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The Ubyssey Dec 2, 1971

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Array THt UBYSSEY
Vol. Llll, No. 32    VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1971
228-2301
"■?y^z.
—garry gruenke photo
Drunks hold
orgy today
The degenerates at left are
planning for the drunken orgy
happening today from noon on to
commemorate the last issue of
The Ubyssey this term.
Residents of the den of
ill-repute (otherwise known as
Ubyssey staffers in SUB 241-K)
are hosting the event, which will
feature a display of em rulers,
typewriters and glue pots.
It is rumored that Ubyssey
editor Leslie Plommer will also be
hanging around.
Meanwhile, today's Ubyssey
contains a pile of Christmas
goodies.
On page 4 is the annual
Christmas editorial, in which gifts
are bestowed on various worthies.
On page 7, some captured
confidential documents (that shed
light on the tenure process at
UBC.
Page 9: a report on the
Canadian Conservatives' response
to Trudeau's policies on the new
Nixon economic plan.
Page 11: a recapitulation and
chronology of this fall's
anthropology-sociology crisis.
Page 21: a Women's Studies
lecture on Women and the State.
Page 22: Ralph Nader's
message to Canada.
Page 30: Sports.
And a special bonus for those
who consider The Ubyssey a
socialist rag: a Page Friday
pictorial report on China in 1971
produced by Ralph Stanton, a
participant in the recent tour by
Canadians of China. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2, 1971
New exec off to flying start
i	
By BERTON WOODWARD
The new AMS executive was
defeated Wednesday in its attempt
to carry out its first item of
business.
It couldn't have a meeting.
The last meeting of the old
council — with a human
government executive — had just
been adjourned. The previous
meeting's minutes had been
accepted, five new signing officers
were appointed, new executive
members resigned old positions
and the human government
executive resigned officially.
Treasurer-elect David Dick gave
notice of four motions to be given
at the next meeting: that three
SUB management committee
motions be rescinded and that a
council vote granting $900 to The
Ubyssey for travel expenses to a
Canadian University Press
conference also be rescinded.
The meeting was then
adjourned and Dick announced a
new council meeting — in effect a
special meeting - would be held
15 minutes later.
When the new council
convened science rep Svend
Robinson quoted the Robert's
Rule which states: "Notice of the
time, place and exact purpose of
the meeting must be mailed to all
members a reasonable number of
days in advance."
Pit stays open
The den of devil spirits will
remain open a week longer khan
usual this December.
The Pit, which normally closes
when classes end, will remain
open until Dec. 16.
It will then be closed until
normal hours resume during the
first week of classes.
OO IT NOW!
while stock ss available
If you still need first term texts, don't
wait any longer. December 13th is our
deadline to return overstocked texts to
the publishers.
After December 13th, all first term
texts will require special orders.
the bookstore
Women's Canada West
COLLEGIATE BASKETBALL
UBC Thunderettes
University of Victoria Vikettes
Fri.-4:30 P.M.
Sat.-4:30 P.M.
War Memorial
Gymnasium
STEVE GARROD, DAVID MOLE
.. . dress for last council meeting
Robinson asked that the
meeting be declared invalid and,
after a brief search of the AMS
constitution by president Grant
Burnyeat, it was.
The elusive meeting is now to
be held Wednesday, December 8,
at the regular time.
The SUB management
committee motions of Nov. 23 to
be voted on at that meeting are:
"That minute No. 1
(Thunderbird Shop) of the SUB
management committee meeting
of Nov. 4 be rescinded and that
the crafts people be allowed to
stay in the building."
"That Room 262 in SUB be
allocated to the NFTU, URSS and
URH." (These are: the
Non-Faculty    Teachers    Union,
Whafs up, doc?
The Morning-After Pill
The morning-after pill, which doctors call "post-coital
contraception" and many relieved women call "a godsend" is now
available to UBC women.
The pill is actually a course of 10 pills, given twice a day for five
days. It acts to prevent a fertilized egg from implanting on the uterine
wall, possibly by making it pass through the uterus too fast to
implant. For this reason it is often referred to as an abortifacient
(abortion-causer).
If you have intercourse without the protection of any
contraceptive method, or the condom breaks, or if you are raped,
previously you had a very unhappy couple of weeks of waiting. Now
if you get to a doctor, or the University Health Service in the
Wesbrook building, within 72 yours, the chances are excellent that
you will not become pregnant. In a recent study, of 1,000 women
given the pills, none became pregnant although 89 per cent had used
no contraception.
The pills are diethylstilbestrol, a synthetic estrogen. You get 25
milligrams in all, which is quite a jolt of hormones. Don't count on
using them every week. When you go to the doctor, he will urge you
to use proper contraaception from then on.
About one-third of women taking the course of pills have no
side reaction at all. Fourteen per cent get a bit of nausea on the first
day. Another 14 per cent get vomiting as well.
The rest get intermittent nausea and/or vomiting for one up to
five days, plus a few other side effects: headache, vaginal spotting,
cramps and so on. In general, side effects are mild for most people.
Remember, the pills will probably not be effective if started
later than 72 hours after the unprotected intercourse. This is an
emergency treatment which cannot be recommended for continual
use.
Do not buy any "morning-after pills" from underground
sources. These are usually dangerous and ineffective. Diethylstilbestrol
is available only from qualified phsysicians. Several days of treatment
will be requrired.
When your period comes, it may be different from the usual:
lighter or heavier flow, a bit earlier or later, or possibly more than a
week late. So if it's not right on time, don't rush out and do anything
desperate: it will probably come eventually. And next time, use a
high-quality condom.
Union of Radical Social Scientists
and Union of Radicals in the
Humanities.)
'That the Student Union
Building be open 24 hours a day."
Dick's motions ask council to
rescind the decisions. Dick said
after the meeting that the latter
two were ultra vires and beyond
the committee's power to deal
with.
The motion to rescind the
motion granting The Ubyssey
conference expenses is also
expected to go before the next
council meeting.
Education rep Sandy Kass, also
a member of The Ubyssey staff,
said Wednesday the motion is "an
affront to freedom of the press."
"Besides," she said, "The
granting of expenses for CUP
conferences is a deeply-rooted,
sacrosanct tradition at this
historic university. Only a
wild-eyed bomb-carrying anarchist
would dispute its solid
entrenchment in university life."
r
r
i
i
i
i
AMS Group Day Care Project
Your  response is needed!   If you  have a child
nearing or within the ages of three to six:
1) Is (s)he currently enrolled in a day
care-preschool facility in Vancouver or
the Endowment Lands?
YES-
NO-
2)
if so
Are    you
standard   of
receiving?
day
YES-
with    the   present
care   your   child   is
NO	
3) If no to either of the above, would you
consider enrolling your child/children in
an AMS Group Day Care facility?
YES-
NO-
Please rip or clip out this questionnaire
and send it to AMs Internal Affairs Officer,
SUB 252. (Drop by the office, send it free
via campus mail or sacrifice a 7 cent stamp.)
NOW TWO LOCATIONS
FOR
^fjeep
Unisex Fashions
202 CARRALL STREET
GASTOWN
AND
834    GRANVILLE
THEATRE ROW        688-4822 Thursday, December 2,  1.971
T HE    v:l)BtSSE Y
Page 3
UBYSSEY PHOTOG Daryl Tan said he was in one of his masochistic rnoods when he took these'pictures of .people attempting-to pass their Christmas exams by smoking,
crying, talking and reading The-tlbyssey. Really there has to be a/better way. . '.'■■'".'•-
Latest tack fa i Is, a nth rosoc ga le conti n ues
A short-lived "addendum" died
a stormy \death Tuesday as the
rebellious crew .'of
anthropolgy-sociology department
head Cyril Belshaw rocked the
boat once more.
In the latest •' chapter of the,
anthrosoc tenure dispute involving
professors Matt Speier, and Ron
Silvers, the department's
promotion and tenure committee
voted Tuesday to kill a plan to
prepare an addendum on the cases
of the two profs. >
The' addendum would have
been forwarded to arts dean Doug
••Kenny.       ...•.-..■■.
The committee's move* came
after Speier and Silvers denounced
the addendum plan Monday as.a
whitewash, and called upon' the
committee to fully reconsider
their cases.
Between the time of
Speier-Silvers' refusal to
participate in the addendum and
the committe's decision, Belshaw
attempted'to go ahead with the
plan by appointing new assessors
for the two profs.
Speier and Silvers then issued
another message that said, "We
are shocked to find that the head1
chose to move from a position of
authority rather than that of
rationality."'
When   some - of   the   newly
appointed assessors "then told the
P and T committee that they,
refused . to go ahead, , the
committee was forced, to quash
the addendum plan. ,
IrT the stormy session, that
followed, the committee decided
not to reconsider the cases. What
took place at.that time is not yet
known, although ' general
information on the committee's
doings continues to' seep through,
the heavy curtain; of. secrecy.
Belshaw has drawn over
department members.   ••■
Anthrosoc grad students met
Thursday and voted to call for a
full department"meeting Tuesday.
At that meeting, if it is held,
. they will present a motion asking
the. P and T committee to
reconsider-the Speier-Silvers cases.
This marks the first time that all
voting members of the
department, including student
representatives, getJa . chance" to
debate the issue that has led "to a>
breakdown of trust and a growing
loss of confidence".   ' '•'"--'
OTEU meets campus workers off-campus
By MIKE SASGES
The Office and Technical Employees
Union wanted to meet in SUB with
non-unionized campus workers.
So the union is holding the meeting today,
'at 5:30..p.m., in the Ironworkers' Hall, 2415-
Columbia. '■'>- ."'.,
Why, asks OTEU regional manager Bill
Lowe. •        :.'<'.      '
'The Alma Mater Society didn't want, to
get involved in any. jurisdictional dispute-
between trie OTEU and the Canadian Union
of Public Employees," AMS general manager
Brian Robinson said Wednesday.
Said Lowe; "We were.only asking to have a
meeting in the SUB ballroom to openly and
freely  discuss-'the  union with unorganized
technical, clerical and office employees." '■".
But this request,, said CUPE LocaKll6
president Bill Morrison, is an infringement on
CUPF.'s jurisdiction. '"'•■■     '*-.'-'
"I'm not against the OTEU getting any
place on campus as long as .we have first crack.
at it."    .
CUPE, which represents ,1,200. campus
workers, is a Canadian union and OTEU is an
American unions:
The human government executive saw the.
union meeting as a jurisdictionaldispute but
decided to allow OTEU "to meet in SUB.   '■
* "The executive was. agreed that although
we .didn't relish any kind of jurisdictional
dispute the space was available to anyone who
wanted to use it," ex-treasurer. Dave Mole said
Monday:
However .both Robinson and SUB building
manager Graeme Vance said they heard of no
such,decision by the executive.
And the new students coalition • executive
has not discussed its. relation with the OTEU.
"I really couldn't say if we would let the'
union use the society's facilities because we
haven't discussed it," AMS co-ordinator Rick.
Murray said Thursday.
;. The  OTEU,  certified to represent AMS •
employees   since   August,. is   negotiating   a
contract containing more than 200 clauses,
with Robinson.
a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
The following letter from Dale
Rolfsen, an assistant math professor, was
received by The Ubyssey Wednesday.
"Yesterday 1 got a S5 packing ticket.
So did lots of other people on my
block (Kings Road near campus). We
were used to parking on both sides of the
road, in spite of the NO PARKING signs.
They just 'don't make any sense on a
one-way street where there are too many
people squashed together and only half
their cars can squeeze in legally. So we all
figured. And we didn't get tickets until
yesterday.
So I spoke to the nice old guy in the
RC'AF uniform (retired?) w'.io was still
wr-ting summonses. He said, sure he
knows about the parking problem. Thats
why he never bothered cars there before.
But there was a complaint .. . had to do
his job ... and he showed me the letter
demanding enforcement. .. signed by
Mr. Balfour of Balfour Rentals. (That
famous outfit owns the buildings on the
NO PARKING side.)
I couldn't figure out what would
motivate such inconvenience to their
tenants. Are they just plain nasty like
some folks say?
Today my next-door neighbor got a S5
parking ticket. Same place. Said she'd be
better off renting one of those garages
some guy called about yesterday. Only
S10 a month. Beats paying all those
tickets, she figured.
Wait a minute, whoso garages just
became available? Balfour Rentals, she
said.
Well, 1 got suspicious.
So 1 call Balfour Rentals. Yes wc have
two garages available soon. May I speak
to Mr. Balfour? In my politest voice I ask
about the letter. He says yes, he wrote it.
Then a shadow passes over-his voice, a
transformalion. "That's none of your
business. It's between me and the police."
Still polite I ask what he thinks people
should do with their cars. "Thats not my
problem." Before I can even stop being
polite: "I'm not interested in talking to
you at all (sic)." Click."
We contacted Balfour Rentals, the
managers of a large number of buildings
in the Vancouver area.
Balfour was conveniently out all day
so we spoke to a Mr. Duncan who
described himself as the office manager.
After the substance of the letter was
pause
don't
mentioned   to   Duncan   a   long
ensued after which he stated, "I
know anything about this."
Duncan denies that the calls to various
residents of Balfour buildings were made
from his office - the same office that
Balfour docs business from.
"I would know if calls were made," he
told The Ubyssey.
However, when first asked if any
garage spaces were available he slated that
he didn't know - a strange thing for the
office manager not to know especially
when he would know if calls were or
weren't made concerning them.
When pressed about it he said: "1
don't think there are, well mavbe one or
two."
This information contradicts that
given by Balfour to Rolfsen. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
Ho Ho Ho
Well, it's that time of year again.
You can tell it's THAT time of year because people
write editorials saying so, because department stores
show a sudden interest in customers and special lighting,
and because liquor store entrances are guarded by
legions of charity workers smiling over the $10 bill they
planted in the collection bowl.
Anyway, it's that time of year again. So in the
spirit of our patron saint, Old Saint Fetish, The Ubyssey
has decided to turn turkey and be nice.
Of course, we can't give real gifts because we
hardly have enough money to put out this here rag, and
public services like the party today in our office (SUB
241-K) come out of our own pockets.
(If we can't get our readers to eat out of our hands,
the least we can do is get them to drink out of our
pockets.)
So, in the spirit of Fetish and Benedict(ine), here
goes — and remember, it's the thought that etc.
To board of governors member Les Bewley: a new
mouth.
To classics head Malcolm X. McGregor: Stan
Persky.
To Conrad (The Shrink) Schwarz: a copy of How
to Manipulate Statistics.
To Peter Trudeau: a boy who'll grow up to be just
like his dad.
To Maggie Trudeau and Canada-: an abortion.
To board of governors chairman Arthur Fouks: a
used-car lot.
To Cyril (Bwana) Belshaw: a wall-to-wall
confidential memorandum and a computer-programmed
department.
To administration president Wally Gage: ". . ."
To Cece Bennett: a spoon and a dirty needle.
To Karl Burau: tenure.
To the board of governors: life-time subscriptions
to UBC Reports; and for the senate, a subscription to
the comics supplement.
To AMS president Grant Burnyeat: one bronzed
AMS constitution.
To Steve Garrod & Co.: certified humans to
govern.
To arts dean Doug Kenny: another campus (the U.
of Alabama?).
To English head Robert Jordan: the English
department at the U. of Alabama.
To the engineers: a vaseline-coated kazoo.
To Allan Fotheringham: a vaseline-coated halo and
a pair of tight Levis.
To Lome Parton: a copy of The Reader's Digest
Digest of Quotable Quotes.
To Jack Wasserman: a copy of Cool Made Easy, by
Allan Fotheringham.
To.the students of UBC: three thrill-packed issues
a week of the greatest Canadian student newspaper west
of False Creek.
To The Ubyssey: excessive alcohol and sexual
activity; a controlling interest in General Motors; and a
diving-board-equipped vat of palsied, pickled zits and
mouldy bat foetuses.
THE UBYSSEY
DECEMBER 2, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editon'Leslie Plommer
Yes, friends, as sure as there's an "X" in "Christmas", this is The
Ubyssey Xmas masthead, in which we introgoose all the loveable little
feces responsibfe for dropping hot puppies down your chimney all year.
Room at top of the executive igloo this year was leased by Leslie
Plommer, who was solely responsible for removing chauvinistic terms such
as "snow job" from the paper. The only other funny thing about Leslie is
Paul Knox.
Paul, who is a snow job, has not been removed from the paper,'but
hangs on in the form of a news editor, reincarcerated from a previous life.
It's beginning to look as though it was the only life they gave him.
Clinging desperately to city desk are Ginny Gait, genius wondergirl
of rewrites and beer lables and Mike Sasges, genius . . . uh . . . well!!, one
out of two ain't bad.
Sandy Kass, a registered, card-carrying member-in-good-standing,
fully-accredited, bona fide Kosher Kid, is another of the sycophantic
senilities responsible for gefiltering the copy through city desk. She's
spending the Christmas holidays celebrating the early days of Easter in her
local synagogue, the Shirley Temple, along with the rest of the Bagel
Bunch, namely Nate Smith.
Nate used to be editor, you know, before they promoted him to
copy boy downtown. He took time off from his memoirs ("I Was A
Teenage Adolescent") to do the "blood money" article —an inspirational
thesis written after a Tuesday "Big Show".
To page 5
Letters
Jocks
It is a fact that of the 20,000
or so UBC students, only about
1,000 participate in organized
extramural sports, which means
five per cent of the student
population is restricted in the use
of the facilities for which they
pay.
This means that 20,000
students are paying $5 a piece to
support some egotistical volleyball
player or some otherr lackey. I am
not knocking those who
participate, because we all need
the exercise. What I am knocking
is the belief that extramurals owns
the gyms.
It is for this reason that I am
quite pissed off.
The five per cent of students
that don't participate are being
ripped off by the extramural
organizations.
The reasons for
non-participation
obvious. Some of us don't have
the time to practise and play three
times a week, and some of us are
not physically able to excel at any
sport. This does not, however,
mean we don't have the right to
use the gym facilities which
belong to us all.
A group of us got together
recently and decided to have a
basketball game at a time
convenient to us all.
We found out that we could
have Gym A on Nov. 21 from 10
a.m. until noon. And so we
booked" it through the P.E.
department.
Well, when we got there
Sunday   some   fuckin'   volleyball
so
are
much
quite
tournament was going on. Most of
these players were not UBC
students. We asked that the hell
was going one and they informed
us that the gym had been cleared
for their use by the traffic cop.
It seems to me and the 20
other UBC students in our group
(who drove out to campus from
the east end) that the P.E.
department is ignoring the rights
of the 95 per cent of the UBC
student population that does not
belong to any extramural group.
The department is giving
precedence to some outside
volleyball tournament while
stepping on us like dirt.
If someone had phoned us to
say we could not use the gym at
that time, it would have been OK.
I hope that you students
realize this the next time you pay
your $5 athletic fee, and wonder
where the money is going.
Well, it's going to about 1,000
snobs in their ivory jocks who
consider themselves possessors of
the gym facilities that belong to
us all.
George Beja,
Applied science I
Women
An open letter to women on
campus:
Women in the anthrosoc
department are calling a meeting
to discuss the problems women
face in the university and the
possibilities for their solution.
We see these problems as part
of the university-wide situation in
which women find themselves. We
would like to open the possibility
of a women's action group within
the university which would
include staff, undergrad, graduate
and faculty women. That is, all
women on campus.
This is a general invitation to
any women members of the
university to join us. We'll meet in
the Blue Room of the Arts 1
building, this Friday Dec. 3, at
12:30.
Dorothy Smith,
Associate professor
Department of
anthropology and sociology
Walking
A not-so-funny thing happened
to me on the way to class today.
While on a sidewalk near the
main library, I was knocked over
from behind by a fellow student
on a 10-speed bicycle. Somewhat
annoyed, I picked myself and my
books up off the ground and
walked over to the dismounted
cyclist who was lying in the
shrubs beside the walkway.
I told him he bore a great
resemblance to a horse's ass and
then broke some of his fingers.
Students have more to worry
about out here than pricks who
aspire to be a Lome Atkinson or a
Torchy Peden.
It is true we have many bicycle
riders on campus (I have had three
10-speeds myself) but the
majority of us walk to class. I
suggest to cyclists that they
exercise,a bit more discretion and
consideration to the mass of us
who ambulate between classes.
Jed Currie,
Science 4. Thursday,  December 2,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
Letters
Burau
My Studium Generale
proposals referred to in the UBC
Reports of Nov. 10 are part of my
fifth brief on university reform as
submitted to the AMS July 14.
Some weeks before, I had
already explained them orally to
student council. After the human
government rejected my proposals
I submitted those proposals that
can be implemented by senate to
the senate agenda committee in
my brief of Aug. 18.
I wish to point out that under
my proposals, students have some
real influence on the courses of
studium generale, i.e. on 20 of the
credited courses or in case of
unresolved disagreement with
faculty an ultimate decision on
half of these 20.
I do not think that on the
whole students are wiser or less
corrupt or less intolerant than
faculty. But all monopolies tend
to corrupt. If students do have a
final 10 per cent influence the
monopoly is broken, and both
sides start thinking. Or if faculty
has become one-sided, petrified,
students MAY make a tremendous
contribution and revolutionize the
whole system by enabling a
competent outsider to bring in
new ideas.
Ten years observing UBC have
convinced me that nothing is
more dangerous for a career than
being a competent outsider; the
establishment seems to welcome
mostly people of their own
narrow background and they are
often very incompetent or
cowardly, or both.
After the introduction of
studium generale there would be a
possibility to give credit for
essential work in student
government, The Ubyssey etc. For
*2^MQM
From page 4
Lingering by the wires we find John Andersen, winning an Oscar for
his middle name and not much else. Oscar has taken the paranoia award for
three years running, ever since he looked under the bed and didn't find
Twigg there.
John Twigg used to be a copy boy, you know, before he was
demoted to John Twigg. He does layout, city desk and just about
everything when he's needed. Usually on Sundays.
Rousing rabbles and buckling swashes on the reportorial side of
things we have Dick Betts, our rabbleswash reporter, along with Tricia
Moore, who wrote the greatest story of the year— in between her groupie
exploits — but forgot to turn it in.
Lest we forget, D. Michael Finlay died two years ago, and it proved
such a success he's been doing it ever since. It just goes to show, if you give
the people something they want to see, they'll turn out for it.
Berton Woodward is presently on his epic work, "The Municipal
Dream" — with Uncle's malingering help. Bev Gelfond and Dave Schmidt
are co-authors of the upcoming bestseller "Ignorance Made Easy" and
Randy Frith is still learning about "Distilling Snow in Your Home".
Bernard Bischoff is still learning.
And who better than Art Smolensky, that hemispherical Hebrew,
that figure who loomed large in Senate, that roundabout rotundity, to
write a consumer column? Jim Adams with his apple and Conrad
Winkelman with his name made sweeping headlines in the classifieds.
Ian Lindsay waffled on most controversial issues and John Sydor
pancaked, while Kathy con Carney played Aunt Jemima all the while.
Helen and Linda Hossie (pronounced "hosie" as in firemen) were
responsible for the feature on the liberation of the Bobbsey twins.
Jan O'Brien, the mastermind behind news desk (sic) is an occult
witch, practising voodoo with stick pins and dummy pages. Vaughn Palmer
polishes as it cleans, but things go better with Vaughn Nelson.
Nothing goes with Fred Cawsey. He's been a DOM with The Ubyssey
since 1967, which explains the large numbers of funny looking chipmunks
in the endowment lands.
Lawrence Leader follows in the footsteps of a long line of Leaders, a
clan of Lithuanian shit kickers.
Lesley Krueger has a rollicking sense of humus in the best Teutonic
tradition, and is a charter member of the Women's Hibernation Alliance.
She was irresponsible for many hot flashes this term.
Sandi Shreve, on the other hand, has five fingers. In her short career
as a promising reporter, she promised more than she delivered. (She
promised quints.)
Jocking off in sports under the trained eye of Gord Gibson (that's
the eye in the middle of his forehead) were Kent Spencer.
Kent, banned from the athletic committee meetings, joins Mike
Gidora, who gets hooped every week and dribbles his stories all over the
office. Jim Adams answers letters addressed to "asshole" and "occupant"
— they're the only loveletters he gets. George Mapson and Harold Crandall
handle the intramural prose and pictures with wanton and lascivious
abandon, while Don Lewis will never give a soccer an even break. And any
rugby reporter named Simon Truelove has gotta be unique . . .
Sue Nicolls and Lynn Pollock are the first female jocks (figger that
out) to appea'r here in a long time.
They're probably the last, too.
Friendly ol' pervert Ian Jukes describes footballing and Ian Cordey is
better with cards in the SUB cafeteria than he is playing goal. Not to
mention his writing talents . . .
I'm afraid David Bowerman is still swinging from fixer to emulsion in
the darkroom, gathering bananas from resident zombie Brett (I'll meet you
in my) Garrett. Darryl Tan and Kini McDonald developed a negative of
Garry Gruenke once, but Warren Mayes buried it in a Kelly Booth.
David Phillips disappeared some weeks ago into a deep and Dirk
Visser in the San Andreas fault and could not be illuminated by a Greg
Deacon.
But The Ubyssey has gone downhill since Shane McCune left — he
was the only pinochle of kulcha left in the entire operation. Who else could
say so little in so much? Who else could extract the genie from the magical
bottle? Who else could nearly forget Brian Sproule? No one but McCune —
the magnificent, unparalled genius . . . hey, who's fer muggin' the twit in
the beard an' goin' skatin' this Wednesday?
one  cannot give credit for such
work under current courses.
My courses have been a failure
in regard to participation for as
the system is — built on credit —
most students do not work except
for credits. Many lack intellectual
motivation anyhow, while for
others it is hardly possible to take
non-credit courses because they
are often dependent on
scholarship marks in credited
courses. Students may even have
to work for some hours every day
for a living (cleaning toilets etc.).
Such students can hardly run for
office or take uncredited courses.
The tendency at UBC for only
the kids from well-off families to
run for office is true not only for
the representatives of the right
wing but also for the extreme left,
and especially for the hippies. For
this reason I support some modest
salary for student leaders who
miss a year on account of their
public service. But the salary must
be modest and it must be paid
openly.
This change should be done
legally by a change in the AMS
constitution. Furthermore,
candidates in all elections ought
to declare their intentions
honestly and the detailed facts of
the budgets ought to be made
public. I would also like
candidates in future elections to
declare their position in regard to
my suggestions of Aug. 18.
In my brief of July 14, I
correctly predicted the defeat of
the human government for failing
to develop an intelligent program
of university reform. I also
explained that the one-sidedness
of The Ubyssey throughout the
years has been the greatest
obstacle to the sane reform at
UBC. By more or less suppressing
other views, The Ubyssey has
become uninteresting and is
hardly read — and certainly not
taken seriously by the bulk of the
students. Since this paper is paid
for by all students, it should not
be a mere means of self-expression
for the staff or special interests
groups.
None of the various student
presidents of Experimental
College have even been allowed to
write something about it. It is
only this year that The Ubyssey
gave publicity at least to my
courses (Sept. 14) and even
printed my letter against the
so-called drug culture (Sept. 21).
Since The Ubyssey usually is very
partisan on the drug question,
everybody told me that my letter
would not be printed correctly.
But it was and I wish to state that
I think The Ubyssey has improved
— only not enough yet.
Only if the student paper tries
to be fair to all different points of
view will it become a really
meaningful forum read by most
students. Then, by and by, a
majority of informed students can
unite behind intelligent proposals
for a university reform.
Only then will such proposals
be accepted by the establishment.
Without such reform most
students will continue to leave
UBC intellectually and morally
even more immature than when
they entered it.
Come to my meetings if you
like intelligent discussion and/or
wish to do something sensible.
Karl Burau
Lights
Now that two women have
been raped and there have been
several bad accidents on
University, Boulevard, perhaps the
authorities will be moved to
replace those quaint, little
antiques that pass for lights with
some decent mercury or sodium
lamps.
It has been demonstrated in
many cities that good lighting
reduces both crime and accidents.-
Proper lights on the boulevard
would prevent collisions between
joggers, bikers, and cars and drive
our sterling specimen of North
American masculinity back to
using his right hand.
Michael D. Wallace,
Assistant professor,
Dept.of Poli. Sci.
Do med students learn
by being so exploited?
The following article, written by a medical
student, provides an insight into what goes on inside
the UBC med school.
More specifically, it is a brief account of what
it's like to be in final year of medicine, doing an
intern's work for next to no pay and with next to
no sleep.
The writer has asked to remain anonymous.
The University of British Columbia medical
school in 1969 changed the old third and fourth
years into the 'new' Phase III and Phase IV program
as the final two years before an M.D.
The Phase IV — so named presumably to make
it sound like an advancement in a continuum, or
simply to account for the difference in the length of
school years - is the year of the clinical clerkship
(known for years in other medical schools). How
did this stupendous change come about in a place
like the UBC medical faculty? A great redistribution
and reallocation, among other things.
The first two years of medicine remain
unchanged, leaving a lot to be desired. The former
third year was chopped from eight months (a
regular school year) to little more than five months
and termed Phase III.
The trouble is that the amount of material was
not reduced in any proportional manner. It became
a hectic game in dead earnest: how much can be
stuffed into the skulls of the medical students per
unit time, without admixture, overflow, or actual
throwing up .. . but then, Phase III is only a prelude
to a greater force — Phase IV.
Phase IV spans 14 months. Aside from three
months of elective externship at any hospital
(approved by the medical faculty) it is incomparable
in its work demand.
It goes from mid-March until May of the
following year, with a two-week break in there
somewhere. For compensation or consolation,
about $120 a month is given as a stipend - it works
out to be roughly 27 cents per hour of work for the
clinical clerk. One must be reminded that most of
the clinical clerks are married and some have
children; we are talking about people in their eighth
year of university. As an aside, clerks have to pay
fees of $660, for they are still students. Moreover,
those clerks starting in 1972 may well get no
stipend at all, because of the 'lack of funds'.
A clinical clerk has to work like an intern. In
fact, Vancouver General Hospital (actually working
with the UBC medical faculty on this problem)
killed two birds with one stone by greatly cutting
the number of interns (to 33 this year) and utilizing
a brand new class of workers, the clinical clerks —
who now double the interns in number — as interns,
at a quarter to a fifth the remuneration. It is a
supreme advantage, not to be denied!
Just as an intern, a clerk (self-named 'clinical
jerk') must do histories, physical examinations,
write orders for patients, provide patient care, do all
the required dog-work (much of which other
personnel — nurses, etc. — are trained to do but
can't because of hospital 'policy'). And also, unlike
an intern, study very hard.
A great deal of work is done to serve the
doctors and staffmen there rather than for patient
care per se.
So what?
The clerk is obtaining practical experience this
way. Besides, it cuts a year out of a residency
towards a specialty if a clerk wishes to carry right
on after graduation. The many who want to do
general or family practice, or others who wish to
practise for a few years to repay the great
accumulation of debts, would still have to intern a
year — the same sort of thing for another year.
The clinical clerk is on call one night in every
three (just like an intern, of course). When on call,
she or he works the regular day work, then takes
care of further problems or admissions in the
evening. The • clinical clerk will be called for
anything from prescribing a sleeping pill or starting
intravenouses to an acute emergency throughout the
night until the next morning, when the regular day
begins and demands the regular day's work again.
Now most of the time the clerk is on call for
more than the patients she or he is assigned to, and
can be on call for many unknown patients. (There is
one particular service at VGH in which the clerk has
to cover 240 patients!)
Again, so what? If interns can do it, so can
clerks; after all, they are learning, aren't they?
Are they — by staying up most of the night, by
jabbing dozens of veins, by working up to 100 hours
a week, by being so exploited?
Now there's the rub.
Interns are known to be an exploited group in
hospitals: their work loads are enormous, their rest
See page 26: CLERKS Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2, 1971
Daycare plan 'exploitive'
By TRICIA MOORE
Former Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Sue
Kennedy said Wednesday the new AMS council
plans for a day care centre are "an example of
further exploitation of women and certainly of a
lack of understanding of the liberation of women."
In organizing the centre, internal affairs officer
Michael Robinson contacted the faculties of
education, home economics and nursing to arrange
for student volunteer workers.
Kennedy said this shows "they don't really
understand the philosophy behind day care centres
if all they can do is talk to the traditionally female
faculties."
Robinson plans to set up either a group day
care centre of a baby-sitting service, using students
who would receive course credit for their work.
The   centre   would   be   a   service   for   UBC
students, faculty and staff with children between
the ages of three and six years.
Kennedy said that day care is a necessary
service, but added that "it is another example of
lack of understanding; that it is only for children
aged three to six when it is children under three that
are the most trouble for the parents and most
students have children of this age."
Robinson said Wednesday the day care service
will begin irf January if a grant can be obtained.
"Otherwise we could not begin until this
summer because there is no money available in the
budget," he said.
Robinson said the centre would be open to all
students to work in, but added he does not want
psychology students to be involved, because he "can
think of nothing more disgusting than using little
kids as guinea pigs."
Courtin' secretary pulls out
Alma Mater Society secretarial candidate Tom
MacKinnon has withdrawn his case from student
court because "the whole thing isn't worth it."
MacKinnon, law 3, won the position of
secretary by 10 votes in the recent AMS executive
byelection. He then lost the position to students
Coalition candidate Hilary Powell by 14 votes on a
recount.
MacKinnon charged that the election results
were influenced by members of the students
coalition manning the polls.
He also charged that ballots were missing at the
recount Friday.
In a letter sent to The Ubyssey, AMS president
Grant Burnyeat and the student court, MacKinnon
says:
"After some thought I have reached the
conclusion that the whole thing isn't worth it. In
fact I have been bored by this controversy for some
time now.
"It's even beginning to freak me out. Hilary
Powell is too nice a kid to do this to.
"The thought of working with such people as
AMS vice-president Derek Swain no longer appeals
to even my morbid tastes. It just wouldn't be any
fun."
MacKinnon said Wednesday "about 150 people
Rebates
offered
Rebates on all books and
supplies bought at the university
bookstore since April will be
offered after Monday.
"We'll be giving five-per-cent
rebates on all items for students
and 10 per cent |to faculty and
staff on books for their personal
use," assistant bookstore manager
Bob Smith said Wednesday.
Rebates will be offered this
year for the last time, said Smith.
He said the board of governors
decided the bookstore could no
longer give rebates because of its
allegedly poor financial situation.
Profs and staff get larger
rebates because at one time they
could go to the publishers for
books, but the bookstore decided
to catch the faculty market by
promising bigger rebates, he said.
A bookstore advertisement in
Tuesday's Ubyssey was wrong.
The ad said rebates will be offered
on all purchases made from April
1 to Dec. 1. However, said Smith,
rebates will be offered on all
purchases made up to and
including Dec. 31.
He said rebates will be offered
during the holidays and during the
last two weeks of January.
"Of course, if the financial
situation of the bookstore turns
around for the better, we'll look
again at the rebate policy," he
said.
had called him at his home asking about the case.
"So many people phoned me I had to run out
of my house," he said.
"The more I saw of certain people the less
appealing it became. They wouldn't like me anyway
because insanity runs in my family.
"The honest truth is that I think I'd make a
great secretary but I'm too freaked out by all these
people."
Earlier, MacKinnon detailed his charges to The
Ubyssey.
"Two students were told by those manning the
SUB north poll to vote for the candidates in
alphabetical order," he said.
"Of course Burnyeat's name was first on the list
and (candidate Til) Nawatzki's name was last."
Swain and treasurer David Dick, both of the
coalition, manned the polls.
"The students there had vested interests, being
members of the students coalition," MacKinnon
said.
He also charged that ballots were missing at the
recount Friday.
AMS ex-returning officer Sandy Kass confirmed
the statement.
'The ballots were gone from the box when we
opened it again for the recount," she said.
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CAMPUS LEAGUES
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the Women's Athletic Association
What are they?
an answer for the student who wishes to
participate in a competitive Athletic Program on
campus, without travel or practice obligations.
an answer for the student who wishes to choose 1
sport and play it for the entire term, rather than
changing sports every few weeks as the Intramural
Program does.
1972 Schedule
Mon
8:30 - 9:30 p.m.
Gym A
Basketball — Women
Mon
5:00 - 7:00 p.m.
Armouries
Tennis — Women
Tues
8:30 - 10:30 p.m.
Gym A
Badminton — Co-Ed
Wed
6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
Gym A
Volleyball - Co-Ed
Thurs
9:00 -11:00 p.m.
Armouries
Tennis — Women
Special Events
Campus League Tennis Tournament (women) — early February
Campus League Golf Tournament (women) — early March
Campus League Curling Bonspiel (women) — mid February
Starting Date:
Monday January 17, 1972
How To Become Involved:
Turn up ready to play at the times listed above - choose one
sport or play they all. Equipment provided, no registration or
entry fees.
Questions? Phone 228-2295
Keep your eye on The Ubyssey and your ear to
CYVR to keep in touch with the "IN" Athletic Program
— Campus Leagues.
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arsity Sports
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John Luurflinger and Staff Wish A
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OPEN 9-6MON.-TUES.-WED.-SAT.
9 a.m. - 9 p.m. THURS. & FRI. Thursday,  December 2,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Tenure: behind closed doors
This year at UBC student interest in the question of tenure has
mushroomed in the face of an extended series of disputes and alleged
injustices in various university departments.
While decisions for and against tenure candidates are part of normal
decision-making fare, and may be of interest to students in particular cases,
the provocative issue that has emerged from tenure scuffles is secrecy.
Since deans and department heads have consistantly refused to discuss
individual cases or the grounds on which decisions are made, the actual
decision-making mechanism is obscured. Students consider this ironic when
it takes place in an institution that prides itself on open debate and public
discussion.
The documents on this page, which were mailed to The Ubyssey in a
plain-brown wrapper, give insights into the tenure system which have
heretofore been kept from us.
Since they're not presented in the context of any department
disputes, but to show how the system works behind the scenes, we've
blacked out the names of the faculty members under discussion, and
anything else that might identify them.
November 2nd,  1971
Professor R. M. Jordan,  Head,
Department of English,
Campus•
Dear Professor Jordan,
On behalf of the Faculty of Arts'  Promotion and Tenure
Committee I am writing to you concerning your recommendation for
tenure for Associate Professor SMHHM
The Committee has decided to suspend judgment pending
fuller documentation from you concerning the following matters:-
1. Quite frankly,  the Corraittee is puzzled by the mismatch
between  the recommendation for promotion of  last year and  the fact
that you do not offer a strong endorsement for tenure this present
year. Can you provide  the Committee with an explanation?
2. In your letter of October 4th,  you mention thatflMMMMfr
is much interested  in  the problems of curriculum and was instrumental  in
establishing the new ^MMMQNMNMM* course. The committee would
like  to know if SMMBMMVhas made  imaginative and creative
contributions to curriculum planning within  the Department.
3. The Committee notes that you do not indicate the reasons
for the deadlock within  the  tenure committee of  the Department of
English. We would appreciate receiving from you a clear statement
as to the reasons for the negative vote  in  this  instance.
If you have any questions you would like to ask please
do not hesitate  to consult me.
Cordially yours,
Douglas T. Kenny,
Dean.
DTKtSGU
THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
MMIIIIM H    H.   UNMH
October 4, 1971
CONFIDENTIAL
I >EP.\HTMF.Nr Ul   tNt.l (Ml
OFFICE OF  Till   Ml Mi
Dean Douglas T.  Kenny,
Faculty of Arts,
Buchanan Building.
Dear Dean Kenny,
The Tenure Comnittee of  the  English Department  discussed »t   length
the case of Assistant Professor IWMhki and arrived at  a decisive recommendation,
by a vote  of 27  to 2_not   to recommend  tenure.     I   am accordingly recommending  to
you that Hr. 4nVHl'a  appointment  be terminated June 30,   1973.
The materials   for  discussion by the   full Tenure Committee were gathered
by a 3 man  sub-committee which worked  In conjunction both with me and with (MHHfc
The materials were complete and the discussion was  thorough.
Although  all aspects of Mr. HtM'i  contribution were considered
I   think it   is  fair to say that   the most  decisive negative  sentiment was based
upon his  teaching record.     The enclosed report  of the sub-committee   Includes   four
teaching evaluation reports,   two  of which  are  very carefully detailed and convey
a very  disappointing picture  of Hr.AMHK'i   teaching.     The  other   two are much
more perfunctory,  one being  favourable  and the other  somewhat   ambiguous.
In  the  area of  scholarship   it  was  observed  that Mr.  ■■^HMi had been
unusually busy and productive,  but  there was considerable concern expressed about
the quality of his work.    His  greatest   strength   Is   In his biographical work on
WHRHHtkV-  which promises  to bear rich   fruit,  as very  few would deny.     His
critical work, however,  especially two articles •■■■■■■■■■■£ in an anthology
4flMMMM0"W"MHV >   elicited mixed assessments.     I  myself would have  to
side with those who believe   them to be   lacking  in  shape and coherence,  though  they
contain a multitude of items  of. information.    Mr. WMBSfchas a number of projects
in progress and will no doubt  gain a name  for himself as  an authority onSSi^B
<SBfe},  but  the Committee quite clearly  felt  that he was  gaining this   scholarly
advancement at  the expense of his  students.
With respect to
was also observed that Mr.
dilatory in that he had been
reappointment, that completi
It is presently about one-th
points out that it is a work
I am enclosing a copy of the
basis for the full committee
some or all of Mr
service Mr . WW9 record  is very-meagre.     It
■VBM't  progress  toward the PhD has been quite
advised by the  department   In  19^|,  at  the time of
on of the doctorate was anticipated in the ensuing year,
ird completed,   though the thesis  adviser  at 4H0>
of broader  scope  than the normal  doctoral  thesis.
report  of  the Candidate's Committee, which was the
's  discussion.    Most  of the  full committee had read
published and unpublished scholarship.
Sincerely youl
THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
October 18, 1971
CONFIDENTIAL
ilH'\k IAMNI   .M   INCIIM1
»hi-k:i oi nil mi mi
Dean Douglas T. Kenny,
Faculty of Arts,
Buchanan Building.
Dear Dean Kenny,
The English Department Tenure Committee considered In extensive
detail the candidacy of Mr . 4aSMBMjaBMs»for tenure.  The result was a split
decision:  12 In favour, and 12 against, with 2 abstentions.  Subsequent
consultation with committee members absent from the meeting revealed a similar
split.  I feel this result fairly represents the department's mixed assessment
°f Nr •■■■ Clearly there is no majority - substantial or otherwise - in
support of a tenure recommendation.  In my view there is not a convincing case
to be made in favour of tenure, and therefore my own recommendation is negative.
The Sub-Committee which consulted with me and with Mr. ■■■■* in
preparing materials for the full committee's deliberations consisted of Professors
Hopwood, Whitehead and Stevenson, the latter the candidate's choice and the other
two picked by lot.
Mr. flMMteavas appointed Instructor II in 19^ His Is a delayed
tenure consideration, since he was offered an additional two-year period under
special considerations.
Most of the consideration given to Mr. 4H|'s case concerned his
record and capabilities as a teacher, since he does not possess the qualifications
for promotion into the professorial stream.  In the department's view, consistent
with University policy, a Senior Instructorship would not entail the research
dimension of professorial appointments.  Nevertheless some attention was paid to
Mr • ■■■**' s modest publication record, as well as to the area of departmental
service.
Although Mr . 4MflHM» is recognized to have considerable pedagogical
talent there is substantial doubt that he possesses either the special skills or
the versatility which alone would justify a tenured appointment as a Senior
Instructor. Mr. Mh» is at his best with small groups of students where his
intimate and personal style of teaching is most effective.  I feel, however, that
his recognized success at this kind of teaching does not render him of maximum
value to the department.  Indeed my impression, gained from conversations with
him, is that he would expect to teach advanced courses and would not be happy
or effective in the constraints of the Senior Instructorship.  In view of the
need to exercise considerable caution In tilling tenured positions at the lower
ranks - the department already is quite bottom-heavy - I find it Impossible to
justify such an appointment for Mr. <VMMM
- 2 -
_ It may be useful for me to specify further the limitations of Mr.
VHBBW b teaching as they were brought out in teaching reports and discussed
by the conmittee. In particular his approach to composition, which would form
a major part of a Senior Instructor's work-load, is characterized by a quite
rigid adherence to a "self-expressive" or semi-creative approach to writing and
a reluctance to employ instruction in the more formal modes of composition.
With respect to literary proclivities he is also somewhat restrictive in his
approach, tending toward attentiveness to modern lyric poetry of a certain
type even when the course description might call for a broader historical and
generic approach to poetry.  There Is also considerable apprehension among his
colleagues that he underrates the Intelligence of his students and tends to
teach to the slower and more unsure of them.
In Mr. HMhv's case, alone among those considered by the department
this year, several laudatory letters from students were introduced for the
Tenure Committee's consideration.  These were not solicited by the department
and their validity for evaluative purposes must be subject to considerable
discretion.  (In fact two of them were from students who knew Mr. «■■■* only
for the first two weeks of the present term). Most of them are undoubtedly
sincere tributes to a well liked teacher, but one must observe that most
candidates for tenure could, if they wished, develop some such epistolary
response from students.  At any rate the committee did take these letters into
account as well as some letters from colleagues In English and in other departments,
especially concerning a lecture given to Arts I.
Mr. 4HMMfc'a administrative service to the department has been
average. He does not enjoy a reputation as a particularly effective or cooperative contributor to departmental business.
At the time of his initial appointment In ^Mr. Q00fe> was
anticipating the early completion of his doctorate.  During the past year he
haa made clear that he is no longer pursuing the doctorate.
I am enclosing a copy of the Candidate's Committee report, including
letters from students and faculty members.
Sincerely yours,
Robert M.
Head
Jordan Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
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OPEN THURSDAY & FRIDAY 'TIL 9 P.M. Thursday,  December  2,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Tories start planning
for impending election
Response to Liberals1
policies is ambivalent
w.
By ROBERT CHODOS
Last Post News Service
OTTAWA - That there is a
great deal of dissatisfaction with
the present government is one of
the more evident political
realities.
Gallup polls, provincial
election results, byelections all
tend to confirm it. The
government's current dispirited
performance in the House of
Commons indicates that
awareness of the discontent has
penetrated even to the Liberal
benches.
According to the rules of the
game, such a situation is a
heaven-sent opportunity for
opposition parties, and
particularly for the official
opposition. All the more so
when a general election is a
virtual certainty within the next
12 months, and a distinct
possibility within the next six.
Appropriately then, the
mood in Progressive
Conservative circles is a buoyant
one, as the Tories prepare for
their annual meeting and policy
conference here beginning
Sunday. Party organizer Robert
Redard regards the meeting as a
kickoff for the Tory election
campaign, and the policy
resolutions that come out of it
will constitute, to all intents and
purposes, an election platform.
However, the Conservatives
are not quite ready to begin
packing for the move into
ministerial offices.
,he first reason for this: it is
not Tory leader Robert Stanfield
who will call the election, it is
prime minister Pierre Trudeau.
The timing, the style, and the
issues of the campaign are for
Trudeau to determine, not for
Stanfield.
The Tories are afraid of
anything that will have the
appearance of a bold new
initiative on the part of the
government, such as the
imposition of wage and price
controls or some move to lessen
Canada's economic dependence
on the U.S. The Conservatives
do not have an adequate
response for either of those, and
they know it. They are also
afraid of the rather formidable
personality of the prime
minister, which wiped them out
in the last election in 1968.
The problems of having to
respond rather than initiate are
common to all opposition
parties everywhere. But in the
case of the Progressive
Conservatives they are
compounded by a further
difficulty: the Tories don't have
very much to say.
Illustrative of the situation is
the Conservative position on the
question of Canadian
independence. There is a strong
strain of Canadian nationalism in
Tory history, beginning with
John A. Macdonald and running
down the years through to John
Diefenbaker. The Tories were
traditionally the party of high
tariffs and the British
connection, while the Liberals
were free traders and
continentalists.
B
ut in the last year or so the
Liberals have done several things
that did not fit into the
traditional pattern. Prime
minister Trudeau went to (of all
places) Moscow, and made
disparaging remarks there about
American relations with Canada.
The government's response to
the Nixon surcharge has
included some surprisingly tough
statements along with the
expected bowing and scraping.
And the recent spate of leaked
cabinet documents has raised the
spectre of a government body
that will screen American
investment, and could even
decide that not all of it is in the
Canadian national interest.
In the face of this there were
two things the Tories could have
done. They could have pointed
out that the government's
"nationalist" response was
pitifully inadequate in relation
to what was required, or they
could have moved to occupy the
continentalist ground being
hesitantly abandoned by the
Liberals.
They tried to do both.
Thus early in November, the
House of Commons debated a
motion by Heath Macquarrie
(PC-Hillsborough), "that this
House, noting the continuing
deterioration of communication
on the basis of common interest
and mutual respect between the
government of Canada and the
government of the United
States, condemns the
government for failing to
employ and improve firm and
constructive economic and
political relations with the
United States, and, at the same
time, for failing to develop a
new economic policy which
would strengthen our economic
independence and fully employ
our growing and highly-skilled
human resources."
It was a neat balancing act. It
allowed Gordon Fairweather
(PC-Fundy-Royal), one of the
more nationalistically-inclined
members of the Tory caucus, to
say in the debate that "'Canadian
economic independence and
Canadian economic development
are   inseparable."   But   it   also
STANFIELD ... the pro-American
allowed Macquarrie himself to
attack Canada's vote in favor of
the Albanian resolution
admitting the People's Republic
of China to the United Nations,
and say:
"We cannot be a Yugoslavia. I
read that a great British
newspaper believes Mr. Trudeau
wants to be a western Tito. He
cannot be a General de Gaulle.
That may be appealing but that
is not for Canada. We cannot,
for many reasons, hard reasons
such as geography, history,
economics and all the rest,
forsake our role as an important
integrated ally of the U.S."
The same inconsistency
pervades the policy papers
prepared for the Sunday
meeting, which will serve as the
basis for the resolutions brought
to the floor and hence,
indirectly, for the Tory election
platform. The paper on
"Canadian sovereignty and
Canadian identity" proposes
that foreign investment be
screened and regulated - about
what the Liberal cabinet is
prepared to consider. The one
on external affairs and national
defence, meanwhile, attacks the
government for its NATO troop
cuts and suggests  that  Canada
should be more resolute in its
support of the western alliance.
But the dominant impression
left by Tory policy at this point
is Macquarrie's position, not
Fairweather's. This 'is partly
because it is the direction in
which Stanfield seems to be
leaning, and partly becuase it is
so unusual to hear Tories talk
that way.
Les Horswill of the PC
research office here, himself a
nationalist, thinks that the
position is an aberration, and
will right itself before election
campaigning gets really serious.
But Horswill also points out
that slowly but irreversibly the
party has been undergoing a
process of de-Diefenbakeri-
zation. Many of the western
Tory members, like Jack Horner
(Crowfoot) and Jack Bigg
(Pembina) are free-traders and
pro-Americans at heart, and
supported nationalist positions
only because of the hold that
the Chief had over the western
caucus, even after Stanfield's
accession to the leadership.
But how that hold has been
slipping, and Horner and Bigg
and the others are free to
espouse the positions they really
held all along.
The immediate effect of the
loosening of the Diefenbaker
grip has been a blurring of the
already faint ideological
distinctions between the Tories
and the Liberals. Because the
Tories have nothing particularly
coherent of their own to offer,
they are reduced to simply
opposing what the Liberals do.
The state of things now is
that that may be enough.
Third-grade arithmetic and
fifth-grade geography combine
to produce a straightforward
Conservative election strategy.
The Liberals currently hold 150
seats, the Tories fewer than half
of that. But the places where the
Tories are strong - the prairies
and the Atlantic provinces - are
areas where the government is, if
anything, even more unpopular
than in 1968. While the Tories
may lose a few western seats to
the NDP, they should, on
balance, come out with at least
as many seats in those areas as
they have now.
The vast majority of the
Liberal seats are in Quebec,
Ontario and B.C. Here the
Liberals have extended
themselves about as far as they
go. In B.C. the Tories have no
seats and thus have nowhere to
go but up, although the number
of seats they can gain is
relatively small. In Quebec the
prospect exists of sizeable
Liberal losses, but these will
more likely go to Social Credit
than the Conservatives — unless
the Tories can pick up someone
like Claude Wagner, the former
law-and-order provincial justice
minister.
In any case, the main
battleground in the next election
is clearly Ontario, and the major
question for the Tories is how
many seats they can add to the
17 now held there.
The provincial Conservatives just
came out of an election there
with a resounding victory, but
Ontario voters have often in the
past proved entirely capable of
going Tory provincially and at
the same time going just as
strongly Liberal federally. The
federal Tories are not trying to
gauge just why it was that the
Ontario Conservatives were able
to increase their majority at a
time when everyone expected
substantial gains for the NDP.
\_Jne theory is that the
electorate is in a bitchy, rather
authoritarian mood, a mood for
'no-nonsense' politics, similar to
the mood that elected Edward
Heath in Britain in 1970. The
emerging pro-Americanism and
Stanfield's pro-business
philosophy, coupled with that
kind of gauging of the
electorate, could make the
Conservative party into
something it never was under
Diefenbaker — a party clearly to
the right of the Liberals. Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December  2,  1971
Classroom Report
By A. T. HUNN
Political science 204 as
conducted by Kal Holsti "is an
exercise in futility.
The course, an introduction to
international politics is futile,
because while Holsti is competent,
witty and intelligent, he is
saddled with the impossible task
of turning a bad course into an
interesting one.
It's not that he hasn't tried.
The course is divided into two
hours of lectures and one hour of
discussion per week, which is a
good format for exchange of
ideas. He has prepared a good
lecture outline to which he
carefully adheres. The reading list
is carefully selected, and also well
outlined.
But try as he might, the course
is a bore, though it's partly a
matter of circumstance.
The bookstore has screwed up
on orders again, and as a result
some of the course's texts won't
arrive until they're out of date.
The course scheduler has
determined the lectures will be
held in two hour blocks, once a
week, in the dreary cellars of
Buchanan and the chemistry
building.
Holsti is plagued by the fact
that he can't effectively give his
attention to his polisci courses
because he is also teaching Arts 1
which takes up a massive amount
of time.
But even if the conditions were
ideal the course would not be
much better. How can a course
which tries to make
bi-multjpolarity a household word
be interesting?
WALLACE, HOLSTI
. . . one bad, one good
The reading list, well prepared
though it is, weekly contains
about 75 pages per week of
jargon, dull theory and long tomes
on systems.
It is only when the course gets
out of abstracts and deals with
specific events that the class
interest rises.
The discussion groups are
conducted by Kal Holsti, Ole
Holsti, Mike Wallace, Lome Kavic,
Dave Brown, Don Lawrence and
Jeff Mellows.
Talking to discussion
participants, it seems that most
groups are a reasonably effective
supplement to the lectures. The
best are those led Kal and Ole
Holsti, the poorest are those with
Mike Wallace, who is very
knowledgeable, yet unable to
stick to the subject.
Although interesting, the
discussion groups don't save the
course.
Polisci 204 is pre-requsite only
for the programmes in
international relations. Otherwise
it can be avoided by taking other
second year Polisci courses, all of
which deal less with abstract
systems and more with specific
governments.
If you can avoid this course, I
suggest you do so. If you can't,
look forward to a dull year.
The course is divided into two
sections, both taught by Kal
Holsti.
Section 1 meets Tuesday
2:30-4:30, in chemistry 150, and
section 2 meets Thursday
9:30-11:30 in Buchanan 104.
GENERAL MEETING
NON-FACULTY
TEACHERS' UNION
Tuesday, 7 December
12:30 A.U.S. Of
BROCK 163
Over the last 18 mo., UBC administrators have shown
they don't want to ACT ON substantial problems for
non-faculty teachers (TA's, RA's, LA's): WAGE
LEVELS, HIRING, GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
(among many!)
They want to mark time, engage in polite useless
negotiations.
BUT
The People at the Short End
(YOU)!
Can't Wait for Favors
We must organize effective action now!
ALL INTERESTED PEOPLE COME!
WE NEED YOUR STRENGTH
NOTHING WILL CHANGE
UNLESS WE CHANGE IT!
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V3>
r Thursday, December 2,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
Step-by-step into Anthrosoc's tenure trouble
By T. R. STAFFORD
At times, the two-month-old
tenure dispute in the
anthropology-sociology
department has read like an
adventure yarn, in which the
ship's captain, gradually going
mad (played by Humphrey Bogart
in the movie version), is faced
with a crew getting ready to
mutiny.
Perhaps, at the expense of
literary liveliness, it might be
useful to recap the events that
have occurred and to briefly
analyze their significance, so that
students heading home for
first-term holidays will be less
inclined to forget what is
happening at their university.
The anthrosoc tenure dispute
has to do with (a) principled
issues about democracy in the
university and (b) the lives of two
teachers.
The principled issues are
tenure, secrecy, academic freedom
and how decision-making works.
The two teachers are assistant
sociology professors Matthew
Speier and Ron Silvers.
On Tuesday, Oct. 5, Ubyssey
writer Art Smolensky suggested
that trouble was brewing in the
anthrosoc department over
upcoming tenure cases.
On the same day, the
anthrosoc promotions and tenure
committee     recommended
professors George Gray, Bob
Ratner,Robin Ridington, Matthew
Speier and Ron Silvers for tenure.
In the cases of the latter two, the
vote was close and there were
several abstentions.
A day later, department head
Cyril Belshaw decided to undercut
the committee's decision by
adding his own negative report on
Speier and Silvers.
By the end of that week, the
anthrosoc grad students formed a
tenure committee of their own,
chaired by James Heap, charged
with the task of submitting a brief.
The Ubyssey, in an editorial on
Oct. 19, asked Belshaw to spell
out the critieria for deciding on
tenure and suggested that the
publishing and teaching records of
Speier and Silvers were better
than some of the candidates
Belshaw had approved.
The grad students published
their tenure brief on Oct. 28. It
was a massive, closely-argued
document that suggested there
were disturbing irregularities in
the way the P and T committee
came to its conclusions, and
presented new evidence, largely in
favor of the two profs. In the
following days, the student brief
was widely read and a major
factor in initiating serious
discussion about the possibility of
reconsidering the cases.
On Friday, Oct. 29 the first
phase of the student protest
peaked with a well-attended
learn-in on "the crisis in sociology
at UBC". The event was
videotaped by students and shown
on campus. A week later, the
proceedings were published as a
paperbook book, titled Learn-In.
On the same day that the learn-in
was held The Ubyssey published a
special section on the situation,
including the results of an
investigation conducted by the
paper which examined the history
of political infighting and
factionalism in the department.
The week of Nov. 1-5 saw new
protests from junior faculty and
undergraduates in the department.
On Nov. 2, David Aberle, a
member of the P and T committee
issued a statement praising the
grad student brief and calling for
reconsideration of the cases.
On Nov. 9 The Ubyssey
reproduced on its front page a
confidential memo in which an
enraged Belshaw urged faculty to
"bombard" the student paper
with letters protesting divulgences
by the press of what was
occurring. Revelation of the
memo further eroded Belshaw's
crumbling credibility as faculty
resistance to the head increased.
The students conducted a
second public learn-in on Nov. 16.
In the meantime Belshaw solicited
and passed on to faculty a letter
from arts dean Doug Kenny
saying that the political climate in
the department was too hot for a
reconsideration to take place. He
also issued a stern confidential
warning to department members
that further news leaks on their
part could result in legal action
being taken against them.
On Nov. 23 the P and T
committee decided to write an
"addendum" to the cases. During
that week the cases overspilled
department boundaries when they
were brought to the attention of
the Canadian Association of
University Teachers.
Last Monday Speier and Silvers
denounced the addendum as a
whitewash, calling on the
committee to fully reconsider
their cases. The following day, the
committee killed the addendum
plan.
* * *
Perhaps the major issue that
has captured the attention of
students during the weeks of
struggle is secrecy. Students in
anthrosoc have discovered
through first-hand experience that
the institution which proclaims
freedom of discussion and rational
debate in reality wields power
behind closed doors and is loathe
to explain why and how it does its
business.
The unfinished fight has also
led   students   to   ask   questions
War Act inquiry will hold hearing here
The Citizens Commission of Inquiry into
the War Measures Act will hold hearings in
the SUB student council chambers Friday.
The hearings will be held from 10 a.m. to
12 noon, 2 to 5 p.m. and 8 to 10 p.m.
The commission was formed last April by
concerned members of Quebec and Ontario
civil rights organizations because the federal
government failed to provide a civil
commission to study the effects of the Oct.
16, 1970 invocation of the act in Quebec.
Three of the 10 commissioners will be at
the hearing.
They   are   Laurier   La   Pierre,   McGill
University history professor; Linda
Meissenheimer, ex-student council president
at Simon Fraser University and Richard
Dunlop, associate law professor at UBC.
Hearings began in Montreal Oct. 16, to
commemorate the invocation of the act and
have since been held in Ottawa, Hull,
Saskatoon and Edmonton.
'The purpose of the hearings is to gather
information on public opinions of the act,"
Dunlop said.
Letters have been sent to political parties
and other organizations asking them to
present briefs at the hearings.
Dunlop said many people at previous
hearings came forward with briefs which
revealed their own experience during the
Quebec crisis.
After Friday's Vancouver hearing, others
will be held in the prairies, Quebec and
possibly the maritime provinces.
Dunlop said the hearings should be
completed by the end of December.
"Then a report on the effect of the act on
civil liberties in times of peace and whether
it should be ammended or repealed now, will
be published in English and French."
EDELWEISS
HAUS
— a light comedy before exams
PHILLIPE DE BROCA'S
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about the nature of sociology.
Members of the Union of Radical
Social Scientists claim that the
fight is between a cluster of
disciplines defending capitalism
and a unified social science that
serves the cause of revolution.
The whole concept of tenure
has come under the gun as a result
of what's happening in anthrosoc.
And the procedures for granting
tenure have been severely
challenged by anthrosoc grad
students.
In the eye of the hurricane is a
deeply-divided department whose
wounds will not be quickly
healed. They are led by Belshaw,
the continuance of whose
headship is now doubtful.
And also in the hurricane's eye
are Speier and Silvers. The answer
to why they are being fired has
yet to be given.
,***"
>*"
^^*~^~~
y   Mm-:
Ioiif gun
belongsto
a man with
no name.
THE GOOD,
THE BAD
AND
THE UGLY
weekdays till 9 — Sat
6        >*
THURSDAY, DEC. 2
12:30-ANGUS 110
7:30-ANGUS 104
75*
E»W»>«<«WiM.MJfciJfaM«MaMiM
1123 Marine Bldg., 355 Burrard St., Vancouver 1, B.C. Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
UBC financial statement
requirement, not an issue
Campus
Leagues?
By SANDI SHREVE
UBC is required by law to
publish an annual financial
statement of all expenditures and
salaries.
But this year no one knew it
was available.
'The government only requires
us to produce and publish the
statement, not to make an issue of
it or give it away," Arnie Myers,
director of UBC information
'services said Wednesday.
He said the government has
only demanded publication of the
statement "for the past few
years".
"For the first few years there
was a great deal of interest in it so
we printed a substantial number
of copies."
Myers said because in more
recent years fewer copies have
been sold, bursar Bill White
decreased the printing order for
the 1970/71 fiscal year.
In previous years all Vancouver
media received free copies of the
statement.
Myers said: "We felt the media
slapped us in the teeth" because
the only stories they published
concerned high salaries of faculty
members and ignored all other
material it provided.
As a result the media was not
sent copies of the statement this
year.
"The statement is publically
available at the university
bookstore and there is no secret
about it," Myers said.
(The statement is not on
display — it is available in a
backroom of the store, priced at
$3.15.)
The statement says $937,000
was paid to the Teachers
Insurance Annuity Association
and the College Retirement and
Equitors Fund which are U.S.
pension funds.
Before 1967 the only Canadian
«e«ts
?«*?*
ARNIE MYERS
... slapped in teeth
alternative to the U.S. pension
fund was one controlled by the
federal government, which limited
investment to equal a return of
only $1,200 per year after
retirement.
In 1967 the university
introduced the UBC Pension Plan
for faculty members, which is
handled through a Canadian trust
fund, Myers said.
(UBC is now in the process of
working out a similar plan for
non-active staff.)
When the new plan was
introduced all new faculty
members were required to use it
while old members had the option
of remaining with the U.S. fund
or changing to the Canadian fund.
The statement says $2,129,876
was paid to the Canadian fund by
all   faculty   members during the
last fiscal year, indicating the
majority of old faculty opted to
change to it.
The statement said a total of
$3,512,000 was paid to countries
outside Canada. This includes the
U.S. pension fund payments as
well as payments to various
scientific supply companies.
A total of $108,402 was paid
to "the university endowment
lands administration.
Myers told The Ubyssey the
endowment lands were originally
to be developed by the provincial
government to provide revenue
for UBC through a share in land
sales profits.
"But this never happened," he
said.
According to the 1970-71
annual report of the Alumni
Association, it received $225,000
from UBC to cover operating
costs.
More than $15,000 of this
grant as well as $277,546 in gifts
and donations was returned to the
university.
Money raised by the Alumni
Association provides scholarships
and bursaries for students.
"A broad range of grants are
made to both men's and women's
athletic committees and to
extramural and intramural
activities," said Jack Strathus,
director of the Alumni
Association.
UBC treasurer Allan Baxter
explained the $2,163 paid to
Simmons and McBride funeral
parlor.
He said if people donate their
bodies to the university for
medical research, "we pay their
memorial expenses when they
die."
Presumably the $601 paid to
Vancouver Hearse Hire Ltd.
covered costs for transporting the
bodies to the university.
miller*
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tour China by the China Friendship Committee in conjunction with the
government of the People's Republic of China.
The one-month tour took the Canadians through all parts of China with
major stops at Peking, Nanking, Shanghai, Wuhan, Tangshau and Kwangchow
(formerly Canton).
Among those who went was former UBC student Ralph Stanton who
was interviewed by Page Friday. Excerpts from the interview along with some
of the photographs taken by Stanton on the tour are presented here for a
special on the People's Republic.
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Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,   1971 :'rfZ^
Friendly Chinese workers applaud the Canadian delegation upon their arrival at a road project near a Peking internal combustion engine factory. All except the Peoples'
Liberation Army worker who decided his revolutionary duty lay more in digging the road rather than the tourists.
"The idea of the educational system is to unite
theory and practice."
Page Friday: How is education structured in China?
Ralph Stanton: Basically, children start at the age of seven. If both
parents work children are in pre-school day-care. All communities have free
day care for children from birth. Women, if they are factory workers, are
given 56 days maternity leave.
Women with babies are given time off from factory to go and nurse
their children at the near-by day-care facility.
Children start at lower school (the equivalent of our grammar school).
The idea of the educational system is to unite theory and practice. Children
we saw worked in a plywood factory utilizing the plywood. This work is
always connected to learning. Twelve-year-olds studying electrolysis were
electroplating car filters.
Previous to the cultural revolution students would have to be 15 years
old to do this work.
The middle school (high school) we went to was in Shanghai and had an
electric motor repair shop attached to it where the students rewound and
repaired electric motors. They rebuilt the entire motor while studying the
theory of how the motor worked. This makes is easier to learn things and, in
our own view, made it less alienating as the people got a more rounded world
view- Continued on Page 6
Minutes after her operation for an ovary cyst a young Chinese woman
recuperates in bed.
A few minutes later she walked down the hall to take a look at the offending
object. Her only anaesthetic was acupuncture.
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Page Friday. 4
UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2,  1971 Thursday,  December 2,  1971
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 MEN AT,WORK at an open hearth blast furnace at the Wuhan Iron and Steel Works.
"They have what they call the two initiatives 9
local and centraV9
■mmr Ej
We saw workers, in this case electronics workers, teaching in a middle
school and we saw teachers who, before this innovation took place during the
cultural revolution, were unable to do the repair work the students were
doing.
Pf: How is university education structured?
R.S.: The University of Peking known as Beta (Bay-dah) was one of the
storm centres of the cultural revolution and its method of operation has been
completely changed.
The old emphasis was on lectures, book learning and generally the kind
of university with which we are familiar. Elitish, academic snobbery and
alienation prevailed.
The new university reformed both the content and the form of
education. They started from Mao's premise that it is impossible to run an
arts and literature factory unless the factory considers "the society as a whole
as its factory.
So students of art and literature must go out and participate in industry
and agriculture. They must go out and study culture directly and combine
their study with direct action.
Again the point was made that learning is easier with the integration of
theory and practice. The new content was to study Marx, Engels, Lenin and
Mao and to participate directly in the social production of agriculture and
industry on a practical level.
The new form was to emphasize discussion, practice, inter-student
discussion, self-study, student professor study and intensive questioning.
Students and cadre who wished to teach could do so in the classroom.
The new method resulted in an end to professorial elitism and
snobbism. Profs are encouraged to learn from the students and if a professor
does not know something he is able to say so without embarrassment which is
a major change from the old China.
Pf: Who exercises control over the university?
R.S. The equivalent to our board of governors is a 39 member
revolutionary committee composed of all the major elements in the
community.
It has six workers from outside the university, seven People's Liberation
Army members, nine professors and academic staff, three representatives
from workers ai the university (physical plant).seven students, six cadre or
white collar bureaucratic type-? from within the university and one
representative from all the families of the students. These people are elected
frorn their own constituency.
The committee is age divided so that young, middle-aged and elderly
are divided more or less evenly.
Although examinations are de-emphasized they are still present. Three
things are tested for: the ability to analyze and solve problems, the grasp of
theory and the integration of theory and practice.
Poorer students were coached by their class brothers and sisters There
is no such thing as paying a coach in China.
Pf: Could you tell us something about the communal- system in China?
R.S.: Communes can be 100,000 people and encompass factories and
things related to agriculture. The general theory of that is the distinction
between urban and rural is broken down and production is diversified.
You can go to a fairly remote community and find a small steel plant in
operation or light industry which is making roller bearings, agricultural pumps
or air compressors such as the situation we saw.
In China they have what they call the two initiatives, local and central.
You never have to wait for the centre to allow something. You can go ahead
on you own but the centre can also initiate projects.
Pf: How is food produced and distributed?
RS.: Food is produced almost everywhere you go in China. We found a
small farm in the Chinese equivalent of an elementary school. The main
task of the countryside is to produce food and the main practice is to make
each region self-sufficient. Now it is generally no longer necessary to
transport grains from south to north.
Food is very plentiful. We ate on communes and factories and were
unable to eat all which was placed before us while our hosts, the Chinese
workers, were able to eat more than we.
A typical worker's meal in a factory at noon would consist of two
dishes. One would be the equivalent of five of six bowls of rice and the other
a combination of egg, vegetables, meat or fish. China produces enough milk
for children.
Pf: From what you saw how is production organized?
R.S.: The factory system there is unlike the one here inasmuch as the
factory may cover a vast acreage and may include housing, schools, hospitals
and recreation facilities. Control of the factories is in the hands of 3 in 1
committees composed of workers, cadre and PLA representatives.
Workers are expected to provide the spark to innovate arid stream-line
production and no one fears losing her or his job since anyone in China who
wants to work can.
..^ftfiT - ' =
VOLUNTEER WORK DAY at the site of a new bridge at Wuhan. Many Peoples' Liberation Army members join the force on such days.
Page Friday, 6
THE  UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971 Men who make wounds
Norman Bethune, a Canadian doctor, was in the
medical corps during the Spanish Civil War and later was a
medical officer in the Red Army in the Sino-Japanese
War. He died there in 1939 after writing Wounds which is
reprinted from New Frontiers.
I he kerosene lamp overhead makes a steady buzzing
sound like an incandescent hive of bees. Mud walls. Mud
floor. Mud bed. White paper windows. Smell of blood and
chloroform. Cold. Three o'clock in the morning,
December 1, North China, near Lin Chu, with the 8th
Route Army.
Men with wounds.
Wounds like little dried pools, caked with
black-brown earth; wounds with torn edges frilled with
black gangrene; neat wounds, concealing beneath the
abscess in their depths, burrowing into and around the
great firm muscles like a dammed-back river, running
around and between the muscles like a hot stream;
wounds, expanding outward, decaying orchids or crushed
carnations, terrible flowers of flesh; wounds from which
the dark blood is spewed out in clots, mixed with the
ominous gas bubbles, floating on the fresh flood of the
still-continuing secondary hemorrhage.
Old filthy bandages stuck to the skin with blood-glue.
Careful. Better moisten first. Through the thigh. Pick the
leg up. Why it's like a bag, a long, loose, red stocking.
What kind of stocking? A Christmas stocking. Where's the
fine strong rod of bone now? In a dozen pieces. Pick them
out with your fingers; white as a dog's teeth, sharp and
jagged. Now feel. Any more left? Yes, here. All? Yes; no,
here's another piece. Is this muscle dead? Pinch it. Yes,
it's dead. Cut it out. How can that heal? How can those
muscles, once so strong, now so torn, so devastated, so
ruined, resume their proud tension? Pull, relax. Pull, relax.
What fun it was! Now that is finished. Now that's done.
Now we are destroyed. Nov/ what will we do with
ourselves?
N
lext. What an infant! Seventeen. Shot through the
belly. Chloroform. Ready? Gas rushes out of the opened
peritoneal cavity. Odor of feces. Pink coils of distended
intestine. Four perforations. Close them Purse string suture.
Sponge out the pelvis. Three tubes. Hard to close. Keep
him warm. How? Dip those bricks into hot water.
Gangrene is a cunning, creeping fellow. Is this one
alive? Yes, he lives. Technically speaking, he is alive. Give
him saline intraveneously. Perhaps the innumerable tiny
cells of his body will remember. They may remember the
hot salty sea, their ancestral home, their first food. With
the memory of a million years, they may remember other
tides, other oceans, and life being born of the sea and sun.
It may make them raise their tired little heads, drink deep
* and struggle back into life again. It may do that.
Bethune memorial in China
And this one. Will he run along the road beside his
mule at another harvest, with cries of pleasure and
happiness? No, that one will never run again How can
you run with one leg? What will he do? Why, hell sit and
watch the other boys run. What will he think9 He'll trunk
what you and I would think. What's the good of pity''
Don't pity him! Pity would diminish his sacrifice. He d.d
this for the defence of China. Help him. Lift him off the
table. Carry him in your arms. Why, he's as light ii a
child! Yes, your child, my child.
How beautiful the body is; how perfect its parts; with
what precision it moves; how obedient, proud and strong
How terrible when torn. The little flame of life sinks
lower and lower, and with a flicker, goes out. It goes out
like a candle goes out. Quietly and gently. It makes its
protest atextinction, then submits. It has its say, then is
silent.
Any more? Four Japanese prisoners. Bring them in.
In this community of pain, there are no enemies. Cut
away that blood-stained uniform. Stop that hemorrhage.
Lay them beside the others. Why, they're alike as
brothers! Are these soldiers professional man-killers? No,
these are amateurs-in-arms. Workman's hands. These are
workers-in-uniform.
No more. Six o'clock in the morning. God, it's cold in
this room. Open the door. Over the distant, dark-blue
mountains, a pale, faint line of light appears in the east. In
an hour the sun will be up. To bed and sleep.
But sleep will not come. What is the cause of this
cruelty, this stupidity? A million workmen come from
Japan to kill or mutilate a million Chinese workmen. Why
should the Japanese worker attack his brother worker,
who is forced merely to defend himself. Will the Japanese
worker benefit by the death of the Chinese? No, how can
he gain?i Then, in God's name, who will gain? Who is
responsible for sending those Japanese workmen on this
murderous mission? Who will profit from it? How was it
possible to persuade the Japanese workman to attack the
Chinese workman - his brother in poverty; his companion
in misery?
I s it possible that a few rich men, a small class of
men, have persuaded a million men to attack, and attempt
to destroy, another million men as poor as they? So that
these rich may be richer still? Terrible thought! How did
they persuade these poor men to come to China? By telling
them the truth? No, they would never have come if they
had known the truth. Did they dare to tell these workmen
that the rich only wanted cheaper raw materials, more
markets and more profit? No, they told them that this
brutal war was "The Destiny of the Race," it was for the
"Glory of the Emperor," it was for the "Honor of the
State," it was for their "King and Country."
False. False ashefl!
Continued on page 8
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Thursday,  December 2,  1971
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 7 Wounds—cont.
The agents of a criminal
war of aggression, such as
this, must be looked for like
the agents of other crimes
such as murder, among those
who are likely to benefit
from those crimes, Will the
80,000,000 workers of Japan,
the poor farmers, the
unemployed     industrial
own country, by the gold, the
silver, the iron, the coal, the
oil? Long ago he ceased to
possess that natural wealth. It
belongs to the rich, the ruling
class. The millions who work
those mines live in poverty.
So how is he likely to benefit
by the armed robbery of the
gold, silver, iron, coal and oil
1
workers — will they gain? In
the entire history of the wars
of aggression, from the
conquest of Mexico by Spain,
the capture of India by
England, the rape of Ethiopia
by Italy, have the workers of
those "victorious" countries
ever been known to benefit?
No, these never benefit by
such wars.
Does the Japanese
workman benefit by the
natural resources of even his
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from China? Will not the rich
owners of the one retain for
their own profit the wealth of
the other? Have they not
always done so?
It would seem inescapable
that the militarists and the
capitalists of Japan are the
only class likely to gain by
this mass murder, this
authorized madness, this
sanctified butchery. That
ruling class, the true state,
stands accused.
Are wars of aggression,
wars for the conquest of
colonies, then, just big
business? Yes, it would seem
so,     however     much     the
perpetrators of such national
crimes seek to hide their true
purpose under banners of
high-sounding abstractions
and ideals. They make war to
capture markets by murder;
raw materials by rape. They
find it cheaper to steal than
to exchange; easier to butcher
than to buy. This is the secret
of war. This is the secret of
all wars. Profit. Business.
Profit. Blood money.
What do these enemies of
the human race look like? Do
they wear on their foreheads
a sign so that they may be
told, shunned and
condemned as criminals? No.
On the contrary, they are
respectable ones. The are
honored. They call
themselves, and are called,
gentlemen. What a travesty
on the name, Gentlemen!
They are the pillars of the
state, of the church, of
society. They support private
and public charity out of the
excess of their wealth. They
endow institutions. In their
private lives they are kind and
considerate. They obey the
law, their law, the law of
property. But there is one
sign by which these gentle
gunmen can be told. Threaten
a reduction on the profit of
their money and the beast in
them awakes with a snarl.
They become ruthless as
savages, brutal as madmen,
remorseless as executioners;.
Such men as these must
perish if the human race is to
continue. There can be no
permanent peace in the world
while they live. Such an
organization of human
society as permits them to
exist must be abolished.
These men make the
wounds.
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
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Stewart: Shrug —Trudeau
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Allegro: Chosen People.
Skinner: Beyond
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Berger: Vagabonding in
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Page Friday, 8
THE  UBYSSEY
Thursday,   December  2,  1971 Thursday, December 2, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Laws affecting women fail
to prohibit discrimination
Page 21
By JAN O'BRIEN
There has been legal change in our society but
it has not brought about substantial social change
for women.
This is because of two factors, UBC law student
Lynn Smith told the women's studies meeting
Tuesday.
"First there has not been what you'd call an
honest effort. Just look at the unenforced and
basically unenforceable Human Rights Act for proof
of this," said Smith in her lecture on Women and
the State as an Institution of Authority.
"Secondly, there is a basic internal tension in
the law, between the ideology that law is the 'stable
foundation of social order,' and the new ideology of
the law as an instrument of social change," she said.
Until the present century, no state has wanted
to legislate the end of the oppression of women
because the state is a patriarchal institution, Smith
said.
"The state to a large extent has taken over the
ancient role of father, the giver of permission to
marry, the provider in need, the rule-maker and
rule-enforcer in important areas of our lives.
"There are really three kinds of laws affecting
women:
they dismissed the appeal, saying that women who
are prostitutes choose that career and therefore are
not discriminated against."
Smith said she was not saying this section
should be expanded so that it applies to men as
well, but rather we should get rid of it altogether.
"Another clear-cut example is the prevalence,
in the Criminal Code, of the requirement that the
female victims of certain sexual offences be 'of
previous chaste character'," said Smith.
"There are also swatches of the civil law which
explicitly discriminate against women. The B.C.
Change of Name Act specifically forbids a married
woman from changing her name without her
husband's consent.
"Several provinces have different minimum
wages for women, and although the actual minimum
wage is the same in B.C., there are separate but
equal minimum wage acts, one for women and one
for men," she said.
"One of the most interesting examples of
implicit discrimination against women is the law
about women's property.
"A married woman does have full legal capacity
to own and deal with property, and has special
1 remedies against a husband who tries to interfere
n RflDicnLPERSPECiiuEonmomEn
• those laws which discriminate in women's
favor;
• those which explicitly or implicitly
discriminate against women;
• those laws which claim to be for women's
benefit but are not in fact."
There are few clear-cut examples of the first
category, said Smith.
"One might be the section of the Criminal Code
which offers a woman a special defence against a
charge of infanticide — namely, that she is suffering
a mental disorder due to the effects of lactation or
childbirth.
"Of the second kind, that is, laws which openly
discriminate against women, one of the most blatant
examples is found in the Criminal Code, Section
164 (1) (c) prohibits 'being a common prostitute or
night walker (who) is found in a public place and
does not, when required, give a good account of
herself.
"This section applies only to women because of
the use of the female pronoun. Therefore, male
prostitutes are immune from arrest when they
commit exactly the same offence," said Smith.
She said it was argued recently in the B.C.
Court of Appeal that this section contravenes the
Canadian Bill of Rights, which guarantees "the right
of the individual to equality before the law and the
protection of the law" without discrimination by
reason of sex.
"The three male judges had a good giggle about
the very notion of males being prostitutes, then
with her in that way.
"As the Royal Commission on the Status of
Women points out, real equality cannot exist
without economic independence.
"Work in the home is not rewarded in
monetary terms, although it frees the husband to
establish a career and accumulate assets.
"If the marriage ends, he gets what he has
accumulated and so does she. The problem is that
usually she has accumulated nothing and that is
what she gets," said Smith.
Smith said maintenance after a marriage
break-up is not seen as a woman's right to
compensation for her services over whatever period
of time she has served, but as a form of charity or
blood money from husband to wife, if she's been
good.
"Maintenance is a tricky thing and an example
of the third or dubious kind of law," she said.
It does in some ways, work in womens' favor
but is not at all an ideal situation — it is probably
psychologically damaging to most women because it
is a continual and constant reminder of a
relationship that has failed and because it is seen as
a form of charity, said Smith.
She then looked at two societies — Russia and
China — which have tried to change the role of
women suddenly and drastically.
"Both Russia and China initially had the
liberation of women as one of the major goals of
their revolution.
See: page 24: LEGAL
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must be at least 17 years of age and possess a Bronze
Medallion in Life Saving. The cost is $15.00 which includes
materials, manuals, certification and National Registration.
Course is sponsored by the National Life Guard Service of The
Royal Life Saving Society of Canada and is being held in the
Alma Community Y.M.C.A. building on the corner of 10th
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THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
HILLTOP GULF
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Nationalize
That mild-mannered
has word of warning
MONTREAL - Ralph Nader,
America's revolutionary boy
scout, was in Montreal recently
and the line he took flowed like a
fine maple syrup.
"Canada," he said, " has lost
its capacity for economic
self-defence against the U.S.A."
It has become, he said, "an
extractive super-colony" milked
by the U.S. for its resources.
Recent protectionist moves by
the U.S. government, designed to
protect the profits of America's
corporate barons are having a
severe effect on the Canadian
economy, Nader said.
And in the face of the import
surcharge and other moves, all
Canada has done is "make a
couple of gloomy statements that
they're not taken seriously
enough by the U.S."
Even Mexico, he indicated, a
country that many regard as a
banana republic, would never have
tolerated the recent American
moves.
By BRIAN McKENNA
Last Post News Service
He pointed to the Mexican law
requiring 51 per cent domestic
control of industry and its bold
nationalization of the oil industry.
Canada must either start
considering nationalizing its
resource industries, said Nader, or
be ready to face eventual
economic union with the U.S.
Nader spent a full day in
Montreal whipping up enthusiasm
at McGill University and Loyola
College — enthusiasm he hopes
will be sluiced into a strong
movement centred on Canadian
campuses patterned after the one
he co-ordinates in the U.S.A.
In   his   wake   he   left   Larry
muckraker
for Canada
BORDER
... meaningless?
Silverman, one of his "Raiders" to
demonstrate to the interested the
strategies of organization and
investigation. "We're not going to
organize Canadians. They have to.
do that themselves. But if they're
interested, we're willing to tell
them how we've done it," said
Silverman, who works out of the
Centre for Responsive Law, 1156
19th St. NW, Washington, D.C.
Nader first appeared to be a
liberal reformer in the grand old
muckraking tradition with his
book on Detroit's motorarchy,
Unsafe At Any Speed. But he has
grown progressively more radical.
And as his shafts penetrate
deeper and deeper into the
American empire and its
corporate underpinnings, his
popularity and the support for his
campaigns continues to swell. A
recent Harris poll showed 67 per
cent approval for his campaigns
with only five per cent opposed.
The task force reports
published under his name read
like they were prepared by a
Ramparts-magazine Marxist, with
the dramatic difference that they
have the combined clout of Time
and Life. He cannot be ignored.
Recently one of his research
groups documented in
excruciating detail the
interlocking power structure of
business and government that
rules California — "the land of
corporate fraud".
Another recent investigation
detailed how the First National
City Bank, the second largest in
the U.S., sucks money from the
poor to enrich the rich.
Now he has launched a
thousand-man study of Congress
— after that, it is expected the
Pentagon will be engulfed with his
raiders.
General Motors can attest to
his legal brilliance - he sued them
for invasion of privacy and won to
the tune of $425,000.
But he cloaks his radicalism,
coming on in the guise of a
Presbyterian minister — a
well-worn grey suit, white shirt
and narrow tie, all the time
invoking the old Puritan Ethic. He
makes   enormous   demands   on
'Canada has lost its capacity
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
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CALL 683-6696 Thursday, December 2,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 23
or join U
then
(and
has
the
those  around him  —  and
works twice as hard himself.
For   Middle   America
Middle     Canada),     this
enormous appeal.
A sense of humor,
characteristic the New Left was so
often accused of lacking, Nader
has in enormous gobs. Rather
than bludgeoning his opponents
with a rhetorical sledgehammer,
he ridicules them with a fine sense
of irony.
"I read every one of
vice-president Agnew's speeches
about law and order in the streets.
I was surprised not to see one
mention of General Motors. And
they're responsible for more death
and property damage than
everyone else put together."
As for revolutionary violence:
"It can't be ruled out. It depends
on the situation.
"And," he told his
predominantly English audience
at Montreal's Loyola College, with
a hint of warning in his voice,
"don't ask me about Quebec.
"I'd much rather talk about
the violence of General Motors or
the violence of U.S. Steel slowly
poisoning its workers or all the
other forms of silent, invisible
violence. Or the violence done to
100,000 Black children every year
who are poisoned by the lead in
the cheap paint peeling off their
tenement walls."
Although it has the aura of a
fad about it, he said, the pollution
movement goes far beyond that.
If the movement is to go
anywhere, he emphasizes, it must
relate to the poor and the working
man, the worst victims of
pollution.
"You don't have to explain to
the worker in the Union Carbide
plant in Welland, Ontario, what
pollution is. The sagging of his
body and the rasp of his voice
from the. industrial poisons
belched out by the plant tells him
what pollution is.
"You  don't have  to  tell  the
coal miner with black lung
disease what pollution is, or the
textile worker being slowly
poisoned by cotton dust.
"And you don't find your
executives living near their
beloved plants. Gary, Indiana, is a
good example. U.S. Steel has
made the town a gas chamber of
pollution. The executives, of
course, all live outside in some
safe shrubberied suburb."
POLLUTION
. the worker knows?
Nader senses that students are
despairing of change, sliding back
to the Fifties when they were the
"silent generation."
"They push against a boulder
for half an hour, and when it
doesn't move, they call for the
TNT." The young underestimate
their tremendous power. After
awakening North America to the
war, racism, the destruction of the
environment, it's time for the
movement to move into Phase
Two.
"Organize. Organize. Organize.
Channel some of your student
fees into hiring lawyers,
economists and others to fight
with through the courts."
And there are other ways.
Nader's hero is The Fox, a sort
of environmental Zorro who is
currently the terror of Chicago
polluters. The Fox believes that
corporations should keep
everything they make. So he
blocks up their sewers so they can
keep their pollution. He bursts
into carpeted corporate offices
and dumps their stinking effluent
in the middle of the floor — and
then disappears.
"They have more police
looking for him than they had out
for the Democratic Convention.
And if they ever catch him it's
going to be the environment trial
of the century."
At his Montreal press
conference, Nader expressed
dismay at the state of Canadian
journalism" in the area of
investigative reporting. A
Montreal Gazette reporter asked
him what areas in particular.
"Where do you want me to
start. How about some of those
company towns. They're
incredible little mini-tyrannies. Or
the insurance industry, or the
food industry, or fishing, or the
oil industry out west, or
banking. ..
"It's like fishing off the Grand
Banks of Newfoundland in the old
days," he said with a chuckle.
for economic self-defence'
>-.«¥
, sjv-X    «
UCC's $5,000 allocated
The university clubs committee divided part
of its $5,000 budget among 35 clubs in a general
meeting Tuesday.
Of the total budget $1,900 went for other UBC
expenses. Telephone bills amounted to $1,100, and
$400 each went to UCC operating costs and clubs'
day.
Of the $3,100 spent on clubs, Varsity Outdoors
Club topped the list with $269.50, and the Varsity
Christian Fellowship received $245. Other religious
organizations got $274.40.
Political clubs got $237.20, and general interest
organizations received the remaining $2,060.90.
Also listed was a $13 surplus.
UCC treasurer Ken Lassesen said earlier that a
$5,000 budget would mean "murder for the clubs".
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
CHRISTMAS PROGRAM
XMAS CRAFT SALE/SWAP MEET/etc. on Fri. Dec.
10, 4 p.m. on — Any student may sell, trade, or barter
for any item.
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE XMAS DANCE - Fri.
Dec. 17, 9 p.m.-t a.m. Trinidad Moonlighter's Steelband.
international = ~ '^ $2 per person, EVERYONE WELCOME.
Between Nations
STUDENT/COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS PARTY - Sun. Dec. 19. 1 p.m.-4
p.m. Turkey Luncheon, International Desserts, Christmas Carolling. 50c
OUT-OF-TOWN-CHRISTMAS-VISITS! Any overseas students who would
like to visit with a Canadian family outside the city should leave their names
and the dates they are available at the I.H. office NOW 224-3887 so that we
can begin to assign our host families.
BOWLING PARTY onriday Dec. 3 at 7:30 SUB Lanes.
m*mmm
'A DAZZLING MOVIE. A superior film.
The most striking and baroque images
you're ever likely to see. A rich, poetic,
Cinematic Style."-Vincenf Canby, New York Times
COLOR
THE MOTHERS OF INVENTION
RINGO STARR
THEODORE BIKEL
Vogue
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
■MMMti
Warning: Crude and
suggestive language
throughout.
B.C. DIRECTOR
SHOW TIMES: 12.35 2.40
4.45 6.55 9.00
^m€^^m^M
wmm*m
"I'M GOING TO GET YOU
ELLIOTT BOY"
Warning: Completely concerned  with  brutality
and sex. B.C. DIRECTOR'
Also   "EUGENIE,   THE   STORY   OF   HER
JOURNEY INTO PERVERSION".
ELLIOTT BOY: 1.55 5.00 8.05
EUGENIE: 12.30 3.35 6.40 9.45
mmmm
JULIE CHRISTIE • ALAN BATES
"THE GO-BETWEEN"
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT. TECHNICOLOR
Warning: Contains one  very  intimate scene. B.C.
Director. SHOW TIMES: 12.10 2.30 4.45 7.05 9.25
GLENDA JACKSON • PETER FINCH
"SUNDAY BLOODY SUNDAY"
SHOW TIMES: 7.30 9.30
Warning: Sex involving three1
people, some swearing and coarse ,
language. B.C. DIR.
m Page 24
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2, 1971
'Legal reform a distraction'
From page 21
"In Russia after an initial period of sweeping
reforms, including state withdrawal from almost all
aspects of marriage and divorce, there was a serious
retrenching and resumption of state involvement."
She said the pendulum is swinging back and
there is no doubt that, legally, Russian women are
much better off than we are.
"In looking at the situation of women in China
we have to remember that the starting-poing was a
• feudal   system  in   which  women  were miserably
oppressed and that it is just over 20 years since their
revolution..
"Most women, as in Russia, and as many do
here, carry a double workload - but they are being
told that proper proletarian attitudes would solve
their problems.
"The Cultural Revolution brought about the
dissolution of the women's movement as a separate
entity," said Smith.
"Charlotte Cohen concludes, 'China is not our
model. Its need and desires are very different from
ours. Women are told what they should be and do —
that's not the way it could be here. Working side by
side with men partially liberates women. Freedom —
however you want it - comes from new ways of
living together'," said Smith.
"Women's liberation can't really happen from
the top down. There is one stunning illustration of
that thesis which is discussed in an article by
Gregory Massell in the Law and Society Review.
"It is the Russian experiment in inducing
revolutionary change in Soviet Central Asia, by
pushing, with all the means at its disposal for the
liberation pf women.
"Since the society was Muslim, reasoned the
Russian strategists, the best way to shake it up from
top to bottom is to attack one of its
most fundamental tenets, male superiority," said
Smith.
"As the experiment progressed limited
retribution (beatings, expulsion from the home) by
men on the women, evolved into a massive backlash.
"Men who participated in their womenfolk's
unveiling were excommunicated from the faith;
unveiled women in the streets were shamed, raped,
killed, disembowelled; female organizers were
vilified, persecuted, sometimes lynched, along with
their families.
"The Soviets discovered that things were not
working out as expected. Instead of leading to the
alienation Of substantial segments of society from
the traditional way of life, sudden and massive
female mobilization tended to lead to widespread
and intense alienation from the Soviet system and
its works," she said.
"In a desperate attempt to salvage the situation,
the Russians imposed an all-out totalitarian
enforcement of the law.
"Traditionalist offenders were shot. Women
were unveiled at gunpoint. This campaign went on
for two years, until it became clear that the only
result was that any indigenous support there once
was, had been totally lost."
Smith said legal reform is necessary but it is
certainly not sufficient.
"In some ways it acts as a red herring, as a
distraction from what really needs to be done.
"Masselsays, of the Asian experiment, for
example, that the greater was the emphasis on the
enforcement of legal rules against oppressing
women, the less was the interest and investment in
systematic organizational and development work —
the tendency was to limit social action to legalistic
enterprises.
"Women's liberation has to be a priority and an
end in itself. When it is seen as a means to
something else the betrayal has begun.
"The only way that it will continue to be seen
as a priority is if women begin to liberate themselves
through changing their own lives," she said.
"It is an anti-authoritarian movement; it can't
rely on an institution of authority like the state to
bring about its goals."
* DEPARTMENT OF THEATREMBBM^^^ii™""""™^™™
Theatre 361/2 presents
HER SCIENCEMAN LOVER
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(The Production That Bares And Exposes Engineers)
SEX! NUDITY! TRAINED ANIMALS!
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BUG STOP: Thursday,  December 2,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  25
By PATRICK MacFADDEN
Last Post News Service
The
Goddy-
Woddies
"I would not," exclaimed Zarathustra,"believe
in a God who didn't know how to dance."
Picky picky, say the new goddy-woddies.
Gimme a god, any old god, multiply him by three,
take away the god you first thought of and —
Shazaam! Time Magazine's on the phone.
As with so many fads, this one finds its niche
among the affluent young middle-class. The new
goddy-woddies have money in their pockets: they
tend to be found on or near the campuses, or
outside the classier rag stores. Their number has
grown in proportion as the academy has turned
from the pursuit of excellence to become a rest
home for wandering bands of the unemployed
young.
The goddy-woddies are enthusiastically vague
about the precise nature of the Word. They wave
their hands, smile a lot, look you in the eye, and tell
you Jesus is where it's at.
Unlike the millenarins of old, the
goddy-woddies have ensured that only the moneyed
can afford the paraphernalia attending the new, hip
ecomenicism. Mojo bags, pre-columbian amulets,
spell stones, zodiac charts, magic potions, ouija
boards and Tarot cards tumble in profusion, and
with astronomical mark-ups, from the handmills of
the hucksters. Magic, once the obverse of religion,
has become a main ingredient.
The books of Edgar Cayce and Jeanne Dixon,
resolutely middle-American, have replaced Malcome
and Eldridge as ego-enhancing experiences.
Necromancy and diluted Zen are the big draws on
the lecture circuit. Tattered maharishis are hiring
tax advisers. Goddy-woddies are polymorphous:
transcendence on Mondays, Satanism Tuesdays, the
Process Church Wednesdays, maybe a little yoga
Thursdays, cool out on the weekend with old
Gurdjieff.
Ideologically, they represent no threat to the
present order. Their structure would find favor with
the Alberta Junior Chamber of Commerce — in fact
there is a strong whiff of the Rotary about some of
their formulations. And for a social system that no
longer requires a massive productive participation,
only acquiescence, they come as a welcome relief
from the burn-it-down brigade of the late sixties.
Where the goddy-woddies are having a
disastrous effect is on enrolment figures in the
traditional academic disciplines. Sociology, and
philosophy appear to be the hardest hit, an outcome
regarded in some quarters as not wholly undeserved.
Departments of religion, on the other hand, are
booming. The lean years are only a memory: rabbis
and reverends, overwhelmed by their sudden
popularity, have been forced to revise their fading
lecture notes radically, the better to accommodate
the new fervor.
Needless to say, Judaeo-Christianity, with its
tiresome insistence on the ultimate responsibility of
the individual for his acts, holds little appeal for the
goddies. One does not have to do good deeds in the
new theology; it is enough merely to be. "Man, that
old stuff," as one of the goddies explained, "that's
too hard."
One result has been a hurried reinterpretation
of the older scriptures to dovetail with the new
sensibility. The more mentally agile of the religion
profs now claim to see heretofore unarticulated
connections between the Talmud and the I Ching;
groovy young Anglicans dash off breathless books
with titles such as Jesus Is My Trip. Even the
Jesuits, it is said, are considering an agonizing
reappraisal of the place of Lucifer in the general
scheme of things.
Many of the further-out, and more heavily
commercialized cults, such as the Process Church,
are imports from the United Kingdom, an area long
noted for combining theological eccentricity with a
healthy bank balance. The maximum leader of
Process is a Robert De Grimston, a Nordic person,
short on theory but a fast man with the lawsuit.
Recently, he has been observed in the Toronto area.
Politically, goddy-woddies remain uninvolved,
seeing the material world as dreary irrelevance.
There is an unfocussed sense of belonging to an
aristocracy, reflected in a furry, gentle fascism.
Most commentators see the goddy-woddies as
either an example of Concerned Youth Seeking the
Answer, or, alternatively, the Decline of the West.
There seems to be little basis for such overwrought
assumptions.
Symptomatic of a society that appears to have
run out of busy work, the goddies may very well
have disappeared by next groundhog day, to be
replaced perhaps — who knows? — by a little
discreet cannibalism. "Take ye and eat, this is My
Body," is what the Man said, right?
INFORMAL FUN SHOPPING
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• CHARGEX  ■ TERMS  m TRADES •  LAYAWAYS
WEST VAN.
1550 Marine
926-5451
Fri. Till 9 p.m.
KERRISDALE
MAIN STORE
2170 West 41st
266-8381
Thurs. & Fri.
till 9 p.m.
Low Everyday Prices— Qualified Personnel —
Largest Stock"
NORTH VAN.
1325 Lonsdale
985-9505
Fri. Till 9 p.m.
BURNABY
Old Orchard
Shopping Centre
Kingsway and
Wttlingdon
437-8551
Fri. Till 9 p.m.
KERRISDALE CAMERAS
,NOW IN BURNABY,
GENERAL PANTS CO. 1
announces
MERRY CHRISTMAS SAVINGS
ON ALL YOUR HOLIDAY CLOTHES. SAVE 10% WITH YOUR G.P.
STUDENT DISCOUNT CARD FOR ADDITIONAL SAVINGS ON THE
FOLLOWING GENERAL PANTS DEALS.
8 TRACK STEREO TAPES reg. $6.98 NOW $3.99
BODY SHIRTS to $15 NOW $4.19
FLAIR PANTS reg. $12 FOR $3.99
KNIT SHIRTS values to $10.99 only $6.99
SWEATERS values to $8.00 only 4.99
LEATHER BELTS up to $4.00 off at $3.99
FOR XMAS GET YOURS AT G.P. Page 26
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, December 2,  1971
'Clerks lake it9
From
and pay meagre. Clinical clerks
are, of course, not the same. Their
lot is much worse — that's the
difference.
Leaving aside the ludicrous
'pay' for work equivalent to the
interns', clerks are fee-paying
students without a curriculum,
without organized teaching aimed
at their level, without much
feedback about their own
performance. Should not their
education be of prime
importance? Or should it come as
a lucky side-effect (as from
clinicians who are eager to teach)?
The great reminder clerks have
that they are still students is
periodic oral examinations, and
the final qualifying examinations
in May hanging over them like a
spectre. "When will I have enough
time to read up on what I've seen
today? When will I have time to
review what I'm deficient in, and
to study for the exams? Why can't
my eyes keep OPEN?"
How about the Phase IV clerk's
spouse, or children, or girl or boy
friend, or social life, leisure, and
health?
This gross exploitation and
pitifully inadequate education of
the clinical clerks (alias final-year
medical students) have made all of
them dissatisfied.
page 5
Some say, 'Return to us the
status of real students', while
others say, 'Let's go back to the
old fourth year, or give us our
nights and weekends back', and 'If
they won't teach us, let's have
enough time for self-study'. And
'What the hell are they doing to
us?'
It's obvious, my friends,
obvious.
The most bewildering
phenomenon besides this folly
called Phase IV is the capacity for
suffering of this group of people
named clerks.
That they can actually take it
and, while working like obedient
dogs, confine their complaints and
tears to only their colleagues and
relatives, is amazing, and the
greatest deterrent to change and
reform in the UBC medical
school.
Is it a need to conform
completely? Is it a fear of being
labelled as 'rebellious'? Is it a fear
of losing that juicy carrot just
around the corner — the M.D.
degree? (Can UBC withhold
60-odd M.D.s?) Or is it apathy or
the tremendous urge to give up?
How can one successfully suppress
the irresistable urge to vomit?
I can't. But then, I am a .. .
clinical clerk.
Campus
Leagues?
Campus
Leagues?
A story about a man who tried to hold onto
his binoculars and his wife ...at the same time.
So what's wrong with being a voyeur?
zOtti Century-Fox presents
The Marriage off a
Young Stockbroker
COLOR BY DELUXE®
ORPHEUM
685-8820
LOUGHEED 2WJ„
BROADWAY EAST OF BOUNDARY 298-7848 Thursday, December 2,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 27
As exams near, students disappear
By VAUGHN NELSON
Pressure is building as the
storm of exams approaches.
With less than two weeks of
lectures left, students are seeking
shelter in libraries, study stalls,
and the health services centre.
To find out how students are
handling the annual Christmas
examination problem, The
Ubyssey posed some general
questions to a number of students
on campus.
Some of these off-the-cuff
comments reflected thoughts
about what exams do.
• "Exams force you to
memorize, to learn what has been
laid out;"
• "They give you an idea of
what you know and what you
don't;" and
• "They ingrain people with
a competitive feeling so they can
cope with the business world and
with    the    pressures    of    their
occupation."
Generally, exams are
tension-builders, causing harried
knowledge seekers to dispel the
excess tension by eating more,
drinking more and talking more.
A few students who experience
a sense of guilt seeing their friends
carrying more books, fighting for
study stalls and putting in long
hours   are   getting   rid   of  their
Ring search fruitless
By RING M. BAKALIVE
Diamonds are forever — except
when they are lost.
J. M. Font lost her diamond
ring Saturday while watching her
son play hockey.
Font said she took off the ring
because her glove would not fit
over it. She did not comment on
the size of her hand, glove, or
diamond.
She said she thought she put
the ring into her purse but it was
so full she did not notice the ring
missing until Sunday. The Fonts
live in Vancouver's Shaughnessy
district.
Jose Font, her husband, took
evasive action Sunday and took
two truckloads of garbage home
from the ice rink.
A quick dig into the refuse
produced no carats.
J. L. Felix, head of physical
plant's garbage collection division,
said Wednesday the abduction of
SUZUKI-NORTON
71 Year-End
Clearance
Now Here
72 Sample Models
4497 Dunbar
228-9639
5& 10 SPEED DEALER
union     garbage    is    not    in      "The    ring    can    never
contravention   of   its   Canadian replaced    because     of
Union     of    Public     Employees attachment to it," she said.
be
my
contract.
Mrs. Font said Wednesday: "I
have been sifting garbage all day
and have found nothing."
She described the wedding
band as having 19 diamonds set in
16-carat-gold.
A reward is offered.
energy by attending lectures for
the first time.
It is also about this time that
many are making New Year's
resolutions to do some serious
thinking about studying next
year.
And as essays, class
assignments and labs become due,
students said they are: "worried",
"pissed-off", "irritated", "under
extreme tension", "paying a
penalty", and "like rats in a
sinking boat".
Talking with other bedraggled
book carriers about exams was
difficult. An underlying feeling of
helplessness exists.
One summarized his thoughts:
"With two to three hundred
people in a class, exams are
realistic. We need them. But they
are still garbage. They don't
reflect anybody's knowledge."
George & Berny's
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REPAIRS
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THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
Liberals use walkie-talkies
at Quebec convention
Last Post News Service
MONTREAL     -     A     new
organizational twist was unveiled
at the recent Quebec Liberal Party
annual nieeting in Quebec City.
The purpose of the manoeuvre
was to defeat controversial
resolutions in committee, before
they ever came to the floor.
The tactic used was simple, but
unique: Paul Desrochers, special
adviser     to     premier     Robert
Star ups
number
TORONTO (CUP) - The death
of The Toronto Telegram a month
ago is proving to be a financial
bonanza for the surviving daily in
the afternoon market here, the
Star.
The Star has announced that
its circulation has increased 32.5
per cent since Telegram publisher
John Bassett killed the paper and
cost   1.200 employees their jobs.
Based on this huge circulation
increase, the Star is raising its
advertising rates by a healthy 31
per cent.
Figures released Monday show
the* Star's net paid circulation
Monday to Friday increased from
387,000 to 505,000. Saturday
circulation has gone up from
513,000 to 719,000.
The price for this bonanza cost
S10 million paid to publisher
Bassett and his partners the Eaton
family, to keep his newspaper
dead and to leave the afternoon
paper market as the sole preserve
of the Star.
GOING SKIING
OVER CHRISTMAS?
We don't blame you one bit,
you've probably wofked hard
this past term and deserve it.
However, make sure you aren't
going to have car problems
when you're 6000 feet up.
Bring in your Porshe,
Mercedes, Volvo or
Volkswagen now to be checked
over and serviced.
Bourassa, had people with
walkie-talkies planted in each of
the committees.
In the natural resources
committee, said Gerald Godin in
Quebec-Presse, Desrocher's plant
had the words "does not pass"
pencilled in next to resolution
138, which dealt with the
nationalization of the province's
mining companies.
He swung into action during
the discussion of resolution 136, a
watering-down of 138 that would
have required mining companies
to make 15 p&r cent of the ore
they mine in Quebec into finished
products in the province.
A little later, he confided to his
walkie-talkie that, "in a few
minutes     138    will    come    up.
According the the breakdown of
votes on 136, I think about 20
people will be enough to defeat
the resolution.
"A few minutes later," Godin
wrote, "the anti-138 commando
squad arrived — people of all
ages."
Pierre O'Neill in Le Devoir
noted that some delegates
protested the tactic. However, he
said: "the truth is that the whole
meeting was rigged. During the
time the committee work was
going on, a communications
network linked by 'walkie-talkie'
to a suite at the Chateau
Frontenac effectively to move
about 30 Liberal election workers
to the right places at critical
times."
FORD'S
FLORAL
CENTER
* plants
* corsages
* fresh flowers
* flowers by wire
A-  to friends & family
4445 W. 10th
224-1341
PUBLIC ENEMY
NUMBER ONE!
You know who a drug pusher is,
don't you? He's a peddler of misery
and death ... a destroyer of lives.
When a pusher's finally got you hooked
on drugs, you're his slave for life.
The more you're addicted
the more he'll profit. He isn't
in business for your health but
for the money he can make from you.
So when he tries to push you on to
drugs, turn your back on him.
Turn him in.
Don't become a mark for the pusher.
The risks you take aren't worth the trip.
For more information, mail this coupon:
Government of British Columbia
Council on Drugs. Alcohol, and Tobacco
Parliament Buildinsis, Victoria, British Columbia
I'leasc scud a free copu of -Ctrl' IT STRAIGHT
some facts about drug abitse."
GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
Hon. D.L. Brothers, Q.C., Minister of Education-Chairman Thursday, December 2, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 29
111
IIHIIIW
Hot flashes
iiiiiiiiiiiiin
Free bus
ride offered
* Some lucky person will have a
free ride to UBC all of January.
The North Shore-UBC
Commuters Club will hold a draw
for a free seat on its direct bus to
the university.
All     fulltime     riders,    whose
January     bus     payments    are
«  received by Dec; 31,1971, will be
eligible.   The   winner's   payment
will be refunded.
The bus will stop in the west
end starting January if students
indicate they want the stop.
If interested in a downtown
stop, or for further information,
, phone the club at 985-1053.
Library hours
Hours in the main UBC library
and most branches will remain
normal until Dec. 21.
From Dec. 21 to 23 and Dec.
28 to 30 the libraries will be open
* from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The libraries will be closed on
all other days until normal hours
resume Jan. 3.
Brock Hall will remain open 8
a.m. to midnight except Dec. 24
to 26 and Dec. 31 to Jan. 2 when
it will be closed for the holidays.
Science pres
Scott Akenhead, biology 4,
was acclaimed president of the
science undergrad society
Wednesday.
He replaces Sue Moyer, who
resigned last month.
Ruth Thorn and Gary Walters,
both second year students, are
running for SUS secretary.
Elections will be held Friday.
Mew deadline
The deadline for applications
for four education students
bursaries has been moved from
Monday to Dec. 10.
Three    bursaries    are    being
offered   to   students   who   have
participated    in    the    education
,  student's  association;  one  to  a
student in the secondary division,
one to a student in elementary
and one to a student at large.
The fourth bursary is for a
transfer student, the only criteria
being need.
Letters of application should
be taken to education room 1, or
left in the internal affairs officer's
mailbox.
II
The conference will include
demonstrations of classroom
instruction regarding sex
education, teenage behavior and
development patterns and family
relationships.
Advance registration is
requested at 733-1310.
Detection of Learning
Disabilities in Pre-School Age
Children will be the subject of a
speech given by Dr. J.U. Crichton
of the UBC department of
pediatrics Tuesday at 8 p.m.
Crichton will speak to the
Vancouver Association for
Children with Learning
Disabilities at the B.C. teachers'
auditorium, Seventh and Burrard.
Love, romance
Women's Studies has now
completed the first half of its
1971/72 program.
The program will resume Jan.
11 with a panel discussion on
Love, Romance and Sexuality.
Registration for the weekly
lectures and seminars will be held
again when classes begin in
January.
What matters?
The Anglican-United Campus
Ministry is sponsoring a
noon-hour seminar on Beliefs
That Matter today in SUB 215.
Fromer Alma Mater Society
president Steve Garrod will lead a
series of discussions on the
personal basis of how men decide
what matters most to them.
What goes on?
Want to know what really goes
on in sex education classes?
You can find out at a Family
Planning Association conference
Saturday at Eric Hamber
Secondary School, 5025 Willow
Street, from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The conference theme is
Education and Human Sexuality:
A Dialogue on Family Life
Education.
'Tween classes
jSfVs M*1 *'•*•* C
ANGLICAN-UNITED  CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Beliefs That Matter with  Steve  Garrod, noon in SUB 215.
LIBERAL CLUB
General meeting at noon in SUB 105B.
CHESS CLUB
Lecture  and discussion on  the  rules
and history of chess, noon in .SUB 213.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Kant Hazel at 3:30 in SUB 111.
NATIONAL  FILM BOARD
Four free films: A Chairy Tale, Auto
-biographical, Carpussel, and The Liv
ing Stone, noon in IH upper lounge.
CCF
Rev.  Hardy  speaks  at  noon  in  SUB
205.
CANADIAN PEOPLE'S UNITED FRONT
AGAINST  U.S.  IMPERIALISM
Mass    democracy    meeting    on    U.S.
domination  of  Canada,  noon in  SUB
lobby.
VCF
"Roy Bell at noon in SUB 207-209,
GAY  PEOPLE'S  ALLIANCE
Organizational  -meeting-   to     discuss
newsletter  and  study program,  noon
in SUB 224.
THUNDERBIRD WARGAMERS
Introductory   ancient   Roman   battle.
7:30 p.m. in SUB 12S.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon in SUB 110. Al!
welcome.
ANTI-WAR  CLUB
Film,  The   Good,  The   Bad,   and   The
Ugly,  noon  in   Ang.   110 and  7:30 in
Ang. 104.
FRIDAY
THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Last   meeting   for   '71   noon   in   SUB
105B.
'*?*'; *,-<»,<fi*?
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
BEER GARDEN
IH  upper  lounge  every  Friday  from
4 to 8 p.m. All instruments welcome.
SATURDAY
cvc
Bowling and after-party at Brentwood
Lanes 7:15 p.m.
MONDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
Last   general   meeting iof   the   term,
noon in SUB 213.
TUESDAY
CUSO
Information   night   at   Int.   House   at
7:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
LUTHERAN  CAMPUS  CENTER
Advent  services  at   the   center,   7:30
ANGLICAN-UNITED   CAMPUS
MINISTRY
General   meeting   and   supper   at   5
p.m. at the Lutheran Campus Center.
DEC. 10
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Christmas craft sale  and  swap  meet,
4 p.m, at IH.
DEC. 17
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Christmas Dance, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at
IH.
DEC.  19
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Student-community   Christmas   party,
1 to 4 p.m. at IH.
Eco-cof lapse
A multi-inedia show on Man
and his Ever-changing
environment will be held today at
noon in Westbrook TOO.
Dave Mason, ecologist, dancer
and singer will discuss the dangers
of eco-col lapse and possible
solutions.
The event is sponsored by the
Environmental   Crisis Operation.
Several color projectors and
tape recorders will be used.
Gam pus
Leagues?
Campus
Leagues?
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1  day $1.00; 3 days $2.50.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is
11:30 a.m., the day before publication. Publications Office, Rm. 241 SUB, UBC, Van. 8.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
STROBES.  BLACK LIGHTS. BUB-
ble  Machines.   10%   off   rental  to
- UBC students. 736-0944.
Greetings
12
INEXPENSIVE. RECYCLED FUR
coats and general fur access. Pap-
pas Brothers, 459 Hamilton Street
at Victory Square. We trade. Open
Monday through Saturday 12 noon-
5:30 p.m.,   681-6840.
Lost & Found
13
WALLET LOST SATURDAY NITE
in W.M. Gym. A.M.S. No. 2521700.
If found please phone Dennis, 224-
9927.  Reward.
Special Notices
des
15
"AT HOME"—SUNDAY, DEC. 5th,
2:00-4:00 p.m. and CHRISTMAS
CHOIR PROGRAM, 4:00 p.m. —
Vancouver School of Theology.
You are invited — 6000 Iona Drive
or 6050 Chancellor.
THEATRE WORKSHOP PRE-
sents Euripides "The Bacchae"
Arts Club, 1181 Seymour. 8:30 p.m.,
December 1-11. Phone 687-5315.
HOW ABOUT YOUR THIRD YEAR
in Europe ? Representative from
Center lor International Business
Studies, University of Oregon, will
be on campus on December 3 to
discuss The 1972/73 European Exchange Program (all majors accepted). Interviews in small
groups. Sign up at your Placement
Office.
WANTED MEN FOR LEADER-
ship Sensitivity Training, weekend
Dec. 3, 4, 5. Sponsor, Canadian
Council of Christians and Jews.
Phone John Smithson. director,
684-6024.
SUMMER WORK PROGRAMS —
Are you interested in planning
meaningful service projects in
Vancouver? Contact Jean Stobie
224-3722 / Val Anderson 224-0069
or write SCM office. No. 39, 6000
Iona Drive.
SECOND SUNDAY IN ADVENT —
Bible Society Sunday Services at
University Blvd. churches: St. Anselm's Anglican—Holy Communion,
8 and 11 a.m. University Hill United—11 a.m. Worship Church
School (joint) is practicing a
Christmas pageant to be presented. Dec. 12.
Wanted-—Information
17
ANYONE KNOWING OF IRREGU-
larities in AMS election held Nov.
24 contact R. Broom, Student
Mail, Faculty of Law.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
35 Sports Cars
& Compacts
M.G.'s, T.R. 4's, Toyota Triumph,
Volvo,   Porsche,  Volks,   Mini,
Pinto,   Mustang, Chevell,
Mercedes,  Cougar,  XR7,  Rover
& many more.
IMPO AUTO
6th & Mqin 873-1608
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Scandals
37
DO YOU  DRIVE A MAZDA. TOY-
ota or Datsun? Does Henneken
Auto Service it for you? If not
- you're paying too much — Call
us at 263-8121 or drop in to
8914 Oalc  St.   (at Marine);     .
JOY MUSIC SANCTUM — ROCK
Folk records. Your kind of music
at funky prices. 6610 Main St. —
open 10 to 9.
GIVE MOM AND DAD THE BEST
Christmas present ever, have your
hair styled at Corky's Men's Hair-
styling,. 3644 W. 4th Ave. Alma at
4th, 731-4717. We guarantee not
to ball up your haircut.
Typing
40
TERM   PAPERS   ETC.    SPEEDILY
& efficiently typed. 35o page. Call
<   Yvonne  at  738-6874   (Kits)
ESSAYS. ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently. 35c page.
Phone   224-0385  after  5  p.m.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Quick service
on  short essays.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at  738-8745—Reasonable Rates.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—THESIS,
Essays, etc. Mrs. Brown. 732-0047.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, Accurate Work, Reasonable
Rates. Phone 263-5217. ,
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
Photography
35
STUDENT'S WANTED: $400 MTH.
part-time in management and PR
of Anti-Air & Water Pollution
Control Products. Open for male
and female who qualify. Send resume to G. W. Oijen. 81 Howe St.,
Victoria, B.C. This is ground floor
of a $100,000,000.00 Ecology Co.
FREE     SUITE    BEHIND     STORE
near campus for student and wife,
_ wife to work in store weeek-tlays.
Suite) + salary. 263-4227.
PRIVATE GIRLS' SCHOOL IN
New Zealand urgently seeks
teachers for Senior Chemistry &
Biology, Intermediate Science, and
Junior Science & Math. Graduates with teaching experience preferred. Salaries to N.Z. State Ser-
viea Scale: NZ $4-5000. Some financial help available for fares If
teachers can guarantee to stay 2-3
years. Attractive live-in accommodation available for women.
Write Rev. & Mrs. E. M. Dash-
field, St. Matthew's School, Mas-
terton,- New Zealand. For further
information ring Ann Willmott
224-1467  (Vancouver).
INTERESTED IN PLANNING SUM-
mer work program. Related to
Inner-City Service Project. Contact Val Anderson 228-9031/224-
0069. Vancouver School of Theology.
INSTRUCTION 8e
SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
Special Classes ,
62
POT at Potter's Centre
another   12   week   session
to   start   JAN.   10
Register  early
wheel work,  hand building,  etc.
for   details   phone:   261-4764
G.   ALFRED
Tutoring Service
63
DON'T LET EXMAS GET YOU
down. Get help at the UBC Tutoring Centre, SUB 228. 12:30-2:30.
Tutors in almost eyery course.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MEDICAL, DENTAL STUDENTS.
Skulls $30.00 to $75.00 and other
fine osteologieal human products
most reasonable priced — Write
to 812-55 Maitland St. Toronto
2X4,  Ontario.
NEW ROSSIGNOL STRATO 102-
207cm, Look Nevada bindings. Call
Sven, 224-9510, Room 214. Tweeds-
muir, Place Vanier. Cheap.
J. SWIFT- MICROSCOPE WITH
Zeiss objectives, etc.; Precision
cathode ray oscilloscope; T.V. on
stand: photographic odds and
ends.  266—1354.	
MARTUT" P28~ GUITAR/ CASE, 2
years old, $500.00. Excellent instrument,    Lawrence,   224-0125.	
iTaTchlio BUCKLE BOOTS, size
9 Cost $110. Now only $40. Phone
Rick.  261-2607. 	
iilScm WOOD SKIS, METAL EDGES,
P-tex base, perfect cond.. $10, Ph.
922-5137, __	
LOVEABLE 57 VW BUS $350. 63
Chev. running $100. Sony TC127
$130.    Scott   100   watt   amp.   $160.
Elac 620
speakers.
733-5608.
turntable.
List   $1X0.
Huge    new
Sell   $69   pr.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
SPRING TERM HOUSING. MAKE
your reservations for January
NOW.R & R at the finest house
on campus. Hurry, vacancies] are
going! Phone 224-9691 Now. 5765
Agronomy.   Meal passes available.
STUDY ON CAMPUS FOR EXAMS!
Full room and board at reasonable
rates. Call 224-9841.
83
Furnished Apts.
SINGLE SUITE. 5 MINS. FROM
SUB. Private entrance. $60 mthly.
Single suite, 3 mins. to SUB —
private  entrance,   $60   month.   224-
WANTED: ROOMATE TO SHARE
furnished apartment for December
with 4th year Psychology student.
Rent $70.00. Phone Everet 732-
8565.  No.  3—2158 West 1st Ave.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
RENT HOUSE FOR DANCES,
parties, Two floors, bar, sound
system. On campus—5745 Agronomy,  224-9549.
I Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
STUDIOS -VITARIUS. 760 WEST
22nd Ave., offering following Fine
Arts courses: Sculpture, Oil Painting, Ceramics, Batic. Advanced
classes after live model. Open
house and registration, Jan. 8th
and Jan. 9th, 1972 from 2 to 6 p.m.
Artist: Rozika Vitarius. Phone
879-8570.
ON CAMPUS, 2-BDRM. TOWN-
house. Large kitchen, basement.
Available   Jan.   228-9493.   $185.00.
NEEDED TWO PEOPLE. PREFER-
ably female to share large four
bedroom house, fireplace — 4989
Mackenzie at 34th. Now Dec. 1,
$62.  Chris, 261-8083.
SHARE HOUSE IN RICHMOND,
$60.00 per month. Phone 278-9394
for details (only one person wanted).
4Rr4Hr$Rr**$»rf£g!|#
MERRY
XMAS Page 30
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
EVERYTHING
FOR THE SKIER
SKIS -HARNESS - POLES
STRETCH PANTS,
SOCKS, GLOVES,
PARKAS, GOGGLES,
BOOTS, ETC.
FULL LINE OF SKATING    j
AND HOCKEY EQUIPMENT
SPECIAL OFFER
SKI OUTFIT
JET SKIS-Step-in Harness
Steel Poles - Complete
48
50
Pedigree Parkas - "Ski" Ski Parkas
Pioneer Down-Filled Parkas
Warm-Up Pants — Gloves — Mitts — Sox
VAL D'OR BOOTS- TYROL BOOTS
ELAN and GRAVES SKI'S
Northwestern Sporting Goods
10th & ALMA (open Fri. 'til 9 p.m.      224-5040
Thunderettes
still winning
By IAN JUKES
The UBC Thunderettes
basketball team came up with an
impressive effort in crushing the
tough Victoria Maplettes 58-29,
Sunday at UBC.
The Maplettes, 1971 Canadian
Senior Women's basketball
champions, had little chance as
UBC roared to a 34-10 half-time
lead behind the shooting and
rebounding of Jan Gee, and the
playmaking and defense of Wendy
Grant and Jo-Anne Sargeant.
Only the insertion of some of
UBC's younger, less experienced
players kept the score respectable.
Jan Gee led the Thunderettes
■ with 12 points, followed by Lynn
Wells who scored all her 10 points
in the second half.
The win could prove to be a
costly one for the Thunderettes,
as forward Linda McCullough
reinjured her knee and will
be sidelined indefinitely.
The Thunderettes finish off
their first half schedule with two
games this weekend against the
University of Victoria. Game time
Friday and Saturday is 4:30 p.m.
at the War Mermorial Gym.
ATTENTION SKIERS ! !
CHRISTMAS SPECIALS!
Take advantage of these
tremendous Ski Package
Savings
:tW
* METAL FISCHER ALU ST. SKIS
Salomon S.404 step-in harness.
1,200 tapered aluminum poles.
Complete  $1 50
* FISCHER RED MASTER   WOOD SKIS
Salomon S404 step-in harness. Good tapered
aluminum poles  only . .      59'
* ELAN EUROPEAN WOOD SKIS
Salomon S404 step-in harness. Good tapered
aluminum poles only    52'
«
* SKI PACKAGES INCLUDING BOOTS
European Wood Skis
Salomon S404 harness. Tapered aluminum
poles — le Trappeur buckle boots (value
85.00). FULL     PACKAGE PRICE $1 05'00
European Wood Skis
Salomon S404 harness. Tapered aluminum poles —
Tyrol buckle boots. FULL PACKAGE PRICE . . .   $90  °°
SEE US AT
IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
LOCATED IN THE MIDDLE OF KERRISDALE
2120 W. 41st Ave. 261-6011
OPEN DAILY TILL 6 P.M. - THURS. - FRI. TILL 9 P.M.
7 'Birds on B.C. team
By JIM ADAMS
Coach Donn Spence's rugby
'Birds will field seven players for
the B.C. Rep.-Australia game on
Saturday.
Australia's Wallabies first -
toured B.C. in 1909 and now
return for the fifth time. The last
in 1967 resulted in Wallabie
victories over UBC 11-6 and over
B.C. Reps 24-11.   .
This year's Wallabies is one of
the strongest editions. Playing the
French International side, always
a formidable opponent, the
Aussies traded victories winning
13-11 and losing 18-9.
Congratulations go to UBC's
Coach Don Spence for his team's
contribution to the B.C. side.
Rarely has a B.C. Rugby Union
team so dominated a Rep side.
Bob Jackson in second row,
Eric McAvity at 8th man, and
Garth Henrikson at wing forward
Soccer action
Pacific Coast Soccer League
action returns to the campus this
Saturday as the Thunderbirds
meet Firemen at 2 p.m. in
Thunderbird Stadium.
The 'Birds are currently in fifth
place, but have played three
games less than the leading North
Shore United.
Today at noon, the UBC
Tomahawks take on SFU in an
exhibition game. The game will be
played on the gym field behind
SUB.
join the B.C. scrum, while Ray
Banks at stand off, Eric Lillie and
Barry Lee at centre and Spence
McTavish at wing complete the
'Birds contingent.
Spence participated in the
selection of the B.C. side and
considers the team one of the best
in years; "young and strong,
capable of fast, open play".
Bob Spray, President of the
Canadian Rugby Union, describes
the Wallabies as "powerful and
explosive".
"Wallabies backs especially can
be relied upon to produce an
exciting, entertaining game," he
said.
So forget last week's bastard
version. For exciting football with
speed and sportsmanship, see the
Wallabies.
Kickoff 2 p.m., Saturday, Dec.
4 at Swangard Stadium.
Nostalgia. . . old programs
record that one, D. L. 'Buzz'
Moore, captained both the 1948
and 1958 B.C. Reps against the
Wallabies.
Letter
In reference to the letter to
Sports of Friday, Nov. 26 in The
Ubyssey: I claim no previous
knowledge of its existence or
content before its publication in
the paper and therefore
disassociate myself with that
letter.
Mary Lou Field PE 2
Weekend Action Box
DATE
SPORT
OPPONENTS
PLACE
TIME
Dec. 3
Hockey
Brandon U.
Brandon
8:00 p.m.
Dec. 4
Hockey
U. of Manitoba
Winnipeg
8:00 p..m
Dec. 5
Hockey
Bemldji State Col.
Bemidji
2:00 p.m.
Dec. 3-4
Basketball
Totem Tournament
Mem. Gym
7:30 p.m.
Dec. 3-4
Hockey JV
B.C. Fest. Tourn.
Nelson & Trail         TBA
Dec. 4
Rugby 3rd
Rowing Club
Slocan
12:00 p.m.
Dec. 4
Rugby Frosh
Royal Roads
UBC
1:15 p.m.
Dec. 4-5
WresUing
B.C. Novice
Oliver, B.C.
TBA
Dec. 3
BasketbaU JV
Douglas College
PE Gym "A"
7:00 p.m.
Dec. 4
Basketball JV
Ruby's Rascals
Mem. Gym
2:00 p.m.
Dec. 4
Cross Country
League Sace
SFU
TBA
Dec. 4
BasketbaU
(Thunderettes)
U. of Victoria
Mem. Gym
4:30 p.m.
Dec. 4
Soccer
Firefighters
Stadium
2:00 p.m.
Dec. 4
Rugby Braves
Trojans
UBC
11:00 a.m.
Dec. 4
Rugby 4th
Trojans
UBC
10:30 a.m.
UBC ANNUAL
SKI TRIP
TO SNOW VALLEY
— Dec. 26-Jan. 2
— Deluxe Transportation
— Accommodation & Meals
— All Lift Tickets
— Parties
$125 all inclusive
Sponsored By
Thunderbird Ski Team
Info. Bill Mcintosh - 926-3964 Thursday, December 2/ 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 31
Totem tourney tomorrow
The 18th annual Totem
Basketball Tournament kicks off
Friday and Saturday at the War
Memorial Gym.
RON THORSEN
.. leading the 'Birds
The Thunderbirds, led by
guards Ron Thorsen and Stan
Callegari, will compete with the
SFU Clansmen, the Lakehead
University Nor'westers, and the
Victoria Vikings in the single
knockout elimination
tournament. UBC has won it five
times.
Last year it was not held due
to schedule conflicts.
Friday night SFU plays
Lakehead at 7:30 p.m., followed
by the 'Birds and the Vikings at
9:15.
Saturday at 7:30 it's the losers.
The winners play for the
championship at 9:15.
It would have been nice to see
a SFU-UBC clash in the opening
round. Unfortunately this was not
possible because the UBC-Victoria
game also counts in league
standings. ■
The games are free to UBC
students with their AMS card.
WCIAA splitting up
The Western Canada
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association presently composed
of teams from all universities west
of the Lakehead, is splitting up
into two conferences.
The Canada West Conference
will include teams from the
universities of B.C., "Alberta,
Calgary, Lethbridge, and Victoria.
The universities of
Saskatchewan, Saskatoon and
Regina, Brandon, Winnipeg,
Manitoba and the Lakehead will
comprise the Great Plains
Conference.
The breakup  of the WCIAA
Wrestlers
win meet
UBC wrestlers defaulted three
matches, but still managed a
33-24 win over the University of
Calgary in an invitational
wrestling meet held Saturday at
SFU.
UBC winners were Russ
Carmichael (126 pounds), Dave
Gray (150), Vic Tyson (167), Bob
Ormond (177), and Bill McDonald
(190). In a heavyweight
exhibition match, Kyle Raymond
of UBC defeated his opponent
from SFU.
Intramural
Well, it's time for the
intramural staff and participants
to hang up the ol* jock in favour
of a pen and pencil.
The year got off to a hectic
start with finances and all, but a
varied program was undertaken.
Sports from football to cycle drag
were played. •
Next term the program will
encompass 10 sports; bowling,
snooker, track and field, Arts 20
race, rugby, wrestling, volleyball,
soccer, ice hockey, and
basketball.
We look forward to your
participation in the future. As of
now, let's look forward to exams,
so at least we'll be around next
term.
TENNIS matches must be
completed by Friday.
SOCCER rescheduled games
on Monday at 12:30; Beta 2A vs.
VOC 2A, and Science 1A vs.
Sigma Chi 1A.
was brought about due to
financial reason. The universities
are finding it very expensive to
send their athletic teams over the
long distances involved between
B.C. and Manitoba.
All university teams except the
football team will be affected by
this split. The football schedule
will continue to operate between
B.C., Alberta, Calgary,
Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
All other teams will compete
only within their own conference,
with playoffs between
conferences.
The Canada West Conference
will have Calgary as its
headquarters. Lou Goodwin of
Calgary was elected president of
the newly-created conference.
'Birds host
Hockey Canada
Tournament
By KENT SPENCER
The second annual Hockey
Canada Tournament will be held
at the Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre Dec. 28 and 29.
The 'Birds are hosting visiting
teams from Toronto, Edmonton,
and Sir George Williams
University in the single knockout
elimination tournament.
Dec. 28, the Toronto Blues
face off against the University of
Alberta Golden Bears at 6 p.m. At
9 p.m., the 'Birds play the Sir
George Williams University
Georgians.
Dec. 29, the losers meet in a
consolation round at six. The
championship game is at nine.
Last year eight teams played in
Montreal and Toronto. This year,
the schedule has expanded to
include centres at Thunder Bay,
Sudbury, and Kingston, Ont.,
Trois Riviers, Que., and
Montcalm, N.B. Each centre hosts
four teams and all the games are
played on Dec. 28 and 29.
The 'Birds will be hoping to
knock off the Georgians in the
opening round and get a shot at
the Bears or the Blues for the
championship.
Last year it was the unmerciful
Blues who defeated the 'Birds 3-2
at the Canadian Championships in
Sudbury, Ont., and went on to
take the overall championship.
If the 'Birds should meet the
Bears it will be their first meeting
of the season. The Bears are
currently two point leaders over
the 'Birds in Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association standing, after playing
the same teams and the same
number of games.
The cost to UBC students will
be one dollar each night, and
tickets are now available at the
Athletic office in the War
Memorial gym.
at
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
4560 W 10th.
duthie
BOOKS
Campus
Leagues?
Campus
Leagues?
Gastown
Wax
Museum'
21 WATER STREET,    685-2751
OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. TO 11 P.M.
SPORT VILLA Ltd.
Cross Country Skiing
is our Specialty
We have Western Canada's largest and most complete
selection of Cross Country Racing and Ski Touring
Equipment.
We take special care of beginners
Come to us for equipment, expert advice on
techniques, where to go, club trips, etc.
We also have great ski clothing and accessories for
both Alpine and Cross Country skiers.
Phone: 731-8818
2693 West Broadway, Vancouver 8, B.C.
FEATURE
SPORTS EVENTS
SOCCER
Thursday noon Dec. 2 — Memorial Gym Field
TOMAHAWKS vs SIMON FRASER University
Saturday, Dec. 4, 2 p.m. — Thunderbird Stadium
THUNDERBIRDS vs FIREMEN
BASKETBALL
18th ANNUAL TOTEM TOURNAMENT
Fri. Dec. 3 -
7:30 — Simon  Fraser "Clansmen" vs Lakehead
University    "Nor'Westers"    9:15    -    U.B.C.
"Thunderbirds" vs U. of Victoria "Vikings"
Sat. Dec. 4 -
7:30 — Consolation Game.
9:15 — Championship Game.
FREE   STUDENT   ADMISSION Page  32
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  December 2,  1971
i>tt0 anil
ANTI-SALE
HOT FLASH!!
List $19.95 - L.&S. $13J
CLASSIC C-2 Vinyl. Shoulder Strap with Pad and Flexible Interior
Divider,    zipper    Top.    Large    Front    Pouch,   with   two    straps.
11" X 9'/4" x 5V2".
Catalog Price $17.50 - Our Regular $13.95
L.&S. Special $10.95
THE FOOT-CANDLE GALLERY
at 3010 W. Broadway
Men are social animals we are told. In other words they like to share
their experiences with their fellow humans.
One of the best communication methods ever invented by man is art
in any form. Some might consider photography as merely the
technique of recording an image but if you ask any photography nut
you'll get a different answer. For him photography is truly an art.
We are photography nuts so we agree. We pooled our ideas and came
up with the Foot-Candle Gallery, a Gallery available free to any
photographer who wishes to share his perceptions of the world.
There is no selection process because censure and art are two worlds
apart. We change the show every month and whoever is next in the
chronological order gets the walls. For the next month they are his
domain.
PHOTO TIPS — PUSHING FILM
f you cannot find a film enough for your purpose the solution is
easy, push it. That is  underexpose   it   voluntarily  and   compensate
for it later. There are three ways of doing this.
—Increase development time in a normal developer.
—Increase temperature in a normal developer.
—Use high energy developers.
The chart below should help:
'Normal To double
[Development   | film speed
' To triple
film speed
Agfa Atomal
Isopan Ultra  |llmn
(ASA 400)      .at 68 degrees
lAtomal
i 16V2mn
iat 68 degrees
Gaf
Super Hypan
(ASA 500)
Hyf inol
8mn
at 68 degrees
i Hyf tno)
i 12mn
at 68 degrees
llford HP4
(ASA 400)
1 Microphen
I 53/4mn
1 at 68 degrees
Microphen
j 8V2tnn
at 68 degrees
Kodak Tri-X
(ASA 400)
Td-76 or ID-111 D76 or ID11
I8mn I12mn
Iat 68 degrees   ' at 68 degrees
Agfapan 1000   Atomal
(ASA 1000)    I 16mn
at 68 degrees
 I	
Atomal
18mn
at 68 degrees
' To quadruple
I film speed
Acufine
8mn
at 75 degrees
.Acufine
|llmn
.at 75 degrees
Ethol UFG
4m n
at 68 degrees
Ethol UFG
|6mn
at 68 degrees
D76 or ID11
9%mn
at 75 degrees
OR
D76 or ID11
j 13mn
at 75 degrees
|OR	
Atomal
20mn
at 68 degrees
■ Atomal t
I 20mn or 24mn
at 68 degrees
These are only suggestions. Try first with a test roll.
*—Visibly increased grain.
We give a substantial DISCOUNT over our regular low prices for the purchase
of 20 ASSORTED  rolls of FILM.
Hansa Print Trimmer UVzxISYa $10 35
ANSCOMITE 100 MINI Slide Projector $9.95
We Can't Give You AN Our Prices Or You Would Lose Sleep Fighting The Temptation
HtXii anb gutter      3010 W. Broadway
Camera^ 736-7833
and
Denman Place
688-3818

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