act with every department of
health and medicine in survey  courses;
Training clinics will be
multi-disciplinary.
Clinic groups will have one
representative from each department rather than several
representatives  from  one.
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED  AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
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Without this label   A/0-bt^%    it is not a genuine KITTEN. Friday, October 21,  1966
Wo farce/
vow mock
governors
By ANGELA OTTHO
A responsible effort, not a
farce is the aim of this year's
UBC mock Parliament, say its
organizers.
Reg Grandison, parliamentary council president, said:
"The five parties running on
the slate will be strictly genuine. Last year there was a
Creditiste party but we want
representation of actual parties this year, not a farce."
This year, for the first time,
the Nov. 18 elections will not
be combined with the AMS
elections.
BY PERCENTAGE
The percentage votes will
govern the number of seats
each party receives.
"Each party will present issues to students for views and
ballots will indicate the political sentiments of today's campus," said Brian Fogerty, publicity director for the campaign.
"This election will parallel
the standard election as closely
as possible," he said.
"We feel that since the election is separate from the AMS
slate, there is a better chance
for issues to be debated and
for students to have some
knowledge of what's going on.
"Each party has indicated it
will have a vigorous campaign," Fogerty said.
MAJOR ISSUES
Grandison said the major issue will be the responsibilities
of parliament.
"We also hope to have inter-
party debates, rules, pageantry, a speaker and bill," he said.
"We will try to be something the federal government
is not—responsible," Grandison said.
Last year, the Liberals won
41 seats, the NDP 18, the Conservatives 10, the Social Credit
five and the Communist party
three.
THE    UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Students get
chance to aid
kids, teeners
Gordon House, an organization to help children and teenagers to adjust to society,
wants volunteer help from
UBC.
The West End neighborhood
house's staff of social workers
and volunteers helps families
to stay together.
It works with people from
six to 20 years old.
"We need more help from
university students for our
child rehabilitation program,"
staff member B. R. Zipursky
said Monday.
The program includes arts,
crafts and games.
All volunteers are supervised
by the professional staff, but
will be involved in consultation and discussion with the
children and families.
Interested students are asked
to contact Emery Barnes, 1005
Jervis,  or phone  683-2554.
-. —gateway  photo
LUMBERING ALONG  THE  FLOOR  of  Calgary's  McMahon  Stadium,   white-shirted   University   of   Alberta   Golden   Bears
Ed Molstad  (64), and  Dave Wray  (51)  lead  interference for ball  carrier Glen Corbett  (12)  as  the  Bears  rip   into the
University  of Calgary   Dinosaurs.   Alberta   is   UBC's  opponent  in   homecoming   football   game   Saturday   at   2   p.m.   in
Varsity Stadium.
TALES TOLD
Raw life attracts girls
By RON SIMMER
Six UBC students have returned from Japan with tales
of raw fish, uninhibited boys,
and communal baths.
The trip was part of a student exchange program sponsored each summer by tne Department of Asian Studies.
Each student brought home
a different impression of Japan.
Nancy Leslie, education 5,
thought that eating such delicacies as raw octopus needed
control of the mind.
"Raw fish," she said, "is
really good."
For Jean Yamashita, arts 4,
the trip was: "Going home to
a country I had never seen."
Patricia Hughes - Games,
home ec. 4, said: "The boys in
Japan are uninhibited, they
really swing."
Helen Hama, arts 3, who had
lived previously in Japan for
nine years, thought the trip
was a great homecoming.
All the girls were enthusiastic about the friendly bathing
habits of the Japanese.
"We would love to see the
ofuro (communal bath) introduced over here," they said.
The group left June 20 from
San Francisco and flew to
Tokyo with some Stanford students, where they were given
a TV welcome by Keio university  students.
After several days of orientation lectures they toured Tokyo
and went camping at the base
of Mount Fuji.
Hosted by Japanese families,
each student spent four days
in a fishing or farming village,
during which they waded in
rice paddies, drove tractors,
and visited local schools.
Following more lectures and
seminars in Tokyo on Japanese
and world problems, the students toured Japan.
They   stayed  at  a  Buddhist
temple at Onomichi, watched
cormorant fishing at Iwakuni,
and took part in peace memorial services in Hiroshima Aug.
6.
Next summer six more UBC
students will go to Japan,
while six Japanese students
visit B.C.
Application forms will be
available later in the year from
the Department of Asian
Studies.
Education rules world
and has jackets too
Education students have
formed an ad hoc committee
and invented an education
jacket.
Fred Spencer, education 2,
and unanimously elected chairman of the Education Action
Committee, charged Thursday
that education seminar rep
meetings are a farce.
He said: "Representatives are
handed the dictates of council;
it's a lot of bull-roar and garbage. EAC will get education
students actively participating
in education activities."
Stephen Carter, education 4,
is the originator of education's
week-old jacket.
"We hope to promote a vigorous spirit through this," Carter
said.
"It's a light blue, same as
SFA's, and students can order
'Clean up act or else
administration threatens
HAMILTON (CUP) — The Fugs, a controversial
group of Greenwich Village musicians, have been told
to clean up their act if they wish to appear at McMaster University's November arts festival.
The university administration has threatened to
cancel The Fugs, noted for their candid views on sex,
unless the group can prove its act won't offend the
festival audience.
The students have been sent to New York to view
The Fugs' performance there. They will report their
impressions to the student council president, who will
report to the dean of students.
Special events chairman, Brian Plummer, is trying
to make arrangements for a Fug appearance at UBC.
it in the education lounge until
Oct. 31.
He said the only thing holding education back is a lethargic council.
"People are ashamed to be
in education. When you ask
them they flatly deny it," he
said.
Spencer said there is a need
for EAC.
"A petition supporting the
committee gathered 20 names
in 10 minutes," he said.
EAC has adopted the slogan:
"Educators rule the world".
Society  seeks
student  flack
The Alma Mater Society
needs an assistant public relations officer.
This officer works with
second vice-president Carolyn Tate and is responsible
for all liaison work between
the AMS and the press.
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RE 3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160 THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding -member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The   Ubyssey   publishes   Page   Friday,   a   weekly  commentary   and   review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER   21,   1966
Hail to thee, blithe spirit!
Bird thou never wert.
—Percy Bysshe Shelley
!.•    -3ST;
Dear Ma:
Well, here it is the middle of October already and
about time I wrote home,  (hahaha)
How are you and dad, everything is fine here at
university, in fact it's so fine it's great. Everything except for the beard I'm growing. That's still pretty spotty,
but maybe it'll fill out.
My friends and I (oh yeah, I joined a fraternity and
had to spend my student loan on dues and now the
fellas want me to move into the house so I'll need more
money from dad hahaha) just got home from the homecoming queen candidate reception but it's only 2 a.m.
and I'll still have time to study before I go to bed.
Studying is fun herejiow, since the professors got
together and made the new arts program you maybe
read about, the one where nobody goes to lectures and
has seminar discussions instead. I got into the program
and so I haven't been to any lectures yet. But my friends
say that's okay. So don't worry. I'll still get education,
(hahaha)
When I move into the house with my friends, things
will be a lot easier because I didn't tell you about this
but last week we were jumping off the walls around
th girls' residence, just like the fellas always do in the
university pranks you warned me about. The guys aren't
bad, ma„ they're really nice to me.
Anyway, the guys will help me get around until
I can stop using my crutches.
It's really good here, ma, because everyone is so
nice. I met some other people who are ok, too, and
I joined a club they've formed — and it's all about
a war some Americans are fighting some place in Asia
(that's a continent across the ocean, ma, I learned about
it in geography).
We talk about the war and we carry signs downtown to tell other people about it. It'si a lot of fun, even
if they don't listen. I'm even helping to make signs and
last week my friends let me pass out handbills to people,
just like you do when the tent crusade comes to town.
They have parties too, and is the orangeade they
serve ever good! One little drink and you see all kinds
of colors and patterns and things. Just like the kaleidoscope you brought me from town one time. They make
it with some kind of acid, which I always thought
burned you, but this stuff sure doesn't burn (hahaha).
I smoke now too.
The only problem I've got is which group of friends
I should play with the most, because they don't seem
to like each other. I like them all, though.
Well, I guess I better go now. The guys want to go
downtown .and do some sociology research in some
clubs they know of. Really intellectuals, my new friends!
Love to pa, and don't let him forget that money.
your loving son,
U of A radicals
We are truly shocked.
The University of Alberta at Edmonton is sniffing
gently at the idea of co-educational student housing —
on campus, yet.
The first radical step will be boy-girl mixing in
previously segregated residence lounges, something previously unheard of except on special Sunday afternoons.
Can this be the Edmonton we know, the school
which pulled out of the far too radical Canadian Union
of Students,, in the city that fires university professors
for criticizing Socreds, in the province which still does
not teach Darwinian evolution  in high school ?
Why, the director of residences there was paternal
istically quoted as saying students are adults and should
be treated as such, if our news sources are correct.
But then, two weeks ago the New Democratic Party
elected its first Alberta MLA in over 30 years, in the
Pincher Creek by-election.
When the winds of change blow through the Great
Plains, they blow exceedingly hard, we guess.
LISTEN TO TAZ. KOG, DON'T Go \M Tttefce'-
IT'S  THE OrJU   PLACfc. \W C&WAPA WHCfcC
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All eagles
unite, fight
evil aircraft
By GABOR MATE
In a news story the Vancouver Sun reported that an
airplane was forced to make
an unscheduled landing when
an eagle flew into the pro-
pellor. The eagle was killed.
These are some new developments:
A spokeseagle for The Eagle Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Airplanes
said that he deplored the incident.
"We eagles", he said, "have
to realize that airplanes have
as much right to gad about
in the air as we do".
He also said the ESPCA
maintains hospitals and rest
homes for unfortunate airplanes who have been victimized by such heinous attacks.
His statement was strongly criticized by spokeseagles
for the Eagle Cong, an overground guerilla organization.
They claimed in a special
broadcast over their clandestine radio that the dead bird
was one of their Kamikaze
flyers.
"We are all prepared,"
they warned, "to sacrifice
our lives to rid the skies of
these mechanical intruders.
We were here first and the
air belongs to us."
To commemorate their fallen comrade a special EC
squad launched a sneak attack on Vancouver International Airport last night.
"It took our janitors five
hours to clean up all the
mess," said an irate airport
official.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Forgotten
Editor. The Ubyssey:
In the controversy concerning the proprosed changes in
the arts curriculum, you seem
to have forgotten about the
students who are directly affected — those students now
in high school.
The high school system has
been greatly revised in the
last few years.
There are no formal examinations; the students' mark
is based on his class work.
This means a closer teacher-
student relationship, and
these ties are created by intelligent in-class discussion.
Also, the school board is in
its second year of experimentation with team teaching
which, I gather, is the teeny-
boppers' version of arts 1.
Thus Malcolm McGregor's
classic statement that the first
year student will be "talking
on the basis of solid ignorance" is utterly and emphatically false. And, incidentally,
pretty insulting.
Another argument is students entering arts would like
to specialize as soon as they
arrive. I believe one of the
great virtues of arts 1 is a
taste of most disciplines, so
he will then be able to choose
the specialty in which he is
most interested.
It is unfortunate that Grade
10 pupils are bombarded with
aptitude tests, and must plan
their courses for Grade 11 and
12, thereby determining the
courses they will take at university.
By Grade 11, the student
has already committed himself to some university faculty
and has a sketchy idea of his
specialty.
No wonder high school students come to the big, wise
peninsula and are hopelessly
confused. It will be essential
to have the new arts 1 program  to   give students  some
kind of solid footing to understand their next three years.
DAVID HOSENBLUTH
editor. Three Feathers
Prince of Wales high school
Wants  to  know
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was wondering if you
could keep the campus informed on the activities of
the intrepid Gabor Mate.
Many thousands of we lesser
folk missed what must be
considered the highlight of
this year's homecoming week
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing . _         Richard Blair
News _.          ___    Carol Wilson
celebrations, namely Mate's
dramatic head-first dive (in
full strait jacket regalia) two
stories into a holly bush. Your
failure to announce this
dramatic stunt (among other
certain things) caused multitudes of us to miss it completely.
Perhaps Gabor could be persuaded to kick off next year's
homecoming in a like fashion.
I sincerely hope so.
BRIAN MONTPELLIER
Education 1
'Cheap  machines
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I would like to complain
about the cheap AMS-run
vending machines in Brock
Hall.
The machines do not, as
stated in Tuum Est, give you
two ounces more, but rather
fill the cup only two-thirds
full.
How about an honest
amount, for a hard-earned
dime?
MURRAY G. MCMILLAN
Arts 1
City      .   ...
..    Danny Stoffman
Photo
Powell Hargrave
Page Friday
         Claudia Gwinn
Focus
Rosemary Hyman
CUP
       Bert Hill
Ass't News
Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Ass't Photo
Dennis Gans
Tom Morris was under shock
treatment. Bo Hansen, John Appleby, Boni Lee, Norman Gidney,
Joan Fogarty, Lin-tse-hsu, Chris
Epp, Mary Crozier, Ron Simmer,
Pat Lidka, Angela Ottho, Rod
Wilczak, Charlotte Haire, Murray
McMillan, Kris Emmott, Diane
Fillmore, and Kyo Gisors reported. Al Francis focussed. Layout
by Hyman.
In sports were Margaret Fair-
weather and Jim Maddin. George
Robert,   nattily  attired,   was  here. Berkeley experiment success
In   the   fall   of   1965,   150
Berkeley   freshmen   all   but
stopped    going    to    lectures,
stopped   writing   exams   and
stopped taking courses.
They were the guinea pigs
in an experimental college
program designed to give the
university student a broad
background in basic issues of
life.
Approval for the program
from university administrators came hard, but Berkeley philosophy professor Jo-
seph-Tussman, head of the
program said, "... we nail
to our mast a banner which
inevitably and necessarily
draws heavy, scornful and indignant fire."
Berkeley president Clark
Kerr gave support to the
plan from its first informal
» proposal in the spring of
1964, Tussman reports. With
administration sanction gained, academic authorization
was given to the venture as
an  experimental  program.
"Our faith in the fundamental educational conception is strong and unshaken,"
Tussman said in a report issued this August.
"In fact, the idea is so
sound that it triumphs over
shortcomings and failures in
execution at any point and
even at every point."
Tussman chose first and
second year arts for the experiment because it is the
only time in university when
a student is not required to
specialize.
NOT DIVIDED
The program he and his
colleagues devised is non-
disciplinary and not divided
into courses.
Students for the program
were picked at random from
325 applicants who had responded to a brief description of the program sent to
. all Berkeley frosh during the
summer. Of the 150 accepted, half were men, half women.
The curriculum was based
on extensive reading. The
students discovered this early
in August when they were
notified to read Herodotus
before the session began.
The first term was spent
in a wide selection of Greek
literature.
Second term began with
what Tussman calls "a 17th
century best seller" — the
bible — and covered Shakespeare, Hobbes' Leviathon,
and Milton's Paradise Lost.
Most of the works were
read   in   entirety,   and   Tuss
man said, "It is, of course,
concentrated, but it provides
a qualitatively unique and
significant experience."
However, no extra reading
was assigned.
"Pre-occupation with rapid
reading, overlong assignments, and graded examinations have gone a long way
towards destroying the art of
reading,"  Tussman said.
Academic reading has become, for many students, not
a mental activity but a physical ordeal."
Reading was not organized
about the L persistent and recurring themes which developed, but these themes were
the "subject" of the program.
overtaxed by the burden of
regular papers and term papers.
Giving fair, adequate,
prompt and careful analysis
and criticism to the deluge
of papers which had replaced exams became a serious
and major problem. The
planned two or three week
interval between papers was
frequently greater.
It was found that the prospect of an approaching term
paper due at Christmas was
"taking some of the joy out
of life and drastically modifying the shaping of the
work."
To prevent this from destroying the exploratory na-
The University of California at Berkeley introduced its
experimental program for arts freshmen a year ago. Focus
writer Al Francis examines the results, as documented by the
program's founder.
The students were studying humanity and its fundamental issues: war and peace,
freedom and authority, order
and chaos.
Exams were replaced by
papers every two or three
weeks and a project each
term. Considerable freedom
of topic was allowed on both.
All the students met for
lectures two to four hours a
week but spent two hours a
week in seminar groups of
15 and about one hour a
week in discussion groups of
30.
Since the program was
staffed by five professors, a
ratio of 30 students to one
professor, private conferences were impossible on a
systematic basis. But they
were encouraged on student
or faculty initiation.
During the year, Berkeley
legislation made a "pass, no-
pass" system possible and
the option of this or regular
grading was offered to students on the program. Most
of them chose the new system, though it raises problems for students whose academic record may later be
assessed by another university or an employer.
Evaluating the program's
first year Tussman said, "It
has been, in many important
ways, an exciting, fruitful
and significant experience
for both students and faculty."
TROUBLES
But troubles were plentiful for the program.
Faculty members and their
five teaching assistants were
<0^
Friday, October  21,   1966
ture of the program and producing conventional library
researched w o rk , students
were given the option of a
term paper or a brief description of the work or reading
done.
The discussion groups of
30 were found unsatisfactory
and some professors split the
seminars into two groups.
With as much time being
spent in discussion sessions
as in lectures, the problem
of how much or little guidance given to discussions by
the professor became a major one.
The lectures were a source
of unexpected difficulty.
They were intended to give
a sense of unity, to sharpen
and clarify the issues developed in the reading material,
and to provide an opportunity for students to hear a
professor other than the one
to whom they were assigned for the term.
FAILURE
Instead Tussman calls
them the staffs greatest failure. Drawn from the fields
of literature, philosophy, political science, mathematics,
and law the professors did
not have the professional
competence in this type of
ordinary  university  lectures.
They were to be studying
what the students were and
take the lead in sharpening
issues.
"We suffered a general
failure of nerve," said Tussman, and lectures became
sporadic.
Contributing to this was
the unusual circumstance of
the presence of the other professors at the lectures and
their role of the critical colleague.
This situation was partly
relieved by the use of guest
lecturers from Berkeley faculty.
Other problems arose as a
result of the unique relationship of student and professor.
In a normal classroom, the
professor is responsible for
only a fragment of his students' education and sees
them on brief occasions.
Under the experimental
program, however, the professor was almost entirely responsible   for   his   students'
THE      UBYSSEY
education   and   was  in   constant contact with them.
Also, the students, who
normally have only a transitory existence as a group
and in as many groups as
classes, were in almost constant contact and developed
a sense of being "a group
with interests which called
for expression and assertion."
CONFLICT
The result was conflict between students and faculty
which expressed itself,
among other ways, in confrontations on three issues,
all involving a desire on the
students' part for participation in running the program.
One confrontation was the
feeling the student body
should have had in shaping
the curriculum. 'There was a
move to have students sit in
on regular faculty meetings.
There was also a protest
when it was decided not to
renew teaching assistant appointments.
All these assertions were
rebuffed but not without
"bruises and hard feelings all
around," Tussman said.
The conflict may have
been an offshoot of the spirit
of the free speech movement
or an inevitable product of
the intimate, idealistic atmosphere of the program.
But Tussman is adamant
on faculty control. He stresses that the curriculum is set
and not subject to the influence of what the student is
interested in.
"Students who commit
themselves to the program
must accept the authority of
the faculty . . . ", he said.
Tussman terms all the problems minor and manageable
except the availability of faculty. Part of the conception
of the program is to have it
staffed by regular faculty
members on leave from their
departments.
COMPETITION
The program is therefore
in competition with faculties
unable or unwilling to spare
their members and with the
pressures for academic
achievement in a "publish or
perish"  system.
To combat this, the program has recruited volunteers from universities other
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Robert Rowan, an associate
professor on leave from
UBC's philosophy department.
The program will continue
this year and Tussman hopes
the second group of first
year students will be admitted in Fall, 1967.
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What are we, hyper-cerebaled ants?
By JOHN APPLEBY
There are those among us
who foul the air with a consistent howl: "Who in hell are
we?"
They get an answer too:
"we are, we are, we are,
ad nauseum."
Maybe the question is well
taken. Who are we, anyway?
Are we a line of apes that
open our collective beer traps
and chant: "I gotta degree,
whadda you got?" into the
receptive ears of corporate
recruiting bods that haunt
the campus?
Berkley's fuzzmobile squatter, Jack Weinberg thought
so Wednesday and maybe he
is right.
Do we just form another
link in a conventional chain
which brings the student
from high school, conditions
him, and fires him out into
"business"?
How many times have you
heard the phrase "when you
get out into business"?
Isn't there anything else
in the universe except business?
In fact, are students being
prepared for nothing but
business?
The concept of a university is to provide and demonstrate alternatives.
That is what the arts faculty is looking at now —
alternatives.
The cry we  often  hear is
for  more  specialization.  But
what is a specialist?
A hyper-cerebraled ant
who can move efficiently
within his own sphere without reference to anything
else going  on  around him?
Wars have been fought and
war crime trials have been
held because people took no
note of what was going on
around them.
The arts faculty is looking
at alternatives that will make
people more aware of surroundings — but they cannot do it alone.
Alternatives have to be developed, cogitated on and
acted upon. Maybe when alternatives are provided we
might just be able to thing in
a way other than the conventional.
Maybe there will be answers to problems which now
seem beyond solution if we
bloody well think.
Students are presumed to
have a certain amount of native intelligence and the only
thing we don't do is use it.
Once out of the university,
all lessons are cheerfully forgotten   by   the   time   of   the
first coffee break.
The program we follow is
merely a study in applied
futility. Problems will arise
and they are dealt with in
strictly conventional processes.
The amount of genuine na
tive intelligence expanded on
large scale decision would
fill the carrying capacity of
an over-developed blade of
grass.
Until a continual awareness of problems is reached
we are wasting  our  time.
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Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,  1966  pi
is a weekly magazine of
commentary and review.
OCT.  21,   1966
ON THE COVER: autumn leaves,
Al Harvey photo.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistant: judy bing
photo: dennis gans
powell  hargrave
kurt hilger
derek webb
don kydd
cartoons: judy hirt
liberal
Why is everyone picking on middle-class liberals nowadays? They
haven't done anything.
Well, friend, that is just
it. They have done nothing whatsoever to overcome the dangers of a
third world war. They
have done nothing to alleviate poverty or end discrimination.
Some, like Lester Pearson, say nothing that can
be translated into ordinary English and still mean
anything.
Some, like President
Johnson, expect us to exercise our powers of
double-think. "I'm for
peace" means "escalate".
"Containment without
isolation" can be roughly
translated "contain al 1
social change in the
world."
But a liberal is worse
than just a double-talker.
In America he is becoming a screen for propping
up an indefensible foreign
policy and a contradictory domestic policy.
He has an insatiable
love for power and
arouses the hatred of conservatives and radicals
with his vacillation and
continuous compromise.
He stands up for values
and ideals which were relevant to the nineteenth
century. He is incapable
of seeing alternatives.
Is there anything we
can say good about a
liberal?
Well, you will never
know unless you come to
the fall symposium on
Liberalism. It's set for the
October 28 weekend and
will include American
humorist Paul Krassner—
editor of The Realist.
So don't sit and consider all the alternatives.
Run to the AMS office
and get your application.
And remember: the best
liberal is a dead liberal.
rmx^s^s^s^s«r^T^^mm^ \x ^mw^i^v^n _?r, i; rt^aw^^'v" -^^v^^^?^^^^mm^^^^mms^m^m^^mm^u^m^m^t'-7»<^
pf 2wo
Bob Cruise talks to Jack
Weinberg.
Weinberg was a member
of the steering committee of
the Free Speech Movement,
chairman of the Berkeley
CORE Chapter, an active leader of the Viet Nam day committee, and has been involv-
in various political organizations of an ad hoc nature
throughout California.
Pf: Why are you wearing
this button which says "I
wouldn't vote for Brown
even if he ran against Regan?"
Weinberg: Anyone who is
serious about changing anything in the U.S. must make
a break with the Democratic
party. I see my role as a radical to agitate for that
break. There is increasing
grass roots support for that
now.
Pf: Do you think right-
winger Regan will win in
California?
Weinberg: Although I
would never vote for Reagan personally I'd like to see
Brown get dumped. Brown is
a representative of the Johnson administration in California. He was the person
who called out the police to
arrest the students at Berkeley. He called out the National Guard in Watts.
Brown and the Democratic party to my mind are the
real enemy in the U.S. As
long as people who want
change get blackmailed into
supporting these people there
will be no real change. The
cost of dumping Brown will
be a Reagan in office but our
experience with the Browns
is that they do the identical
policies as the Reagans but
they do it more effectively.
Pf: Are there any effective
avenues for change in what
Marcuse has called "one-dimensional"  America?
Weinberg: Anti-war movement does not, at the moment, have any strategy.
Many are becoming frustrated and withdrawing into
drugs.
Anti-war sentiment is very
high in the U.S. The peace
movement, however, just as
the civil rights movement,
has become quiet for a little
while — it will re-emerge
stronger than ever.
Pf: How would you compare Germany 1939 with
USA 1966?
Weinberg: There are significant differences. There is
not a vibrant pro-war sentiment, no storm troopers or
Gestapo.
On the other hand I feel
American imperialism in Viet
Nam is of the same ilk as
Nazi expansionism. It is the
same political system.
It takes different rhetoric.
Nazi's   spoke   of   lebensraum
Democratic party
must be destroyed
for real change
and America speaks of defending freedom and peace.
I think both countries essentially wanted to establish
a  Pax  Romana.
Pf: The opposition to the
war in Viet Nam and the activist civil rights movement
seem to have exposed the
twentieth century liberal
more as a manipulator and
no longer a nineteenth century radical  liberal.
Weinberg: I basically agree
with that Analysis. People
who identify with the Bobby
Kennedys and the left wing
of the liberal establishment
fail to realize that for any
kind of change, a real break
with that liberal tradition has
to be made.
Pf: What do you think of
the coverage by Life and
Time Magazine of the War
in Viet Nam?
Weinberg: What is most
striking is how early the papers carried the atrocity pictures. I think it is essentially
a method of supporting and
bolstering the war effort. It
is an attempt to brutalize
Americans into making them
more willing to accept the
role of their military. It is a
way of getting them to accept not only this kind of behaviour in Viet Nam tout in
other locales.
Pf: How do you feel about
the level of political consciousness in America when it
tolerates overt manipulation
and deceit by its political
leaders?
Weinberg: I remember.
when I was in high school
we used to be told America
fights clean and tells the
truth. I believed it. This began to break down with the
U-2 incident, then Cuba, and
now  the war effort.
Conservatives are better
about that sort of thing. Liberals seem to find lying to
be much more a part of their
tradition.
Pf: Do you think there will
be an end to American racism and American war policy
without widespread grass
roots social revolution in
America destroying the military  industrial   complex?
Weinberg: No!
Pf: What about the American  Communist Party?
Weinberg: Without going
into some of the long range
goals and strategies which I
have fundamental disagreement with, I am very unhappy with the way the CP has
been functioning. They have
acted as a conservatizing influence in the radical movement. They have consistently
articulated the positions that
liberals have held and have
essentially been the force in
organizing liberal sentiment
against radical activity. This
was evident during the Free
Speech Movement. They have
been wed to the Democratic
party in the U.S. and they
don't want to rock the boat
either.
Pf: What about the left-
wing establishment: the Kennedys and Fulbrights?
Weinberg: I see Kennedy
as basically making a bid for
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
power. He is as bad as Johnson.
Pf: Do you think the image
of the radical as a nose-picking weirdy-beardy member
of the scandal set has changed now that the radical base
has broadened.
Weinberg: Certainly within the movement. I can remember when picketing of
any kind was considered
Communist activity. Now
housewives picket supermarkets. Even Walt Disney shows
have picketers in them.
A few friends of mine
drove by a meeting and saw
some right-wing picketers
and yelled "take a bath, take
a bath" and the right wingers said "oh, no we're not
pickets!"
Pf: What do you think of
student body  government?
Weinberg: Fundamentally
it will not be a vehicle for
radical activity. The structure
and framework is a drag and
a strain. Significant change
comes best from organizations independent of the established forms. In the meantime it wil serve to raise the
issues.
Pf: How do you feel about
Black Power?
Weinberg: I think that the
the concept of black power
was an inevitable and
healthy development within
the  negro  struggle.
I think the SNCC leadership wants to build a strong
black movement that has its
own integrity which can develop its own leadership and
be respohsible to its own
base and then be in a position to form coalitions with
other sectors of the white
community which become radicalized.
Pf: I understand there's
been some erosion or limitation of the freedom gained
by the Free Speech Movement at Berkeley?
Weinberg: In a sense the
erosion began as soon as the
battle had begun. I think to
some extent that has to be
expected. The situation in
which the v i c t o r|y was
achieved was one of struggle
and once the struggle ended
the university administration
which has a continuing ongoing organization is able to
begin the clampdown procedure.
It was impossible to ever
win ultimately because the
power exists outside the university in the state, in the
military and industrial complex.
Pf: How does the future
look?
Weinberg: I am an optimist. But things could get
worse before they get better.
Friday, October 21, 1966
V TRADE YOU MY HORN for your furs, says Oliver Reed
to Rita Tushingham as they stand in the Squamish bog
during filming of The  Trap,  coming  to Vancouver.
From Africa to Canadian plain
By MARSHA ABLOWITZ
and RANDY ENOMOTO
Margaret Lawrence, Canadian author,
scored her first successes with novels
and short stories about Africa. Only
recently has she begun to write about
Canada, and her two latest novels, A
Stone Angel, and A Jest of God are
both set in the Canadian prairies.
I wondered why her first published
works dealt with Africa, and why she
was writing about Canada now though
she was settled in England.
She said seven years' experience in
West and East Africa had a strong
impression on her which lasted for
several years after her return to Canada. Her background is Canadian-Scots
PresbyterianJPrairie, but her viewpoint
is more difficult to analyze.
Canada is her home, and she would
like her children to be educated in a
Canadian university, but she chose to
live in England to be close to her
British publisher and to be in contact
with British writers. Margaret Lawrence is one of the few Canadian au
thors who writes for a living, and she
seems to be the only Canadian so far
who is producing a large foody of works.
The African sense of freedom tooth
political and individual is a theme running through the novels and stories.
She says she never wrote anything
worth publishing until the African experience.
English is the literary language for
many African writers and though the
language is still tainted with Colonial
connotations, she says this (bothers
others more than the African writers
themselves.
Margaret Lawrence said she did not
not find herself influenced toy African
literature when she was in Africa, but
she is very interested now in contem-
pirary Nigerian prose. She says she
never felt as though she 'belonged' in
Africa, but since living in England her
African friends are writers and they
can meet as people without the feeling
of distance.
She has  written  about British  im
perialism and when asked about American imperialism she said, "I don't
think the Americans have more right
to Viet Nam that the British had to
Africa."
Albout Canada she said, "I would like
Canada to stay Canadian," however, she
had confused impressions about any imminent Canadian cultural revolution.
She came to Canada for the publishing of her latest toook and though the
Canada Council gave her a grant to do
research on Vancouver, she says she
has never claimed to do "anything
academic enough to toe called research.
I told them I would like to just walk
around Vancouver and absorb impressions effortlessly, as through the pores
of my skin."
Since she seemed to have had close
contact with the African people, I wondered if she had any similar communication with the Canadian Indians or Metis.
She said no, when she was a child there
were only a few Metis near her home,
and they were so poor she never had
any opportunity to meet them.
Perspective: let's try new arts plan
By DON WISE
Artsmen want new Arts.
At least the serious scholars do. And the opinion of
students willing to invest
valuable time in learning
about the new arts program
surely merits careful attention when arts faculty members meet this week to vote
on the new scheme.
Forty arts students have
met with faculty members
several times to analyze the
pro and con arguments.
They are well informed.
They are also well aware of
the administrative headaches and the political implications involved in a radical overthrow of the established order.
But their prime concern
is improved teaching standards at UBC.
Their decision?
Unanimous approval of a
trial run next year for the
two sections of arts 1 outlined in the faculty curriculum committee brief.
This is by no means a total rejection of the present
system. Nor is it a mandate
for the dreamers to propose
fantasy and  alternatives.
It is a clear vote of confidence in the faculty members who have had the guts
to rock HMS Status Quo.
And it is an invitation for
them to show their scheme
can pass the acid test of
competition with time-proved five course system.
Obviously administration
prob lems still must be
ground out. Student opinion
of the present system is a
mystery to the faculty. But
the    curriculum   committee
now being formed by the
arts U.S. is willing to work
all year with faculty members to help clarify any
doubts.
And this spirit of concerned co-operation can only
result in a complete overhaul of the present unchal-
lenging system, even if it
is not radically changed.
The proposal is also based
on some shaky assumptions.
Will a reduction in class
time result in more study
hours? Will not a de-emphasis on a grading system reduce frustration and the
regurgitation mentality?
Can frosh benefit from seminars while going into them
"on a solid basis of ignorance" — McGregor?
These questions have thus
far  been   answered   in   ex
tremes, an intellectual game
is being played.
And there are petty, yet
nagging criticisms. Costs per
student will rise. The best
profs will be taken from
senior students (rather
ironic that the best men
want revision). Other faculties allowing arts electives
will be shafted. Profs are
not qualified to lecture outside their area of specialization. And so on .
But when all factors are
pieced sensibly in perspective, surely no one would
place so little confidence in
a committee comprised of
the arts dean, assistant dean
and members of every department as to reject its recommendation's without a
fair trial.
Corruption:
White House
and the fixers
Just because a man somehow gets himself to reside in
the White House does not
mean that he need or can
forget all about his former
profession.
He may even have ample
opportunity to practice it. Especially when his occupational background is that of one
of Washington's most notorious fixers in the city's long
history of corruption.
Or was anyone so naive as
to assume that having dump-
By M. S. Arnoni, editor of
the   Minority of  One.   from
which this is reprinted.
ed his chief-of-staff, Bob|.y
Baker, and such other of his
staff members as a few prostitutes, Lyndon Johnson
would know how to be a
straight, honest man even in
the unlikely event of wanting
to?
Nothing could be more consistent than for the old hustler from Texas to form in
Washington a President's
Club as an institutionalized
channel for trading campaign
"contributions" for government contracts.
Which is merely a miniature
replica of the club he and
Bobby Baker had maintained
in the Senate. In the new version, ordinary club membership is available at a measly
$1,000 but access to its sanctum sanctorum at $10,000.
According to Clifton Carter, the recently resigned executive director of the Democratic National Committee,
the members of Johnson's
new Congress "are assured of
a direct relationship with
President Johnson.
"Members who want to talk
to the president, the vice-
president or one of their assistants have only to contact
my office. Members will immediately be put in contact
with whomever they want to
reach."
That a so-spent $1,000 or
even $10,000 is a good investment was shown in a number
of cases. Even in the case of
the President's old-time
friend, George R. Brown,
whose Club "contribution" of
$25,000 "coincided" with the
award to him of a contract for
Project Mohole, the investment would have more than
justified itself had it not been
that Congress suddenly abandoned this plan for drilling
below the crust of the earth.
Other Club-member enter-
preneurs had better luck. A
mere $10,000 from the top
executive of the Anheuser-
Busch brewery "coincided"
with the withdrawal of a
pending anti-trust suit against
that firm. A $1.3-million contract in the antipoverty program "happened" to coincide
with a $3,000 Club "contribution" from the contractor
firm's Washington manager.
As for LBJ, well, he is at it
again. You just cannot make
e fur collar out of a pig's tail.
Friday, October  21,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page4 9 Bourgeois illusions immobile
• • •
By SIMON GRABOWSKI
More than three quarters of
a century ago, Strindberg declared that the theatre as an
art form was becoming obsolete and would only stay alive
for a limited time. Its appeal
having been mainly to people
on a halfway level of education,   he   said,   it   was   now
Part of a creative writing
assignment written apropo
the recent production of Gol-
dini's The Servant of Two
Masters, adapted for Page
Friday.
bound to lose ground steadily, as people were becoming
more reflecting, less capable
of self-delusion requisite to
the enjoyment of theatre.
However, within this limited time, Strindberg explained,
the theatre might be capable
of contributing to the development of the modern mind—
provided that it be developed
and modernized in accordance
with the needs of modern
age.
He did not leave this task
to others. The contemporary
pf 4our
theatre of the absurd, so far
the latest stage in the modernization of Western drama,
would not have been conceivable without this madman,
this daredevil from Scandinavia.
'But reflection and self-
delusion, in view of what the
twentieth century really came
to be like, surely constitute
an almost brilliantly tragicomic paradox.
Surely Strindberg, unlike
for instance Hamsun, cannot
in any way — at least not
in the context of this prophecy — have foreseen the
mission bestowed by history
upon the United States as the
eventual destroyer of Western civilization; cannot have
foreseen that vast civiliza-
tional mass performance in
which reflection as an individual human activity was to
be ritually drowned in a
spring-flood of unquestioning
collectivism, an apocalyptic
ocean of blind, raving gregar-
iousness; and in which self-
delusion has mushroomed into
its fullest bloom in the history of , intellectual distortions, foreshadowed only by
the German intermezzo a
brief while ago.
He cannot have foreseen
the conclusive triumph
of that very principle of half-
education named by him as
the main bearer of the old,
illusionistic, essentially bourgeois, theatre; and if his view
of that theatre is correct, we
should today still have a
theatre, or, more precisely, a
theatre-function, pretty much
the same.
In the era of the commercial, automatized version of
Djengis Khan, the globally
crusading, globally enterprising American businessman
and his imbecile domestic
social activities—in the era of
the secret love affair between
the American public and the
car and the only too public
copulation of American
stupidity and European small-
state gullibility, the theatre of
the Western world would, in
spite of any tendency towards
a different function-content
attempted or achieved, in the
meantime, still first and foremost be an institution serving to fulfil the illusionist
needs of the half or less than
half-educated middle-class in
the mainstream of our society.
Which sure enough it Is.
One of the ingredients of
the old drama that Strindberg
wanted to wipe out was that
of stock character. This concept, which today still dominates a material proportion of
all imaginative writing and
theorizing-about-same within
the   Anglo-Saxon   sphere   of
the world, is also still going
strong, if not even stronger,
in our contemporary world of
the stage, that is of the
theatre as a social function.
The middle-class audience
simply feeds on stock characters.
The typical middle-class
mind is in itself so brilliantly
narrow that it cannot really
comprehend and conceive of
other minds in other than
strictly standardized categories.
It should be noted though,
that other minds, within the
same social context, lend
themselves most willingly to
this   kind   of   categorization,
and that thus within its traditional bounds the system
functions remarkably well.
However, this is only the
everyday side, the restrictive
negative side of the question.
The circus, or theatre side
contains that same negative
aspect inasmuch as there is
no reason why one and the
same middle-class mind
should be capable of more
comprehensively embracing
human character within the
theatre-building than without.
But, in addition to the restrictive negative aspect, the
theatrical side contains a positive aspect—that the middle-
class spectator wants something more from these inside
fictional stock characters than
he has been getting from his
own outside stock characters.
Something which does not depart from his basic orderliness of experience, his purely
mental security yet offers
some strangely active kind of
security, some gay blessing
from beyond his tangible
daily humdrum universe.
He wants, then, a laugh. A
laugh, yes, a laugh deluxe, an
artisically, and thus trans-
cendentally, authorized laugh
which may signify that he is
having a hell of a good time.
Not only a hell of a good time
in  general, but  a  hell  of a
does men's clothing fashion
have to
be "shallow"?
Daroff doesn't think so s\ i
...and proves it with
'BOTANY* SOO
All men's suits look alike on a mannequin in a clothier's
window.
It is only after you've worn one for a few months that
you begin to realize there is a difference in men's
fashions.
This difference is the intent of the maker ... an intent
that we describe as the dedicated Daroff Personal
Touch.
0*
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
,4445 West 10th Ave.        -        East of Sasamat
2901 West Broadway at Mackenzie
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CANADIAN AMERICAN SEMINAR:
C.U.S. Committee is receiving applications for the
Canadian American Seminar to be held at the University of Windsor, Nov. 2-4_1966, on "An Independent
Canadian Foreign Policy: Fkct or Fiction?" Applications must Ibe in by Oct. 20th, Box 153, Brock. More
information is available from the CUS office, Brock
Extension 258.
COMPANY OF YOUNG CANADIANS:
Students interested in (a) programming or (to) recruiting for the Company of Young Canadians, and
interested in forming a local U.B.C. committee to
form a communications liaison with the national headquarters are asked to apply in writing (stating interest,
experience, faculty and year) to the A.M.S. Secretary,
Box 54, Brock Hall.
SCHOOL VISITATION
HIGH
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
ASSISTANT PUBLIC RELATIONS
OFFICER:
Applications are being received for the position of
Assistant Public Relations Officer for the Alma (Mater
Society. Qualifications is a belief in the value of active
student participation in university and community
affairs. Apply in writing to Box 54 or to Brock 210
for further information.
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Grant Request Forms for conferences to toe held during the first term, 1966-1967, will be accepted by the
Treasurer until 4:00 p.m., Thursday, October 27, 1966.
("Request Forms" are available from the Accountant,
Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.MjS. Office).
DISCIPLINE COMM.
NOTICE OF HEARING
Take notice that the Discipline Committee is investigating into the matter of an alleged abuse of rules of
conduct of the Games Room to wit:
1. Failure to pay for use of the tables, and
2. Disregard for the authority of the Games Room
Manager on Friday, October 14, 1966 at app.
5 p.m.
Persons desiring to give evidence in this matter are
directed to the hearing to toe held Oct. 21, 1966 in
Board Room, Brock "Hall.
Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,  1966
V *xr^T_wrwr",*~** ^m^vi'-'^x^mz&rr $gw$?^%mm
mms
... theatre safe, irrelevant
good time at The Arts, and
thus must truly have deserved to have it.
From the supposedly artistic Beyond, then, there is communicated to him a veritable
gourmet blessing, the highest
obtainable kind of magic confirmation of himself and his
adopted middle-class values
as being Really Allright.
Well, reader, these are just
a few casual thoughts that
have strayed through my
mind since last month in the
Frederic Wood Theatre when
I was Having Fun together
with a large set of well-
behaved responsible puppets
from the upper middle-age
brackets of nicer Vancouver
citizenry. Fittingly, I was
seated in the lower left wing,
from where I could study the
intriguing audience almost to
its full extent.
What I saw was indeed arresting: On the stage, an utterly unengaging old comedy
where every line could be anticipated about ten minutes
ahead and the interrelationships between the characters
were about as productive of
tension as would be the eventuality of never having to see
Burrard Street again in one's
life.
In the audience, gratitudin-
ously smile-performing faces
and happy ha-ha-ha's; a fun-
l^ovitogf, pseudoh equivocal
group endorsement, by the
Benevolent Adult Sex Monopoly of the Outside Family
Society of a fertility-flaunting
servant-girl and her supposedly tickling quasi - juicisms
which were of course but
healthy banalities on a reassuring PTA family level;
and other similar great community participation experiences in interaction with
what was going on on the
stage.
That nothing actually was
going on up there and so
much in the audience—was it
a hoax, pr a hidden artistic
insight, a cosmogonic parable,
a soaring, revelational paradox referring only to itself?
It was nothing of the kind.
It was merely the enactment
of those principles basic to
the middle-class way of
achieving transcendental satisfaction, of which I have
sketched a theoretical outline
in the preceding passages. It
was the festive foddering-
hour of the faithful: the gates
to the illusionist Beyond
were standing open, the audience gathered below, the
stock characters assembled
above; and the former feeding off the latter, sipping new
strength for the continued
maintenance of the Old, sipping and feeding off the
harmlessness, the uncontro-
versialness, the innocuity
which only the grail of the
stock characters offers the
affirmation seekers from the
land of the great Status Quo.
Never a puzzling thought,
never a sudden discomfort.
Only the expected, the
straightforward, the cheerful
— smiles and laughter, the
apotheosis of security.
A good laugh is the surest
proof of a good conscience;
indeed, a good laugh is the
best assurance that everything should be just what it
is.
It is true that Shakespeare
wrote his dramas about four
hundred years ago. His plays
are good in themselves, they
are dramatically effective
now as than.
But what about other
theatrical relics of past centuries, of lesser stature than
Shakespeare? Do I mean to
say that they should be altogether discarded? For Heaven's sake, no! Go ahead and
study them, I say, find out
how much such and such has
contributed to the development of such and such, and
how A has influenced B and
so on — go ahead and study
for instance the Commedia
dell'Arte, savour it by all
means, make a student production of it if that will be of
any avail from the point-of-
view of acting; but do not
waste time and opportunity
staging it as an ordinary professional production so long
as there are pertinent, dis-
t u r b i n g things around to
which one might expose the
inertia of the cultural consumers instead.
True, "The Servant of Two
Masters" is not the peddler of
explicit false values like, say,
a Hollywood picture or a
Broadway comedy; but it is
built almost exclusively on
the effect of stock characters,
a fact which is not weakened
by any possible reference to
the aesthetic or educational
aspect of the presentation of
such a play.
To put such a play on, to
give the cultural consumers
their beloved stock characters and whole innocent,
harmless little amusement,
presented to them with a
stamp of what they themselves would conceive of in
such terms as "artistic responsibility" or "excellence",
is to pander to the establishment. No, we must not allow
them    any   theatre-evening
which is spiritually gratis,
which does not somehow disturb them, does not somehow make it tricky for them
to slip right back into their
smug little respectability and
self-deluding routine.
Barring the heavy staple
classics, we have today no
use for additional plays that
do not somehow strike the
viewing establishment in its
bland, blank face, punch it
in its smug little belly, and
kick it, poetically speaking,
in its sad interfemoral Victorian wasteland. Today, when
thinking and speaking of the
theatre and the dramatic
medium, these are the explicit functions that we must unconditionally request it to
undertake, at least for the
time being. What the needs
would be thirty-five years
from now, no one knows. But
the very insistence upon this
request today may be that
which could ensure our finding out.
pf 5ive
Still Time For
CHRISTMAS
BOOKINGS
Drop In or Call
R&H TRAVEL
ASSISTANTS LTD.
Domestic and
International Travel
Information - Reservations
TICKETS HERE
(No Service Charge)
4576 W. 10th Avenue
CA 4-3262
1 block from UBC Gates
Homecoming Worship
THIS SUNDAY
"**r*
«"(^W
(
l^M JJ^Jiiii**-  .-!_.
10 a.m. — Service With Communion
Reception into Student Membership.
Lutheran Church in American and Evangelical Luthern
Church of Canada.
—Chaplain C. Robert Pearson.
11:15 a.m. — Morning Worship
Lutheran Church — Canada (Missouri Synod).
—Chaplain Herbert Fox.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
UNIVERSITY and WESBROOK (East of the Gymn.)
look Around You ...
every year, many thousands of UBC alumni think
enough of their alma mater to support this university through Alumni Annual Giving. They are
helping UBC to attain that extra margin of flexa-
bility which will enable it to become a truly great
university.
An extra measure ... for excellence
I'm Getting Married
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME	
ADDRESS  	
MR. ROY YACHT, Consultant
rm CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
i_ — J
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
w«Mp4^
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON W DRUGS
Limited
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
Vancouver        M^MMMaMMBMMHMHH   New Wastmindar
677 Granville     ||Y|TTTjTb7|T|7TTI      «75 Columbia
Opp. THE BAY    |lllAi|k| i'AilklOPP- Army * Navy
681-6174 l____B________-___-----l---l-! ia 14)751
Friday, October  21,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11 Don't miss the FABULOUS ACCENTS
Featuring the Motown Sound of
the SOUL SISTERS
Next* Friday and Saturday at the
EMBASSY    BALLROOM
1024 Davie
Dancing from 10:00 until 1:00 a.m.
"The Place With the Dancing Lights"
Admission only $1.50
Homecoming '66 Ball
to be held at the
ARMOURIES FIELD HOUSE
Vancouver Accents Kentish Steele and the Shantelles
Big Band Sounds of Phil Stansfelt Eric  Sandquisfs  Tenette
FEATURING "SANDY AND JEANIE" AND
THE CROWNING OF THE HOMECOMING '66 QUEEN
Tickets available at A.M.S. Office or phone 224-3242
Asian aid
In the film The Mouse That Roared a small nation declares war on the United States in the hope that, having
been defeated, it will become the recipient of generous
foreign aid toenefits. To induce North Viet Nam to adopt
a similar attitude has been one of the underlying themes of
President Johnson's current Southeast Asian trip.
After the war, Johnson said Wednesday in New Zealand,
"we shall begin a nobler war against man's ancient enemies
— hunger, ignorance, and disease — everywhere in Southeast Asia, including North Viet Nam, if its goverment so 1
desires. j
"America pledges herself," said Johnson, "to that war 1
for human dignity, a war for health and enlightment, a war |§
for your children and generations of children to come."
The offer is not going to be accepted, or even seriously
considered, (by the North Vietnamese. Nor can they be
expected to treat seriously the figure of Johnson knocking
at their door, napalm in one hand and the horn of plenty
in the other. As they hadn't requested that Johnson should
send his bombers to devastate their land, so now they are
not asking that the plunderer should reconstruct what he
has destroyed.
Johnson's offer is based on several assumptions which
the North Vietnamese must consider false. To begin with,
it assumes that North Viet Nam began the war, and could
therefore end it at will. In fact of course, until the American
bombing of North Viet Nam the war had been a civil war,
began and fought by South Vietnamese.
Although her attitude would no doubt Ibe important,
North Viet Nam could no more end the war than could
Canada have ended the American Civil War.
Secondly, even if Hanoi were in a position to make the
decision whether or not to continue the war, her acceptance
of the offer would have to be predicated on the assumption
that America is acting in good faith. Ho Chi-minh, who has
been deceived twice by the western powers, once by the
U.S., is not likely to make that assumption.
Third, the North Vietnamese must resent Johnson's
paternalistic tone and his twentieth-century version of "the
white man's burden." They do not want the aid that Johnson is offering.
What they want is to be allowed to develop their country in peace. Without any American assistance, North Viet
Nam was rapidly on the way towards industrialization
until the bombings began. Her people, though they had to
work hard, were no longer starving as in the days of white
colonialism, and they were gradually improving their
standard of living.
They were not a primivite nation plagued by hunger,
ignorance, and disease, requiring American assistance to
eradicate these evils. In contrast, South Korea, one of America's allies in South Viet Nam, is a (backward, poverty
stricken nation.
Among South Korean children the incidence of scurvy
and beri-beri — two diseases due directly to malutrition —
is one of the highest in the world. Yet South Korea has been
receiving American aid for almost two decades.
Consequently, Johnson's lofty promises will not sound
very attractive to the leaders of North Viet Nam. They will
dismiss them as mere rhetoric, designed to obfuscate the true
issues involved in the Vietnamese conflict.
7 " "   -„_i.   i^,r*S ?,V^r^%Z??is?Vtmx>/.
Sir O. hinders lectures
It's about Kerensky and
Galbraith.
Rumor has it that several students actually
heard them speak, despite
a conscientious effort by
the sponsoring university
lectures committee.
But the lectures committee consistently books
halls too small, expecting
no one to show up—Committee head Sir Ouvry
Roberts doesn't believe in
publicity.
Meanwhile, the special
events committee which
does this sort of thing so
much better, has had its
budget amputated b y
$3000 by the AMS.
They approached Sir
O. for funds to bring in
more   relevant   and  contemporary speakers.
It cost the university
lectures committee $2000
to bring in Galbraith.
They do not seem to be
short of money. But the
request of special events
was turned down.
And so the university
lectures committee goes
on its myopic way refusing to correlate its program with that of special
events, bringing in safe
establishment pillars,
providing copy for the
downtown papers, sponsoring salmon-bone chocking dinners, cocktail parties, and cosy evenings
at the homes of faculty
members.
Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21, 1966 ftfC^frt-^Ufr^^. <-"'
[b,£i *     *$$glW*W* »»*" s » - ^WWJ *$ £i <
SDS: organize students,
seize university control
How to arise and confront a
Sick Society.
"Don't mourn, organize."
"There will be a caucus on
the raft to discuss a swim to
the island." The second Clear
Lake peace swim (the first was
the day before).
•    •    •
"Fund raising time!" I have
before me two baskets. Money.
The writer is Gordon Peterson, a fourth year history student and member of the Students for Democratic Society
at the University of Washington, Seattle. This is his statement about what SDS is.
You can put it in either basket.
This one is Love; this one is
Power. Now who will get the
most—love or power?" Power
always loses.
Reporters (who became
friendly — we tend to grow
on relatively tolerant people)
noted for their tabloids the
workshops on "LSD and the
movement'' and "working
with communists." One collected a dual language dictionary:
participatory democracy, hangups, hung-up, acid heads, turn-
on, turn-off, groovy.
Perhaps SDS is a style. We
are certainly not yet a movement.
We see ourselves as the focal
point for the changes that American society will undergo
under the influence of o u r
generation. We have a vision
of a decent society: a society
in which power always loses.
We see this as attainable only
through the granting of power
to the individual over decisions which affect his life. To
do that, to democratize American society, we must ourselves
refuse, negate the game the
system is trying to get us to
play, the climb-the-bureaucra-
tic-ladder game. Negate it and
write a new one, our own
game ,a democratic game.
Today ki the university, in
the corporation, in government, or any of one of the
myriad of the authoritarian
hierarchies described as bureaucratic, decisions are made
which to a frightfully large
extent affect our lives: our
capacity to interact with other
people, our capacity to maintain personal integrity and
identity, and our capacity to
love.
They affect us through their
structure. Decisions which affect us are made above, beyond
our reach. Within the realm
of this game the man on the
ladder can only accept, and be
changed by the decision and
by his own personal acquiescence, by his surrender to
others of the control over his
own life.
The administrators have
that control. Administrators
concerned not with humanity
and people, but with 'efficiency' towards implementing
goals not chosen by those affected,   goals   inherited from
past generations, goals increasingly less relevant to a world
of prosperity.
Surrender control in the interests of the Golden Calf,
kneel on the ladder and surrender ourselves, our humanity, our contact with one another as human beings in the
interests of those whom we
are unable to locate, if indeed
in the interests of anyone, any
human beings. In the interests
of an impersonal rationality,
the goal of which is irrelevant
(ending of scarcity) and unknown (we are not conscious
of it as a goal), we repress our
most human capacities.
The capacity to create: the
demand of the individual to
order his own existence according to his own demands;
the capacity to be human —
to realize that we live because
of and for One another, that
interaction is not merely a
sociological concept, but the
essence of our humanity, that
the essence of this interpersonal action is the qualitative
measure of our lives: as individuals, groups, or societies.
And that love — empathy,
neurotic dependency, depending upon one another, call it
what you will — is our high-
ets capability, that without it
we are alone, and that alone
we are nothing.
Our present social organization engulfs us in a rationality
that would deny us all this.
In this society power always
wins.
The system seeks to control
us for its Golden Calf. It says
'scarcity' and would trade us
the goods it tells us we need
ii only we would repress what
we can be, accept the order
from above — yes, play the
game, its game, be rational,
follow authority.
In return for the goods it
tells us we need — to fall into
line behind the ladder and
learn to say tyes' and shun
those who would say 'no'. Like
automatons we climb up the
ladder in the face of orders
from the top, from those who
have spent their lives on the
ladder learning to say yes,
and enjoying the goods it tells
us we need.
But those on the ladder: Do
they create, do the relate, do
they love? This is what SDS is
about. We want to push over
the ladder, all the ladders, and
play another game. One in
wh(ich love never loses to
power.
to pf 10
see: more SDS
f!""   mm*'''''''
M   7§ven
Friday, October 21,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
SKIERS!
SEE! LATEST IN   .   .   .
Ski Racks
Skies
Ski Fashions
CLARKE  SIMPKINS  IMPORTS
Burrard  and  7th
RE  6-4282
SPENCER W. KIMBALL
from
Salt Lake City
speaks on
"fM   *
Philosophy of Mormon.sm'
Mon., Oct. 24 - Bu. 100
12:30
TRADS
outstanding in any crowd!
The lithe tailored lines of TRADS stand out
in any crowd and add an air of confidence
to the wearer. Long wearing blends and the
finest worsteds are featured in fashionable
shades with modern international flair for
eye-appeal. DON PARKER TRADS are popularly priced at your favorite men's shop; look
for the authentic "TRADS" hang tag - your
assurance of top value.
Page  13 rit4rt»tMM<tMftl«ii|«t»i * i * * • • * # vv******«****#**«
Graduating Education Students
4th Yr. Elementary -  5th Yr. Secondary  -   1 Yr. Transfer
PHOTOGRAPH TO BE TAKEN
Campbell Studios Mobile Unit
10:00 a.m. till 12:00 a.m.
1:00 p.m. till    3:30 p.m.
OCT. 24 - MONDAY
MICHAEL CAINE.S ALFIE
MIUICENT MARTIN -JULIA FOSTER • JANEASHER • SHIRLEY ANNE FIELD
VIVIEN MERCHANT • ELEANOR BRON • WITH SHELLEY WINTERS AS RUBY
TECHNICOLOR" TECHNISCOPEKA LEWS GILBERT PRODUCTION [&*»
■XXimxi BY Bill NAUGHTON BASED ON M P1A< MHl BY BU NAUGHTDN • MUSIC BY SONNY R0WI6 • (WOW. AMI DKCTfO BY IfWB GMERT
STRAND    CSSa?
MU   1-7748
STARTS
FRIDAY
To Persons
Under 18
WORLD-WIDE   INTERNATIONAL
TRAVEL
in the
University Shopping
Village
offers the very best in
travel advice
* Meticulously arranged individual
trips
* Detailed information on tours
of all ranges
9 Complete arrangements for travellers cheques, hotel reservations,
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B.C.'s Leading Travel Organization  Representing
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WHEN YOU  THINK OF TRAVEL THINK  OF WORLD-WIDE
«^ WOKLD-WIDE
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Miss Robyn Masked — Manager       Telephone: 224-4391
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
,-"!
It has English sub-titles, you know,
and it's so relevant to America, it hurts
By CHARLIE BOYLAN
The Shop on Main Street is no longer
showing at the Studio. And aside from the
usual connaisseurs of foreign film, I doubt
many students saw it. A pity.
It had everything going for it too—winner
1965 Cannes Festival, Lincoln Memorial
Theatre Foreign Film Festival, and (gasp) the
Academy Award Oscar for best foreign film
of the year.
But it wasn't in technicolor or cinemascope,
and, as the ticket-lady said with a sneer, "It
has English sub-titles, you know!"
Yet in ninety minutes, Czech director Jan
Kadar captures the dilemma of the little man
trapped in the web of a racist, totalitarian
state. Anton Britko, played by Joseph Kroner, is carpenter in the Hitler puppet state
of Slovakia.
Hen-pecked by a selfish bitch of a wife,
he finds salvation in a "generous offer" from
his petty-bureaucrat fascist brother-in-law.
Britko is made the new Aryan master of the
Jewish widow Lautmann's button shop. The
widow herself played by Ida Kaminska, is
supported by the rest of the Jewish community.
Through the development of Britko's relationship with Mrs. Lautmann, the action
centres on the film's main symbol, the tower
of racist hatred and brute terror erected in
honor of the Fuehrer. If the hysteria and
chauvinism cannot convince the people, fascist techniques will cower them, make them
impotent, and nihilistic.
In an extremely effective crowd scene, the
director shows how puny people are able to
intimidate others. The "white Jew" Kuchar is
beaten and abused.
But Britko changes. He is forced finally
to reject the racist mythology, which he
never actively accepted before. Yet for him
there is no escape. He is just a little man, a
man without power.
The tragedy is that of the unwilling victim.
The heroic is his ability to see what originally he did not want to see — that which
would inevitably implicate him in moral
choice and action.
The film is so relevant to our own situation in America it hurts. Maybe that's why
people don't go to see it. Or maybe that little
ticket lady is right. Who wants to go to a
movie if you have to read?
Hopefully people didn't go because they
didn't know about it. In that case, hopefully,
Cinema 16 will show it here at UBC. The
Shop on Main Street earned its awards.
THE   PAINTED   SHIP   SAILED,   in   Brock
Wednesday, in the Kits theatre tonight.
CAREERS IN MANPOWER
• INTERESTING
• CHALLENGING
• REWARDING
University graduates! Do you enjoy working with
and helping others? The new Department of Manpower and Immigration offers career opportunities
for personnel desirous of contributing to Canada's
social  and economic development.
For further  information  contact your  University Placement Officer
Make Appointments Now for Interviews November 1 to 10
DEPARTMENT OF MANPOWER AND IMMIGRATION
Page  14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,  1966 Goodies   67 from Ottawa
-rt<9
By JUDY BING
Centennial year has goodies galore in
store for campus culture vultures.
Perspective '67, an open competition-exhibition for young Canadian artists and
craftsmen is one of them.
. Application forms are due by December
first — B.C. Binning, head of the Fine Arts
Department, has them.
"We are not aiming for a specifically Canadian content — only for Canadian artists,"
visual arts officer of the Centennial Committee Richard Graburn told PF.
The visual arts program, costing the government $191,000, also includes grants to
art museums throughout the country. UBC's
Fine Arts Gallery gets $3,000.
The centennial is youth oriented.
In co-operation with the Association of
Universities   and  Colleges   of  Canada   ,the
Centennial Commission is sponsoring a conference on the role of the arts in the university at Queen's, and Second Century Week,
a humanities seminar, at the University of
Alberta.
Also under the AUCC program, there will
be a travelling lecturers' program, bringing
Canadian and international speakers in the
arts to universities from coast to coast.
A bi-lingual travelling theatre group will
perform one-act plays in English et en fran-
cais cross country. The troupe is the brainchild of Dorothy Somerset, former head of
UBC's theatre department.
All this brought to you by the Centennial
Commission, a parliamentary committee for
developing a national program to celebrate
you know what.
All together now: happy birthday to us . . .
mrnmmzm
Aid others, forget local squalor
Editor, Page Friday:
Let's forget about our Canadian Indians that live in
squalor in our backyards.
Come, people, help those poor
war - objectors unfortunate
enough to be born in another
country that is at war.
Let's forget about our Can
adian Eskimo who faces continual poverty and eventual
extinction. Instead, people,
you can contribute money to
a committee that will send
these funds thousands of
miles to a communist country
in south-east Asia. A country
Reef Guard is everywhere,
we mix freely with them
The writer is visiting the University of Peking. He was
a grad student at UBC and editor of Prometheus magazine
last year.
By CLIVE ANSLEY
I thought you'd appreciate a short report on how conditions here appear in comparison to David Oancia's report.
Our first day in Canton we were mobbed by about three
hundred Red Guards in a public park. They all wanted us
to sign autographs. Then they sang us a series of welcoming
songs, posed for photographs with us, and had a long serious
discussion about their activities.
Here in Peking we showed the Red Guards Vancouver
Sun clippings, "We'll tear off your skins, etc." They joined
us in a hearty laugh, inquired whether our skins were still
intact, and began a long and fruitful discussion with us.
The Red Guards are everywhere and we wander freely
among them.
sworn to your downfall can
use the funds to heal their
war-wounded.
The Canadian Indian and
Eskimo have waited over a
hundred years for the vast
amounts of assistance they
now need to survive in a
white man's society.
They can wait a few more
years until the war is over for
any contributions from the
help - the - objectors - to - war
societies and end-the-war committees. After all, who is
more important: draft dodgers
and war objectors from another country, communists
fighting in south-east Asia,
or our Canadian citizens?
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Friday, October  21,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15 \*\*w&$MvS-.    v A*>s 4v_&-Mur
W* ft""    -
" * XJV
More SDS: power and love
from pf 7
We are, for the most part,
students: the university is our
society, our bureaucracy, the
game which we are having to
play — the game we didn't
choose, hut inherited.
A bad game, an irrelevant
game, a stupid game. Tied not
to the needs of the present
generation of student and their
reality, but to those of their
parents.
The university, with the
death of scarcity, has become
functionally a consumer good.
Not an investment, whose
economic return must be
maximized, not even a luxury
good — but a common consumer non-durable good, complete with Madison Avenue
created demand. Consumed
for the benefit of the consumer-student, for his or her
humanity.
What is lacking, however, is
consumer sovereignty. Supply
(the school bureaucracy and
its creations) has no relation
to demand (the real needs of
the student generation).
The result is an education
suitable only for the mentally-
retarded — those hung-up in
their parent's world, tied to
their parent's games and!
hangups.
To create a university responsive to the needs of its
students, to create a society
responsive to the needs of its
members — those affected
must control that which affects them. Democracy or as
SDS people might verbalize it
—participatory democracy "let
the people decide" — is a
means  by  which  people can
- FORUM -
'The   New   Left"
SPEAKERS:
JACK EAST
RANDY ENOMOTO
DON DUGGAN
Sun., Octo. 23-8 p.m.
875 East Hastings
SPONSORED BY:
Progressive Workers Movement
-    COLLECTION   -
make structures responsive to
their needs.
The students must make the
policy that affects their lives.
To do this the students must
run their universities. The universities must be democratized.
And so that is what we are
going to do. Begin that long
process towards tearing down
that ladder, a first step towards a democratic society.
We're going to stop crying
about the bad game and try
and change it.
'Don't mourn, organize'. We
are going to organize students
to take control of the university.
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The story behind these hands
could be the story ahead for you
Twenty summers ago, these hands mined for ore. When fall came, they became the
hands of a student. Long hours of study made them the hands of an engineer. Through
the years, they have remained the hands of a musician. Today, they are the hands of a
Director of Ontario Hydro.
They are strong, confident hands which tell of a keen mind that welcomes challenge
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Ask Now at Placement Office for Interview Appointment on November 2, 3 and 4
%
9v
a
V
Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October  21,  1966 Friday, October  21,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   17 Page 18
UBYSSEY
Friday, October 21,  1966
UBC THUNDERBIRD DEFENDERS like these await Saturday's homecoming
football opponents, the University of Alberta Golden Bears. Above,
Ben Stapleton (36), Chip Barrett (19), George Brajcich (75), swarm over
a felled Portland State College ball carrier in Oct.  8 game as Sonny
Brandt (37) backs them up. Thunderbird defence will face offence
dubbed 'best in the Wesf by Golden Bear supporters in homecoming
clash at 2 p.m. in Varsity Stpdium. Alberta fans are expected to arrive
in Vancouver for the game on special chartered train car.
Bird flanker must fool
Alberta's Golden Bears
UBC Thunderbird Chip Barrett will try to get lost Saturday.
Barrett, normally a defensive halfback, will fill the Birds'
twelfth spot on offence as well,
when UBC meets the University of Alberta Golden Bears in
the annual homecoming football game at 2 p.m. in Varsity
Stadium.
It will  be   UBC's   first   12-
man, Canadian-rules football in
two years.
Bird head coach Frank Gnup
said Thursday he plans to use
Barrett as an offensive flanker back lined up to the outside
of ends Lance Fletcher and
Rod Smith.
"We've played five games of
American football this season,
and our offence is designed to
function with four backs instead of five," Gnup said.
Girls make mark
in WCIAA tournies
By MARGARET FAIRWEATHER
UBC  players tied for  first place  in tennis  and  tool-
second spot in golf at the Western Canada Intercollegiate
championships at Winnipeg, Oct. 14-15.
Stephanie Green, science 3,
Barb Johnston, arts 1, and
Sally Stewart, arts 4, won
eight out of a possible nine
single matches and swept the
doubles three straight to gain
eleven out of twelve points
in the tennis competition.
The UBC team placed first
among the women's division
but tied for first with Alberta
in the over-all standings as
they had no entries in the
mixed doubles.
In the golf tournament,
UBC's Marilyn Palmer, education 2, gained low scores of
82 and 80 for the meet.
Fiona Blair, education 2,
and Doreen Kimura, nursing
4, rounded out the UBC team
which placed second in the
competition.
Teams from universities of
Alberta, Saskatchewan and
Manitoba competed in the
tournament.
Badminton
winds up
Top three players in the recently concluded intramural
badminton tournament were
Alex Barloewen, engineering;
George Brown, St. Andrew's;
and Don McDonald, physical
education.
Intramurals director Gor-
die Cameron reports that volleyball, tennis singles, golf
singles, and ice hockey are
well under way.
Curling begins next Friday,
Oct. 27, at 9:15 p.m. in the
Winter Sports Centre.
Touch football at noon today pits engineering 6 vs fifth-
year physical education, and
Zeta Psi vs Botany.
"There isn't time to put in
enough plays to take full advantage of the extra back, so
we've told Barrett to concentrate on staying out of the way
of the rest of the backfield.
He'll be a decoy."
Gnup's offence should be
ready to roar no matter who
gets in its way. The Birds
mangled the Whitman College
Missionaries 58-12 last week in
Walla Walla, Wash., and are
healthier for Alberta.
DANYLIU BACK
Hard-running halfback Paul
Danyliu suffered a leg injury
against Portland State College
Oct. 8, and missed the Walla
Walla trip, but will be back in
uniform Saturday.
Tough fullback Dave Corcoran got two touchdowns against
Whitman even though he was
hurting, and Gnup pronounced
him completely healed.
Alberta sports a high reputation and a 3-win, 1-loss record
in Western Canada Intercollegiate play. Their fans call
them the best team in Western
Canada.
The Golden Bears' loss came
last week in Winnipeg at the
hands of the University of
Manitoba Bisons, who knocked them off 4-2.
RUNNING THREAT
The Bears, coached by former CFL lineman Gino Fracas,
feature a strong outside running attack led by quarterback
Terry Lambert and halfback
John Violini.
UBC's scouting reports indicate that Lambert throws
about 15 times per game, with
moderate success.
Bird passer Dick Gibbons
has completed almost that
many on each of UBC's last
two outings, and Gnup said
Canadian football's three
downs may have the Birds
throwing more, unless the
weather is bad.
And don't forget about Barrett, the flanker who's supposed to get lost. He and Gibbons combined on a 75-yard
touchdown pass to start the
Whitman slaughter on the
second play of the game.
—gateway photo
ALBERTA QUARTERBACK Terry Lam pert leads the Golden
Bear offence into Varsity Stadium for homecoming game
Saturday. Lam pert a third-stringer last year, is billed as
a fine running quarterback capable of throwing.
x Friday,  October  21,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   19
SATURDAY GAME
Soccer Birds
defend top spot
The UBC Soccer Thunderbirds play the New Westminster Royals Saturday to defend their share cf first place in
the Pacific Coast Soccer Leapue.
The   Birds   go   into   Satur-
Athletics  needs
team   manager
day's game still without the
services of fullback Jim Berry.
Another doubtful starter is
left-winger Jim Jamieson, who
is out with a bad ankle.
Coach Joe Johnson has
brought Al Elmer up from the
Tomahawks to fill the left
wing position and will go with
the rest of his usual starting
lineup.
The Royals, who are fresh
from a win against Burnaby
Villa, will want to win this
game to get out of their position in the league basement.
Said Johnson: "We won't be
an easy prey for them, even
though they think they're on
a winning streak."
Johnson said he expects a
win from his Birds, though
"we'll have to keep our heads
up."
Co-holders of first place in
the PCSL are North Shore,
who the Birds meet a week
from Saturday.
Crew needs aid
UBC's rowing crew is stepping up its training program
for the 1967 Pan American
Games in Winnipeg and the
1968 Olympics, and an assistant
manager is required.
Interested students should
phone Don Newton at 261-5454.
HUM
SATURDAY
NIGHT
INDOOR
AUTO RACE
FOREIGN  STOCKS
A  cross  between   stock   car
racing  and  a  demolition
derby.
AGRODOME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Child  under  12  FREE with
Adults
Head football manager
Bob McGinn needs a bright
young man to assist as a
team manager.
He points out that, managers receive all team benefits.
McGinn  may  be  contacted
at 261-1878.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
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456D WEST 1DTH AVE.
Vancouver 8
GRAD CLASS
First General Meeting
Membership: all students in the winter session who are
registered in the final year of a course leading to a
Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members of the
Grad Class.
—positions   open are: President, Vice-president, Treasurer,
Secretary,  Social Convenor,  Public  Relations Officer,
—a meeting of the Grad class (all graduating students)
for the first time on MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, AT 12:30
IN THE AUDITORIUM.
—nominations may be sent to the Secretary, AMS, post-
box 54.
Sports car
club's rally
approaches
The UBC sports car club's
annual fall rally, the Totem,
will be run Sunday, Oct. 30.
Students may enter the Totem by obtaining an entry form
at club headquarters in hut 7
behind Brock Hall, or by simply turning up at the starting
point, Brentwood shopping
centre, before the starting
time at 8 a.m. Oct. 30.
Entry fee is $3.
TYPEWRITERS
SPECIAL    STt'HEXT    RATES
3 Months $18.00
AM   Makes,   Standard   or  portable
also   Electric   Portables
Consolidated   Typewriters
534  W.  Pender    MU 5-6371
A GO GO
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presenting
"SOUND   UNLIMITED"
and   the
A GO  GO  GIRLS
Dancing 9 to 3 Every
FRIDAY    and    SATURDAY
Ample  Parking
821   RIVER   RD.,   RICHMOND
Available   for   Private   Functions
Monday   to   Thursday
Reservations,   CR   8-2624
Paul Krassner
Returns October 28
QUAKER MEETING FOR WORSHIP
SUNDAYS  11   A.M.
FRIENDS' HOUSE, 535 W. 10th AVE.
Visitors Welcome
Vancouver Woman's Musical Club
presents
GERALD MOORE
"The Victor Borge of the Longhairs"
In An Evening of Music and Mirth
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE OCT. 28, 8:30 p.m.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St.,
and at all Eaton Stores — $3.00
Students $1.50 on presentation of A.M.S. card
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io can
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THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  October 21,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Socred honors rebels
HUNGARIAN CANADIANS
Hon. Ralph Loffmark will
speaker Sunday at 3:30 in
Brock Lounge, to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the
Hungarian Revolution.
COMMUNIST CLUB
Nelson Clarke, Communist
federal organizer, speaks on
Communist Response to Mitchell Sharpe Tuesday noon in
Mildred Brock. Coffee will foe
served.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Enter the Homecoming Rally
which   starts   today   noon   in
front of Brock Hall. A city map
is advisable.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Meeting Monday noon in Bu.
203. Dr. MacKenzie will speak
on Parenthood Planning.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Meeting   noon   today,   Ang.
417, for students interested in
Wayfarer.
UN CLUB
Monday is UN Day. Attend
meeting and lecture at noon in
Buchanan 106. Guest speaker
will be Dr. Faris, formerly with
the U.N. Nutrition program in
India. Slides will be shown.
EL CIRCULO
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
204. Travel films will be shown.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Duane Emberg, from the University of Washington will
speak on the Syndrome of our
THE DEATH OF GOD
IN OUR TIME
TALK BACK
St. Anselm's
Church
University Boulevard
Sunday Evenings
7:00 to 8:00
Death of Prayer
Death of God
- Oct. 23
- Oct. 30
Short address followed by  questions
and  comments  from   the   congregation,  concluding   by   8:00   p.m.
Coffee  Hour follows  for those
interested in further discussions
Success, Monday noon in Ang.
104.
REP CURLING TEAM
No curling this Saturday. All
girls welcome to join the team
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
LIBERAL CLUB
Ron Basford,   (MP  Vancou-
ver-Burrard)   will  speak  Monday noon in Bu. 104. Everybody
invited.
CIRCLE K
General meeting Monday
noon in Bu. 2205. All welcome.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting today at noon in IH.
Coffee, conversation and film,
L'Art Negre. Today is final day
to pay club dues.
DESERET CLUB
Meeting Monday noon, Bu.
100. Speaker is Spencer W.
Kimlball, General Authority of
the Mormon Church.
PRE-LIBRARY CLUB
Mr. Ley, Director of the
Fraser Valley Regional Library
will speak Wednesday noon in
Bu. 225. Dr. Rothstein will
also be present. All welcome.
BLUE GUARD
First general meeting Tuesday at noon, Bu. 3202. Everyone welcome.
VISITING PROFESSOR
Professor Charles Dedeyan,
University of Paris, will speak
on A New Humanism: Comparative Literature, Wednesday
noon, Bu. 102.
PRE MED SOC
Meeting    Wednesday    noon,
Wesbrook 201, Dr. Graham of
screening   committee   will   be
there.
JUDO CLUB
Team workouts Tuesday and
Thursday at 4:30 p.m., in the
gym.
IH
Dance tonight, lower lounge
at 9 p.m. Admission 25 cents.
Everyone welcome.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting today noon in Bu.
204.
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TONIGHT!
FREE DEMONSTRATION
SEE EFFECTIVE RAPID READING AT ITS BEST
AT THE
VANCOUVER HOTEL SALON "A"
1st Demonstration - 5:00 p.m.
2nd Demonstration - 8:00 p.m.
BRING A  FRIEND
NOW REGISTERING FOR WINTER CLASSES
LAST SERIES BEFORE THE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS
EVELYN WOOD
READING DYNAMICS .».feS
OF BC LTD -
SUITE 210    549 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER 1BC    685-2374
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST—GREEN LEATHER PURSE
containing $10. Fri. Oct. 11. Phone
Stephane    736-6907.	
LOST — GIRL'S WATCH WITH
brown strap. Reward. Phone
Kathie   987-7739.
LOST — GOLD BRAIDED RING.
Size 4 in Freddie Wood or Buchanan.   224-9872.   Andrea Rose.
LOST PARKER 75 PEN THURS-
day, Oct. 13. $5 reward upon delivery. Call Tony, RE 3-0234,
after   6   p.m.  	
LOST —BLACK CLUTCH PURSE:
ED. 1128 Thursday. Contents very
valuable. Call Sandy, AL 5-3691
after 6 p.m.	
GYM   STRIP   FOUND   IN   CHEVY
II.   Phone   Don,   AM  1-7477.
HITCHHIKER LEFT PARCEL IN
red Volkswagon, Sunday, Oct. 16,
owner would appreciate return.
Phone  (468)  224-9045.	
FOUND AN UMBRELLA IN EN-
gineering 200 on Wed., Oct. 19.
Phone 224-9869 and ask for Parkin.
Coming Dances
12A
HOMECOMING '66 BALL, SAT.,
Oct. 22. Tickets on sale now at
AMS Office, $3.75 per couple,
Armouries   &   Fieldhouse.
DANCE TO THE EXCITING NEW
sound of the brave new world at
The Black Cat Ball, Saturday,
October 29 (the Armory, 8:30 to
12:30.  Admission  $1.25 per person.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F & G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and Staff Welcome.
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
STEVESTON HOMECOMING
Dance Fri., Oct. 21. 8:30-11:30 p.m.
in the gym. All Steveston Grads
are  welcome.
THIS IS A GROWING BUSINESS,
you grow it and we'll cut it!
Campus Barber Shop. 153 Brock.
ADVANCE     MATTRESS     COFFEE
House Sunday nite films
Vietnam Documentary
S.D.S.   Community   organizing
award  winner  in   New  York
Film Festival
8  p.m.,  10th  &  Alma — 50c
ENGINEERS BEWARE M. G. U.
Friday noon at  New Music  Bldg.
SEE FASCINATING, BEAUTIFUL
and outstanding Exhibits, Displays and Demonstrations at the
B.C. GEM SHOW, Food Building,
Exhibition — today 6:30 p.m. to
11 p.m.; tomorrow, 10 a.m. to 11
p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m. Adults,
$1.00, children 25c. Excellent door
prizes.
ARTSMEN, SCIENCEMEN, ENG-
ineers all agree that Miss Commerce, Dale Wood, is Home-
coming Queen  to  Be!	
TALK   BACK   AT   ST.   ANSELM'S
Church,   Sunday,   7:00   p.m.
Transportation
14
RIDE    NEEDED.    THREE    GIRLS.
Kingsway   from    Slocan,   Welwyn,
Knight.   Wendy,   434-5911;   Louise,
. 879-2392;   Helen   876-9817.
RIDERS WANTED: VICINITY
Sentinel Hill, W. Van., 8:30's
M-F, 9:30's Sat. Ph. WA 2-3657
eves.
RIDE WANTED FROM UBC TO
vicinitv Marine and Hudson, 4:30
p.m.   Phone   Bob,   261-4481.
Wanted
15
SENIOR MADE STUDENT TO
share large, comfortable, and
fully furnished suite in 12-storey
Kitsilano apartment bloc. Luxurious living at residence cost.
Phone Norm at 736-0579 after six.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1959 VOLVO, VERY GOOD CON-
dition, radio, six good tires (2
snowp.   327-3584  after  6  —  Ron.
MISCELLANEOUS
34
ELECTRONIC KITS BUILT, DE-
vices built from schematics: Jim,
Robson   410,   224-9720.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Scandals
39A
PLEASE DON'T TELL JOHN
about our sex life. Signed: A
Worried Pooh!
TOUGH     DO-NUTS     BITSY     AND
LOFUN.   Ash  B.
GAMBLERS! WHAT IS THE COM-
merce Casino? See the Homecoming Parade tomorrow to find
out!
JOHN D.  KNOWS INDIAN TOADS
in  Dawson City  and  likes it.
THE BRAVE
OCT.  29
NEW WORLD
SEWING • ALTERATIONS    40
1957 PLYMOUTH, V8,  AUTOMATIC
transmission,   winter  tires,   best  offer, call Ken at 224-7230 after 5:00
58-TR3 GOOD SHAPE, NEW PAINT
runs good, best cash offer. Phone
Martin  at   733-5286.
1960 CHEV. STND. 6 CYL. 4-DOOR
W.W. city tested. $795 or best
offer.   Phone   FA   7-6632.
Motorcycles 27
1966    SUZUKI    80cc   TRAIL   BIKE,
1000  mi. Reasonable offers.  Phone
922-4812.
FREEZE WHATEVER YOU HAVE
off on my 1966 Suzuki 150cc.
Phone Derek,  224-0635 or 942-4407.
FOR SALE 50cc HONDA SPORT,
$125, or 150cc Honda Benly, $225.
Phone   943-3705.
FOR SALE: 1961 BSA 650CC CALL
Rick at 224-9667 after 7 p.m.,
Sat.   $375.00.
REMODELLING, SHEATH DRESS-
es,    separates,    skirts,    etc.   Special
attention   to   wedding  gowns.   Ph.
CA  4-6471.
Typing
43
TYPING,     ESSAY    AND    THESIS.
Call Joan 228-8384.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
FREE PRIVATE ROOM AND
bathroom for mature female student In exchange for light household duties. Also some remuneration  —   224-5253.
INSTRUCTION
SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
FOR STUDENTS IN GERMAN
extra help in their curriculum
and for persons interested in the
languages and eager to speak it
properly by a retired professional
man from Vienna. $2.00 per lesson.   325-4902.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful >>00l-
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office. Brock Hall.
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROPES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.
STARVING STUDENT MUST SAC-
rifice new black vinyl raincoat for
food money. Cut price. Call Paula
228-8929.  Leave  phone number.
MUST SELL BASS GUITAR AND
30 watt bass amp. Like new. Asking $355.00. Phone 738-6730 after 6.
LIKE    NEW,    3-SPEED    BICYCLE,
horn.   $25.   Tel.   Bono,   224-9927.
NATIONAL BASS AND NEW
Kalamazoo amp, hardly used,
both   $325.   AM   6-5701,   Michael.
RENTALS   8c  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
GOOD ROOM NEAR GATES. MUST
be non-drinker, non-smoker.' Ph.
224-3096.
BEDROOM AVAILABLE FOR WO-
men student in apartment near
University.  Telephone after 6 p.m.
224-4674.
WARM SPACIOUS ROOM FOR
male. Four blocks from Gates on
11th. $6.00 to Nov. 1st. 224-9822
for Bill Graham after 6 p.m.
DOUBLE SLEEPING ROOM. Private bath, entrance, Seven min.
walking dist. from Brock. Mrs.
Boyce,   224-5700.	
SLEEPING ROOM, PRIV. BATH.
Breakfast if desired. 4307 W. 13th
Ave.  Van.  8,  B.C.   224-7471.
ROOM FOR RENT. KITCHEN
privileges. Female only. View
room, 10-12 a.m. 2136 W. 2nd. Ave.
LARGE ROOM FOR RENT. JUST
outside gates. Completely self-
contained.   Suitable   for  two   male
students.   224-6757.
Room & Board
■2
BOARD AND ROOM FOR UNI-
versity student. Attractive room
for girl in spacious home in UBC
district.   224-0688   for   details.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SENIOR STUDENT HAS SUITE
wants to share (male) RE 1-4219
between  5  &  7.
WANTED — SR. FEMALE STU-
dent, quiet non-smoker, to share
suite with two of same. Granville
and Matthews. 731-8832 after 10
p.m..   Car-pool.

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