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The Ubyssey Sep 10, 1985

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Vol. LXVIII, No. 1
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 10,1985
228-2301
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Student loan debt up $6000 in '85
By ROBERT BEYNON
The average UBC student with a
student loan graduating in 1985 had
a debt load of $10,000 — up $6200
from 1984.
UBC awards director Byron
Henders said Monday that a survey
the awards office conducted last
May showed the average student
debt load jumped 263 per cent from
May 1984 when the debt load was
$3,800.
"It wouldn't surprise me if the
average jumped to $15,000 per student (with a loan) next May," said
Henders.
B.C. awards officers have been
forecasting trends like this for the
past two years, Henders said, but
no one has paid attention.
Henders added, "A single parent
with two kids and a $12-14,000 debt
cannot pay off their loan if they get
the average job a university student
gets after graduating."
A person with a debt load of
$12-14,000 would have to pay approximately $150 per month for 10
years to repay their loan.
Duncan Stewart, Alma Mater
society external affairs coordinator,
said the figures show coming to
UBC to improve your skills doesn't
make financial sense for many people.
"It used to be that a graduated
student would catch up in total earnings with someone who didn't go
to university within four years,"
said Stewart. "But now, with the
job market the way it is, it takes a
student 10-12 years to make as
much money as someone who
didn't go to school."
Stewart said this shows that the
B.C. government shouldn't have
removed the partial grant program
two years ago. During the program
the provincial government gave
students a money grant that didn't
have to be repayed along with their
loan.
And the loan remission program
the Socreds announced this summer
is a step in the right direction, but it
won't alleviate the expense of post-
secondary education for most
students with loans, Stewart said.
"The actual remission is at most
10-13 per cent of the total loan,"
Stewart said, not the 25-33 per cent
the Socreds claimed it is.
The Social Credit government announced in June it would pay 25-33
per cent of the provincial government portion of a student loan
package. However, the provincial
portion of a total student loan is only 40 per cent. The federal portion
comprises 60 per cent of the total
loan.
Provincial education ministry
spokesperson Erik Denhoff said the
ministry is keeping an eye on the
student debt average and might
consider changing their policy in the
future.
The July Statscan figures show
that 22,000 students, or 18.5 per
cent of students, were unemployed
in B.C. in July and would require
additional   funding   to   return   to
school.
Gord Miller, a second year Simon
Fraser University physics student,
said he made a total of $1700 for
the entire summer. Miller said he
worked at Whistler two months until early July when he realized he
was saving no money because his
entire pay went into living expenses
and the cost of moving out to
Whistler.
He returned to his parents home
in Burnaby but couldn't find
regular work for the rest of the
summer.
Grads boycott South Africa
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
UBC's Graduate Student centre
will soon be free of all products
distributed by companies with interests in South Africa.
The Graduate Student Society
has already removed Rothmans
products from the centre's cigarette
machine and will ask the
university's food services director
next week to ban Carling O'Keefe
beers from its lounge.
More than 350 students have
signed a petition in support of the
ban, which will stop the sale of Hi-
Test, Miller's HiLite, B.C. Growers
Ciders, Jordan and St. Michelle
Wines.
"We definitely got enough
signatures to make our case," said
society coordinator Susan Cawsey.
"Food services has agreed to
remove the products if we had
enough signatures."
Food services director Christine
Samson said Monday she would
have "no problem" in complying
with the petition's request. "Oh
sure, we could remove the products.
If there was only one type of beer
available though, I'd have to consider that."
The Alma Mater Society,
however, which sells Carling
O'Keefe beers and Rothmans
cigarettes in SUB, has no immediate
plans to clear its shelves of the products.
AMS vice-president Jonathan
Mercer said the boycott issue will
likely be a topic for discussion at
the    Sept.    18   student   council
Recommendation could hurt universities
VANCOUVER (CUP) — The
variety of courses offered at post
secondary institutions will diminish
greatly if the Tories accept the main
education recommendation of the
McDonald commission, say B.C.
educators.
The commission recommended
the federal government funding
post secondary education through
student vouchers instead of the present system of transfer payments to
the provinces.
George Ivany, vice-presidenl
academic of Simon Fraser University, said he fears comprehensive
educational institutions will disappear if operating grants are totally
dependent on student dollars.
"Students keep chasing around
after different faculties each year,"
he said.
Ivany said universities will
become schools for computer
science, engineering and business
student because those are the areas
of high demand.
"I can't imagine a university
without philosophy."
The McDonald commission says
the student voucher proposal would
respond to the need for education
to coincide with future job markets,
and prevent the potential for provincial abuse of the present system.
But John Waters, president of
the College and Institute Educators
Association,  said  post  secondary
education is not just a job training
centre. He said education serves
many ends, including social and intellectual development.
"It seems the McDonald report
has an exclusive concern for
economic ends and intellectual ends
are ignored.
"We agree (with the commission)
that job prediction is very difficult
and educational institutions have
done a bad job but we think that is
an argument for broader
education."
Dean Goard, a bureaucrat in the
universities ministry, said he thinks
the recommendations will lead to a
market university system in which
universities will compete with each
other for money.
"A little competition is fine but
you might end up with a huge
advertising campaign such as $1.49
day university — 'come to our
university and save' — type of
thing," he said.
Gourd said the competitive
nature of the proposal would mean
universities would limit their offerings to programs in high demand.
He doubts the universities could
keep up with the changing demands
of students.
"With the money in the students
hands, the ideal qualities of plann-
See page 2: B.C.
meeting. He hesitated to say which
position he will take on the issue if a
boycott motion is proposed.
"I want to get more information
and all sides of the story before we
make a financial, or in this case, a
moral decision," he said.
"If a financial decision was made
and that affected our revenue which
goes toward helping the students of
this university, well, that would
worry me."
AMS president Glenna Chestnutt
was unavailable for comment.
Carling O'Keefe products, including Hi-Test, Miller's HiLite,
B.C. Growers Cider, and St
Michelle wines, are sold in the
Gallery Lounge and in the Pit in
SUB. The AMS runs both liquor
outlets.
The AMS'S SUB-cetera store
sells Rothmans, Craven A, Dunhill
md Sportsman natural light
cigarettes, all of which are
distributed by Rothmans of Pall
Mall Canada Ltd.
Carling O'Keefe and Rothmans
hand over some of their profits to
the Rembrandt Group, one of seven
South African corporations which
control 80 per cent of shares on the
Johannesburg stock exchange.
The Rembrandt Group is controlled by Anton Rupert, a supporter of the apartheid regime,
which denies all freedoms to black
citizens in South Africa and ensures
supremacy to the country's white
minority. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1985
B.C. cuts chaotic
From page 1
ing and development will
disappear."
Waters said direct-to-student
funding would not allow universities to plan unless they could
predict the student enrolment but
he added: "It wouldn't make much
difference in B.C. because there is
almost no long term planning in effect here."
Water said because of educational cutbacks in B.C., the situta-
tion is "so chaotic" that institutions often can't plan more than six
months ahead.
Ivany said "the universities have
had some difficulty with the way
the province has handled funding
but I'm not sure (the direct student
transfer) would help us out of the
bind we're in."
Since 1983, the federal govern
ment's grant to B.C. has increased
$62.6 million. During the same
period the Social Credit government reduced the post secondary
grant by $48.3 million, pocketing
the money for other purposes. The
McDonald proposal would mean
B.C. would receive approximately
eight per cent less federal money
than it presently receives but the
funds would be earmarked for
education.
Gourd denies the provincial
government abused the transfer
system. According to Gourd, the
agreement signed in 1977 between
the federal and provincial governments allowed the province to
spend the money as it saw fit.
Gourd claimed the government
needed the money to pay for health
care because "health costs have
risen dramatically."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
New university lobby group forms
By VICTOR WONG
The Canadian Federation of
Students will be getting some competition in its role as lobbyist for
university students.
Seven university student
societies, including UBC's Alma
Mater Society, are organizing a new
lobbying organization called the
Conference of University Student
Councils (CUSC), which will come
into official existence in October.
The idea for a new student lobby
started with the University of
Alberta, which rejected membership in CFS last year but still
wanted to be part of a student lobby. The UofA organized a conference this summer and invited
delegations from university student
societies dissatisfied with CFS.
"People wanted another CFS,
with a few differences," said AMS
external affairs coordinator Duncan Stewart, who attended the conference.
CFS Pacific Region chair Terry
Hunt said he didn't know very
much about CUSC or its aims, but
"it strikes me as somewhat funny
that those universities who didn't
want to work together in CFS are
now working together."
Hunt defended CFS interest in
non-student issues, by saying,
"CFS policies are decided by
students. If they decide that
something concerns them, then it's
a student issue."
Among the proposed differences
are:
• The new organization will only
focus on concerns specifically dealing with university students. Thus
CUSC will speak out on post-
secondary funding, but not on pornography or Central America.
"Those issues are important, but
they are not the place for a student
group," said Stewart.
• Unlike CFS, membership in
CUSC would be limited only to accredited universities with student
populations of more than 10,000.
Thus, the University of Victoria
would qualify for CUSC membership while Simon Fraser University
would not.
• There will be no set fee structure associated with CUSC
membership. "The universities will
pay what they want to, there is no
minimum fee," said Stewart. "If
some universities say they can't pay
at all, fine. If we can keep the damn
bureaucracy down to a minimum,
there'll be enough money."
• Delegation to CUSC will be
restricted to the president of the
member student society or an appointed proxy. Stewart said the
AMS would work out its selection
of proxy later on in the year.
Besides UofA and UBC, the
University of Toronto, the University of Windsor, and the University
of Western Ontario are also founding members of CUSC.
Stewart added there should be no
conflict of interest between CFS
and CUSC. "We hope, in fact, that
CFS will follow our lead," he said.
Star wars 'no' vote first step
— garry Htka photo
FURRY EMBRACE FROM canine friend affords younster in rain gear protection from inclement weather. The canine appeared to be of almost the
same age and height as its human friend — with, however, less fur.
By JAMES YOUNG
Prime Minister Mulroney's "no"
to direct government participation
in the American Strategic Defense
initiative is a move in the right
direction, but may not go far
enough, members of the Vancouver
peace community said Monday.
"It is a big step towards reducing
Canadian participation in Star
Wars," said Al Banner, a member
of UBC's Students for Peace and
Mutual Disarmament.
"However, while we are extremely glad that Mulroney made
this decision, we have to be careful
that we don't become involved
through the back door," Banner
said, referring to the prime
minister's statement that Canadian
businesses are still free to bid on the
$26 billion worth of Star Wars contracts.
Banner also said Canada could
become deeply involved in Star
Wars when the U.S. reorganizes the
North American Air Defense Command (NORAD) of which Canada
is a member, to include a space
weapon defense system.
End the Arms Race vice-
president Gary Marchant voiced a
similar reaction to the annoucement
Mulroney made Saturday in Ottawa.
"We think the arguments against
Star Wars were so overwhelming
that Mulroney had no choice but to
say "no". In our view, this was a
very responsible decision," Marchant said.
"We see it as a victory for the
peace movement because originally
the Canadian government seemed
'to be leaning the other way," he
said. "It was through a lot of
political pressure that we convinced
Mulroney to vote the other way."
But marchant agreed there are
still many ways Canada may end up
participating in Star Wars.
"We are particularly concerned
that Canadian companies and
• universities which receive Star Wars
contracts may be subsidized with
Canadian taxpayers' dollars,
through grants issued under the
Defense Industries Productivity
Program (DIPP)," he said.
UBC Political Science professor
UBC teaching staff layoffs go to arbitration
By ALLYSON JEFFS
A dispute between the UBC administration and the faculty
association over the fate of 12
teaching staff given notice in July
will be brought to arbitration later
this year, the faculty association
president said.
Sidney Mindess said Friday arbitration was chosen over court action promised earlier. He added the
association has not ruled out taking
the university to court if a satisfactory result cannot be achieved
through arbitration.
"We feel arbitration is still a legal
process. If we go to court now there
is always the possibility that a court
could send us back to arbitration if
we bypass it," he said.
The arbitration procedure used
will be the one contained in the existing faculty-administration contract.
Charles Bourne, chairman of the
university's negotiating team, said
each side will choose an appointee
to the arbitration board and those
two members will choose a third,
mutually agreeable member.
Meetings are not expected to begin
before December and while the
faculty's collective agreement
specifies the matter must be resolved within 30 days of the commencement of arbitration, the deadline
can be extended by mutual agreement between the faculty association and the university.
Three teaching staff from the
dental hygiene program and nine
from the faculty of education, who
have received a year's notice of termination which expires June 30,
1985 stand to lose their jobs. The
staff were given notice when the
university senate declared their programs redundant.
Mindness said the association is
not debating senate's right to
declare programs obsolete but is
"concerned with what happens to
the people in those programs after
they're declared redundant."
Margaret Nevin, director of community relations, said the 12 staff
members "have not been fired or let
go."
What has happened is 12 tenured
faculty have not been relocated,
their positions have been declared
redundant and they have been given
one year's notice," she said.
Apartheid opposed
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
UBC students will soon have the opportunity to join university
students all over North America in expressing their opposition to apartheid in South Africa.
While Canadian and American campuses begin to organize protests
and boycotts against the Pretoria government, students here will be able
to take part in anti-apartheid activities organized by two UBC student
groups, the Southern African Working Group and the Lutheran student
movement.
The Southern African Working Group, which has its first meeting
this school year today at 5:30 p.m., plans to try to persuade the university's board of governors to divest in companies which have interests in
South Africa.
The group will also discuss plans for Oct. 11, a day named by U.S.
student leaders as national day of student action against apartheid. The
day has also been set aside by the U.N. as Solidarity with South African
Political Prisoners Day.
"As university students, we should be aware of what's going on in
South Africa and should be doing something about the situation," said
the group's secretary Sean Boulger.
"This is a basic human rights issue. It's 1985, not 1885. Human beings should not be treated in this manner."
All interested students are invited to attend the meeting in the
teaching assistants' union office, room 202, in the armouries.
The 20-member Lutheran student movement is planning an educational campaign about South Africa, beginning with a film Oct. 6 called
Winds of Change. The film features interviews with Bishop Desmond
Tutu and campus pastor Alan Boesak.
Two weeks later, Oct. 20, the group is sponsoring a talk by David
Messenbring, assistant to the director of Lutheran World Ministries and
a friend of the late black consciousness leader Steve Biko. Messenbring
helped interview, research and smuggle materials for Biko's book, I
Write What I Like.
Both events will take place in Lutheran campus centre at 7:30 p.m.
"We think the general public needs to be informed as truthfully as
possible about the circumstances in South Africa," said Lutheran cam-
W>us chaplain Ray Schultz.
Nevin added ' every effort" is being made by the university to
relocate the faculty members and
that the three given notice from the
dental hygiene program will likely
be hired by Vancouver Community
College. VCC has assumed responsibility for the program, since it will
no longer be offered at UBC, she
said.
Mindess said that while such an
offer is expected, none of the three
teachers have been approached by
the college to take on a position.
For several years the facutly
association and the university have
been trying to negotiate a procedure
to handle teaching staff whose jobs
become obsolete.
"During the past two years there
have been about 30 meetings on
this," Nevin said. "The administration and faculty association could
not agree to a procedure so we had
no choice in the matter. To my
knowledge there is nothing in the
contract to say we couldn't do this.
There is nothing to say that we had
to have a procedure in place."
Bourne said the faculty and administration negotiated a redundancy procedure in 1984 but the
association membership failed to
ratify it. The last set of negotiations
broke down in March and no new
negotiations are planned before the
arbitration board holds hearings, he
said.
At a meeting in July, the association passed a vote of non-
confidence in the board of governors, acting administration president Robert Smith and the acting
vice-president academic following
the decision of the board of governors to give notice to the 12 faculty
members without a mutually
agreeable redundancy procedure.
and peace researcher Michael
Wallace said that it was not yet
clear whether Canadian companies
and universities would qualify for
such grants.
"When Mulroney says Canadian
companies and universities are free
to bid on Star Wars contracts, does
he mean that he won't stop them,
or does he mean that they are entitled to government defense subsidies?" he asked.
"If there will be subsidies, then
Mulroney is going back on what he
said at the news conference,"
Wallace said.
Wallace added UBC researchers
applying for such grants could be
hindered by the rule which prohibits
See page 6: FEW
Facelifts
delayed
By DEBBIE LO
The AMS club office renovations
in the student union building which
have been delayed one week have
already disrupted some ctub
schedules for the fall term.
The Dance club which has 700
members and is the largest club on
campus, was moved out of their office in the summer, and was told a
new office would be made available
for them in the fall, even though
they had asked to reamin in their
previous office for the coming fall
term, said Margaret Johnson,
dance club vice-president.
"No one in the club had been
give notice to move out," she said.
"The student activity commission
and council members we contacted
acted as bullies when they moved us
out."
Johnson said when they told the
AMS about their irritation at being
moved out without previous warning she was "scolded" by AMS
vice-president Jonathan Mercer
who treated her with the attitude
that the club "should not question
the AMS."
Johnson said the dance club had
to deal with the frustration of not
having an impartial ombudsperson
to bring their problem to. Mercer
held the position over the summer
and continues to hold the position
until a replacement is appointed.
She said it is important the Dance
club protests the unilateral AMS
decision to move them to a smaller
office because of the club's strong
membership.
"We are holding out for the sake
of all clubs."
Simon Seshadri, AMS director of
administration, who was in charge
of club office allocations said he
has only received complaints from
the Dance club and the Science Fiction club so far.
He said the delay was caused by
additional approvals that were
needed from the fire marshal and
physical plant to complete the
renovations.
See page 4: AMS Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10,1985
CFS criticizes Challenge '85 program
OTTAWA (CUP) — Flora MacDonald, federal minister of employment and immigration, heaped
roses and nightingales on her
Challenge '85 student job creation
program in a meeting with the
Canadian Federation of Students
last week.
"She's the consumate politician,"
said Barbara Donaldson, chair of
CFS, the national student lobby
group. "She said 'I've never had
the honor of running a program
that was so well received' and I said
'Well, you've never been a minister
of employment and immigration
before'."
At the meeting, MacDonald invited CFS to the program debriefing three weeks from now, to critique Challenge '85 after final
statistics come out.
"If she's sincerer and she's listening to what we have to say, then we
could get the program changed,"
Donaldson said. "They're getting
ready to do the summer programs
again and she's getting lots of bad
press."
Challenge '85 created 100,000
jobs  this  summer,   according  to
AMS clubs receive
new office space
From page 3
freedom to design the size of each
club office as well as the size of the
AMS administration offices.
When asked why many of the administration offices were larger
than club offices he said "the
designers were to take into account
use, necessity and expansion" of
the office space.
"We must assume the support
staff will grow," he said. "The administration is paid to be in there.
They use their offices more frequently."
There are presently about 170
clubs in the AMS of which 63 will
now share 40 club offices. Last year
40 clubs shared 26 offices in SUB.
Club renovations cost approximately $50,000 this year, said Seshadri.
Rhiannon Charles, president of
Ballet UBC Jazz, said she is "happy" with their new office which was
moved to a more prominent location.
Employment and Immigration
statistics. Of these, 84,500 were
Summer Employment Experience
and Development (SEED) program
jobs.
Among the SEED jobs, 67 per
cent were "career-related", 31 per
cent "work experience". Fifty-
seven per cent were in non-profit
organizations, 33 per cent in the
private sector and 33 per cent in
municipal government programs.
The average SEED job lasted
11.7 weeks and paid $4.89 an hour.
Challenge '85 also provided
money for RCMP hiring among
other programs.
The ministry admitted at the
meeting it had no way of knowing if
the SEED jobs were related to
careers or not. "If a student said
the job was career-related on the
application, the ministry assumed it
was," Donaldson said.
Donaldson is mainly concerned
that Challenge '85 jobs did not provide students with enough money to
survive during the school year. Student aid departments in most provinces assume students have worked
16 weeks at minimum wage, and
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Those students who worked less
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Donaldson also said Challenge
'85 failed to correct regional
employment disparities.
"Because Challenge '85 focused
on creating jobs in the private sector, it worked best in places with a
big industrial base: Toronto and
Montreal," she said.
CFS Executive Officer John
Casola is skeptical of the government's claim that 85 per cent of
students found summer jobs.
"I worked at a Canada Employment Centre for students this summer," Casola said. "I filled 30or 40
jobs for the same guy: some for one
and a half days, some for a few
hours. Flora is going to call that 30
or 40 jobs placed."
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INTRODUCING TCU'S
STUDENT BUDGETER ACCOUNT
Set this account up in
September to coincide
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and your finances will be
totally organized until next
April.
We'll help you set aside the
amount you need for 2nd
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We'll also prepare a budget
program where you deposit
your living expenses for the
year and then receive equal
installments from October
until April.
In this special "Student
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be earning a higher interest
rate than a conventional daily
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STUDENT LOANS are
processed at the TCU
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right on campus. If you
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(RKDIT  LNION
HELPING GOOD IDEAS GROW Tuesday, September 10,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Stein Wilderness Festival Held
By Rick Klein
The trail climbs steeply, rising
through the fading remnants of the
spruce forest that blankets the
valley floor. Around the valley
tower craggy peaks, quardians of
the high passes into the Stein.
Ahead, on the switchbacks
leading up to the pass, the enormity
of the spectacle unfolds. There is an
unending line of people slowly
ascending the trail that climbs to the
height of land.
What is happening is truly unprecedented — a gathering of more
than 500 people in the alpine
meadows of the Stein River Valley.
People have come from all over this
Labor Day weekend, backpacks
loaded with blankets, musical instruments and food. A Metis
medicine man from Bowen Island,
a Lummi holy man from
Washington State, Indians from the
Okanagan, the Northwest Territories, the Coast, and of course,
the Lillooets, hosts of the gathering
and the Native people who hold
aboriginal title to much of the
Stein.
There are also hundreds of white
people — outdoor enthusiasts,
mountain climbers, foresters, environmental activists. The gathering
is a turning point, a watershed in
relations between whites and
natives, and between everyone and
the Stein.
The Stein is the last major
wilderness watershed in southern
B.C. But plans are proceeding to
begin logging road construction as
early as this fall. The wilderness
gathering is meant to reaffirm ties
to this valley, and galvanize support
for the river's preservation.
Volunteers appear and help those
in need over the crest of the pass. A
man with an injured foot on crutches, an older man who is blind be
ing led by his wife, old people and
young children.
From the crest, the vast panoama
of the Stein Valley comes into view.
Distant icefields, the broad forested
valleys of the river and its
tributaries. The festival site appears
as a kaleidoscope of color. Bright
tents like dots upon the green mantle of the meadow floor. At 2,040
metres (6,800 feet), by the side of
Brimful Lake, the festival site is
nestled at the edge of a high plain
ringed by granite peaks.
The weary arrivals are greeted by
the smells and sounds of a welcoming feast. The outdoor kitchen is a
hub of activity. Head cook Bernice,
directs volunteers to chop potatoes
and peel corn. Strips of salmon are
cooking on the fire. Dinner for 300?
For 340? The arrivals keep coming
in.
Around the campfire Lillooet
Tribal Council chief Perry Redan
welcomes people to the gathering.
He is a slight, dark man with a piercing stare.
"This is Native land you are on,"
he says. "You are welcome here.
You are to respect this place, leave
nothing behind but the mark of
your footprints. We join together to
protect it."
Redan steps aside to confer with
John McCandless, the tribal council's environmental point man and
chief organiser of the festival. A
mobile VHF radio is used to reach
the helicopter that brings in food
and firewood.
Every detail has been thought of
— the markets along the trail, the
outhouses, the first aid kits, all the
little things that must be attended to
when 500 people come together in a
mountain wilderness miles from the
nearest road.
As the sun disappears behind the
far ridges, things begin to heat up
CAMPING OUT high in the coast range.
by the fire. Burning embers and the
acrid smell of wood smoke. Voices
and instruments join in the night
echoing off mountain peaks. The
full moon is greeted with hoops and
howls as it rises above the ridge,
casting a luminous glow over the
valley.
The morning dawns clear and
cold and frost lines the tents. The
helicopter comes early ferrying
tribal elders from the valley below.
Six men carry an 80-year-old man
from the helicopter in his
wheelchair.
The elders are essential to the
spirit of the proceedings. They
represent a concrete bond with a
traditional past, a past in which
people lived in close harmony with
the earth. Now they have come to
add their voices in the call to protect
this last piece of what was once a
wild land.
A television camera crew arrives
with the helicopter's next load. A
news reporter asks about the Stein.
"It makes no sense to log here,"
she's told. "Even the logging company is reluctant to proceed."
Another tells of the large government subsidies, numbering in the
millions of dollars, that will be required to make the logging viable.
"This is Forest Minister Tom
Waterland's own riding. He will
stop at nothing to keep the wood
flowing to the area's lumber mills."
The voices are unanimous. The
Stein must be saved. There are no
forest service or forest company officials here, they declined the invitation to attend.
The day is spent listening to
speeches from Native and non-
Native leaders alike. So many
voices speaking in unison. "The
Stein does not belong to this generation, it belongs also to those
children yet to be born."
Cleric Peter HamiU's first parish
was at Lytton near the mouth of the
Stein. He talks of the Judeo-
Christian values that have somehow
condoned the destructive use of this
land. "We will see true conservation," says Hamill, "only when the
ethical system extends to the natural
world, when we come to see the
natural world as, like ourselves, a
manifestation of the creator and
something deserving of respect."
He  asserts  that   non-economic
values are as important as economic
ones. The B.C. Court of Appeal
ruling on Meares Island stated that
cedar and spruce had value outside
of their economic use, that the
Native people also have value in
Canadian society, and that Native
people want to live their culture and
not merely see it in museums.
David Thompson of the Stein
Coalition speaks next. "White
civilization has been here for about
150 years, and during the last 30
years alone we have done more to
change the face of this province
than in the last 10,000 years since
the Ice Age."
He says he fears what will happen
in the next 10 years.
Lillooet Grand-Chief Jimmy
Scottsman presides over the day's
events, introducing speakers and
providing comic relief. He is a small
man with a mischievous smile.
"Did you hear the one about the
nun and the hell's angels?" he asks.
Jimmy is like the Heyoka of the
Dakota Indians, the jester who
teaches us to laugh at ourselves.
Another Lillooet Chief expresses
his people's view that all things are
interconnected and no one thing
lives separately from another.
"This water, this pure stream
gives life to the eagles and all
animals, it will eventually meet the
Fraser," he explains. "The Fraser is
the most powerful river and it feeds
our people with salmon. Now," he
continues, "the fish are declining.
You cannot come and disturb, log
these valleys without effecting the
whole."
"The government of this country
wants us to assimilate." He speaks
slowly, carefully. "But each race of
people has been put on this earth
for a reason. We want to live our
culture and it is for this reason that
we meet here to protect the Stein."
The speeches draw to a close,
people wander off to their tents, to
a ridge top, to some private communion with the place.
We come together again, dinner
for 500 is served: salmon, soup,
bannock, vegetables, and fruit. Led
by a man named Napoleon, we give
thanks.
After, there is more music. Word
goes around of a meeting up the hill
to plan a course of action for the
Stein. One hundred people gather
around adjoining fires. An eagle
feather is passed from hand to
hand, when it reaches you it is your
turn to speak. There is much talk of
the future.
There is little time for this wild
valley and the discussion takes on a
heightened urgency. British Columbia Forest Products officials say
that the company intends to begin
logging road construction in the
lower Stein canyon this fall.
And a notice of expropriation has
been sent to the Merritt and Becky
Mundall, the private land owners
who farm the land at the river's
mouth. The Mundall's are seeking a
court injunction trying to block the
expropriation.
Already colored ribbons mark
the proposed logging right-of-way,
forming a 7.5 metre (25-foot) swath
that overruns both pictographs and
an ancient trail.
Ideas, fears, and commitments
are shared around the fire, and
many strategies emerge. Lobby the
government, reach the public with
the implications of this logging
scheme through exposing the subsidies required, and the opportunities foregone.
Above all there is talk of action;
of setting up a camp at the river's
mouth across from Lytton where
coals from festival fires will be kept
burning. It is here where, if all else
fails, confrontation will take place.
In the morning a farewell
ceremony is held. The Sacred Pipe
is offered to the four directions —
north, south, east and west — and
passed around the circle from hand
to hand and mouth to mouth.
To the rhythmic beat of the
drums, Pipe-carrier J. C. Lucas
speaks. "This drum is like the heart
of the people. The sky is like our
breath. Water is like the mind of the
people, and the earth is our body.
This is the vision that sustains us."
Joe David, the Nuu-Chah-Nulth
carver from Meares Island, is the
last to speak. "It is as if we are in
heaven up here," he says. "We
have renewed ties with each other
and with the land. When we go
back down to earth, we will have
this memory to draw upon. It is a
reservoir in our hearts. The river
flows through us all." Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10,1985
Cheaper bus fares in the cards
By CAMILE DIONNE
Bussing to classes could be a lot
cheaper soon. A proposal for a $22
concession farecard for post-
secondary students is currently
under consideration by the Vancouver Regional Transit Commission.
The proposal, by Alma Mater
Society external affairs coordinator Duncan Stewart and
several other B.C. student organizations is scheduled to be voted on by
No more ABM's
From page 3
He added the "designers", the
AMS architects were given the
classified research being done on
campus.
Wallace said Mulroney's statement that only a naive 6-year-old
would fail to understand Star Wars
is a response to Soviet research was
the kind of rhetoric to expect from
the prime minister.
"The Soviets have at no point
done very much Anti-Ballistic
Missile (ABM) work, other than
upgrading and perfecting the small
system they have around Moscow,
which is within the ABM Treaty,"
said Wallace. "Even the American
administration has not accused the
Soviet Union of any major violation of the ABM Treaty."
Marchant said that Star Wars is
more than a research program.
"Only 1/37 of the Star Wars
budget requested by (U.S. President) Reagan is for basic research
and 36/37 is for development and
testing of components and subcomponents," he said.
"SDI is fundamentally different
from past research efforts in that it
would clearly violate the ABM
Treaty."
the commission during their Sept.
13 meeting.
"If it goes before a commission
vote it should pass," Stewart said
Monday. He has been lobbying for
the post-secondary student concession farecards all summer.
Of the seven mayors and
others involved he feels four "express strong support" for the proposal, said Stewart. B.C. Transit assistant general manager Larry
Ward declined to comment before
Friday's meeting.
The proposal would provide for a
post-secondary student farecard for
off peak hours only which would
cost $22, the same as other concession farecards. This new card would
be good anywhere in the transit
system during off-peak hours and
could be upgraded during peak
hours with an additional cash payment. This measure is expected to
save students over two million
dollars.
Over the last eight years there
have been four attempts to institute
a post-secondary student farecard.
All have failed.
The current proposal is a compromise between a flat concession
farecard for university students and
the current situation of post-
secondary students paying the full
adult fare.
Stewart feels the additional cash
fares during peak periods would encourage students to travel during
non-peak times. This would reduce
pressure on the transit system during periods.
(PANGO PANGO — UNS) Hairy
Puce Blorgs on this tiny island
kingdom rejoiced at the astounding
success of their indoctrination
retreat. Bureaucrat Blorg Slimin
Sliveradri splintered with delight at
the fun. Others canoed on the
lagoon in dangerous winds.
Keynote Blorg Blob Grill was
almost speechless with enthusiasm
for the whole even but survived to
return to the big village.
In the village, Absolutely Muddled Society Blorgs struggled to deal
with thousands of leftover calendars they didn't hand out.
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139
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
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By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
This has been a summer of cutbacks and
change at UBC.
During April and May, administrators
argued about which programmes to cut in
preparation for a May 25 meeting where
senate decided to close nine programmes and
courses.
While some senators complained the three
days they were given to consider the brief
report on each proposed cut was inadequate,
they voted to stop offering courses ranging
from dental hygiene to several parts of the
education faculty.
But the bachelor of landscape architecture
program was retained following strong reaction from students and media publicity.
The dental hygiene program was cut from
UBC amid offers of money from the dentistry profession to keep it going and it was
recently announced a similar set of courses
will be offered at a community college.
The bachelor of recreation program was
dropped from the education faculty along
with the communications media and
technology program and some courses in industrial education.
The well regarded institute for animal
resource ecology, which coordinated research
in several departments and provided an independent voice on fisheries management
and reforestation was closed, saving about
$100,000.
The poultry science department will be
merged with the animal science department
and the diploma program in agricultural
sciences, which no one has taken since 1967,
was discontinued.
The dentistry and recreation programs will
continue to be offered this year.
Also in May, the price of a glass of draft
beer in the Pit rose from 95 cents to $1.15
and soft drink prices in SUB went up to 75
cents.
Meanwhile, the debate continued following the imposition of a $32 student athletic
fee by the board. Students are still calling for
an athletic council which both student affairs
vice-president  Neil   Risebrough  and   Alma
CHILDREN...enjoying the summer.
Mater Society president Glenna Chestnutt
said was imminent in early July.
The AMS Joblink program which tried to
link students to jobs had a good summer, doing better than last year but student
unemployment continued to be a problem
with 15,000 B.C. students without work in
July.
July 4 saw the appointment by the UBC
board of governors of noted geophysics and
moonrock expert as UBC's new president.
Student and faculty members of the selections committee seemed happy with their
choice of David Strangway, who was acting
president of the University of Toronto for a
year. Strangway takes office Nov. 1.
At the same meeting, the board unilaterally imposed a redundancy procedure for
faculty in closed departments. This was
followed by the dismissal of 12 professors,
three in dental hygiene and nine in terminated programs in education.
The faculty association passed a motion
the following Tuesday expressing non-
confidence in the university's acting administration president,- Robert Smith, the acting vice president academic, Dan Birch and
the board of governors. They said the procedures imposed by the board left the potential for abuses of tenure and academic
freedom.
The faculty are still preparing for a court
case with Canadian Association of University
Teachers support to get the administration to
overturn the administration policy.
Student council rejected a motion at its July 3 meeting to withdraw student radio station CITR's $100,000 guarantee of money to
get high power transmission. The guarantee
is needed to get Canadian Radio Television
Telecommunications Commission approval
for CITR's planned move from 49 to 4900
watts of power. CITR is still waiting for their
CRTC hearing date.
Various students started complaining
about the summer job performance of the
AMS executive who were paid $1,750 per
month for four months and the hiring committee which was supposed to review their
records at the end of June didn't meet until
July 17.
Even then new committee chair Nicci Ricci
delayed the decision until a special July 24
meeting when the executive were rehired constitutional amendments for next year were introduced.
The amendments, which would reduce the
number of people hired, will come up at the
Sept. 11 meeting of student council.
The AMS also paid $300 in repairs to a car
rental agency following an accident society
president Glenna Chestnutt had while driving
near Kelowna.
B-lot parking fees were increased to $32
from $24 to pay for a paving job which is
supposed to increase the number of spaces 15
per cent.
The board of governors gave a very high
priority to fundraising to build a new library
on the old bookstore site to the south of
Sedgewick library. The building, expected to
cost $16 to $17 million and be completed
within five years is supposed to solve the
chronic overcrowding problem in UBC's
library system.
The university also got a new computer
system, an Amdahl 580, which should relieve
congestion on the terminals that have been
moved to a room in the old bookstore
building.
The ministry of health decided to remove
coverage offered to visa students and workers
under the Medical Services Plan. About
4,000 students and workers are affected by
the decision, which forces them to obtain expensive private coverage. The decision has
sparked a protest movement at B.C.'s three
universities spearheaded by graduate students
who are most affected by the new rules.
Campus unions started getting upset about
efficiency reviews by Ritchey and Associates,
a consulting firm which does time and motion studies for organizations which want to
cut labor costs.
Finally, the July unemployment rate, the
latest figure now available, was reported at
22,000 people or 18.5 per cent of B.C.
students.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10,1365
Foreign students might pay $20 million in visa fees
OTTAWA (CUP) — With deliberations still underway, nearly 100,000
foreign students will have to wait
until late fall to find out how much
they will each have to pay to off-set
the Canadian government's deficit.
The government plans to charge
visa fees, possibly S50 each, in
hopes of generating $20 million a
year in federal revenue. Students
make up about a third of the
foreign population in Canada.
Finance minister Michael Wilson
announced the decision to institute
visa fees last November. He plans
to begin charging fees in January
1986.
According to Len Westerberg, an
official with the department of immigration in Ottawa, the particulars
of the fee rate will not be made
public until late October or mid-
November.
"It hasn't been settled yet," he
said.
Westerberg denied the government was planning to charge $50
per student authorization to study
in Canada, as reported in the Globe
and Mail in August. "Those are not
the figures we are useing at the moment," he said.
Westerberg would not say
whether the fees would be higher or
lower than the reported $50, and
added: "there is no sense in putting
fear or a false sense of hope in the
public that the fees will be "X"
number of dollars."
By law, all foreign students are
required to obtain authorization to
permit them to live in Canada,
which must normally be renewed
annually. Institutions operating on
a semester format often requiring
authorization to be renewed on a
term by term basis, Westerberg
said. "It's a document count, not a
head count."
Westerberg said some of the
money raised by the fees would
cover administrative costs and
the rest would be applied to the
federal deficit. He said the government hopes to earn $4.4 million in
the first fiscal quarter, ending April 1.
This is not the first time that the
Ministry of Employment and Immigration has decided to try and
recover administrative costs.
UNIVERSITY
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Firms of Chartered Accountants in British Columbia are now hiring a limited number of applicants to begin
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KITSILANO Tuesday, September 10,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
We've got those mad-about-you-sad-
about-you-can't-get-by-
wlthout-you-blues. Thats right, the
Ubyssey is break!n' its heart over you
sports writers, news writers, graphics
people, photographers and other
assorted creative types.
The headquarters of heartache is in room
241k of SUB and the weeping stops every
Wednesday at twelve-thirty for a staff
meeting where everyone Is welcome. This
Wednesday sees a seminar on
newswriting given by Vancouver Sun
reporter Keith Baldrey. So drop by and
bring an end to the senseless suffering.
MUSIC/UBC
! MUSICIANS NEEDED !
UBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA needs STRING PLAYERS
Rehearsals in       Monday 3:30-5:00
Old Auditorium   Wednesday 7:00-9:30
UBC JAZZ ENSEMBLE (STAGE BAND) needs
Tpts, Tbns, Sax, Rhythm
REHEARSALS: Monday or Wednesday Nights
AUDITIONS: Saturday, September 14 from 10 a.m.
in Old Auditorium.
^ Further information in Music Dept. Office.	
ORIENTATION   WEEK
i
* War Memorial Gym |
* * Gym B West Osborne ■
l-iower Intensity I
. H-Higher Intensity ■
B-Body I
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| I
I        COST- M0 00 - Choose any of the classes listed above as many times as you like, any   ■
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1 REGISTRATION: First Term - Sept. 3-18; Second Term - Jan. .
| Recreational Sports (Rm. 203), War Memorial Gym or late registration
. during first week of exercise class. .   -
I Sponsored by  Recreation U.B.C. For Fitness Information:
I 738-4169 t
I 'VALID UNTIL SEPT. 20. 1365 —/»-—» j
SEPTEMBER    1985
TUESDAY
PHILIPPE
LAPOINTE
JAZZ FUSION
SUB PLAZA   12:30 pm
SUPPORT THE USED BOOKSTORE
Rooms   119 &   I25  in  the SUB
BUY YOUR TICKET  FOR THE
AMS TUITION FEE LOTTERY
WEDNESDAY
ORIGINAL
NEW YORK SELTZEP
presents
PUNCH
LINES
FREE COMEDY
SUB PLAZA        12:30 pm
DIET   PEPSI   SUPERSTAR
CHALLENGE
WIN WILSON SPORTING GOODS GIFT CERTIFICATES
TUES & WED    10:30 am-???     SUB PLAZA
ALL EVENTS PRODUCED BY AMS PROGRAMS
THURSDAY
CRAVEN   A
MUSI C A L
CHAIRS
$100  TO WINNER
PRIZES INCLUDE ALBUMS
AND CONCERT TIX
SUB PLAZA   12:30pm
FIRST ANNUAL
INTRA-FACULTY
VOLLEYBALL
TOURNAMENT
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
7 30- II 30 pm
TICKETS NOW ON SALE FOR
PLATINUM  BLOND
SEPT 29-WAR MEMORIAL GYM
&
THE  HOOTERS
OCT 4-SUB BALLROOM
FRIDAY
INTRAMURAL
FASHION SHOW
SUB PLAZA  12:30 pm
MILLER BEER & PEPSI present
DOUG AND THE
SLUGS
WITH GUESTS.
PLUS:
-REFRESHMENTS & BBQ
-DUNK  TANK
(FOR BURSARY FUND)
bring  I.D.
MaclNNIS FIELD
3:30 —7:30 pm
WITH
-FABULON
-4th FLOOR
SUB Ballroom
doors: 8:00pm
Tix $4.50
at AMS
Box Office
All  Ages
Welcome Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, S
S&&£
UBC started 70 yea
By IOLANDA WEISZ
Alma Mater Society Archivist
The idea that a university would
be an asset to the province of
British Columbia was first officially
supported by the provincial
superintendent of education, John
Jessop, in 1877.
Later, in 1906, the province incorporated the Royal Institution for
the Advancement of Learning, a
local board which supervised the
McGill University College in British
Columbia. From 1907 until 1915
several hundred men and women
seeking an institution of higher learning could take two years of arts
and science or applied science for
credit at McGill.
Realizing the need for a university was imperative, the government,
in spite of scanty funds, opened its
doors on September 30, 1915 at the
Fairview Shacks on the Vancouver
General Hospital grounds. First-
year student enrolment was 379,
academic staff numbered 31, with a
clerical and technical staff of 12.
The students themselves had been
actively engaged with the problems
of organization. Following the lead
of most universities in Canada and
the United States, UBC adopted a
system of student self-government,
the Alma Mater Society.
Between 1916 and 1922, UBC
enrolment increased to 1,176
students and the inadequacy of the
"shacks" was dramatically
underscored.
There had been many plans and
proposals made during these years
to move the university to Point
Grey, but up to the spring of 1922
no one had the initiative or the
ability to execute them.
Students took up the idea that
"the government be petitioned to
take the necessary action which will
result in the University being moved
to Point Grey."
Ab Richards, who was the president elect of the Alma Mater Society, succeeded in not only interesting
the student body, but in getting
their unanimous support. Petition
forms were printed and distributed
to students to get them signed that
summer.
By fall session, the students had
obtained about 15,000 signatures,
which was not sufficient to make
the government take definite steps
in the matter.
Certain students did a lot of work
during the summer. From these, Ab
Richards selected a committee
which was known as the publicity
campaign committee.
These people threw themselves
heart and soul into the work and
before the middle of October had
inaugerated a news service and
organized house-to-house canvassing which boosted the total number
of signatures to 56,000. Although
this number far exceeded the objective set in the spring, the committee
had in the meantime arranged for
still further publicity.
Varsity Week began on Oct. 22,
and ended with the big pilgrimage
to the wilderness of Point Grey on
Saturday, Oct. 28.
When the site was reached, trek-
kers climbed up the skeleton of the
Chemistry Building, speeches were
made, songs were performed and
much shouting and yelling ensued.
The climax of the pilgrimage was
the erection of the cairn. As Ab
Richards and John Allardyce
stated: "The cairn has been erected,
not as a monument either to the
Campaign Committee or to the student body, but to mark now and for
all time one of the biggest events in
the history of our University, the
building of a real and permanent
home at Point Grey.
"A milestone in the history of the
University, and a landmark for the
future. It also marks one of the
greatest efforts ever put forward by
an undergraduate student body in
support of its University, an effort
which will only end when our objective is attained."
Thus ended the pilgrimage, but
not the campaign. A few days later,
the petition was presented to the
government by Ab Richards, Percy
Barr, Jack Clyne and Jack Grant. A
week lataer, on Nov. 9, 1922,
Premier John Oliver announced
that the government voted
$1,500,000 for immediate construction of university buildings at Point
Grey.
Since then the pilgrimage, later
known as The Great Trek, has
taken its place at the centre of the
enriching traditions of UBC.
By the autumn of 1925, the
Science building, the library and a
block of semi-permanent structures
were ready and UBC held its first
session on the new site.
The Twenties was a remarkable
period in University history. The
University of British Columbia
established a reputation as a
teaching institution.
High achievements were attained
in academic studies and every
aspect of undergraduate life.
The Ubyssey became a semi-
weekly and the yearbook, Totem
appeared after 1926. The number of
clubs grew from nine in 1918 to 21
by 1930. Among them, The Player's
Club and the Musical Society occupied positions of unrivalled prominence and affection in UBC's
heart. These years also established
UBC's reputation for outstanding
athletic performance.
The constituencies showed keen
interest in UBC's athletic planning
program. When it became clear the
government would provide insufficient funds to construct a gymnasium and playing fields, the
students' council of 1923-24 started
to raise funds to build them.
In the 1930's, the interests of
students widened and deepened
with their attention focussed first
'TIS;
on the social problems of the
depression, then on the steady drift
toward war.
Along with these major problems, the constant theme was the
student effort to improve the
university — to develop playing
fields; to build a stadium; to build
the Brock Hall; to excel in sports, in
debating, in artistic achievements;
to publicize the value of the university to the community.
The presentations of the Musical
Society and the Players' Club were
of very high order. So too were the
Film Society and the "Varsity
Time", the university's own radio
program which began in 1937.
The Ubyssey continued to give a
faithful account of campus social
^CifchiC;;:.  SS iptember 10,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
SAffwS.
^"~T  >T«i^i*-
irs ago
life along with ample commentaries
on athletic events.
The tradition of student
endeavour grew with the years. On
February 5, 1936, the first important drive for funds for a union
building was launched. Four years
later, the Brock Memorial building
was officially opened for the
university's twenty-fifth anniversary.
The year's following the end of
World War II brought an influx of
student veterans, which placed a
heavy demand on UBC resources.
The student population rose from
3,000 in 1944-45 to over 9,000 in
1947-78. Many temporary facilities
were built on the campus and the
campaign   to   build   the    War
Memorial gymnasium started.
During the post-war period, campus life was inevitably dominated
by the veteran students as had been
the case on the Fairview campus
after World War I. With their
maturity and experience they
assumed leadership in all phases of
undergraduate activities.
In the 1950's the tempo quickened — UBC expanded immensely,
not only in physical facilities but
also in teaching staff. The scale of
its operations was affected by increasing enrolment which imposed
further administrative changes.
Residences became necessary to
the future of the university. Despite
these additional facilities, UBC
needed more permanent classroom
CAMPUS BY CAIRN... then (below) and now (above).
ams archival photo
and housing accommodations.
The Great Trek's spirit continued
throughout the years until in
1956-57 the need for increased
housing and other facilities became
so pressing that the Second Great
Trek was instituted.
The students staged a giant campaign. A most impressive student
brief was prepared. After numerous
demonstrations and much talk, the
government announced a matching
grant of $5 million to accompany
any donations from industry,
business and private individuals.
The grant was later raised to $7.5
million and still later, as a result of
a political rally, to $10 million.
From 1959 to 1966 the AMS
engaged in the planning and
development of the Student Union
building and the Thunderbird
Winter Sports center.
In the fall of 1960 a series of constitutional changes took place
within the AMS. The changes principally affected the organization of
the students council, the executive
body of the AMS.
This decade also marked the
emergence of student activism at
UBC. In 1963 students collected
250,000 signatures in a province-
wide "Back-Mack" campaign, trying to force the government to
spend more money on higher education.
In the seventies, a series of
developments of unfinished areas
and renovations to the Student
Union building took place and the
Aquatice Center was completed.
These and the present SUB plaza
developments were undertaken to
meet the needs of the student
population and to enhance UBC.
Since the Great Trek, students
have funded or helped fund 13 major campus buildings. This outstanding support is believed to be unequalled by the students of any other
North American university.
In addition to the contributions
to the building projects, each year
the graduating class supports
various campus activities and programs. To name just a few: gifts to
the university daycare council for
improvements to children's centers;
funds for law students legal advice
programs; upgrading wheelchair accessibility to campus buildings;
substantial contributions to the
UBC library book fund; student
aid; talking books for handicapped-
to-print students.
Today the AMS has a membership of 26,000 students. The operations of the society with all its constituencies, about 180 clubs and
nine service organizations are extremely complex.
Students interests and concerns
are just about as varied and complex as the AMS itself: accessibility
to higher education , women's
issues, daycare, student employment, bursary funds for needy and
deserving students, capital projects
development.
The independence and initiative
of UBC students in unique, and
vital to the development of UBC. In
the eighties, a time of reduction
rather than expansion, the Alma
Mater Society is turning its energies
to building not only daycare and
recreational facilities, but also to
building its role as education advocate in British Columbia.
University
reinstates
old ceremony
By RAJ BASI
AMS president Glenna Chesnutt
was hopeful the revival of the Cairn
ceremony would attract a larger
crowd of students than the administration President's speech to
froshes held Monday.
The ceremony took place during
lunch hour at the Cairn situated on
main mall between the chemistry
building and the bus stop. Despite
the prominent location and convenient time the low student turn out
was somewhat disconcerting.
(freest^jj
Regardless, acting UBC president
Robert Smith optimistically introduced the cairn as "a symbol of
student commitment and a monument of an essential institution
where ideas, unity and progress
flourish." He said he hoped the
event would occure regularly in the
first week of classes and thereby
convince the province its government and its people of the value of
UBC.
The next speaker, Dr. Eagles
Blythe was called upon to give a
historical perspective outlining the
significance of the cairn. He
described it as "an educational
homage which pays tribute to
students of seven decades."
In his words "the fact that the
AMS has taken the initiative to
revive the Cairn ceremony does not
mean that it is living in the past but
the past is alive in them." He hoped
the Cairn would be a landmark to
the future united student body and
cried, "long live the spirit of 1922."
But the meagre student audience
seemed to dampen Blythe's hopes.
Moreover, he may have overstepped the mark when he concluded
that "UBC has new traditions but
the Cairn still stands as a symbol to
the university... a shrine to which
every student must bow."
Monday, not only did the
students fail to bow to the shrine,
but the majority did not even turn
out to hear the sentiment. If the
university motif is anything to go by
"Tuum est" (it's up to you), the
mind boggles.
Rounding up the ceremony was
the chancellor, Robert Wyman. His
words hit home: "The university is
going through a difficult time today
and there is an increasing need to
involve ourselves as students committed to this university."
Wyman believes UBC is essential
to the province and country and will
"survive and thrive." He too seemed optimistic that UBC students do
care about this institution and are
committed to its well-being.
But, counting heads — 150 at
best — I wasn't so sure. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1985
Dealing at AMS book sale
By JASON LEVINE
The AMS is having its annual used book sale, and it offers students
a chance to get books much cheaper
than in the UBC book store.
Simon Seshahdri, the AMS
organizer of the event, says that it is
a vital service to students.
"When you can get a book that
normally costs forty dollars for half
that price, then why not?"
Seshahdri says 500 students have
brought in books and there are
almost 3,000 for sale. "The way it
works is really quite simple. The
students bring in their books, and
the AMS takes a fifteen per cent
commission from whatever sells.
The student gets to keep the rest. It
works out to be a good deal all
around."
Seshahdri says the 15 per cent
commission is for the AMS to break
even from the event.
"I realize that we could make
money if we wanted to, but this is a
service to students, so we only attempt to break even."
Asked if she enjoys standing in
the long lineups at the UBC book
$1.00 OFF
Any
Sandwich
LE BON APPETIT
. 1535 Yew Street
I (Next Door to Reds)
*with this coupon
NEW
RETURN POLICY
On
Course Books
W
• Course books bought for Fall
Term may be returned for
full refund any time up to
Oct. 1st  (the ten-day rule
has been eliminated).
• Books must be unmarked and
in saleable-as-new condition.
1 Returns will NOT be accepted without the original
SALES RECEIPT.
After OCT. 1st all sales of
course books will be NON-
RETURNABLE.
REMEMBER
to keep your receipt.
NO RECEIPT
NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Blvd.
228-4741
store, Miranda Aaron said, "I really hate standing in lines. The books
here are so expensive, too, however,
I can't get the right books anywhere
else, so I have to pay these prices
and stand in these lines."
Another student, Mark Bentz,
says the sale is fine, but usually the
books are in very poor condition.
"The used book sale usually
doesn't have the books I need, and
when they do, they're usually not
worth buying."
The sale offers students who have
used books a chance to make some
money said Jean Yuen, one of the
many students that are selling
books.
"I don't have much money and
so this gives me a chance to make a
little, while at the same time saving
someone else a little," said Yuen.
"I really think the UBC book store
is overpriced, which makes this sale
all the more attractive. This book
sale is really a very good idea."
The AMS book sale continues
until Sept. 20.
PIZZA FACTORY
2630 Sasamat St. at 10th Ave.
Best Quality & Prices Nearest UBC
10"
4 Toppings 5.50
FREE 26oz. Coca-Cola with any order over $9.00
CALL: 224-2417, 224-2625
(Free & Fast Delivery)
Mon.-Thurs. 4 p.m.-l a.m.
Fri.-Sat. 4 p.m.-2 a.m.
Sun. & Holidays 5 p.m.-l a.m.
CORRECTION
The phone number listed
for Sedgewick Undergraduate Library (Renewals) in Inside UBC 1985,
under frequently called
numbers, page 81 is incorrect. The correct number
is 228-2406.
VACANCIES
FOR
WOMEN
in
TOTEM PARK
RESIDENCE
(Room & Board)
Commencing: September 1, 1985
to: April 30, 1986
Rates: Single room - $2,986.96
Double room - $2,732.86
Please Contact:
PONDEROSA
HOUSING OFFICE
2071 West Mall
Tel: 228-2811
UNIVERSITY
HEALTH
and
ACCIDENT
Plus
LIFE
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Non- Residents
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COMPREHENSIVE
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HEALTH CARE
Visa Students • Work Visas
a PLAN 1 WORK VISAS & POST DOCTORAL
f    PAYS THE FULL HOSPITAL STANDARD WARD RATE
x     Ritas may exceed $1,000.00 a day In Metropolitan areas
f    PAYS YOUR DOCTOR FROM THE VERY FIRST VISIT
>Home Office Hospital
PLUS • LIFE INSURANCE • DISMEMBERMENT• REPATRIATION,
PLAN 1 WORK VISAS & POST DOCTORAL
SINGLE
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up to 3 months
$145.00
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up to 4 months
$220.00
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up to 12 months
$425.00
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PLAN 2STUDENT VISAS-REGULAR STUDENTS
■ PAYS THE FULL HOSPITAL STANDARD WARD RATE
Ratas may exceed {1,000.00 a day In Metorpolttan areas.
■ PAYS YOUR DOCTOR FROM THE VERY FIRST VISIT
Home Office Hospital
i PLUS • LIFE INSURANCE• DISMEMBERMENT* REPATRIATION
PLUS
» PAYS FOR EXTENDED HEALTH CARE
Over and Above the Basic Coverage For:
Prescription Drugs
Private Duty Nursing
Private or semi-private
hospital accommodation
Chiropractor ($200.00)
Osteopath
Physiotherapist
Chiropodist—Podiatrist
X-Ray & Laboratory
Local Ambulance Services
Wheelchair rental. Crutches
Braces & Other
Medical Appliances
Dental Accident (S1.0O0.0O)
PLAN 2 STUDENT VISAS-REGULAR STUDENTS
SINGLE FAMILY
up to 3 months $110.00 $220.00
up to 12 months $325.00 $650.00
JOHN INGLE
Head Office. 710 Bay Street, Toronto, Canada
Toronto Montreal Vancouver
1416) 597-0886      1 800-268-9069 (804) 886-0144
All Canada 1-800-268-9059
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Royal Centre Mall — 1055 West Georgia Street
VANCOUVER
685-0144
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FIVE MINUTES FROM CLASSES! Tuesday, September 10,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Time to protest
Welcome to the University of a Billion Cutbacks.
UBC, which was established in 1915, enters its 70th
year with more problems than it ever had and very little
sympathy from anywhere in B.C.
Students in giant classes or courses which fit their
timetable but not their program because of enrolment
restrictions should get involved in the fight to make
education a priority again in B.C.
Faculty and teachers are worried about their jobs and
their programs, especially in light of UBC's recent
failure to get nearly $2 million in expected government
funding for this fiscal year.
Some professors have even ended their lectures with
a few words on cutbacks and a call to students to do
something to stop the gradual erosion of the university.
A quick glance at a history of UBC will reveal a history
going back to the beginning of students protesting to
defend and advance an institution they believe in.
The time has come to overcome the impersonality of
a campus population, the size of a small city, and build a
protest spirit.
You can join in by becoming active in your department students association or your faculty
undergraduate society but abov all you should start doing something about preserving UBC as a university
whose degree you will be proud to display.
Write to your MLA and the government telling them
you want B.C. to be an educated society, not Bennett's
dream of a second Philippines.
&>&~he«fi
■    - •  ■ .    -v       .-.-   ■"■»'" «>1h*  -^^   »'<;,.it*.i. .4:.     •—.. '''-^- ,.v ..■—.-    --• **■
WW"
A,
:*»*"-
CSIS: a powerful and unaccountable agency
By KEVIN ANNETT
For some reason, Canada's secret
police have always feared university
campuses. During the 1960's and
'70's, the RCMP maintained undercover agents in every university,
even for a while, against the direct
orders of a Solicitor-General. Now
that such "subversive" acts as
peace marches have again become
commonplace, the old Mountie
paranoia is undoubtedly making
them see red. This time, however,
their covert activity will have a
stronger cloak to conceal it: a
secretive, powerful and largely
unaccountable agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service
(CSIS).
The CSIS was formed last year,
taking over the job of the RCMP
Security Service by recruiting 90%
of its former personnel (you know,
all those guys who stole PQ
membership lists and burned
barns). In its intrepid search for
"threats to the security of
Canada," the CSIS will have the
legal right to open your mail, bug
your home and telephone, seize any
medical files, government records,
tax forms, reporters' notes and
lawyers' records (including confidential client files), circumvent the
Human Rights Act and break any
law. Parliament will not directly
monitor the CSIS, nor will the
Solicitor-General. And if you're a
government employee and you
reveal any "vital" information
about the agency, you can be put in
jail for five years.
2b). Perhaps the genius who
thought up this vague carte-blanche
can tell us what political activities
aren't "foreign influenced" in
some way!
It has also become subversive to
think certain thoughts. According
to s. 2d, any activities "intended
ultimately to lead to the destruction
of the constitutionally established
system of government in Canada"
are considered threats to national
security. By this criterion,
teaching, writing or advocating a
different system of government in
our society is subversive, as these
actions may "ultimately" lead to
such a radical change. Calling for
the abolition of the Canadian
Senate, for instance, can now
qualify one as a target of the CSIS,
under section 2d.
Many of us were bewildered by
the sudden creation of this secret
police, particularly when our civil
liberties had just been constitutionally "guaranteed" by the
Charter of Rights; a Charter which
the CSIS is free to ignore. But there
has to be some threat to Canada to
warrant such measures, doesn't
there? The government, Liberal or
Tory, has yet to indicate what that
threat is, or if it exists at all.
It can't be the Russians. According to the RCMP itself, only nine
Soviet spies have been apprehended
in Canada since the early 1960's.
And I haven't read of much terrorist activity in our country. As it
turns out, the "threat" appears to
See page 14: CSIS
Ronald and Nancy Reagan beasts in disguise
Just who will the CSIS be pursuing with this power? Literally
anyone. The CSIS's definition of a
subversive is so broad that is encompasses peaceful political
dissenters and any Canadian involved in social change. For example,
according to Bill C-9 which created
the CSIS, a "threat to the security
of Canada" includes "foreign influenced activities within or relating
to Canada that are detrimental to
the interests of Canada ..." (s.
IMS dubs rtemvt new SUB offioas
Attention all new students and
apathetic veteran students. Here is a
note to remind you of the great extracurricular organizations awaiting
you at U.B.C.
The A.M.S. has 170 affiliated
clubs, encompassing a wide spectrum of interests, from sports to
politics, religion to martial arts. If
you wish to spend your years at
U.B.C. with your head buried in a
text book, that's your choice, but
we hope that you'll broaden your
education, and have some fun and
consider joining a club!
Club's Days '85 will be held on
Monday and Tuesday, September
23rd and 24th in the Student Union
Building from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. All clubs may have a display
booth set up on the upper and lower
floors of the SUB. During Club's
Days visit any or all of the displays
to obtain club information.
If you have any questions regarding joining a club, establishing a
new club, etc. please contact Nindy
Duggal or Lorna Pritchard in the
SAC Office — SUB Room 246.
University is what you make of it
— so get involved!!!!
Nindy Duggal
clubs commissioner
The "666" code of Revelation
13:18 has been broken! It identifies
Ronald and Nancy Reagan as the
two beasts. Why? They are one
flesh.
The code is based on the number
6, for God created man on the sixth
day. In the alphabet, A has the
value 6, with each succeeding letter
having an additional value of 6,
i.e., B is 12, C is 18, etc. After
determining the value of every letter
of the alphabet, add the values of
each letter of Ronald Reagan, his
public name. It will come to 660.
His middle name Wilson is not used
publicly, so the value of each letter is 1 because he is the 1st beast.
The 6 letters have a value 6, bringing the total to 666.
His wife's public name is Nancy
Reagan. Her full name is Anne
Frances "Nancy" Robbins Davis
Reagan (six names). Using the same
code, her public name adds up to
618. Using the remaining letters (23)
of her full name, only using the
value 2 for each of those letters for
the 2nd beast, that adds 46 for a
total of 664. The remaining 2 come
from the quotes around "Nancy"
as that's the name the 1st beast
likes. The total is 666. Both full
names are in The 1985 World
Almanac, pub. by the Newspaper
Enterprise Assn., Inc., of New
York, page 310.
There is, of course, no proof that
the Reagans are the two beasts, so
all one can do is watch to see how
they play out their roles, for the
people, or for the dragon. It will be
expensive, however, for many
billions of dollars may be wasted
preparing for war in space, only to
discover that the dragon's appetite
cannot be satisfied.
John-Wayne Johnson
16759 Meandro Court
San Diego, CA 9212*
THE UBYSSEY
September 10,1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
The ball tolled twelve midnight et the college graveyard. Muriel Draaiama and Rick Klein auddety
transformed into werewolves. "I use the aim pump to clean my fangs," said Muriel. 'That aucks," said
Robert Beynon flinging his red satin cape. "What's with the disco garb," asked Murray Johnson sitting
on a rotting gravestone. "We've got to let David Ferman and Patti Rather out of the tomb," squeaked
Camilla Dionne and Karen Gram who had flown to a nearby tree and hung uspide down swinging from
side to side. "What does the world look like from the angle?" asked Debbie Lo waving a bony finger.
"It's all relative, depending on you perspective," answered Karen. "Let's not mix Einsteinien physics
with reiativistic philosophy," suggested Stephen Wisenthal scratching his skull. What about Dave and
Patti croaked out Gordon Clark and Steve Kontic and emitted large gurgles of chagrin. Raj Baal,
Dorothy Miyake and Eva Busza flew overhead looking for traces of blood. Gerry Lotke called to them
"Your Woody cruising isn't much use — we have to get Patti and Dave out." FrankenJason Levine had
an idea: "Let's harness lightening power and split the rock." Evelyn Jacob provided the capacitor and
beamed the energy at the gravestone. Lo and behold the rock split and out jumped Dave and Patti to
join the graveyard monster bash in the night of the living dead. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10,1985
CSIS watches you too
From page 13
come from ordinary Canadians.
Nearly one million of us are on
RCMP/CSIS files, the highest percentage of monitored citizens in
the western world. According to
RCMP testimony to the MacDonald Commission, their main
surveillance targets are peace activists and third world solidarity
organizations.
The CSIS is what the Security
Service was before it: a political
police. Its activity, covert or otherwise, is aimed at political dissenters
opposed to the Canadian status
quo, invariably those of left-wing
beliefs. And now, protected from
public or parliamentary scrutiny
and armed with unlimited powers
of search, seizure and surveillance,
this political police is essentially an
autonomous power unto itself.
It you're beginning to worry
about Canadian democracy, you're
not   alone.    The   existence   of
something like the CSIS is repugnant to the very spirit of critical
thinking which animates a university and in the pursuit of which many
of us have come to UBC. Destroy
that spirit with the fear and suspicion bred by a secret and unnecessary spy agency, and we might
as well close down universities,
along with newspapers, political
parties and every other critical institution.
Of course, the CSIS hasn't won
yet. They've simply pushed our
country one step closer to a police
state, the machinery for which is
now in place. If we allow ourselves
to be intimidated by the CSIS, and
curtail our beliefs or public dissent
because of fear of being branded a
subversive, then they will have won.
But perhaps the final word
should go to a friend of mine who is
a Chilean refugee. When I told him
about the CSIS and the scope of its
powers, he smiled sadly and said,
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"they had to have a military coup in
my country before they could set up
anything like that".
The Vancouver unit of the CSIS
operates out of five floors at 1177
West Broadway, the former B.C.
headquarters of the RCMP security
service.
Kevin Annett is a political science
graduate student and a definite
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an Tuesday, September 10,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Things go better without Mukavejev's Coca-Cola Kid
By DAVID FERMAN
With the nick-name of the Coca-
Cola Kid one would expect a jolly,
happy go lucky character, a sort of
mammal version of Jiminy Cricket.
The character one sees in Dusart
Mukavejev's latest film, however, is
as remote a character as one will
meet in modern cinema.
The Coca-Cola Kid
directed by Dusan Mukavejev
at the Capitol 6 theatre
The story line is very interesting
but is obviously low on
Mukavejev's priority list. The hear
Becker (Eric Roberts) is introduced
as   the   ideal   American   and   an
American idealist who is Godfearing, money-loving "money is
God's muscle," and of course an
ex-marine.
Becker, a Coca-Cola trouble
shooter who triples sales everwhere
he goes, arrives in Sydney,
Australia before his Telex arrives
and immediately takes firm control
of the office. In a strange scene
Becker intensely studies a map and
finds one minute area where there is
no one buying Coke.
When he demands to know why
no one is buying the real thing in
that area he is told that the area is
an uninhabited national park of a
desert. Becker snaps sharply "Well
people get kinda thirsty in the desert
don't they?"
The Kid drives out to find that
the blank spot on the map is actually a well populated valley that is run
by one man, T. George McDowell
(Bill Kerr), who also happens to run
an antique soda company. T.
George, an ornery version of Colonel Sanders, is firmly opposed to
Coke moving into his town. The
classic struggle of a lone individual
versus a giant corporation seems
perfectly set, but Mukavejev
tampers with the plot repeatedly
and the cola war is a letdown.
Although Becker is presented as
the film's hero he is hard to like and
impossible to understand. This is
not Roberts' fault entirely as he successfully demonstrates a full range
Graham Greene explores
cultural landscape and political
Iflavour of Latin America
of emotions from anger to
bewilderment to humiliation. Unfortunately Mukavejev doesn't explain any of Becker's motives. Why
does he fail to recognize the constant advances of his secretary? And
why does he quit the Coca-Cola
company.
The film wanders all over, and
these detours are the films brightest
moments. They include a trip to a
music studio where Becker searches
for a jingle with the definitive
Australian sound. He asks the
engineer his opinion and is told that
the music was as "Australian as a
barbwire canoe, as Australian as a
shit sandwich."
Another successful detour is the
strife between his beautiful
secretary (Greta Scacchi) and her
loutish husband. The husband visits
her in the office and proceeds to attack her in the halls. After the husband is dragged away Becker tells
her that "that better not happen a
second time." She replies, "Don't
worry he never does the same thing
twice."
The secretary makes inumerable
passes at her boss, and he finally
relents only to learn that she is T.
George's daughter.
The plot is mixed up and the
rushed video-style editing makes the
film even more jerky. The
cinematography itself is bold and
beautiful, with shots of lush
Australian wilderness, close-ups of
executives with the reflection of
Coke bubbles rising on their faces,
and a surreal scene of lovemaking
in the feathers of a torn Santa suit.
The Coca-Cola Kid attempts to
make statements on modern day
Australia, corporations, love and
money. It fails miserably.
The worst aspect to the Coca-
Cola Kid is the end. Just when the
audience gets a grip on the story,
three lines of poetry are splashed on
the screen saying that the third
world war takes place the next
week. The poem is shocking but it
doesn't fit the film and adds
nothing to the story.
The Coca-Cola Kid looks great,
but bring your Walkman.
By EVELYN JACOB
Grahame Greene's novel, Getting
to Know the General is a book
about dreams: romantic dreams,
and broken dreams. It is a story of
one man's idealistic vision for the
future of his country and people,
and the collapsing of that dream.
Greene calls his novel a "personal involvement," a growing
friendship with the head of the
Panamanian National Guard,
General Omar Torrijos Herrera.
One of the book's strongest
points is that it is told from
Greene's first-hand experience in
Latin America, rather than through
the eyes of a detached onlooker.
This also becomes, paradoxically,
the major weakness of the book,
for where there is a single viewpoint, there is also inevitable bias.
Thus one must be prepared not to
find the Latin America which appears in the New York Times of on
the pages of American history
books. The novel is not merely a
gathering of cold facts, but rather it
is filled with compassion and sympathy, as the Latin American Struggle unfolds before us.
In 1976, Greene received his first
of numerous invitations to Panama
which he continued to accept until
Torrijos' death in 1981. After their
first meeting, Greene describes the
General as aloof, hardly more than
a shadowy figure. He finds instead
a companion in the General's right-
hand man, Chuchu, a Marxist professor and Greene's guide to Latin
America.
Getting to Know the General
By Graham Greene
Before long, however, Greene
pieces together the reason behind
Torrijos' elusiveness: "I had the
impression," he tells us, "that he
was deliberately leaving me alone to
see what I wanted to see, to get to
know Panama in my own way,
uninfluenced by him."
Greene indeed comes to know
Panama, which he describes as
"one vast tangle of telephone lines
We need sport
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Openings are now available
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and a medley of contradicting
voices." He witnesses in vain the
power struggles of opposing
Panamanian government forces;
views with pity, the naive cries of
the impoverished natives.
Greene's voice perhaps becomes
the loudest as he points his accusing
finger at the United States's involvement in Latin America: he
makes no pretenses about the
"quiet revolution" staged by the
Americans in Panama in 1903,
when Columbia refused to agree to
the building of the canal. He talks
bitterly of Panama's recent
diplomatic relations with the United
States, and the.signing of treaties
that came to mean nothing at all.
Certainly, Greene learns that in the
game of power, "a revolver is no
defense."
But in the middle of what Greene
calls the "jig-saw puzzle" of Latin
America stands Torrijos' Panama,
a comforting refuge from extreme
rightist forces, a sanctuary for San-
danistan    and    El    Salvadorean
See page 16: Greene
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10,1985
Greene denied U.S. entry
From page 15
refugees. Torrijos' dream, Greene
explains, "was for a Central
America which would be socialist
and not Marxist, independent of the
United States, and yet not a menace
to her."
But while Torrijos becomes a
near "saint" to Greene, he is
cautiously viewed by Western eyes
as a shrewd "dictator." Greene's
Latin American sympathy would
certainly make a staunch conservative roll over in his/her grave;
Greene, in fact, has been denied entry
to the U.S. on various occassions.
Getting to Know the General
ends but does not conclude: we are
left instead with an enigma—who
killed General Torrijos? Greene
leaves us with more than a hint between the lines.
In Getting to Know the General,
Greene packs in a variety of genre
and themes, such as political
history, travel, autobiography,
magic and religion. The novel
moves quickly, as Greene explores
the landscape and political-cultural
flavor of Latin America. His style is
easily readable and undecorated;
his mood is informative and yet
emotional.
When asked by an American
whether he felt 'used' by leftist
forces in Latin America, Greene
replied simply that he has "never
hesitated to be 'used' in a cause that
he believed in," even if his own
choice "might be only for a lesser
evil."
"We can never," Greene says,
"foresee the future with any accuracy."
Whether one would agree with
Greene that the Sandanistas are a
"lesser evil" in Central America, or
that the Misquito Indians are "well
treated" in Nicaragua, is a question
of personal belief, of political persuasion. The writer's task is to unfold the truth. It is the truth itself,
however, that becomes often
obscured. Greene, nevertheless,
must be admired for venturing
where few men would dare to go;
for never forgetting the essential
humanity of man in the shadow of
the politics of power.
Getting to Know the General is a
short and rewarding read, but must
be approached slowly, with caution, and careful thought.
DO YOU HAVE ASTHMA?
If you have asthma, you might be interested in
volunteering for a research study on the effect
of a combination of 2 inhalers (Atrovent &
Berotec) on breathing tests in asthma.
The study involves coming to V.G.H. for
breathing tests on 6 separate days for about 4
hrs. each. Volunteers will be compensated
$50.00 for each day.
If interested, call V.G.H. Lung Function Lab,
875-4830 (and ask for Nancy Gibson) for further information.
NOW OPEN
Volunteer Connections
is here to help YOU find
exciting and challenging
volunteer opportunities.
Call 228-3811 or come to
Room 200, Brock Hall
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
FACULTY OF ARTS
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS
a) One representative from the combined major,
honours, graduate, and diploma students in each
of the departments and schools of the Faculty of
Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and Second Year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the
meetings of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to
committees of the Faculty.
Nomination   forms  are   available  from   School   and
Department  Offices,  the  Dean  of Arts'  Office,  the
Faculty Adviser's Office, and the Arts Undergraduate
Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of
the Registrar of the University not later than 4:00 p.m.,
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1986
NOTE: In constituencies from which no nominations
have been received by the deadline, there will be no
representation.
& ToucheRoss
Look sharp.
The headhunters
are coming.
They're coming to find you. The cream.
Those who have ambition, smarts and
motivation.
The bright minds who wish to join a bright,
energetic company.
An international firm of chartered
accountants, professionals with an industry
reputation for forward thinking and excellence.
If you think your head fits with ours, please
submit your application, accompanied by recent
transcripts, to the Campus Employment Center
by October 3rd.
October 21st, 22nd & 23rd, we'll be on
campus. Hunting for you.
^
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Jackets, pants
hats & deck boots
SPECIRLTIES
(JEST
4564 W. 10th Ave.
university gates
228-1112 Tuesday, September 10,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
BIRDS WIN - Start
of Banner Season
By STEVEN KONTIC
After a slow start the UBC
Thunderbirds Football club went
on to dominate the visiting University of Saskatchewan Huskies for
three quarters winning 20-3 in front
of 2,000 delighted fans at Thunderbird Stadium Friday night.
The Birds were aided by star performances from several key players.
Running back Terry Cochrane
trying to fill the shoes of now Win-
to the UBC eight yard line before a
Rob Moretto interception ended the
drive early in the fourth quarter.
Long runs by running back
Cochrane and fullback Mass
Geremia took UBC out of trouble
deep in their own end and set up a
12 yard field goal by Mike
Williams.
UBC capped the game off with a
late   game   touchdown   by   Mass
SPORTS
nipeg Blue Bomber Glenn Steele
was spectacular rushing 23 times for
140 yards and adding another 86
yards in punt returns.
Rookie Mike Bellefontaine's
booming punts gave the Birds good
field position all night long as he
proved a more than adequate
replacement for Tom Dixon now
with the Edmonton Eskimoes.
With the defense,end Carey Lapa
stood out with 4 sacks, a partially
blocked punt and a tipped pass that
eventually led to a Cochrane
touchdown.
"The defense played well," said
UBC coach Frank Smith. "They
(Saskatchewan) got alumni yardage
in the middle of the field, but
nothing serious."
A 33 yard field goal by Saskatchewan's Mike Bischoff and three
singles by UBC accounted for all
the scoring in the first half which
ended in a 3-3 tie.
But early in the third quarter fifth
year Huskie quarterback Doug
Siemens was intercepted by UBC
safety Terry Ainge at the Saskatchewan five yard line. Seconds later
Cochrane scored from the two yard
line giving UBC a 10-3 lead which
they never relinquished.
An unnecessary rougness penalty
killed a 107 yard pass play from
Siemens to his favourite target fifth
year receiver Kevin Sawatzky that
would have tied the game for
-Saskatchewan. Despite the setback
Saskatchewan marched all the way
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Geremia on a five yard toss from
Q.B. Jordan Gagner. UBC started
out from the Saskatchewan 35 yard
line as a result of a partially blocked
punt by Lapa.
UBC coach Frank Smith was optimistic and happy after the game.
The kids enjoyed playing football, and that's what it's all about,"
he said. With that in mind UBC
could be in for a banner season.
Would you rather watch a live         ferentiate between a hockey rink
hockey or football game then have        and a swimming pool,
sex? Do you spend countless nights             If you can meet these gruelling re-
wide   awake   pondering   a   better         quirements then you've made the
strategy for your favourite team?            team and even if you can't we'll
Do you flare up and go into wild         sneak you on.
temper   tantrums   when    your             You can then make your choice
favourite team loses? If so, you are        of covering football, hockey, soc-
a sports freak and should ponder a         cer,   tennis,    skiing,    rowing,
glorious career in sports journalism.         volleyball, basketball, gymnastics,
Get your start right here at The        squash, and rugby, to name just a
Ubyssey. Besides becoming a legend         few.
in your own mind, other people             Aid  The  Ubyssey  in  quashing
may notice you too.                               pretentious,   dull,   unimaginative
Years later, sitting at Sport's 11-         sports journalism full of brainless
lustrated editor's desk, you may         cliches,
think of your humble beginnings at             Ev£n whUe yQU read this mide
e      yssey.                                           hundreds of young enthusiastic sup-
Men and women are desperately                     m >deddi     tQ join The
needed   to   cover   varsity   sports         ubyssey and better their lives,
events and report back to throngs
of eager fans. But like all things at            Once one has decided to join The
UBC one must meet the necessary         Ubyssey one must take the quest:
requirements.                                            finding The Ubyssey office. Is it
For one, you must be able to         simply myth or does it exist? The
deadlift a Ubyssey edition. Next,         answer can only be found by open-
the prospective journalist must dif-         ing the door of SUB 241k.
UNCLE ej.
WANS&YOU!
Get Drafted.
WEDNESDAY NITE IS UNIVERSITY NITE.
7 P.M. ONl       ROCK VIDEO BY MUCH MUSIC.
WHOLESALE HULKS SALE... $3.95 REGULAR $5.95
Incredible! Hide the women and professors! This monster is made from 350 grams (over 3A lb.) of beef!
...Lettuce, tomato, mayo, relish, onions, pickles and a fried egg! It once fed the entire
Egyptian dune hill racing team.
RED HOT CHICKEN WINGS - RED HOT PRICES... $1.95 REGULAR $2.95
NACHOS... $1.95 REGULAR $2.95
You have to present your student card to enjoy this promotion.
ORtWAL
Burnaby • Coquitlam • Kitsilano • North Vancouver • Richmond Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10,1985
%^f^2z^^
CAMPUS CUTS
TUESDAY
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, everyone
welcome. 10:30 a.m. and noon. Meet at Main
Library entrance hall.
WEDNESDAY
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Keith Batdrey of the Sun speaks on How to Write
a News Story for new, old and prospective staffers, noon, SUB 241k.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, everyone
welcome, 10:30 a.m. and noon. Meet at Main
Library entrance hall.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting. Noon SUB 215.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Introductory meeting, discussion, planning.
Noon-1:30 p.m., St. Mark's college, conference
room.
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, everyone
welcome, 10:30 and noon. Meet at the Main
library entrance hall.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of membership cards for fall 85. Only $45 for
unlimited classes in jazz, ballet, stretch and
dancercise, noon-1:20 p.m. SUB 208.
FRIDAY
UBC LIBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, everyone
welcome, 10:30 a.m. and noon. Meet at Main
library entrance hall.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of membership cards for fall '85. Only $46
for unlimited classses in jazz, ballet, dancercise
and stretch, noon-1:X p.m. SUB 208.
UBC HANG GLIDING IN SPl
Organisational meeting to check out interest in
the sport of heng gliding, 3 p.m., CEME 1210 or
phone 228-3256.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
UBC Women vs. University of Puget Sound, 10
a.m., O.J. Todd field.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
UBC vs. Red Lions, 12 p.m., Douglas park.
The Keg
The Keg Coal Harbour and Boathouse
Restaurants are looking for energetic, hardworking, caring people who would enjoy working
with the public. All jobs are part-time — two-
three evenings per week. Please apply in person
at the Canada Employment Centre (Brock Hall,
Rm. 106, on campus) this Wednesday,
September 11, 12:00-3:00 p.m. or at the
Boathouse Restaurant on Cardero St., between
2:00-3:00 p.m. on Wednesdays.
FINE ART SALE
Prints For Every Taste And Budget
Hundreds of Reproductions at $2.50—$6.00
300 Exhibition Posters—Most Far Below List Price
Moderately Priced Original Etchings
Time: 9-5
Place: S.U.B. 1st Floor
FINAL DAY DRAW
PRIZE: $100.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE • WINNER AT 1 P.M.
• ONE ENTRY PER PERSON • NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
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FALL HOURS:
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY-7:30 A.M. TO 10:00 P.M.
SUNDAY - 8:00 A.M. TO 0:00 P.M.
©
men and women
Haircutting for
5736 University Blvd.
(In The Village)
228-1471
HOURS Mon.,-Sat. t a.m.-* p.m. Sunday 12-6 p.m.
Fraa Hair Shampooing
and Conditioning
#3.00 valua with this ad
Expire* Oct. 30. 'SS
"T"
I
I
I
♦6.00 OH Parma
With this ad
Expiraa Oct. 30, "85
LOOK
itting fee L(J Sa7 ^ • ^ %S
rescrip"°V.m   tlj QS
.f.3i,'85 M/%7"¥»^r%7
Soft Contact Lenses
Daily Wear
Plus initial $20 fitting fee
Single Vision Prescription
Eye Glasses from
Offer expires Oct. 31, '85
CAMBIE OPTICAL
17th and Cambie 879-9494
ImTHE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
—™—
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE- Private
SMITH CORONA Electric Typewriter with
case.Brand new condition. $249.00.
325-3888 after 6 p.m.
KITCHEN SET, 6 swivel chairs, dining rm.
table, 4 swivel chairs, china Er liquor
cabinet. No reas. offer refused. 321-0707.
TWO  BINOCULAR  MICROSCOPES.  2-
way mechanical stage. Low power thru oil
emersion. Variable strength light source.
576-2652.
1S74 BMW 2002 rfalt. Eng. Bilstein shocks
and much more, impeccable condition.
$5960 224-4762.
HEWLETT-PACKARD - 41 cv. All manuals
case, plus MATH MODULE «260 firm.
David George 263-6733.
DUAL 504 TURNTABLE with ADC cartrge
pitch control, belt drive $150 obo, Yamaha
CA600 amp 30 watts $150 obo, both in excellent cond. Pat 734-5863.
BABYSITTER WANTED 2-3 morn, per
week for 8 month old twin boys. Some light
housework. $4/hour 222-3348.
40 - MESSAGES	
ANY UBC STUDENT, staff, faculty wishing
to write about peace/disarmament for The
Ubyssey please call James at 734-4128.
70 - SERVICES
ADVENTUROUS?
HOT AIR BALLOONING, YACHT PARTIES
SCUBA PARTIES, TEXAS BBQ's,
DISCOVER INTRIGUE, EXCITEMENT
& ROMANCE.
DISCOVER DOUBLE-DATE
for $20/year
736-4444
R.B.B. CONSIGNMENT
GARAGE SALE
We sell good used
furniture, dishes, large
& small appliances, linens
and much, much more.
Priced right for a student's
budget
Open Mon-Sat 9:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
Victoria Drive
327-SB01
St. Mark's Church, Kitsilano
West 2nd Ave. & Larch 731 -3811
Anglican       Episcopal
Sunday Services
8:00 a.m. HOLY EUCHARIST
10:30 a.m. SUNG MASS
WEEKDAY EUCHARISTS: Wed. at
10 a.m. Thurs. at 6 p.m.
We welcome the U.B.C. Community to
our parish!
1968 NOVA. 4-Door. 6-cylinder. Good
running condition. $400. 926-4785.
20 - HOUSING	
ON  CAMPUS  RMS  FOR  RENT at  the
Deke House. $1360/dbl, $1600/sgl. per
term. Meals Er cleaning incl. No waiting list.
Ph Glen or Erik 222-1135.
LGE BRIGHT RM. Bayswater Er 5th. Kitchen
bathroom, Er laundry priviledges. $250 incl.
util. 733-9964, 736-3688 Victoria.	
30 - JOBS	
PART-TIME SALES WORK in sporting
goods store for wkends Er late evenings.
Please leave resume at 3615 W. Broadway.
BUSINESS STUDENT: gain experience,
earn commissions, SELL CANADA SAVINGS BONDS. Mr. Starke 689-3324.
WANTED: a physically strong individual
with own pick-up truck. Apply in SUB Rm
266. Please indicate availability as well as
vehicle type.
DELIVERY DRIVER WANTED: Fast Foo's
requires a part-time delivery driver with
reliable car. Apply to 2278 W. 4th Ave. No
phone calls please.
University Hill United
and Presbyterian
congregations
invite you to join us in
worship Sunday mornings
at 10:30 a.m. in the Epiphany
Chapel Vancouver School
of Theology.
6060 Chancellor Boulevard
86 - TYPING
TYPING, research. Free editing, spelling
check, carbon copy. 926-7752.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, tectums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9667,
224-7351.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
90 - WANTED
SOCCER GOALIE WANTED, Pt. Grey
Soccer Club, near UBC call George
879-3417 or Amir 224-4762. Tuesday, September 10, 1985
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 19
The Fall - surveying Hell
By LAURA BUSHEIKIN
The Fall is a theatrical extravaganza which explores the eternal theme of good versus evil and
humanity's fall from grace.
The Fall
at the Vancouver Little Theatre
3102 Main St.
A team of actors—David Bloom,
George Dawson, Sherri-Lee
Guilbert, Kate Hull, Michael
Keller, and Sarah Orenstein, along
with director Ed Astley and musician John Dowler — worked
together to create the compilation
of scenes from such diverse sources
as The Bible, Harold Pinter's The
Homecoming, Shakespeare, Helen
Caldicott, and The Diary of Anne
Frank. The final product is a sort of
Hell 100 — A Survey of
Humanity's Confrontation with
Evil.
The Fall is intense and thought
provoking. It delves into the
darkest depths of pain, evil,
despair, and angst, through explorations of original sin, opposition between men and women,
family relationships, murder,
revenge, fear of death, the alarmingly natural viciousness of
children, war, both modern (Vietnam) and mythical/historical
(Troy), suicide (through dramatic
readings of actual suicide notes)
and the nuclear arms race — and
this is just a summary!
The subject matter is certainly
horrifying. But the piece is saved
from relentless gloom and doom by
infusions of humor, strong portrayals of great human courage and
dignity, and, incredibly, an uplifting ending.
Actor and co-originator David
Bloom describes the theme as "a
sort of trip through hell . . . trying
to be honest about how many awful
things there are in the world but
also not advocating giving up
hope."
The Fall is playing at the Vancouver Little Theatre on Main
Street, which is little more than an
intimate basement. There was no
set — not even a real stage — just
an open space. However, the actors
turned this to their advantage, exhibiting a finely attuned sense of
space and the dramatic impact of
movement. They used their bodies
as props. This was complemented
by skillful use of lighting and sound
effects.
There is one particularly effective
scene in which the theatre is plunged into darkness. Eerie flashes of
light and a strobe expose the actors
as they enact a series of fights on
stage, accompanied by harshly
realistic sound effects culminating
in a menacing whistling roar of falling bombs. It is indeed uncomfortably like a trip through hell.
Much to the relief of the audience, the scene following provokes giggles rather than gasps.
Throughout the whole piece there
are changes of tempo and mood
just when they are needed. The acting on the whole is commendable,
Make Yourself
At Home
at ,he DEKE HOUSE
The Deke Fraternity House.
5765 Agronomy Road
Live without rush hour,
within minutes of SUB!
Rooms are NOW MAILABLE FOR RENT.
Please phone either GJen Bury or
Erik Madsen at 222 1135 or 222 2619
tor details. Great Food. Free Parking!
Competitively Priced!
Just $1350.00 per  term!
Please see our ClassifiedAd in tNspaper
although George Dawson should
have found a way to achieve more
variation of character among the
many roles he plays.
The scene from Shakespeare's
Titus Andronicus unfortunately is
difficult to understand for someone
without a previous knowledge of
the play. Otherwise the compilation
format is a success. An array of
masterful theatrical artistry, more
than anything else, gives The Fall a
unity which could easily have been
lost with the plot.
Considering the sombre subject
matter, The Fall is surprisingly enjoyable to watch. The Fall engages
both the mind and the heart of the
audience. It is both understanding
and — dare I say it? — educational.
Student
There's No Such Thing As
A Free Lunch!
EXCEPT AT HILLEL
Tuesday, Noon
The Jewish Students' Assoc./Hillel/Network welcome you
Hillel House is located behind Brock Hall.
&
IMAGINUS PRINT SALE
September 10-13
SUB Main Concourse & South Plaza
228-2348
6th Ave.
Bicycles
"Our Service Makes the Difference"
END OF SEASON SALE ON
FUJI BICYCLES
Excellent Sale Prices on Commuter, Sport, Club
and Mountain bikes.
TUNE UP SPECIAL    $24.00
(Includes complete adjustments of brakes, gears, wheels, bearings)
• All Work Fully Guaranteed.
• Plenty of Free Parking.
Open Monday to Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
856 W. 6th Ave. 875-0029
Str*lF>Lt=: SHELVES
-/
Basic Cut: $6.95
3621W. 4th Ave. 733-3831
dSJ/O OFF REGULAR FREES
(A& STUDENT D15C0UKTT
/an extra \0% off
Of=FCB.   erM>m£«.    «fe*»T   %X /85"
STUDENT SPECIAL
20% OFF
THE REGULAR PRICES
OF ALL MERCHANDISE
IN THE STORE.
With a copy of this ad
or the presentation of
an AMS Card.
Big savings on hockey equipment, soccer   boots,   racquets,   running   wear,
sports bags, day packs, etc. etc. etc.
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
OPEN SUNDA YS NOON TO 5:00 P.M.
THIS OFFER EXPIRES SEPT. 30/85 Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 10, 1985
THE FRASER ARMS HOTEL-
. , nrasents ""
NowJilLSati!!^!
sF^Z^t-   "BEST NEW COMEDIAN run -
CMTf&L       BES «ft/.spe«»'/"~ous female impersonator
tickets $5.""'$3.UU mi u; ,	
27
28
Mo/V._-
^ecoramy *-"      ^   ~ ■
A^iU HOT FROM TORONTO .
"" ' ' •   HVSTCE0^THE
MON-.THUBS^^o^BEFOBEMO, T'« ■
T.r*FTS«6.00/M "" ttl
iepr.
■the
HHYTH
30
Uoy^'NEST
OCT
°°&72nn
frW^
Cleanhta*
mon.^.
rs$s.
t .ronTcWcago with
A/pv
*NPJ*!9INAL
■4-
i!FO«
i*£yfta«**.
0/\y
70:00 &72nn
TICKETS FOR ALL SHOWS; YTC/CBO, EATONS, WOODWARD'S & ALL USUAL OUTLETS
CHARGE BY PHONE 280-4444-INFO: 280-4411/261-7277
INI THE FRASER ARMS HOTEH
1450S.W. MARINE DRIVE (foot of Granville)
261-7277

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