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The Ubyssey Jan 11, 1966

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Array Residents
are
THS UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 34
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1966
CA 4-3916
MP to try
for voting
act repair
By DANNY STOFFMAN
Ubyssey Ass't City Editor
The MP from UBC will try
to ensure in the next session of
parliament that students never
again lose their vote in a federal election.
Grant Deachman, Liberal MP
from Vancouver - Quadra
(which includes UBC) will
sponsor a private member's
bill to amend the Canada Elections Act.
The bill would give voting
rights to students not in residence at their university when
an election is called.
In the last general election
some students lost their vote
because the elections act says
students not normally living in
a constituency must be registered and in attendance at
university when an election is
called.
"This bill will give the same
rights to university students as
to ministers and teachers,"
Deachman said in an interview
Monday.
Ministers and teachers may
move to a new constituency at
any time between calling of an
election and polling day and
register to vote.
"I estimate about 2,000 student votes were lost because
of this provision in the act,"
Deachman said.
He said he does not expect
opposition to the bill.
"I've made this bill as simple as possible so it will have
appeal to all members," he
said. "All it does is amend this
one section of the election act."
Deachman said the bill was
being presented as a private
bill rather than a government
bill because it has "low" priority.
— dannis oan» photo
FINGERTIP CONTROL is demonstrated for white-clad UBC
Thunderbirds. by University of Montana forward Lee Levk-
necht. Too late to stop his shot are Morris Douglas, Ian
Dixon, and Alex Brayden. 'Birds dumped Montana 74-69
Friday, but succumbed 93-66 Saturday. (See story p. 9)
AMS seeks
wider voice
for students
The AMS council called Monday night for student seats
on three administration committees.
Council passed a motion pres-    	
City 'punks
beat rob UBC
hitch-hiker
sing for student representation
on the Senate Library Committee, the Advisory Planning
Board (campus development),
and the Residence Student Affairs Advisory Committee.
STUDENT BENEFICIAL
A second section of the motion asked that students be able
to participate on any committees of the Faculty Association
and the Senate "where it is
agreed that student participation will be beneficial."
Council Nov. 15 passed a
motion that ■ representatives
should be sought on the Senate.
Arts president Chuck Campbell who made both motions
Monday said neither precluded
the other.
GOOD CASE
Campbell said a student representative on these committees could serve as a liaison.
"The committees could facilitate the student needs rather
that what someone thinks are
the student needs,"  he  said.
"We want people at the committee level who can get background and know about the
situations," he said, "We have
an especially good case for this
is the residences and the library."
Campbell said there was no
reason for not getting on the
Senate in time and on the committees right now.
A 19-year-old UBC hitchhiker was beaten and robbed
early Sunday.
Bruce Woodward, Arts I,
was hitch-hiking on Marine
drive, at 2 a.m., when a car
with three youths inside stopped to pick him up.
As he entered the car, Woodward was kicked in the chest
by one youth.
Two others then jumped on
him and kicked him again,
Woodward said.
Woodward told police he
was then robbed of four dollars and the car drove off.
Woodward walked the remaining five miles to the campus RCMP detachment.
"I was not seriously hurt,"
Woodward said Monday, "just
some bruises and scratches."
He said there were cars going by as the robbery was taking place.
"It was just some punks
from Vancouver," he said.
McGregor named
TO FOLLOW BUTTEDAHL
Dorm czardom goes to classics head
By PAT HRUSHOWY
A board of governors meeting Thursday appointed Classics head Dr. Malcolm McGregor as
UBC's new director of residences.
McGregor succeeds temporary housing director
Knute Buttedahl, who leaves the post Jan. 15 to
devote full time to his recent appointment as associate director of Extension.
Buttedahl said Monday he made the move under pressure from extension head Dr. J. K. Friesen.
Former housing director John Haar, who was on
a year's leave of absence, resigned the post during
Christmas to remain as director of the new Centre
of Adult Education at Elliot Lake, ntario.
McGregor will remain in his post as head of
the classics department while acting as director
of residences.
Much of the administrative load of the housing
office will be left to assistant housing director
John Rohringer.
Buttedahl said he was delighted with the appointment.
"I see nothing but great hopes for housing administration under Dr. McGregor," he said.
McGregor said Monday he plans to integrate
residence life with the academic community.
"I think a residence should not be a hotel. It
should be a genuine part of campus life," se said.
"What we hope to do is produce a regular
academic program for all residential areas, bringing them to the campus and the campus to them.
powell   hargrave   photo
malcolm McGregor
. . . into residences
"This is something that will have to be done
slowly. For example, we might have various series
of lectures on a broad range of subjects, once a
week, say, for a number of weeks," he said
"My policy now is to support the residences,"
McGregor said.
'1 would like to see an athletic program in the
residences. Not necessarily outdoor sports. There
are many indoor sports I would support — like
ping pong and chess."
Food services, he said, are doing a good job.
"In general, food services are pretty good. The
food is substantial and healthy but I will look into
the issue."
He has no immediate plans for replacing Fort
-Camp.
He said the residences are in pretty good shape.
"I have gathered the impression that Knute
Buttedahl did a very good job."
"But I have to learn my lessons. I have to visit
and find out what residences are really like before I can make any definite plans," he said.
He summed up his future policy with, "If we
say students are grown up when they come to campus, we must treat them as such".
UBC President Dr. John B. Macdonald said:
"The object is to place greater emphasis on
making residence life an academic experience, that
is why we are appointing an academic," he said.
"We chose Dr. McGregor because of his great
understanding of students and his concern for the
quality of student life on the campus." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1966
FIRMS VISIT
More jobs open
for  66 grads
By CHRIS BROCKHURST
Student placement officer Cameron Craik is getting
more jobs for graduating students.
Craik said Friday the num
ber of firms and businesses
visiting the campus in January
alone is more than a 100 — SO
per cent rise from January,
1965.
"These firms, both government and private enterprise,
are seeking not only graduates
but those; in higher undergraduate years; the latter for summer employment," Craik said.
• •     •
"Our purpose is to provide
a meeting place for student
and business."
Twenty rooms in the placement service and adjoining offices are used for the personal
interviews carried on by management and technicians from
across Canada, U.S., and Great
Britain."
"A trend toward the campus
by business concerns is becoming more and more pronounced, and to facilitate this, regular bulletins of the dates of
firms visiting and their receiving hours are published and
posted at various points on
campus," said Craik.
• •     •
Students who elect to take
interviews with the company
representatives are in no way
obliged to that company, he
said.
In fact it would be to their
benefit to see more than one
team, Craik said.
Strachan says
fees must go
B.C. New Democratic Party
leader (Robert Strachan came
out Friday with a strong stand
for the abolition of tuition fees.
Speaking at a "Politics a Go-
go" meeting sponsored by the
UBC New Democrats, Strachan
said, '"University fees, as such,
should no longer have a place
in educational life."
He pointed out that the first
party to advocate fee abolition
was the CCF, predecessor of
the NDP.
Strachan also charged that
B.C. is not the master of its
own destiny.
"Decision are often not made
in B.C., often not in Canada,
and often not on this continent," he said.
"We invite all students, graduate or not to come down and
view the morass of literature
pertinent to student placement
and career opportunities," said
Craik.
"And our doors are open to
any and all."
The placement office is on
the West Mall opposite the
armory.
AMS wheel
chasing
B.C. buses
AMS Coordinator Graeme
Vance, has mobilized the cannons of officialdom and the
result could be increased bus
service for campus residents.
An unfortunate tangle with
a herd of Hydro buses on Jan.
1 brought Vance's attention to
the sporadic bus service between downtown Vancouver
and tiie campus.
So Vance sent a letter Monday to Einar Gundersoh, executive director of the B.C.
Hydro  financial  division.
Gunderson is also a member of the UBC board of governors.
In the letter, Vance pressed
for an express bus from downtown to the campus.
"Such a service would be
especially valuable on Friday
and Saturday nights," the letter said.
"This would catch the ma-
lority of theatre goers."
The letter also suggested a
downtown exoress from residences between 6 and 7 p.m.
Gunderson told Vance
Thursday that everything possible would be done to correct
anything lacking in the present schedule.
Vance said it took him five
buses — of which two died en
route — two and a half hours,
and a near riot at the Blanca
Loop to finally get home Saturday evening.
The riot occurred when a
1:45 a.m. bus stopped at the
Blanca Loop.
The driver hurriedly changed his route sign to "North
Vancouver" and took off in
a flurry of snow, leaving 30
frozen walkers.
Charter flight opens door
to Europe for AMS members
The Alma Society is sponsoring a charter flight to Europe
this coming summer.
There are 140 seats on a Canadian Pacific Airlines jet scheduled to leave Vancouver May 21 for London.
All AMS members and their families are eligible. Further
information may be obtained from travel director Kyle Mitchell
at the AMS office or by calling 731-2646.
ENGINEERS' AUTO
stashed away
Education fixes auto
but EUS won't  pay
The debt collector's claw is
hovering over the hairy red
mass.
Education undergrad society
treasurer Doug Black sent a
letter Thursday to the engineers claiming the EUS owed
the Ed. US $50 for repairing
the engineers' 1949 Austin.
Ed. US members captured
the car two weeks before
homecoming last fall, hoping
to use it in the homecoming
parade.
Then they found it would
not work.
They spent the money getting it fixed before it was recaptured by engineers the day
before the parade.
And now they want their
money back.
And the engineers won't
pay.
EUS president Art Stevenson said Monday he appreciated the education effort but
"the workmanship was inferior. We refuse to pay."
Black said the engineers had
allowed the car to be captured
so education could repair it.
"The hairy red mass realized that the only way to get
the car running was to put it
into the hands of educaion,"
he charged.
Black said if the engineers
fail to pay by Jan. 21 the debt
will be transferred to the B.C.
Credit Ltd. for collection.
Stevenson admitted he was
getting a deal on the Austin.
"They must have spent $150
on parts,   labour  and  trailer
rental."
The Austin is now well hidden from the other envious
faculties, Stevenson said.
Trans-Canada Pipe Lines Limited
Applications are requested from
Civil, Mechanical and Electrical
engineering graduates who are interested in:
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
HYDRAULIC CONTROLS
PIPELINE DESIGN
COMPRESSOR  STATION  DESIGN
COMMUNICATIONS
Comprehensive company benefits. Good starting salary.
For Further information and/or interview, please contact:
PanoMial P»puilwnt
TRANS-CANADA PIPE UNES WAITED
ISO EgBnton Avenue East,
TOfONfO   1 2,  OVnOjfiO
TeUphona: Ar*a Cod* 416, HU 7-ttll, Ural 3*7
FORESTRY
GRADUATES
Business Administration
Logging
Other Options
MacMILLAN, BL0EDEL & POWELL RIVER LIMITED
LUMBER • NEWSPRINT - PULP - PLYWOOD • PACKAGING - FINE PAPER • PANELBOARDS - SHINGLES
Invites you to discuss
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES in our
FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY
interviews will be held on campus on
JANUARY 11, 12 and 13
Fof infOFUKmoit applications and appointments ptooso eeo yew
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE Tuesday, January 11, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
6,000 HOURS
EACH WEEK
UBC opens jabber lab
A $70,000 addition to UBC's
language lab with 126 new individually-controlled seats in
two new classrooms opens next
week.
The labs—now seating 150—
will eventually toe aible to handle eleven different programs
at the same time, says lab
supervisor George Johnson.
The new labs, located in the
basement of the Buchanan
building, will be open for one
week of orientation, beginning
next week. Johnson said the
eventual aim of the labs
is the establishment of a library system in which students
may borrow any tape and practice individually.
Dr. R. J. Gregg, who has
been working on UBC's language laboratory system for eight
years said that the new tape
equipped booths will bring
UBC into line with other universities. They will provide
6,000 student hours of practice
a week, he said.
NEW LANGUAGE LAB
. . . individual tapes
Metallurgist Armstrong
named engineering dean
UBC president John Macdonald anounced Monday the
appointment of Dr. William
Armstrong as dean of applied
science.
Armstrong, 50, succeeds Dr.
David M. Myers, who resigned
last year to organize a new
major university in his native
Australia.
The faculty Armstrong will
lead includes seven departments of engineering and the
schools of architecture and
nursing.   It   has   a   full   time
teaching staff of 92 and a student enrollment of 1,266.
Armstrong has been a UBC
faculty member since 1946. He
has resigned as head of the
department of metallurgy to
take the new post.
Commenting on the appointments, Macdonald said: "Armstrong is keenly aware of the
issues through his scientific
and administrative experience.
He recognizes and supports
the need for closer integration
of engineering within the uni-
-MARXIST MISSING
Man from Hanoi
breaks UBC date
The   special
Aptheker.
events
Taylor set
to meet Vic
fee rebels
By SUE GRANSBY
VICTORIA—President Malcolm Taylor will confront Victoria College fee rebels at an
open forum Thursday.
AMS president Paul Williamson said in an interview
Monday it will be the stud-
dents' first chance at open discussion of the fee protest with
Taylor.
Fifteen hundred students are
withholding the $56 increase
in second term fees despite the
board of governors decision to
fine students $10 if the Jan. 15
deadline is not met.
The board Thursday extended the original Jan. 8 deadline.
But the Victoria student council, still not satisfied, has voted
not to pay the extra $56 until
Jan. 27.
committee   can't   find   Herbert
Aptheker, head of the Institute of Marxist Studies in
New York, was scheduled to
speak here Monday but he has
not yet appeared.
Aptheker arrived in New
York Sunday from a trip to
Hanoi and therefore faces a
five-year jail sentence or a
$5,000 fine.
Under U.S. law, visitors to
North Viet Nam must have
the permission of the government.
Special events chairman
Murray Farr  said Monday at-
Aptheker's home phone number is unlisted and the New
tempts to contact Aptheker
have failed.
York telephone exchange refuses to give out the number
of the institute.
"They said they couldn't find
out anything," said Farr.
"But he's agreed to come so
we expect him.*'
Farr said the lecture would
probably take place late in
January.
Aptheker has been given a
free reign on the topic of his
lecture — if he makes it.
versity, within industry and
within government.
Born in Hamilton, Ont. Armstrong graduated from the University of Ontario in 1937 with
the degree of bachelor of applied science with honors.
Armstrong came to Vancouver with the B.C. Research
Council and joined the UBC
faculty in 1946.
He was appointed head of
the department of metalurgy
in 1964. ,
Past president of the B.C.
Association of Professional Engineers in 1964, Armstrong is
now vice-president and president-elect of the Canadian
Council of professional Engineers.
One of the first problems
Armstrong intends to face is
the shortage of engineers.
"We are not producing engineering graduates at the rate
required by Canada's expanding economy. I can see no possibility of easing the shortage
during the next decade," he
said   Monday.
The new dean said his views
reflect those of the Committee
for Scientific and Technical
Personnel of the Organization
for Economic Cooperation and
Development, which visited
Canada two years ago to investigate training of scientific
and engineering personnel.
Drug man says LSD
safer than college
Br BRUCE BENTON
LSD is safer than four years at college.
Speaking at a press conference Monday Dr. Richard Alpert said he had used the hallucinatory drug over 300 times
and had suffered no brain
damage.
Alpert has established a
company called Sole Co. to act
as a focal point to distribute
information about this drug.
Alpert was dismissed from
his position as a Professor of
Behavioral Sciences at Harvard when he administered
LSD to an undergraduate student.
He said, "the drug confronts
you with the real world. With
its repeated use you alter your
life to become increasingly
harmonious with nature.
"It's a kind of a religion,"
he said. "When God had a
spiritual experience he told it
to his disciples who in turn
wrote it down and told it to
others.
"This then was paraphrased
by ministers and fed to the
parishioners.
"Thje real beauty of this
drug is that for about half a
cent a parishioner they could
have an experience of their
own."
Alpert said a person who is
to use the drug must be mentally prepared  and  must  be
RICHARD ALPERT
. . 'no brain damage'
imder perfect clinical conditions to ensure no harmful effects.
The drug was administered
to a group of theology students
in a church and afterwards it
was said that they had undergone a genuine mystical experience. "The environment
and mental makeup of the subject affects directly the result,"
said Alpert.
Alpert is speaking at noon
today in the auditorium.
HE'S CONCERNED
Election apathy
Hender
worries
Students do their SHARE
for WUS drive—slowly
The SHARE fund drive is gaining momentum but the
Objective of $10,000 ,is still out of sight.
The World University Service is sponsoring the campaign which began Jan. 3 to raise money to build a health
centre at the University of Nicaragua.
Present contributions total $1,712 leaving over $8,000
for the faculties to collect before the deadline Jan. 21.
Of the faculties, pharmacy is still the lowest contributor with $5.45, science the highest with $233.
SHARE planners have scheduled the Spencer Setton
Jazz Quartet and a poetry reading for Wednesday noon in
Brock lounge.
AMS president Byron Hender is concerned.
Hender said Monday he was
worried about the lack of interest shown by students in
previous AMS elections.
Nominations for first and
second slate elections open Jan.
19.
At stake are offices of president, first and second vice-
presidents, secretary, treasurer
and coordinator.
"Too many people vote because they like the look of
somebody's face," said Hender.
He said it was necessary to
arouse interest in student government among students.
"One way to do this is to
make issues as well as personalities the highlight.
"You must have well informed  students,"  he said.
Also the role of student government must be defined.
Nominations for the first
slate; president, second vice-
president and secretary, close
at 4:00 p.m., Jan. 27 and students vote Feb. 2.
Nominations for the second
slate first vice-president, treasurer, and co-ordinator, close
Feb. 3 and the vote is Feb. 9.
BYRON HENDER
. 'somebody's face'
Future teachers
Two hundred high school students will attend a Future
Teacher's Conference at UBC
on Jan. 28 and 29.
Theme of the conference is
"Teaching as a Profession".
The conference will include
speakers, a symposium and
discussions. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1966
mvtrsssr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater. Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1966
"It is not the contexture of words, but the
effects of Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
Dean Armstrong
It is with considerable surprise and even more
pleasure that we applaud the appointment of Prof.
William Armstrong as the new Dean of Engineering.
Considerable surprise, because in Dean Armstrong's
appointment, the administration has departed from its
usual practice of bringing in as deans outsiders or relative newcomers to UBC.
Surprise, and much more pleasure, in that the man
appointed is a highly respected and well-liked human
being:
Dean Armstrong is beyond doubt a man the entire
engineering faculty — staff and students alike — would
have chosen for the post.
"Prof. Armstrong commands the admiration of every
engineer," is how Engineering Undergraduate Society
head Art Stevenson put it.
Dean Armstrong's active role in industry, in the
Professional Engineers association, plus his abilities as
professor, and his accessibility to his students have won
him a high place indeed in the opinion of his co-workers
and students at UBC.
Which, all in all, is a good position to be in, if you've
just become dean.
Academics
It is with less enthusiasm that we consider the appointment of Dr. Malcolm McGregor as new Director of
Residences.
Earlier this year, we had high praise for Residence
head Knute Buttedahl, who had begun to bring some
light into the dark condition Housing had been left in
by his predecessor.
Mr. Buttedahl's reforms, long overdue, were all
the more to be applauded in view of the "it can't be
done" attitude which had so long prevailed against those
very moves — from lounge areas in Port huts to coffee
cups in Lower Mall kitchenettes — which he implemented.
Now, just as he is getting reform underway, Mr.
Buttedahl has been replaced.
Now Dr. McGregor is a man of undoubted scholarship. And his ability to work closely with the present administration is surely shown, for example, in his editorship of President John Macdonald's annual reports.
But we are leery of the announced intention of
the new Housing head to make residence life "an academic experience".
Of all the pressing ways in which present dorm
life is deficient, its lack of an academic program is probably the least pressing.
We suggest the primary task of the new Director
of Residences is rather the dissolution of the huts of
Fort and Acadia camps.
After all, there is something about living in a barely-
converted army hut that is basically unpleasant — let
alone un-academic.
Once this situation is rectified, of course, then the
new Director of Residences could proceed with his lecture series, ping pong, and chess.
The huts, after all, were brought to UBC by another
academic — Dr. Gordon Shrum.
The kind of strong will and fast action that procured the huts for UBC in the first place — to meet the
post-war influx of students — are exactly the qualities
needed now to replace the huts with residences more
habitable — as well as conducive to any new academic
environment.
Succeed in this, and the new Director of Housing
will surely receive the thanks of every student enjoying
his residence life by taking a break from studying by
rocking round the Canteen juke box.
EDITOR: Tom  Wayman
News    Ron   Riter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City        ....   Al   Donald
Photo       Norm   Betts
Sports     Ed Clark
Ass't  News    Dan  Mullen
-_-     Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West
Ass't City   Danny Stoffman
Page   Friday       John   Kelsey
Managing       Ian   Cameron
Features       Mike   Bolton
CUP       Don    Hull
Dodging in and out of north
Brock basement Monday were the
following eager bright eyed types:
Sue Gransby, Bert Hill, Stuart
(I'm leaving) Gray, Brent Cromle,
Dick Taylor, Val (I'm sick) Zuker,
Blair Halse, Andrew Horvat, Chris
Brockhurst, the Ukranian wonder,
Bruce (by-line) Benton, Dennis
Gans, Doug Halverson and Carol
Anne Baker. Anne Balf came in
and said nobody picked her up for
the party, which was sad. There'll
be another press day Wednesday
for people who have recovered
from   the  party.
BIG JOB AHEAD
LETTERS  TO THE   EDITOR
'High  professional  quality'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
May I offer my personal regards to you and you staff on
your winning of the Southam
Trophy for an unprecedented
fifth term.
While I may, on occasion,
be critical of the content of
your paper, there can be little
doubt of the high professional
quality which you have exhibited.
Please extend my congratulations to your staff on a job
IN THE EAR
well done.
BYRON H. HENDER
President, AMS
•      •      •
'INCORRECT'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to correct any
misconceptions concerning the
nature of the Arts Undergraduate Society's anticalen-
dar that might have arisen
out of the article on page
three of last Thursday's issue.
It was incorrectly stated
that the anticalendar would
"cover only lectures and
exams — not course content."
In fact, the whole purpose
of the proposed anti-calendar
is to provide greater information about every aspect of the
courses in Arts and consequently the question of course
content will play an important part in the final evaluation.
BILL IRVINE
Arts IV
Chainman of A.U.S.
Anticalendar
BY IAN CAMERON
Warning on warnings
While browsing through an
American magazine the other
day, I saw a picture of the
new look in American cigarette  packages.
Thanks   to
some very vocal    pressure
group,    there
will,    in   future,    be    a
stamp on the
side   of   all
Cameron       packets    saying   "Warning.   These   cigarettes   may   be   injurious   to
health."
I think that this is terrible.
Not, mind you, because of
my feeling towards Milady
Nicotine.
Although I freely admit
that the only thing that has
got me up in the morning for
years is the thought of the
first cigarette.
At one time, I kept them
on the desk beside my bed,
but this led to interesting con
tests in the morning to see
which would give out first;
my tongue, my bladder, or
my cigarettes.
I learned to control the
first two, but there was little
I could do about the third,
so I stopped buying cartons
and started leaving the packs
on the kitchen table underneath a glass of orange juice.
At least I get something to
eat before lighting the first
one.
But as I said, this is not
the reason for protesting this
latest move in the war to
outlaw pleasure.
I can see ramifications in
this.
Sooner or later, other pressure groups will pick this up,
and in the years to come we
will see things like this:
"Put a substance that is
highly inflammable and more
than somewhat toxic in your
tank."
"Buy   the  new   Chevrolet,
which may kill people if it is
involved in an accident."
On loaves of bread we'll
see notes reading: "This product may cause indigestion."
Bottles of booze will tell
us that they might cause hangover.
Then  the rot  will  spread.
Campaign managers will
get up and say, "I would like
to introduce my candidate,
who, by the way, might turn
out to be a crook, or inept,
or half-a-dozen other things,
all undesirable."
University exams will tell
students that writing papers
might lead to failure.
Birth control devices will
say, "This product is 90 per
cent effective, and you never
know which time out of ten
it's going to fail."
Finally, of course, we'll
have signs saying "Warning!
Reading this warning might
cause eyestrain."
Meanwhile, anyone got a
cigarette? Tuesday, January 11,1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
ORECROUND
Readers respond
to marriage article
COMMUNIST
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re: John Kelsey's Page Friday sin article on marriage
and women.
To you, sir, cries of indignation.
You have bastardized the
morality of Canada.
You have scandalized the
traditions of the west.
You have advocated communism, in the devious way
all Russian dupes do.
Marriage is the most moral,
sacrosanct institution mankind has yet devised.
You have slandered the
holy name of woman.
You have advocated promiscuity, disease both spiritual
and physical, decay and decadence.
You will burn in the atheist's hell for your crimes.
LABURNA  McLEAN
Ed in
MORALMAN
. . . marriage his
SEX
Editor,  The Ubyssey, Sir:
There isa curious contradiction in your article of last
week's Page Friday.
You think that western
civilization has been going
down the slippery slope towards disaster by granting
j^ffmoo tn ■ornmen and, at the
same time, you consider holy
matrimony a rather wicked
institution controlled by the
unprincipled members of
MOM (Mother or Marriage).
It will be impossible to condemn both of these as evils,
ifyou believe in co-habitation
without the benefit of priest
or state.
Denial of the vote to women must leave them in a state
of dependence which from
their point of view can only
be rectified by placing a
strong ring through the nose,
A bond between themselves and men such as we
find in marriage.
By giving women the freedom to take their destiny into
their own hands, one may
eventually expect to approach
them on a plane of equality,
at least, as regards sexual
pursuits.
Unfortunately the time
elapsed since 1921, the year
of universal suffrage, has
been too short for a complete
change in outlook when it
comes to man-woman relations and relationships and,
hence, your criticism of women's double role, of wishing
to be treated as equals while
retreating into the shell of
"fallen angels" femininity on
certain occasions, is true but
unfair.
However let me congratulate you on the fearless position as to co-habitation.
Too often the male of the
species has leanings towards
free-love or some such variant as a harem but is really
adverse to allowing the female of the species the same
privilege.
Take co-habitation built on
mutual respect and desire
(mostly desire,  no* doubt).
This requires a certain degree of equality, not only in
business but also in domestic
matters.
Take note Mr. Kelsey, you
should have to do the dishes
and clean the house once in
a while since your partner in
this affair will undoubtedly
have a regular job.
If she did not have an independent income, she would
be a slave unable to throw
you out of the house as easily
as you would so to her.
Your conclusion, that marriage is a pernicious habit,
is absolutely correct and
should have been the premise
from which your article could
have taken off.
A beautiful opportunity to
make a point was missed
since one cannot really say
anything good about the institution of holy matrimony.
It assumes the possibility
of finding a partner whom
one will hold in esteem for
the remainder of one's life.
c u s. o
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY SERVICE OVERSEAS
APPLICATION FORMS
Fill them out.   Get them in as soon as possible.
Selection interviews begin on
January 24th
Of course, so goes the
theory behind it, you must
not be allowed to "sample"
the "merchandise" with
which you enter into this indissoluble relationship.
To keep marriage as a going custom, we must brand
everything else evil and particularly sexual indulgences
before marriage.
Abstinence is the order of
the day for those who are not
enjoying blissful domesticity
in the bonds of holy matrimony.
Abstinence is pronounced
holy and generations of saps
are torn between their desire
to be holy and their lusts.
What a vicious method of
torture yet without it, the
institution of holy matrimony
must fall.
Once pleasure is introduced,
people begin to ask questions
which are bound to lead to
the realization that sexual arrangements allowing the exchange of partners, and other
practises, will lead to a more
enjoyable life.
I, for one, vote for pleasure.
Let the "virtuous" delight
in their masochism.
WULFING von SCHLEINITZ
Arte VII
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
Richard Alpert - Ph.D.
and
Steve Durkee - Artist
Speakng on "If Mescalne, L.S.D., Mornng Glory seeds,
etc., were avalable, how would you use them?"
Today — Noon — 25c — Auditorium
STUDENTS:-
Learn about Atomic  Energy of
Canada Limited
And employment opportunities it has to offer
by attending an illustrated lecture in Room 250
of the Chemstry Bldg., at 12:30 p.m., Jan. 12th.
See a working model of Western Canada's first Reactor
on January 13th or January 14th, in the lower corridor of
the Hennings Bldg., between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
HAPPY DAYS
by Samuel  Beckett
Student Performance - Mon., Jan. 17 - 7:30 p.m.
TICKETS 75e
THE AUTHOR OF "WAITING FOR GODOT" WRITES A WHIMSICAL COMEDY OF
THE ABSURD, WITH JOY COGHILL, DIRECTED BY KLAUS STRASSMANN.
Note: Some tickets at 75c will be available for all the other performances,
January 14-22.
SUPPORT CAMPUS THEATRE Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Chief Mathias Joe stole the show
Convertible lace stole
WOMEN'S
EDITORS:
Joan GodseJI
Musa Lincke
Sorry, I'm not interested
// you're on the prowl,
just tilt your cap forward
A sarong kebaya from Malaya
Twenty attractive models wearing
authentic costumes from 13 different
countries brought the excitement of faraway lands to Brock Hall on a very
'blah day in January.
It was UBC's 1&66 International Fashion Show, sponsored by World University Service to raise funds for a clinic
in Nicaragua.
Chief Mathias Joe of B.C.'s Squamish
Band stole the show as he stomped down
the runway in eagle quills, ermine tails,
Russian glass beads, doeskin and bells.
Each glass bead on the Big Chiefs
hand-made vest was traded for one fur
pelt with the first white men in B.C.
Deer hoofs and bells tied around his
ankles were for sound effect.
A dark-eyed Philippine beauty, robed
in a loosely-draped satin skirt and beaded top easily drew oohs and ahs from the
males in the audience.
Her pale yellow lace shawl can be
worn sari-style or as a mantilla.
Nurudeen Adedipe modelled his blue
poplin coat and pink Guinea brocade
pants, which are typically worn by the
younger generation in Nigeria.
Ade's hand woven, hand-embrodered
hat of many colors doesn't just keep his
head warm.
When he wears the hat over his forehead, it means he is "on the prowl."
But when the hat sits on the back of
his head, it means he's "not interested."
JOAN GODSELL wrote
and POWELL HARGRAVE pixed
Beautiful Janet Tai modelled Malaya's
traditional sarong kebaya—a two-piece,
figure-revealing costume of autumn red
and metallic gold.
A long golden lace and matching gold
slippers added a finishing touch.
Vancouver Province fashion co-ordlna-
tor Winnifred Mathers commentated the
international fashion show, while CBC's
Tom Baird made music on the grand
piano. Tuesday, January 11,  1966
THE     MOOBYSSEY
Page  1
AGGIES  WEEK TO FROLIC
Farmers share best of balls
"TH»»r -3T*€^   IS   Such f?   6«<e€.   **jl h*   t**.ks
Mysterious Twong Pouch
Aggie's gift to Campus
For any so-called student on
this campus who doesn't know
about the Twong (you had better not admit that to anyone)
this article brings you into the
realm of the educated. Even
though all members of this
institution should know of
Twong it is also a well known
and irrevocable fact that only
Aggies possess them.
The original Twong was unearthed, in the remote expanses of darkest C-lot but is believed to have actually originated in Africa.
At first it was thought to
be just a hairy piece of hide
sewn into a carrying bag.
After some investigation, however, it was discovered that
there were no seams to the
Twong and it was decided
that it was a Twong Pouch
and not actually the Twong
itself.
Soon the Aggies (who found
the  Twong  Pouch  during  a
Soil Science lab) began to notice the many uses of the
Twong Pouch — carrying
books, notes, shoes, lunch, etc.
They also discovered that they
felt much better all around
when they had their Twong
Pouch close at hand.
Now that the general location was known it did not
take long to unearth more
Twong Pouches and soon
every Aggie could be seen
proudly displaying his Twong
Pouch.
Being good fellows, they
made Twong Pouches available to Engineers, Artsmen,
and Sciencemen but amazingly as soon as one of these inferior types would lay a hand
on a Twong Pouch it would
shrivel up into a tiny ball
and disappear. Apparently
only the strong, upstanding
and extremely virile Aggies
could do justice to a Twong
Pouch.
Here's why an apple a day
is worth your donation
Do you realize that one raw apple of 2Vi" diameter
weighing 5.33 oz. contains:
Water, 85 per cent — Energy, 70 cal. — Proteins,
trace — Carbohydrates, 18 gm. — Copper, 8 mg. — Iron,
0.4 mg. — Vitamin A, 50. I.U. — Thiamine, 0.04 mg. —
Riboflavin, 0.02 mg. — Niacin, 0.1 mg. — Ascorbic Acid,
3.0 mg.
And you can have all of this for one small donation
to the Crippled Childrens Fund on the Aggies Apple
Day — TODAY.
After considerable investigation, it was discovered that
the Twong Pouch was the
outer covering of a Twong
which has miraculous powers
and could bestow these upon
the holder of its skin—namely
an Aggie.
Every year now, a celebration is held to commemorate
and exalt the coming of
Twong. Every Aggie joins
this celebration which has
come to be known as the
"Farmer's Frolic".
The less fortunate members
of the student body not well
enough endowed to be Aggies
may take advantage of this
opportunity to see a real
Twong Pouch resplendant in
its formal dress. This can best
be described as resembling
mohair.
Every woman on campus
longs for the chance to be the
personal date of a Twong
packing Aggie but failing that
will also date other types in
order to just get close enough
to see the Twongs at first
hand.
Do you know what a Twong
Pouch is? If you still aren't
sure about what the illustrious Pouch of Twong is, be
sure to come to the "Farmer's
Frolic" on Saturday night.
Just ask any Aggie and I'm
sure he will be more than glad
to show you his Twong Pouch.
Hard times dance
Sat. in armory
"Aggie" Week ends with Hard-times Dance!
The Farmer's Frolic, the annual ball sponsored by the
"Aggies" will be held Saturday, January 15, in the U.B.C.
Armouries, from 9 p.m. - 1 p.m.
This year's dance promises to
be the most outstanding yet,
as it has grown in stature to
gain a reputation as the friendliest dance on campus. The
dress for this swinging affair
is "hardtimes", enabling all
who participate an opportunity
to enjoy a good time while being relaxed and casual.
• •      •
This is not a square dance
but a dance with such favorites
as the Mexican Hat Dance,
Polka, Waltz, and the newer
popular dances. The 'well-
known band playing for this
Frolic is HANK the HOBO
with the HILLBILLIES, a
group renouned in Western
Canada as outstanding entertainers.
A half-time show has been
added this year which features
the versatile Cumberland 4.
This group has been very act-
tive in the Vancouver area. The
group is back together after
a layoff for exams and has
started tremendously well by
playing at Hy's Encore and
other night spots around town.
This group promises to put on
an  excellent  performance.
• •.    -*
Costume     prizes     will     be
awarded at half-time to the
best, or rather, to the worst-
dressed  couple.
This will not be a good
dance — it will be a Great
Dance — and it is shown that
most who attended last year
will be back for more fun. So
if you have not attended before, come and join your
friends at this year's Farmer's
Frolic.
Frolics  in
in  a  nutshell
FROLIC
• Only $2.75 a couple
• From 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
• At the Armouries.
• Tickets from AMS or any
Aggie.
• Features Hank the Hobo.
• Dress — Hard^Times.
• Half-time     entertainment,
The Cumberland 4.
• Costume prize.
• Saturday, Jan. 15.
THIS CHILD and many others
like him will benefit from
your contribution to the
Crippled Children's Fund.
Buy an apple from the
"Aggies" today and support
this worthwhile cause.
Farmers must
provide more
—Expo theme
Seven and a half acres at
the 1&67 World Exhibition in
Montreal are now being prepared for the agricultural pavilion which will house "...
one of the most original and
creative presentations ever
shown to man."
At Expo, Agriculture will
tell the story of how man has
been able to master his environment and make it produce
food, and how man is now facing the challenge of feeding
an already hungry world with
an   ever-increasing  population.
The Agricultural exhibition
features a "sun acre"—an area
supporting crops and animals.
Surrounding this central unit
will be a group of pavilions
displaying' loosely connected
subjects, all designed to provide Expo's thirty million estimated visitors with "a walk
through nature". These will include sections on soils, crops,
mechanization, animals, marketing, and farm management.
It will be shown that a farmer
needs an education in the basic
sciences and must use the flow
(Continued on  Page  2)
SEE: MORE FARMERS Page 2
THE     MOOBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11,  1966
MOOBYSSEY
Member  Better  Barns  Association
Published once in a blue-moon by the campus blue-
shirts — the AGGIES. Opinions are not necessary. This
paper is distributed free to anyone sick enough to read it.
EDITOR: Bob Shafto
ASS. ED.: Mike Sanders
AUS PRES.: Ed Curylo
CARTOONS: Diana Erickson (from Ace Reid)
Roselynn Stevenson
REPORTERS AND DESK: Rick Maynard, Grant Huffman,
Larry Rogerson, Tony Milkovich, Dan Cumming, Jerry
Zednai, Jim Collins, Dave Parsons, Al Ford. And special
thanks to The Ubyssey newsdesk.
"... Hail to thee, 'blythe' spirit."
AN EDITORIAL
Sssss... Aggies!
"What are a bunch of farmers doing at a university?"
"Let's face it, Aggie, you are out of the picture.
Take a look at the world, Aggie. We are booming! We
need bridges, roads, factories, mills, refineries, and railways. Why are you at a university, dung shoveller?"
Yes, Aggie, take a look at the world. In the corner
of a square in a small village in India a group of starving people seek shelter from the sun.
• • •
They are beggars, starving because the more fortunate, who have houses and are usually the providers,
are also starving. It is the end of the dry season. The
monsoons are late. They may not come at all — they
didn't come last year.
"Yep, those people are hard pressed for bridges
and man alive do they ever need railways."
• • •
Now, take a look at Afghanistan. Years ago it was
decided to help this country get on its feet, so foreign
engineers moved in and built beautiful bridges—unused,
towering above the fair weather road which has been
used since before the time of Genghis Khan. Yes,
Afghanistan is very grateful — for these outstanding
landmarks. Yet still they starve.
Billions starve
Probably only half of the world population is starving
or is not receiving a balanced diet. The increase in population during 1967 is not likely to exceed two people
per second on the average. If food production is not
increased, only about four billion people in the world
will be inadequately fed by the year 2000.
• • •
Agriculture students are striving to learn how one
can increase yields to help feed the world; how to get
two blades of grass where formerly there was only one;
how to get an extra egg per week from hens; how to get
sheep to produce triplets and quadruplets instead of
singles and doubles; how to produce market pullets in
only eight week; how to feed the world as it is now
and as it will be in the years to come.
• • •
Aggie, you are only concerned with such lowly
things as soil, sheep, cattle, bacteria, vegetables, swine,
grass, fruit, grain, and humanity.
You are only concerned with the most fundamental
way in which to make this world a better place to live!
Sssssssss .. . Aggies! . . . sssss.
ITS IIST A60OT T*$ TIME WERV MMMlNCr 5 ySMTOtR ff TWRE MN'T SWE
OTHER \rW "W  MNKt V\JNW<r!
Dean stresses UBCs role
in province agriculture
Food has always been the
primary necessity of life. In
the present rapid evolution of
an industrial world society,
an adequate supply of food is
of paramount importance if
men are to achieve social
stability. To provide and
maintain an adequate supply
of food, agriculture must be
prepared to utilize to the utmost the resources of modern
science.
Although this challenge is
world-wide, it is well to appreciate how we are attempting to meet it in our own province.
Meetings are now under
way at three regional locations in the province to discuss the outlook for British
Columbia agriculture. These
have been arranged by the
Honorable Minister of Agriculture for British Columbia
and are designed to promote
forward-looking discussions of
the long and short-term developments, both technological and economic .which may
affect the future of agriculture in this province.
The discussions will centre
upon a specific presentation
on suggestions for the longer
term Agricultural Develop-
for each region through 1975-
85. Presentations will also be
given on the more immediate
demand outlook for crops and
animal products presently
available in the province.
Papers will also be present
ed on the outlook for new
scientific and technological
research, with a conscious effort to recognize current research  gaps   in  the   light  of
DEAN EAGLES
. . looking ahead
changing  conditions  and the
emergence of new problems.
The overall objective of
these sessions is an endeavor
to ensure the maintenance of
the agriculture of the region
at a maximum level of production of top quality products. The Faculty of Agriculture is participating in these
discussions with representatives from the provincial Department of Agriculture, the
Canada Department of Agriculture, together with agricultural producers and others
serving the industry.
This first Outlook Conference shold give direction to
evaluations and solutions of
the complex problems facing
agriculture in this province,
not only for the benefit of the
primary producer but also the
ultimate consumer.
Blythe A. Eagles, dean,
Faculty of Agriculture,
The University of British
Columbia.
MORE   FARMERS
(Continued from Page 1)
of farm papers, bulletins, radio
and T.V. reports; that he must
have an intimate knowledge of
mechanical and automatic
equipment; that he must learn
to select from crops, varieties,
breeds, and operation techniques that are best suited to
his business.
The rise of computers to analyze farm operations and to
indicate the most desirable
managerial   procedures   is   an
example of  how  management
in farming might be illustrated.
The population of the world
will nearly double by the year
2000. In contrast, the rate of
production of food per capita
is very slow, and this must be
increased markedly if hunger
and malnutrition are not to
overwhelm mankind. This will
be the fundamental message
in agriculture's story at Expo
67 and is the challenge facing
"Man the Provider". Tuesday, January 11,  1966
THE     MOOBYSSEY
Page 3
CONSTRUCTION of the $4,355,000 building to house the UBC faculties of forestry and agriculture has begun. The new building will include a 150 seat auditorium and a 35,000 volume
library for the use of students and faculty, and will enable the two faculties to launch a joint
teaching program under a plan developed over the past ten years.
Leftovers
from the
feed trough
A turkey weighing 62 pounds,
and estimated to be equal when
'dead to between 280 and 300
Christmas dinners, won the
heaviest turkey competition at
the International Poultry Show
at Olympia, England.
Prince Charles of Britain
won a first at the Smithfield
Agricultural Show with his
Devon steer, Climsland Jasper.
Bay Street's George Hees to
a farmer in the rural riding of
Northumberland:
"Mighty fine Guernseys you
got there. Just about the nicest
I ever seen."
Farmer in reply: "Holsteins
—and the verb form is 'saw"."
•      *      •
A pair of Aggies are seriously interested in producing a
boar with a "gilt" complex
while several others are looking over the new crop of lambs
and are wondering "wether" or
not . . .
From the Frontier Press:
Neepawa, Manitoba, Jan. 12,
1905. By the destruction of the
Opera House block here and
several stocks of merchants, a
loss of $75,000 was sustained
this morning. It took the firemen three hours to get water.
•      •      •
LONDON (AP)—The Agricultural research council here
says pigs can be taught to control the temperature in their
sty.
Pigs at a research farm have
learned to press a lever controlling an infra-red heater
when they are cold and a
second switch to turn on a fan
when they are hot.
Building spurs
naming game
Former UBC president
touted as best choice
By LAWRENCE G. ROBINSON
The University of British Columbia has been outstanding in its contribution towards the development of higher
education in this province and in Canada. From its earliest
beginnings, the Faculty of Agriculture has served as a keel
to the University.
The admirable and plausible roles of both the University and the faculty have been possible through the efforts
and aspirations of many people.
Developed new faculty
But among those that have
shaped the formation and
early years of this faculty one
name surpasses all others in
brilliant qualities — Klinck.
When the Faculty of Agriculture was to be established
at the University, the President of the University, Dr.
Wesbrook, was looking for a
man who "must develop agriculture as a profession comparable in all respects to other
professions".
There were few people in
whose hands Dr. Wesbrook
could confidently thrust such
a great ideal; there were even
fewer men with minds stout
enough to undertake such a
herculean task.
In May, 1914, Dr. Klinck,
then at Macdonald College,
was invited by the president
to be dean of the faculty. Apart
from what was expected of
him by the President, Dr.
Klinck realized that he had to
clear the land for experimental purposes and select a teaching staff, without either of
which there would be no faculty.
Not many people today,
directly or indirectly involved
with this University, do know
that an Aggie was President of
the University. After five
years as Dean of the Faculty
of Agriculture, Dr. Klinck succeeded Dr. Wesbrook as President of the University in 1919.
Belongs with greatness
It is this man, with a high
sense of foresight, after whom,
it is hoped the $4.3 million
Agriculture - Forestry complex
will  be  named.
In so doing, we shall be making the name of Klinck an
ever-living word around the
University like. Wesbrook and
Buchanan — for it is among
such great names that it belongs. Let this name grow to
be time-honoured like the University it helped bring to light
and the faculty it did bring to
life.
If remembrances are the
glimmering arches that span
the summits of the mind, then
"KLINCK BUILDING" should
stand as a shining remembrance to a man with unmatch-
able capacity for organization
and leadership, and a man
with selfless dedication, courage and conviction.
AGGIE IMPRESSED
BY  THE KLINK
Bi-faculty complex ready by   67
By RICK MAYNARD
Dean Blythe Eagles (Agriculture) enthusiastically showed me plans of the building
that will set a New Trend on
campus. I was impressed! The
four story, $4,355,000, G-
shaped building is being built
for realistic fluidity.
It is designed for the efficient flow of student traffic
from one place to another.
Twelve years ago the idea of
housing the two faculties under one roof was conceived
by Dean Eagles and Dean Allen (former Dean of Forestry),
who realized that it must be
designed so that the two faculties would always maintain their individuality and
integrity.
Construction is unique Unusual and efficient use of
space means many changes
from the traditional layout.
Corridors are wider near the
doors, as the larger classrooms are near the entrances,
and lockers are in alcoves
with a small changing room
in each alcove.
Calculators and typewriters are in sound-proofed
rooms, and there will be a
special receiving room for animals. There will also be a
storage room for high explosives that has a wall which
will blow out rather than up,
so that the whole building
will not collapse!
Like relaxing?
a "com
mon" room on the first floor
will have moveable partitions
for those who desire privacy.
The girls have their own common room with study facilities and a siesta patio outside.
Study areas? — three — one
for those who like to study
out loud, a strict one, and
the library, which will have
thirty to forty thousand volumes, mainly relating to Agriculture and Forestry.
The large lecture labs and
comfortable seminar rooms
are already booked up to 24
times a week. Lecture rooms
may be used by all UBC students, but are especially designed  to  meet  our  needs.
Instrument labs will be constructed for optimum mutual
use, and will be fully equipped for photogrammetry, surveying, dairying, animal hus
bandry, agronomy, soils, food
tech., bacteriology, and so on.
There were many difficulties to overcome and vast
amounts of research to arrive
at such a creative conclusion.
Large and small decisions had
to be made: What tile should
be used? What cupboard design? Which grain of wood?
Each question had to be hashed out until the best material
was found for each situation.
The big question now is,
when will it be finished? Dean
Eagles, forever bubbling with
optimistic enthusiams, says
"We'll move, in at the beginning of the 1967 term, for
sure." Page 4
THE     MOOBYSSEY
Tuesday, January  11,  1966
HANK THE HOBO — Once again this swinging group will
perform for the lively Aggie Hard-times Dance. Hank and
his group have played at various night-spots around town
and have become a very popular and well-known group.
^
tt£Y, CoMin yew Ftvvo\*j$, xm. OS WHERE \NE Ml&ttT sec Uem.
COV080WS ?
\
■HfVJAKE, you   o\)i»»TA   B6_  MORE.   CfvRS-FuV- - THNv>s  CA-«
vJiv3uR you j\st ENRcnARRtD"
Horse scents will beat
common scents every time
• Rub on boots and enjoy the prestige of being identified
as a westerner.
• Be a pedestrian but smell like an equestrian.
• For the man about town who likes to horse around.
• Stable-izes all household aromas.
• Your friends will say "Eureeka".
• Smell like a pony — not a phoney.
• The more scentsitive will re-act instinktively
• A dung good product, but frankly — it stinks!
IN AGRICULTURE
Many fields covered
Soil  science
The fact that all food comes
directly or indirectly from the
soil substantiates the importance of soil science.
This is a broad field and
embraces many other sciences.
Soil microbiology, soil conservation, soil fertility, soil chemistry, soil genesis, classification, surveying, and cartography are taken and are related to soil-plant relationships, representing the scope
of study of a soils student.
Taking a four-year course
however, the student in soils
is exposed (as are all agriculture students) to courses outside the faculty itself, such as
chemistry, physics, math, and
microbiology.
Thus a particular soil when
under study undergoes determination of pH, quantitative
presence of elements essential
to plant growth, and moisture
content at various tensions.
Soils vary greatly from one
area to another, thus making
each a different and separate
problem.
The "dirt" boys can be seen
to be true scientists devoted
to their work of continuous
research.
Agriculture
economics
Economics in agriculture is
a far reaching field; it is the
business end of agriculture.
At the farm level it deals
with farm organization, accounting, and production decisions. Marketing and processing of agricultural products
are other fields in themselves.
Government policy for agriculture   is   another.
At the farm level Ag. Economics deals with the use and
choice of input factors and
strives to combine those inputs so as to maximize profits.
Marginal analysis of data
and principles of factor substitution are the important considerations.
Production in agriculture is
complicated by uncertainties
not found in other industries.
Risks of weather, insects,
diseases, and market fluctuations must be coped with.
The agricultural industry is
characterized by many thousands of decision makers each
arriving at independent decisions.
These decisions and their effect are often unpredictable.
Processing and marketing
firms must try to gauge and
co-ordinate supply and demand.
Studying the effect of price
changes in consumer preference is a function of Ag. Economics. The response to these
changes is often delayed by
the biological factors affecting
agriculture.
Government legislation, tariffs, quotas, and other restrictions are pertinent in many decisions affecting agriculture.
Studying their effect is important in Ag. Economics.
Agricultural
mechanics
Agricultural mechanics is a
much broader field than one
might first realize, for it. is not
just   concerned   with   farm
machines.
Closely allied with agricul-
t u r a 1 engineering students,
they may also study food
mechanics, drainage, irrigation, and farm structures.
A broad background in
math, physics, and chemistry,
is required in this field as well
as the general requisites of the
faculty.
Often considered the most
lucrative division of the agricultural industry, the Agricultural machinery companies offer many good positions for
graduates.
Poultry science
This very important department of the Faculty of Agriculture consists of different fields
including nutrition, pathology,
genetics, processing, and marketing, all of which are important fields for the graduate
in Agriculture.
The department is very
active in research and is
known throughout Canada and
the U.S. for their achievements
in nutrition, genetics, and pathology.
However, this has not limited the Department from helping the poultry industry in
B.C. Many of the ideas used
used today have been initiated
through this department of
Agriculture.
However, with the increase
in technical knowledge in this
field it is virtually essential
that one specialize, not only in
just the poultry industry, but
specialize in a specific field
in poultry.
Because of this, graduates
must be fully aware of the
problems and research in his
particular field. With this tool,
each graduate can command
very rewarding jobs soon after
graduating.
Plant
science
Plant Science is one of the
major departments in the Agriculture faculty. Included under
this department are options in
Agronomy, Food Technology,
Horticulture, Plant Protection
and Plant Science. Students
may major in their choice of
programs but it must be remembered that in dealing with
a science such as this, there
cannot be any definite boundary between the different
divisions.
To gain a well-rounded background in the field, courses
from all options must be included in the course of study.
It is a credit to the department that students taking the
Plant Science program have
at their disposal specialists in
the various fields, to whom
they are able to direct questions and discuss any problems
which may arise.
Because of this ease of communication between student
and staff, a significant number of students continue at the
graduate level.
Graduates in Plant Science
are readily employed, each
year,  by government  and  in
dustry for positions requiring
a sound knowledge of Plant
Science.
Dairying
Dairying as an agricultural
department actually does not
have a great deal to do with
cows, except that it is concerned with milk and related
bacteriology and chemistry.
This is a versatile course,
however, as. is shown by the
fact that just as many graduates from this department enter the brewing industry as the
dairy industry.
Students in dairying take a
four year course which gives
them a liberal education in
agriculture as well as chemistry, biochemistry, zoology, bacteriology, and math.
At the end of four years, a
dairying graduate is qualified
to work in dairy laboratories,
the brewing industry, meat
and food processing labs, government research labs, food
processing labs, government
research labs, food and drug
labs, water testing labs, and
opportunities offer themselves
also in medical laboratories.
The department of dairying
also offers Masters and Doctors degrees for those students
wishing to go on.
Animal science
The Department of Animal
Science encompasses all the
fields of animal production:
breeding, nutrition, physiology,  and management.
Students pursuing a course
of study in the department are
at liberty to choose their area
of specification and proceed
to their degree as a major in
this field.
Those students not interested
in this major, still find it helpful to take courses in the department to further their own
knowledge and understanding
of Agriculture as a whole.
Briefly the study involved
in each division is as follows:
Animal Breeding is primarily
concerned with developing
better breeds of cattle, sheep,
and swine, to meet ever-
increasing demands for food
production. Animal nutrition
attempts to study the most effective methods of feeding to
provide fastest growth and
maintain metabolic requirements.
Animal Physiology is mainly the study of the animal
body and its responses relating to maintenance, growth,
and reproduction.
Needless to say management
is extremely important in that
the individual producer by
competent handling of his herd
or flock can most beneficially
meet the needs of the consumer.
Graduate facilities at U.B.C.
in Animal Science are rapidly
expanding and are on a par
with the best equipped and
most modern labs in the country. Tuesday, January 11, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
MAD MEL AND CUSTOMER
. . . ringing up another sale
IT'S A  RAGGE  SHOPPE
Bad Boys  more
than just a store
RECIPES
If you think a men's clothing store is just a place to buy
men's clothes, then stay away
from the Bad Boys' Ragge
Shoppe.
This is the place that doesn't
only sell clothes, it sells something  else.
Like Peruvian bedroom slippers, which are made to fit
Peruvian feet and so a number of them have to be sewn
together to fit a Nordeameri-
cano's lumbering toe-holders.
Or like a genuine U.S. Navy
pea-jacket — brand new.
Or like shirt-jackets with
ibell-bottom sleeves.
Of course, the regular men's
wear sits apologetically on
the shelves, but under the fiery
eye of Mad Mel — former local DJ and partner in the Bad
Boy's — it's all they can do
to retain their composure.
Well, how would you like
to be placed beside polka-dot
shirts with inch polka-dots, or
flowered shirts with white
cuffs and collars or white shirts
with flowered cuffs and collars?
The choice on the latter is
optional, although only about
a dozen of each exist in the
world.
Mad Mel or one of his merry
crew will show you shirts with
collars so big they have to have
two buttons to hold them down.
Or if shirts don't drive you
wild, how about corduroy
pants.
Or bowlers. Or top hats.
Or a genuine 100 per cent
Regulation Beatle-type hat,
airlifted from London via New
York. Leather ones, or the
cloth Donovans.
For as Mel will tell you
the things the Bad Boys' have
are unique, to put it mildly.
One,- two,- four- or twelve- of
a kind items are their specialty.
Like, bring in a cow and
Bad Boy's will make you hides
(like Sonny and Cher's).
As for prices, the Bad Boy's
attitude toward money is expressed by their cash register,
says Mel.
It's a  steam-cleaned  toilet.
"We  don't give a — about
money," Mel says.
The Bad Boy posts just one
word of warning on their 315
Seymour street entrance to the
basement store. "Restricted to
those over 16".
"We like 'em with it, but
we don't go screamies," Mad
Mel explains.
And there he and his partners sit, waiting to show you
a corduroy military-style jacket
with epaulettes, a red-dyed soft
leather jacket, hand-crafted
crazy ski sweaters, or ... .
Back to the kitchen, woman!
About 1910 — when good
digestion waited on appetite
and health waited on both of
them, Mrs. E. W. Kirk published the "Eleventh and Enlarged Edition" of her "cheap,
concise and reliable cookery
book."
• •      •
And in 1965, it appeared
under our Christmas tree —
a subtle hint from an English
grandmother who believes,
like most misguided males,
that women belong in the
kitchen, perhaps barefoot,
perhaps pregnant, but IN THE
KITCHEN.
The following recipes are
designed for such women:
• •     •
HAGGIS (Genuine Scotch)
Procure the large stomach
bag of a sheep, also one of the
smaller bags called "King's
Hood", together with the
pluck, which is the lights,
liver, and heart.
The bags must be well washed, first in cold water, then
plunged in boiling water, and
scraped. Great care must be
taken of the large bag; let it
lie and soak in cold water,
with a little salt, all night.
Wash also the pluck.
In boiling (1V6 hours) leave,
the windpipe attached, and
let the end of it hang over the
edge of the pot, so that evil
impurities may pass freely
out.
• •      •
When cold,  cut away the
windpipe and any bits of skin
or gristle that seem improper.
Then take the large bag
which has been thoroughly
cleaned, and put in minced
hearts, lights, small bag very
small, (sic) and a small portion of the liver along with
V2 lb. suet, 2 small teacupfuls
of oatmeal, (previously dried
before the fire), black and
Jamaica pepper and salt, also
V2 pint of beef gravy.
Sew up with needle and
thread, prick over to prevent
bursting, and boil in water for
3 hours.
Serve in a napkin on a dish,
without garnish or gravy, it
being sufficiently rich in itself.
(Makes a capital dinner for
the bairns.)
RAW BEEF SANDWICHES
(A New Mode)
or: Beef Sandwiches Ain't
What They Used To Be
Scrape the pulp from a lean
fresh steak by laying it flat
on a plate. Use a sharp knife,
and scrape from you, leaving
nothing behind but the skin.
Dissolve V\ oz. gelatine in one
gill water, and when cool mix
in Vfe gill cream, then the
meat, which should be prepared the last thing.
Pour out on a flat dish to
get quite cold, then either
stamp it out in rounds and
place between thin slices of
bread and butter the same size
and shape, or cut in dices and
make the sandwiches in the
usual way.
ARTIFICIAL ASSES' MILK
Take four sheep's trotters
and simmer 20 minutes in a
pint of milk until reduced to
one-half pint; then add one-
half ounce refined sugar and
a pint of fresh and good cow's
milk.
Excellent   in   wasting   diseases.
P.S.—We   don't   know   what
trotters are either.
BAY
THE PRIZE
Paul  Newman,  Ed.   G.
Robinson, Elke Sommeus
—Plus—
TWILIGHT OF HONOR
R. Chamberlain
Nick Adams
Students 75c
DELTA
H.
JAN. 14 & 15
T BIRD GANG
Ed Nelson
—Plus—
THE FLY
Marshall, V. Price
—Plus—
EVIL EYE
QhwdiovL & WnhqaiL <£id.
VARSITY SHOP
4444 West 10th Avenue
CLOSING OUT
SALE
OUR COMPLETE STOCK OF MEN'S CLOTHING AND
FURNISHINGS
50*> Off
NO EXCHANGES — NO REFUNDS — ALL SALES FINAL
Alterations extra
OPEN FRIDAY EVENING TIL 9 P.M
< Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1966
B.C. CHAMPIONS
Arnet rink starts
defending title
The 1965 B.C. curling champions took the first step in
defending their title Sunday.
Skip Jack Arnet and his rink
of Terry Miller, Glen Walker
and Soren Jensen won both the
A and B events in the Thunderbird Sport Centre's club playdowns.
The rink now advances to
the Zone Three playdowns,
leading to the provincial championships Jan. 22 and 23 at
the Capilano Winter Club,
North Vancouver.
Arnet took the A event of
the double draw with an extra-
end 10-9 victory over the determined John Munro rink
Saturday.
Munro,  the  1962 B.C. high
JV hoopsters
one win away
from Victoria
UBC Jayvees moved to within one game of league-leading
Victoria by trouncing CYO in
a Junior Men's League basketball game Saturday at King
Edward Gym.
Led by Sam Vandermuelen's
27 points, UBC scored an impressive and easy 104-45 vie*
tory over the cellar-dwellers.
The victory was the eighth in
nine games for the Jayvees.
Teammates Bob Molinski
and Glen Carter backed Van-
dermuelen with 14 points each.
Bob Kelsch bagged 22 for
the losers.
UBC plays YMCA at King
Ed  Thursday.
UBC (104) Vandermuelen 27,
Molinski 14, Blumenscheit 11,
Carter 14, Kainer 9, Langley 9,
Jagger 8, Rice 8, Quinn 4.
CYO (45) Kelsch 22, Kelly
10, McLean 4, Cameron 2, Collins 7.
LEAGUE  STANDINGS
Victoria 9-1
UBC 8-1
YMCA 7-3
N. Shore 3-6
Kerrisdale  3-6
CYO 2-7
>
SUB chairman
set to take
council report
Student Union Building
chairman Roger McAfee will
make a progress report to council next Monday.
McAfee said Monday he will
reveal the costs to date and
present a rough timetable for
construction which is expected
to begin this summer.
The student project, financed by AMS fees for the next
30 years will now cost an estimated $5 million to complete.
Construction costs have increased more than 25 per cent
in the past year, McAfee said.
SUB is designed to replace
Brock as the student meeting
place on campus.
school champion from Salmon
Arm, had his brothers Tom
and Peter and lead Ken
Spraggs, curling with him.
Munro forced the extra-end
when he counted one in the
twelfth.
The Salmon Arm skip "had
drawn to the four foot behind
an Arnet guard in the extra-
end with his final stone.
Arnet, showing the form
that carried him to the Dominion finals last year in Saskatoon, made a raise takeout for
the victory.
In the B event final, Arnet
won his seventh straight game,
victory over Daryl Nielsen
(Dave Etmanski, Calvin Hodge,
Doug Clayer).
3 records
set by UBC
in Tacoma
TACOMA — UBC Thunderbirds swim team defeated
Eastern Washington State College but lost to the University
of Puget Sound in an intercollegiate double-dual meet here
Friday.
UBC led by Jim Maddin and
Bob Walker swam to a 65-30
victory over EWSC but were
nipped 48-47 by the strong UPS
squad.
During the meet, three UBC
records were set.
Maddin, a freshman to the
Thunderbirds,. swam the 200
and 500 yard freestyle in two
minutes respectively.
Bob Walker equalled the 50
yard freestyle record time in
24.0 seconds.
Russ Quinn, performing in
his first collegiate meet, won
the three metre diving event
against the two American colleges.
NEWMAN
CLUB
PRESENTS THE ANNUAL
NEWMAN BALL
Frday, January 21, 1966
in the
REGAL BALLROOM
of
THE GEORGIA HOTEL
RECEPTION 8:30 DANCING 9:30 TO 1:30
FORMAL DRESS
TICKETS AT A.M.S. or NEWMAN CENTER
$5.00 per Couple
Engineers and Scientists:
Let's talk about a career at Boeing...
50-year leader in aerospace technology
Campus Interviews Monday and Tuesday, January 17 and 18
The most effective way to evaluate a company in terms of its potential for dynamic
career growth is to examine its past record, its current status, and its prospects
and planning for the future, together with
the professional climate it offers for the
development of your individual capabilities.
Boeing, which in 1966 completes 50 years
of unmatched aircraft innovation and production, offers you career opportunities as
diverse as its extensive and varied backlog. Whether your interests lie in the field
of commercial jet airliners of the future or
in space-flight technology, you can find at
Boeing an opening which combines professional challenge and long-range stability.
The men of Boeing are today pioneering
evolutionary advances in both civilian and
military aircraft, as well as in space programs of such historic importance as
America's first moon landing. Missiles,
space vehicles, gas turbine engines, transport helicopters, marine vehicles and basic
research are other areas of Boeing activity.
There's a spot where your talents can
mature and grow at Boeing, in research,
design, test, manufacturing or administration. The company's position as world
leader in jet transportation provides a
measure of the calibre of people with
whom you would work. In addition, Boeing
people work in small groups, where initiative and ability get maximum exposure.
Boeing encourages participation in the
company-paid Graduate Study Program at
leading colleges and universities near
company installations.
[fto looking forward to meeting engi-
|»ring, mathematics and science seniors
arjfl graduate students during our visit to
your campus. Make an appointment now
at your placement office. Boeing is an
equal opportunity employer.
(1) Boeing's new short-range 737 jetliner. (2)
Variable-sweep wing design for the nation's
first supersonic commercial jet transport.
(3) NASA's Saturn V launch vehicle will power
orbital and deep-space flights. (4) Model of
Lunar Orbiter Boeing is building for NASA.
(5) Boeing-Vertol 107 transport helicopter
shown with Boeing 707 jetliner.
Divisions:  Commercial Airplane   •   Military Airplane   •   Missile   •   Space   •   Turbine   •   Vertol   •   Also, Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories Tuesday, January 11,1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
— dennis gans photo
TOP-SCORING 'BIRD Bob Borazzoul loses ball to defending
Grizzlie Greg Hanson during UBC's Friday 74-69 upset of
the powerful Montana team. 'Birds lost Saturday game
93-66.
DURING WEEKEND
Birds, Grizzlies
split hoop action
By ED CLARK
UBC's basketball Thunderbirds gained a split with the
University of Montana Grizzlies over the weekend.
Thunderbirds   pulled   off   a
Rowers meet
The UBC rowing crew wil
hold an important meeting at
12:30 this Thursday in the War
Memorial Gymnasium. All
members are expressly instructed to attend.
All absentees will be expected to assemble at Port Moody
at 6:00 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 16.
Recital Slated
The student chamber music
class recital will be held Jan.
14 to 17 at 8:00 p.m. in the
Education Building room 100.
major upset with a 74-69 victory Friday but then were
crushed 93-66 by the Grizzlies
Saturday at War Memorial
Gym.
A jubilant 1,493 fans cheered the Birds to victory by witnessing Peter Mullins' crew in
its best form Friday.
Rookie forward John Olsen,
who looks as though he has
won a starting position from
Morris Douglas, hit for 21
points, three more than TJBC's
top  scorer Bob Barazzuol.
Birds from beginning to
end applied" their successful
full-court press and ran the
Grizzlies off the floor. They
managed to find the basket
more often than their American opponents to salt away
their biggest victory of the season.
But Saturday, it was a different tale.
Grizzlies, stll licking their
wounds from the night before,
hit the court in full stride.
They ruffled the feathers of
the startled Birds, shooting
with consistency, passing with
precision, and outrunning the
home squad before a near-
capacity 2,000 fans.
Center Tom Schilke, a 6'10"
beanstalk, hit for 19 points to
lead the MSU attack but Birds'
only consistent performer, Bob
Barazzuol, bagged a game high
21 points.
UBC led 51-50 after just
over a minute of play in the
DIAMOND      RIN««
A number of Scholarships
Each of $6,000 per annum are available
to suitable graduates in
Any Branch of Engineering or The
Applied Sciences who are interested in
Graduate Studies in Mining Engineering
at McGill University
Representatives of sponsoring companies will visit the
Campus on JANUARY 21st, 1966, to provide further
information. Appointments may be arranged through
your Placement Office.
SONNIT .
.    .   FROM $100
FIRBANKS
599  Seymour  -  Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
DONOVAN CAPS
THE ONLY PLACE IN
NORTH AMERICA TO
GET THE REAL THING
"No good when they are new . .
Look for a fully loaded bus and
a mud puddle and give it the
treatment."
"DONOVAN"
315 SEYMOUR
second half but Montana went
to work and outshot the Birds
22-6 in a period of seven
minutes.
UM outshot UBC 3-1 the
rest of the way and for the
last five minutes Mullins gave
his bench strength some action,
giving the regulars a not-so-
well deserved rest.
Thunderbirds play Seattle
Pacific College this weekend
in the American city.
Student loans
flow again as
backlog fixed
Dean Walter Gage is back
in business handing out Canada
Student loans to students.
Students trying to get loans
last week were refused application forms until the office
caught up on a backlog of applications.
Students may borrow $1,000
a year for five years, interest
free until six months after
graduation.
Gage attributed the temporary stoppage that ended Monday to "the number of people
who leave it to the last minute."
A Challenging
Career
Opportunity
Representatives of
THE BRITISH  COLUMBIA
PROBATION SERVICE
will   interview   male
candidates
for
PROBATION
OFFICER
POSITIONS
Enquire now at the University Office of Student
Placements for an appointment January 19, 20, 21,
1966.
AMS ELECTION
INFORMATION
Nominations Open Wed., Jan. 19, 1966
for the following positions:
Slate I
President
Second Vice-President
Secretary
Slate II
First Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator
Nominations must be received by the A.M.S. Secretary
before:
Slate I—4:00 p.m. Thursday, January 27, 1966
Slate 11—4:00 p.m. Thursday, February 3, 1966
Nominations will be posted only by the A.M.S. Secretary and will not be posted until such time as an eligibility form has been received by the Secretary.
The open candidates meeting will be held on Monday,
January 31, 1966, in Broek Lounge for the first slate,
and on Monday, February 7, 1966, in Brock Lounge.
ELECTION DATES ARE:
1st Slate-Wednesday, February 2, 1966
2nd Slate-Wednesday, February 9,1966
Nominations forms, elegibility forms and election rules
may be obtained either in the A.M.S. Office or from
the A.M.S. Secretary. Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1966
FOR  MASTERS   PROGRAM
Librarians need money
The UBC school of librarianship hopes to offer a masters degree in 1966 or 1967.
But, says librarianship head
Dr. Samuel Rothstein, more
money will he needed to do
it.
"We need to establish adequate scholarships," said Rothstein. "Very few librarians
can do a masters program
without financial assistance."
"There is pressure to expand to -meet the demand for
librarians~~by public and university libraries, but quality
is   essential,"   Rothstein said.
"The rate of expansion
should be planned so as not
LIBRARIAN ROTHSTEIN
. . . 'more money*
CUS means survey
due in February
Results of the national student means survey taken last
year will be released in February, says AMS president Byron Hender.
The survey, made by the
Canadian Union of Students,
was made to determine the
financial status of Canadian
students.
Hender said the survey was
discussed at the CUS director's
meeting in Ottawa.
The survey will be used as
the 'basis of a brief to the Canadian Universities' Foundation
Commission on higher education financing.
The directors also discussed
the inter-regional scholarship
exchange plan in which CUS
offers 60 scholarships for Canadian students to attend different Canadian universities.
Hender said CUS wants to
offer 100 scholarships next
year and hopes to provide 1,000
by. 1967.
Hender said the UBC division of CUS gives six scholarships now, but it is hoped the
number will be increased to
10 by 1967.
The CUS directors also
agreed to look into a low premium auto insurance program
for students similar to the life
insurance plan now offered by
CUS.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
to jeopardize our standards
of student selection or of
teaching."
Admission standards require a student to have a
bachelor's degree with at least
a second-class standing and
a working knowledge of a
second language. The 70 students in this year's class were
chosen from 140 applicants
who could meet admission
standards.
UBC's school was only the
35th in North America accredited by the Canadian and
American Library Association, though several hundred
institutions offer training in
library work.
The school receives many
letters from libraries inviting
applications for positions, and
each year representatives of
20 libraries visit campus to
interview potential employees.
Awards  liberal
in  grad  studies
Five MacKenzie King Travelling Scholarships of at
least $1,500 each will be
available for 1966 graduate
studies.
The scholarships are open
to graduates for study in
Britain or the U.S. in international or industrial relations.
Information is available
from Dean Walter Gage.
"THE"  PLACE
to meet
your  friends
is at the
iDo-NutDinerl
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak $1.35
Ifs Really Goodl
Full course meals
within your  income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
WAR & REVOLUTION IN VIET NAM
A Socialist Analysis
Speaker: JOHN RIDDEL
Editor of Young Socialist
Available at Bookstore, 10c.
Bu. 102 Wednesday noon
Forum
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6 RENTALS
£ TERMS
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CUSTOM PHOTOFIN1SHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stocktot
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
IS THERE
A FAST-GROWING,  DIVERSIFIED,
CANADIAN  COMPANY
YOU  CAN JOIN
NOW?
THERE IS: DOMTAR.
Domtar Limited is one of Canada's
most vital and diversified companies. It produces a world of
products for a world of people:
pulp and paper, building and
construction materials, chemical
products, packaging products,
products for the home and
kitchen.
University graduates in the engineering fields, in the sciences.
business administration, and in
commerce and finance will find
ample opportunities for their initiative and imagination within
the modern Domtar operations.
21,000 Canadian employees develop, produce and market Dom-
tar's wide range of consumer and
industrial products in 121 plants,
mills and laboratories from Victoria to Halifax. In addition, there
are Domtar facilities in the United
States, the United Kingdom,
Europe and the West I ndies.
A Domtar representative visits
Canadian universities throughout
the school year. He'll be happy
to discuss career opportunities
available today at Domtar. If you
would like a booklet describing
I
domtaA
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I
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1
1
1
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the opportunities within Domtar,
write to: Recruitment Services,
Domtar Limited, 2100 Sun Life
Building, Montreal, Quebec.
DOMTAR Tuesday, January 11,1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 11
SNOW SCULPTING CONTEST took modern art look last
week when sciencemen and engineers pitted artistic
talents. Bemused students examine science entry, now
melted into library lawn.
Cruise opens sanctuary
to quick change artists
Want to change the status
quo?
Fed up with antiquated
laws?
If so, you're just what the
old order ordered.
AMS first vice-president
Bob Cruise will preside at an
open meeting of the constitutional revision committee
at noon today.
Any students interested in
discussing amendments to
the AMS constitution is welcome to attend in Cruise's
office in Brock Hall.
®
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority
requires
COMMERCE  and  SCIENCE  (MATH.)  GRADUATES
for the following CAREER  OPPORTUNITIES:
—COMMERCE GRADUATE IN TRAINING (ONE)
—Accounting Option
INDUSTRIAL   RELATIONS  TRAINEE   (TWO)
—Commerce/Industrial Relations Option
—SYSTEMS ANALYST-PROGRAMMER (THREE)
—Maths. Major
—Commerce/Accounting Option
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS - JANUARY 17, 18
Please contact the Student Services Office
for an interview appointment.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CUSO Applications Forms
Application forms for a position next September
through the Canadian University Service Overseas
are available at International House for anyone who
plans to graduate or receive some other degree or
diploma this year.
It is recommended that these should be filled out at
the earliest convenience.
Constitutional Revisions Committee
An open meeting of the Constitutional Revisions Committee will be held on Thursday, January 13, at 12:30
pjn., in the office of the first vice-president, Brock
Hall.   Anyone interested in attending is welcome.
UNLIT LOTS
Fees spark park-in
HAMILTON (CUP - UNS) —
Police halted a student park-
In demonstration at McMaster
University Monday.
The park-in was organized
by McMaster's Student Representative Association to protest a decision by the university to charge a parking fee
for previously free lots.
The SRA said students were
not directly consulted on the
matter.
The fees came into effect
Monday.
Student cars blocked entrances to major parking facilities for more than two hours,
tying up traffic.
Students drove up to kiosks
and refused to pay the 25-cent
per car charge.
Police finally convinced
them to move by threatening
to have their cars towed away.
The SRA also protested the
"deplorable" condition, of the
unpaved, unlit parking lots
and access roads, and the failure of university authorities to
answer a recent question of the
legality of the parking fee for
off-campus visitors.
"We wanted each student to
stall for as much time as possible," said Bruce Hyland,
chairman of the SRA's ad hoc
committee. "If we can create
enough trouble, then perhaps
university authorities will realize that they are not even
doing the unimportant job of
providing parking efficiently
enough."
SRA member Bruce McKay
told the meeting that he suspected more than 75 per cent
of the money would be used to comply with city regulations
finance  the  collection of  the
fees.
He also said that it appeared
from the condition of the lots
that very little was being spent
on upkeep.
The legal question was
raised by the opinion of city
solicitor C. B. Demaray that a
fee cannot be charged for public parking unless parking lots
"In other words they must
have a license," he told Hamilton city council Jan. 4. "Regulations, however, do not prevent the university from
charging fees to students and
faculty."
An open general meeting of
the McMaster Students' Union
has been called for Jan. 12 to
discuss the parking situation.
ATOMIC ENERGY OF
CANADA LIMITED
will conduct
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
on
Thursday, January 13, 1966
Friday, January 14, 1966
for
Engineers Mathematicians
Physicists Metallurgists
Chemists Biologists
Commerce
CONTINUING EMPLOYMENT
Arrangements for interviews should
be made through your university
placement office
ATOMIC ENERGY OF CANADA LIMITED
Chalk  River, Ontario
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 11, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Interns turn extroverts
CHOR SOC
Meeting Wednesday 6 p.m.,
Bu. 104. Remember our Jam
Session 2 p.m. Saturday, Brock
Hall.
•     *     •
MARDI GRAS
Speedy Gonzales cartoons.
Wednesday noon, Aud. Admission 25c. Charity.
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
Dale Reubart and Francis
Adaskin playing Stravinsky's
Concerto for Two Solo Pianos,
noon Wednesday, Bu 106.
•     •     •
ONTOLOGICAL  SOC
What About the Future?
by Bill Thompson. Wednesday
noon, Bu. 221.
THE
INN
SEEN
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Associate Editor
Specialized services are rapidly being extended
to seemingly ridiculous ends.
From personalized busy signals for telephones to
electric toothbrushes we are being confronted with
a rapidly expanding number of mechanical devices
which are cunningly designed to de-emphasize self resourcefulness.
With bewildering indifference we are drifting into
total dependence on complex machines for such
routine tasks  as  opening  a can.
Faced with this frightening thought I have
spent much time recently eavesdropping on the many
small groups of strategists, philosophers and fore-
seers which abound in the Brock cafeteria and
lounges. My worries have been much relieved by the
daring, originality a>nd sensibility of several plans
which are in the process of implementation.
With an aesthetic sensitivity to certain elements
of research and concern for the ethical implications I
was excited by one plan in particular. This progressive scheme will sharply reduce the amount of time
wasted attending classes.
How to avoid classes
A recording secretary will be provided for each
class and an articulate, precise summary of each
lecture will be mimeographed and left at a pickup
station for class members. This summary will include
an analysis of key points made in the lecture with
concluding remarks by knowledgeable graduate students.
A bibliography will also be provided for those
interested in doing further research on the lecture.
A few dollars per student per course would cover
expenses involved.
The time saved by not attending classes could be
devoted to creative effort such as drinking coffee
in Brock and contemplating such critical areas of student concern as British Columbia's sesession from
Canada and the advancement of free love.
Despite their obviously sinister implications such
specialized services as personalized busy signals for
telephones can have a humorous angle.
A humorous angle?
Imagine what the appropriate busy signals might
be for certain campus personalities. Obviously traffic
czar Sir Ouvry Roberts phone, when engaged, would
emit a "stomp, stomp, stomp" sound surprisingly
like that Nazi soldiers made when strutting through
the infamous "goose step" march formation.
"Yes, no, yes, no, yes, no" would become a
familiar sound to those calling student president
Byron Hender's number while "not now, not now,
not now" would soon be widely known as the signal
indicating UBC president John Macdonald's phone is
still busy.
Certain national personalities might suit musical
busy signals such as an organ softly playing "A
Canadian Sunset" for the private line into a certain
high office in Ottawa.
The busy signal for UBC's athletic director's
office optimistically enough might be a recording of
90,000 fans roaring their team on at the Rose Bowl
game.
What are interns really like?
Hear them speak Wednesday
noon in Wesbrook 201.
• *      •
CHILDHOOD ED SOC
Mr. McPhee of Vancouver
School Board on Special Class
Facilities. Ed. 204, Wednesday
noon.
• •     •
SOCIALIST CLUB
War and Revolution in Viet
Nam: A socialist analysis.
Speaker: John Riddel, Editor
of Young Socialist Forum.
Bu. 102, Wednesday noon.
• •     •
WUS
Regular noon meeting today
in Council Chambers of Brock.
• •     •
BRIDGE CLUB
Meeting in Brock TV Room,
Wednesday, 7:30-11:00 p.m.
• •     •
CIRCLE K
Important meeting. Everyone out. Important business
and slide show. Wednesday
noon. Bu. 2205.
• •     •
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting Tuesday noon, Bu.
204. Dr. Plumb on Operative
Dentistry.
• •      •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Would you take LSD If it
were available? Hear Dr. Richard Alpert, recently fired Harvard professor and Steve Dur-
bee, New York artist, explain
the psychadellic drug situation. Aud- Tuesday noon. 25c.
Scholarship
fundsabound
below 49th
Graduate students stand a
chance to win $2,130 in the
field of child study at Tufts
University, Massachusetts.
The Queen Elizabeth Scholarship, covering tuition for a
one-year graduate course involving a full year is open to
those already holding a bachelor's degree.
The program is concerned
with the development of the
young child through the age
of six.
Applicants will be expected
to return to the field of education in Canada.
Further information is available from the Canadian Education Association, 151 Bloor
Street W., Toronto 5.
•     *     •
The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, has offered 15 scholarships, each worth
about $4,800, to British university students.
Awards will be given for
any subject at undergraduate
or graduate levels. Their duration will be adjusted to the
length of the holder's course.
PAYMENT
of Second-Term Fees
Students are reminded that second-term fees are
now due and payable and should be paid to the
ACCOUNTING OFFICE
on or before FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1966
c u s. o
—films on a CUSO Doctor in Nigeria,
—film on Beverley Bie, a UBC grad (now a
teacher in Ghana) at CUSO orientation.
—film on a nurse and agriculturalist in
the field
Will be shown at 12:30 Thursday,
13th January in Education 1008.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, 12.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lest ft Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication* office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST ON 23rd DECEMBER, one
zlppo lighter engraved with Borden cow. Virtually valueless but
dripping with sentiment. Reward
for   return.     Telephone   228-2131.
LOST — MAN'S BLACK GLQVE
on Thurs.    Please phone 224-1725.
TAKEN BY MISTAKE—RAINCOAT
from History 202, Bu. 100, 8:30
Friday. Please contact me at FA
7-6125. I have your coat. Keys at
Lost   and   Found.
FOUND ON DUNSMUIR AFTER
Rossland Ski Week, assorted ski
equipment. Call John, TR 4-7711
before 10 a.m., after 10 a.m.
FOUND—KEY CASE WITH 3 KEYS
contact Audio Visual Extension
Dept.   (south of Biology Bldg.)_
LOST — LADY'S GOLD WATCH
between H. Angus and library,
oil Monday, 3rd, 9:15-10:15 a.m., or
in the library. Large reward. Call
RE  3-6097 after 5:30.
WILL THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my raincoat in mistake from the
College of Education phone to arrange an exchange. N. Brearley,
Local   2807.
LOST—BROWN LEATHER WAL-
let, vicinity of Women's Gym and
Fieldhouse. Please contact Char-
lie, Acadia Camp, CA 4-9934.
Special Notices
13
WANTED — APPLICATIONS FOR
counsellors, diabetic summer
camp last two weeks in August.
Phone Kerry,  AM 1-6944.	
DANCE TO "THE CHESSMEN" AT
the Lower Mall Ballroom, January 14, 9:00-12:00. Admission $1.00,
75c.
INTERESTED IN WE E K E N D
work in Vancouver's newest and
swingingest nlte club opening
soon? We are looking for "attractive "go-go" dancers, waitresses, cigarette and check room
girls, 18 and over. Phone 682-
9144.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM 43RD AND
Balsam, M.W.F., Si&t lectures.
Phone   Chris,   261-8582.
WANTED—RIDE FROM 16TH AND
Oak. Phone Peter, TR 6-9*54,
8:30  classes.
ALTERNATE DRIVER WANTED
for North Van carpool. For further details phone 985-1804, ask
for  Jim  Jr.
RIDE NEEDED FROM CAULFIELD
area, West Van. Call 926-2471
after six.
WEST VAN CAR POOL—WANTED
1 or 2 drivers. British Properties
preferred.   922-6869  or   922-1665.
Wanted
15
TEXTS  FOR GERMAN  210  NEED-
ed.    Phone  Peter  at  AM  6-4038.
CAN ANYONE GIVE FIRST-HAND
information on travel in South
America? Write N. Janosy, 1246
Fendrell.
AUTOMOTIVE St MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
57 CONSUL IN GOOD HEALTH
needs a new home. Call grieving
owner  at AM 6-4974 after 6.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters ft Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs M
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RB
1-8322.
Typing
^
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
GRIFFITHS LIMITED, 70th and
Granville, Phone 2(3-4530.
Help Wanted
51
$400 PER MONTH WHILE BEING
trained to sell Business Life insurance. Career position with unlimited possibilities; age 21-30.
Good education and background.
Character subject to scrutiny.
MU   5-7234.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKI BOOTS, SIZE 10, GIRL'S ICE
skates, size 6; men's skates, size
9. All in good condition. Good
bargains.    AM   1-7448.
WELCH ALLYN OPHTHALMO-
scope, Tycos Aneroid Manometer,
Helllge Sahli Hemometer and
Hemocytometer Head Mirror; lie-
lex Hammer. 733-3769 after 6
p.m.	
"GOOD   AS    NEW"    INFANTS   TO
adults   clothing.     Discount   prices—
new cribs,  playpens, buggies,  etc.
Rentals      "Good    as   New."      2846
West  Burnaby.     RE   1-3310.
CARPOOL WANTED FOR PAYING
passengers in Highland area.
North Vancouver. Phone Pat,
YU  8-2548;  Carol, YU  7-3796.
FOUND — CIGARETTE LIGHTER
with  engraving.   Phone  733-3754.
WANTED—WEST VAN CARPOOL.
around 22nd and Marine, not necessarily 8:30's. Phone WA
6-2254.
Rooms
81
LARGE, BRIGHT BED-SITTING
room with desk. Carpool available;
|35 per month. AM 1-7448.
WANTED YOUNG MAN TO SHARE
apt. with same. 736-0601 after 6
p.m. - 10 p.m. Mon. and Thurs..
Room ft Board
ROOM AND BOARD FOR STU-
dent — West Point Grey — warm,
quiet private home. Phone 224-
4823 afternoon or evening.

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