UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 27, 1967

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125952.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125952.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125952-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125952-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125952-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125952-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125952-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125952-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125952-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125952.ris

Full Text

 ON
FRATERNITY BRETHREN
bumble about on the floor
of the gym Thursday in
a two-hour Mardi Gras pep
meet full of words and
action signifying the efforts
of 14 fraternities and nine
sororities to provide Greek
comedy for 3,000 students.
Hellenic bash continues today and Saturday with
floorshow and dance in the
PNE Showmart building.
Jolly King and pretty
Queen will be crowned at
the close of the week long
wassail which, if successful, will result in a $15,000
contribution to the Vancouver Association for Retarded Children, and
whose theme is funny cartoon characters.
Lesli
le wanies
ffl
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY, 27,   1967
Vol. XLVIII, No. 41 <*^*>48 224-3916
meets march
Federal grants
hit by Bennett
Higher education in B.C. received the benefit of double
vision Thursday when premier W. A. C. Bennett indirectly
slammed UBC president John Macdonald's statements concerning education finance.
Bennett denied that the federal government was committed to $21.6 million in aid to B.C. universities in the
year beginning April 1.
He was speaking in the legislature Wednesday in reply
to questions from Point Grey MLA Dr. Pat McGeer.
He claimed the federal government has pulled the rug
out from under Canada's provinces by refusing to honor a
commitment to meet higher university costs.
In an interview Jan. 18, Macdonald said the province
would receive $27 million this year in the form of a three
per cent share of personal income tax and one per cent of
corporation tax in lTeu of the federal universities grant.
"So the provincial government only has to raise another
$6 million and add it to the $27 million to increase its
grants to the $66 million needed,'" he said.
Bennett disclaims this commitment and insists that the
federal government has withdrawn from shared-cost programs.
"Against all the wishes of all the provinces in Canada
the federal government has withdrawn from certain shared-
cost programs for universities, forestry, and vocational
schools," he said.
By VAL THOM
Education Minister Leslie Peterson
backed down Thursday and agreed to address students in front of the legislature
today.
Peterson telephoned AMS president
Peter Braund Thursday to notify him of his
decision.
"Peterson will come out to talk to the
students if he is summoned by a runner
when he is not addressing the house,"
Braund said.
Previously, Peterson had refused a request from the University of Victoria students to meet the marchers in front of the
parliament buildings.
'Cannot  condone  march'
In his reply to Stephen Bigsby, president of the UVic Student's Council, he
said: "I cannot condone or participate in
your march to the legislature or the mass
meeting you plan."
Peterson offered to meet student representatives in his office before legislature
met this morning.
Six students, including Bigsby, Charlie
Boylan,    AMS    first    vice-president,    and
UBC library names bomb-book
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
UBC librarians have identified from several
small fragments a book that gives RCMP a clue
to the Christmas bombing of a B.C. Penitentiary
guard and his son.
The book, Anthony Adverse, by Hervey Allen,
was identified Wednesday within three hours toy
staff from UBC library's humanities division.
The four librarians involved refused to be
identified.
"When you are dealing with this kind of person," said one librarian, "anonymity is the best
policy.
"The guy is obviously a maniac," he said. "As
I do not wish to receive a pad-age in the mail, I
think it best not to give my name."
RCMP say the dynamite bomb, which blew off
the hands of Frank Newton and partially blinded
his son, was sent in a hollowed-out copy of a 1938
edition of the book, wrapped as an apparent
Christmas gift.
The UBC librarians were able to trace the book
through identification of literary characters present
in the text fragments.
The librarians said RCMP first sent the book
fragments to the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
The fragments were then sent to the UBC library
where the librarians noticed the name "Ouvrard"
in the text, identified the book, and traced the
edition by matching page numbers in an edition
from the New Westminister Library. _      __.....
Frank Flynn, BCAS president, were to
meet Peterson at 9 a.m. today.
Peterson was unavailable for comment
on  his sudden change of  mind.
President Macdonald also gave the
march his approval Thursday.
"The march is a reasonable and responsible thing to do," Macdonald told The
Ubyssey.
"It is an attempt to show student concern," he said.
"I have no objection  to this at all."
However, Macdonald still thought fee
reduction would have to wait.
March 'responsible  action
"This is not an appropriate time for fee
reduction,"  he  said.
Dr. Pat McGeer, Liberal MLA for Point
Grey, also supported the march.
"Responsible ordered, civilized actions
are  good."
McGeer said he will meet the students
on the legislature steps today.
He felt the MLA's in parliament were
aware of the student's feelings.
But "we don't know anything about the
budget yet," he said.
More than 100 UBC students left for
Victoria at 9:30 a.m. from SFA, UVic, BCIT,
Vancouver and Victoria Nursing Schools,
and Victoria high schools.
The students are supporting a four-point
program outlined  in the universities brief.
Points include equalization grants for
out of town students, an independent grants
commission, fee reduction and gradual
elimination of fees, and student representatives on the board of governors and senate.
The students are also asking for more
money from the government to finance
higher education.
Macdonald has stated that $66 million,
double   the   amount   granted   last   year,
To Page 3, See "WEAR"
COHEN ON LSD
— see pf 2
•____-_-_-----____■----________ Page 2
TH.      UBYSSEY
Friday,   January 27,   1967
Prof blows cool, cools it
— kurt hilger photo
HO, HO, HO. Stepping into
the valley of the Jolly Greek
Giant, Mardi Gras Miss
moves intip the swing of
pep meet Thursday.
Only an engineering professor from UBC would deliberately freeze himself for
science.
Professor Fritz Bowers
will snowshoe 100 miles in
40 degree below zero temperatures to see how it feels.
On the trek a tape recorder
will monitor his pulse rates,
body temper- ^.\/^mmmt^- %•
ature and
breathin g
rates.
An expert
in electronic
m o n i t o ring
equip ment,
Bowers is
going to
Wainwright, Alaska, Feb. 1-
22.
He is the only Canadian on
the 22-man Armerican-spon-
sored team.
"The party will carry
camping gear, including two-
man tents for shelter. However, tents would be used
only under extreme conditions
such as (blowing snow," Bowers said.
"Under normal conditions
we will sleep outdoors in
"mummy" or sleeping bags."
Of the 14 scientists on the
trek,  seven   will   eat   stand-
BOWER
More fascism, communism
needed at UBC says prof
There is a need for courses in communism, fascism and
nazism at the university level, Eiric Dehn said Thursday.
Dehn, a teacher from Bristol Grammar School, England,
is presently on a international speaking tour.
He told an audience of about 25 students at International
House that courses on the "isms" are not being taught
because of "fear of indoctrination."
"Dangerous political prejudices based on a false set of
values attached to political labels ate instilled early and
remain throughout life."
Dehn said that people then misinterpret facts to back
up these incorrect, preconceived opinions.
"Prejudgements of youth based on total ignorance and
propaganda can be avoided by teaching students how to
think, not what to think.
"It is a mistake to simplify truth to make it appear so."
Board rehash pondered
MONTREAL (CUP) — A revised version of the University
of Montreal's charter contains a proposal to include students
and professors in the university's board of governors and
senate.
The new charter, which will go before the Legislative
Assembly for approval, will permit two students to sit on the
board of governors, said associate vice-rector Paul Lacoste.
The two students, who must hold the equivalent of a BA
Honors degree, "will be appointed after consultation with
student representatives", Lacoste said.
Professors will be officially associated with the university
for the first time through their five seats on the board.
'Wear armbands'
From Page 1
is needed to keep B.C.'s universities operating and expanding at the present level.
The proposed strike continues to be an issue on campus.
"I do not favor a week-long
strike," Braund said Thursday.
The matter will be the highlight of Monday's council meeting.
Liberal MLA Barrie Clarke
suggested Thursday that students wear black arm-bands
for a week rather than strike.
"You are trying to show unanimity and concern, but the
public are down on strikes at
the moment," Clark said in a
telephone interview Thursday.
"But such a measure as black
arm-bands would get you frontpage coverage," he said.
ard army C rations while
the other seven will be on
half rations.
"The results of the experi
ments will be valuable to
physiologists and designers of
Arctic survival equipment,"
Bowers said.
Council finds SUBspace
The new Student Union Building will have plenty of
wide open spaces.
Council discovered Monday night that there is an extra
1,500 square feet of storage space in the basement of SUB.
The crawl space is between two walls in the basement
and the ceiling varies from nine to 13 feet.
"When you plan a building you get spaces like this," said
treasurer Lome Hudson.
Negotiations are taking place to rent 450 square feet of
the space to the bank in SUB. Other suggestions were to use
it as storage for the SUB art gallery or as a laundromat.
Sewers drain UBC cash
A sewer contribution from UBC has saved $45,500 for
the Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District.
UBC will contribute $115,000 toward pending work in
the university area under a revised cost-sharing formula.
Lands and water resources minister Ray Williston conceded the new formula when he met with representatives of
Vancouver, Burnaby, and GVSDD last week in Victoria.
The sewerage board achieves the saving by combining a
southwest Marine Drive project with the university plans.
The combined projects will cost a total of $351,100.
tg 4ohV-.fr
__*# ♦ 4l4i *****
Iwuxtfae
©
s*   sme tfokgdts just-
sfouU*Ti6e tfiottgAt-.
tAtcen
IAPW-TTC
We sceHe9U£a.
I&wnw£*via$. cVM-ttnerelal
so, conic gtuse •
lajjinefte -was fcafcpify-
Jiojjwg windward
Ihe cftfier day when, a
ghadki&g happening
Sfo Uougta •aimir the
m$en&i&$ £tnal exam*.
now, there are Azd
thoughts, and. there are
awful 'tboutftitetbut Hie
^mx^pk <£ iitsd exams
is itt a <2lass hy itself.
fcitfr, ju& as Japkefte
■was abwtfo-flitig
liergelf off the cafcipus
Watertov\rer,-vvho Should
&&?e&v be&ide her fcitir
Aeir ampus6cm6nutHa#en
uiM day ^bryax,^
e-v?"e_uniifed lappy.
** lieavejvs.no! "lie
.replied. «*I lave catae
\o testraift you, ■Strata
4Ms deed.»
Vdiich. i& darned #xd
ppoo-f mafc our aSper
managers really cans.
"but 1 did Hot see you,
ctfi-th-nd the ladder"
She jrcfcested. "you.
truly ar© super*t4*afer."
Uptnttle demonstrates
jfo cape jjfe proposes
fir sipenmntycrs.
:s Hft^
_... only	
Montreal canvpusb-uik,
rates a sujermanag-r.
c?au our superroanas-fers
really//y? ^
well,-nobody knows
fersure.
"bat iV% i unity that
there is always A  „
•flone booth soaaewiere
near a cam^sbaafc.
*-*Vn5^        A*£gr*c***rf
campwsbanh
t ifaBesl monet/sittinf service in-fowi*.
catnjntsbank branch
in -tie adtninisftrat-bn. building
&fVeiTGcnTmana<&r   °
RAINCOATS
CROYDON
Manufacturers    Clearance
UNITED  TAILORS
BRITISH    WOOLLENS
549 Granville       MU  1-4649
oome things
you should
know about
Tampax
tampons.
1
Tampax tampons worn
internally are right for women
of all ages, single or married.
2.
# Tampax tampons.prevent odor, chafing, and irritation; let you tub, shower, even
swim, any day.
3
Tampax tampons free
you from all the restrictions of
pins, pads, and belts.
4.
• Tampax tampons are
made of pure surgical cotton,
protected by a silken-smooth
container-applicator; easy to
insert; readily, discreetly disposable.
5
Tampax tampons give
you the confident, comfortable protection you want.
6.
Tampax tampons are
dainty and feminine to use;
undetectable under even the
sheerest, sleekest clothes.
7.
Tampax tampons are the
original tampons, the ones you
trust; developed by a doctor
over 30 years ago, and tested
and proven successful in use
by millions of women.
8.
Tampax tampons make
being a woman a little bit
easier. A lot nicer.
DEVELOPED BY A DOCTOR
NOW USED BY MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE  MADE ONLY  BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.   ONTARIO.
>.*.'#.X-i. .-*, Friday, January 27,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Grad Ed-Act sheet
defended by leader
SHAPES, TEXTURES, weights appealing to children are
characteristics of the new education clinic's apparatus.
Dr. Robin Smith shows education student Peggy Koopman.
UBC clinic trains
child counsellors
UBC's new education clinic is learning to solve the learning
* problems of B.C. school children.
The primary purpose of the faculty of education clinic is to
train specialists who will set up smaller clinics throughout the
province. These specialists will aid students, teachers and parents
in spotting and solving problems. The clinic opened this term.
Between 10 and 20 per cent of school children have learning problems.
Dr. Robin Smith, professor of educational psychology and
director of the clinic, cited one example: "The boy was 15 years
old and able to read only at the grade one level. The clinic
tests revealed that he could not remember words, designs or
pictures. We tried a different method of reading instruction
and now he has made substantial progress."
The clinic serves as a remonstration centre for undergraduate teachers. Tests are conducted in a room flanked by
two-tiered observation units behind one-way glass.
Four smaller testing rooms using special equipment can
be seen through one-way glass from the seminar room next
door. All these rooms will eventually be wired for tape recording, closed circuit TV and sound broadcasting.
More than 100 children will visit the clinic for research and
observation purposes.
Students  needled
UBC students are being asked to be needled for two
weeks when the annual spring blood drive begins Mon.,
Jan. 30.
The blood will run from January 30 until February 10.
Flowing takes place at the Armories every day except Feb.
8 when blood-letters will move to Brock Hall to celebrate
Chinese new year.
Last fall 11 per cent of the student body gave the red
matter. There's another 89 per cent somewhere who are
either dry or damned scared.
MacKINNON
Grad class president A. K. MacKinnon
asid Thursday he doesn't "give a damn"
what 1967 grads think of his statement
condemning today's march and a proposed
student  strike.
MacKinnon had been criticized for telling Vancouver news media Wednesday the
entire grad class was opposed to Education
Action Week. His announcement was titled
"Statement on Student Action by 1967
Grad Class" and began: "The Graduating
Class (1967) finds itself unable to support
the Alma Mater
Society of UBC in
its program 'Education Action
Week  ..."
"I don't give a
damn what anyone thinks, and if
they don't like it
they can turf me
out," MacKinnon
told The Ubyssey
Thursday.
He said he is entitled to speak for
the entire grad
class.
"Peter Braund speaks, for the whole
student body — he doesn't just speak as
AMS president," MacKinnon said.
MacKinnon said any grad could have
attended a grad executive meeting last
week. But he admitted the meeting wasn't
announced.
"Of course it wasn't announced — our
meetings have never been anounced and
never will be," he said.
"(Any grad class member can find out
about a meeting — all he has to do is ask
Brockburgers loosed
on  evening students
Connoisseurs of (Brock food will soon be
able to enjoy extended dining hours.
Food services head Ruth Blair announced
Thursday that the Brock Hall cafeteria will
remain open until 10 p.m. weekdays, and 5
p.m. Saturdays.
The only catch is being able to gather
enough staff. If the help problem is solved,
the new hours will begin Feb. 20.
his  grad class representative."
In his announcement, MacKinnon recommended a system of grants based on
academic qualifications "in place of the
abolishion  (sic) of fees."
He said the grad class feels "fees do
serve a useful function in that a student
has no right to feel proud of an education
that was given to him."
President John Macdonald Thursday reiterated his 1964 stand that abolition of fees
is a correct goal for B.C. universities.
"But this is not an appropriate time for
reduction   of fees,"  Macdonald  said.
UBC burns, burns
while Bird fiddles
Vancouver city council decided Tuesday
not to seek changes in the fire protection
agreement with the provincial government
for the university endowment lands.
The administration iboard reported that
the city has been paid $10,000 annually for
its standby fire and inhalator service. The
city has had to respond to only four calls
since the agreement was signed in  1961.
Alderman Hugh Bird objected to the
fact that the university area, which contains
many high priced homes, pays only seven
mills of its taxes for fire protection while
Vancouver residents pay 12 mills.
Noted forester
John Bier dead
An outstanding research scientist and
teacher in the field of forestry at UBC
died Tuesday.
Professor of forest pathology at UBC
Dr. John Bier, who died after a short illness, was a graduate of the University of
Toronto and had been at UBC since 1957.
"His death deprives the faculty of an
outstanding research scientist and teacher
who made a notable international contribution to forestry research," said Dean J.
A. Gardner, head of Forestry.
"Dr. Bier was in the process of developing a new program of courses for the education of forest research scientists spanning
many disciplines including entomology,
pathology, silviculture and forest genetics."
Grits back grants group
The UBC Liberal club has urged that
an independent grants committee be established.
In a brief prepared for the B.C. Liberal
caucas, the club proposed that the committee consist of representatives from labor, business, universities and the provincial government.
"The present committee is weighted
with a majority of government appointees,"
the brief reads.
It also urges travel grants and living
allowances for  out-of-town students.
UBC Liberals also felt the concept of
universal accessibility could not be attained until fees are abolished.
They urged a shift in emphasis from
scholarships to bursaries and an increase
in the maximum amount available to each
student under the Student Loan Plan.
The brief also emphasized the importance of higher education, citing the Economic Council of Canada report which estimates the return on education investment
as 15 to 20 per cent.
To raise the money needed for higher
education, UBC liberals want a tax increase.
"Although an increase in taxes is politically unpopular, we can see no other
means of generating the necessary revenue,"  said the brief.
55* OOCMEETriY STAFF- CAPTAIN,
55- feLCOLONELAND MAJOR!     " Mvmsw
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday,  loc.  24;  features,  sports,  loc.  23;  advertising,   loc.  26.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
Get your facts first and then you
can distort them as you please.
— Mark Twain.
JANUARY 27, 1967
Secrecy:
Mr. Justice Nathan T. Nemetz
Chairman, Board of Governors,
University of British Columbia.
Dear Mr. Nemetz:
Although it is not required by the universities act
of this province, the University of B.C. board of governors finds it necessary to meet in secret.
This gives the university the character of a corporation, although the reality is more akin to a municipality
and students are more analogous to citizens than
employees. Municipal councils meet publicly and openly,
moving in camera only for personality discussions and
certain contractual debates.
Today, the decisions of the board must necessarily
affect both student finances and educational quality. It
is important that the people who will be affected by
those decisions know how they were reached, and what
information the board considered.
In the final analysis, the interests of the board and
of students are identical — a better UBC. If students
were privy to the board's deliberations, new information'
and new directions might be evolved for the board by
students. In return, students would gain a better understanding of the why of the univeTsity situation.
The Ubyssey requests permission to attend the
Feb. 9 board of governors meeting and to report the
discussions of that meeting in our Feb. 10 edition.
Tiddly winks?
We're having trouble believing all this.
First, President Macdonald would neither condone
nor condemn a rosy little march to Victoria. Now, after
hearing talk of an irresponsible strike, he's backed the
march as a good thing.
Simultaneously, education minister Les Peterson
opened his mouth to change feet by retracting his earlier
condemnation of the irresponsible march and agreeing
to meet students.
Now premier William Andrew Cecil Bennett gets
into our jolly game, effectively calling both Macdonald
and prime minister Lester Pearson irresponsible. Bennett says the federal contribution to education isn't
nearly as much as Pearson and Macdonald say it is.
And the  Vancouver Sun, which usually bleeds all
over the place about irresponsibility, says nothing about
the march but the strike is irresponsibility in answer to
greater irresponsibility on Bennett's part.
What a fun word, irresponsible.
Meanwhile, nobody knows how much the universities
are getting next year, AMS elections open next week,
somebody wants to strike and somebody else doesn't, and
everybody's got to write exams in two months.
What a fun game, student activism. It's got no rules
and everybody can play.
Anyway, you're irresponsible if you didn't march
today.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
News    _            . Carol Wilson
City       _  Danny Stoffman
Photo    ....     ... _      Powell Hargrave
Page Friday .   ...      Claudia Gwinn
Focus _- _    Kris Emmott
Sports    __ Sue Gransby
Ass't Newt Al Birnie
Ass't City ......         Tom Morris
CUP-—  Bert Hill
_.**'-...*.*•-.
"Well, at least you don't have to
drive through   it."
CLASS OF '67
"Well, at least it doesn't run down
your neck."
""by ^oMl/^fas
Tree mice or we strike'
Marches, strikes, freezing for
science with wires attached, the
Animal, heads, trivial Riter,
freaking out on tape, Val dreaming revolutions with Murray extinct: funny place to work, this.
These did: Helen Manning, Val
Zuker, Marg Ladbury, Dave Cur-
sons, Filer McMillan, Charlotte
Haire, Derreck Blackie, Norman
Gidney, Val Thom, Alan Neld,
Heather Macintosh, Dave Welsh,
and the incomprehensible but licentious Rick Shaw. Mike Jes-
son, Pio TJran and Marg Pair-
weather w«re sportswise. Kurt
Hilger, Chris Blake, Dennis Gans,
and Don Kydd fotographed picturesquely. Cartoonist Dave Sloan
please come home. All unpurged
staff: meeting Tuesday, n.b.,
noon.
And now the last edition of the news as
brought to you by Breezy Minds Inc. reminding you scandal does not happen; it is a state
of mind.
From UIBAC, that tiny colony of students,
comes this report:
Inhabitants have again threatened to
strike unless the government releases three
mice once used in an experiment to discover
why students always protest in September
and January.
The mice were captured when they were
found eating pink cheese which reportedly
contained an unknown substance.
UBAC student
president condemned the action of the
g o v e r nment by
claiming he would
no longer stand by
while he was beside himself.
P. Brittle claimed he would crack
'before falling before the mother
government. MORRIS
"I    have    seen
enough in my day to make me annoyed,
maybe," he said.
Asked what action he would take besides
the threatened strike, Brittle replied that a
measure of hard-line tolerance mixed with
a minute breakfast should bring the government around to the student's backside.
"But we must remember that violent
action may harm and destroy our case while
a passive role may be unprecedented.
"Three strikes and you are out, you know.
My philosophy only gives me three choices,"
Brittle said.
"We can take the pitch and have a ball
moving to first base, or swing at the thing
and miss, or be called out on the third
strike.
"I have no choice in my position but to
retain my decision which if anything is a
non-commital role, and face my mother this
evening."
Meanwhile UBAC vice-president Chump
Joyland persists in taking a strong stand.
"We shall overcome when the overcome-
able becomes relevant," he said.
It is reported at the present time that
students are continuing with plans to invade
the capital and have sailed to the planned
landing sight.
Reports from the area say they are experiencing stormy weather and a great
amount of black paint and rotting cardboard
have been sighted floating off the coast.
Latest reports from Smash Events Ltd.
indicate chairman Brain Plunger will not
be intimidated.
"I will not be intimidated," said Plunger.
He was refering to usually unconfirmed
rumors that no more radicals would be
allowed to speak at UBAC.
"If Joyland can do it, I shall also overcome," he said.
"There are elements at UBAC which are
trying to subvert Smash Events but they
shall not win out. My motto is never trust
a radical until he is exposed. I also believe
that exposure is unhealthy."
Always unreliable sources claimed today
that a new president for UBAC would be
found sometime.
The presidential position was left empty
when J. MacD announced he would continue
another time, another place.
The presidential role has recently grown
stagnant as a result of various and unknown
incidences. It has been compared to the role
of kings in foreign countries: the costs are
high and the functions non-existent.
Few candidates have been suggested for
the position but latest rumors say that Fable
Fate will apply with the backing of his new
exercise in ego-building, "—rds".
Speaking of Fable Fate, latest unconfirmed reports say that he will organize a Conviction Crusade on Campus.
"We must have convicts at UBAC," said
Fate.
"Don't mis-interpret my meaning. We
want people with convictions. They can be
convicted to anything, as long as they have
a cause.
"Of course anyone has the right to have
their own thoughts but I personally prefer
those of the far, far right," he said.
. "Again don't mis-interpret me. We of the
far right and those of the far left are all the
same thing anyway. It's kind of a we're for
the world but the world is not for us type
of ideology."
Here is a sports scoop: Outdoor sports
continue as the Straits turn black, students
of UBAC continue to chew wet cardboard to
keep warm, and one, lone individual continues his walk across the waters.
Indoor sports continue.
Indications are that the final weather
will take place this evening.
And that is the latest news from UBAC.
One parting comment: He who strikes first
has no balls.
COMMENT
— see page  13
■■ **.4fe*V'k.*.*.**-_.*■-*__-* ■ 1t^»\fc%fc^.'*u^u^,---*%%->»-%.%-:».^-,'*-'-*-,*-»
!   it'*»J»-N* **--***,-at-**  .  *:
pi
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
Jan. 27, 1967
ON THE COVER:
Education   and   beyond.
Academic Symposium
Feb. 3 to 5.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants: judy bing
sue richter
cartoons: gordon fiddler
Beyond
This is an evolving university, constantly working towards improving its
academic stature. In this process of
evolution and enhancement we, as students, should be taking part in the vital
dialogue on the idea of an education
or we are not receiving the full benefits of the devices available.
Discussion should be a vehicle by
which a student learns of the important
things going on outside the classroom
as well as a tool to report his ideas on
matters.
A school's substance is not determined by its officials but by the whole
academic community, by the school's
share-holders so to speak. We young
scholars do not come here merely to be
fed with the knowledge that will allow
us to lead acceptable, affluent lives.
Instead, we really come here to take
part in the evolution of the university.
As ideas are imparted to us, we in turn
are expected to impart something of
ourselves.
The benefit of education is a two-
way affair with both student and school
receiving a share.
Symposium is but one means of allowing students to contribute.
Education-New Trends is the topic
which is to initiate discussion and response  at  Academic   Symposium.
Ideally it will range afar from the
elementary level to the university and
beyond. It may include teaching
methods, courses, politics in the school
and/or personal grievances, diatribes
or frustrations.
It's  for  the  loud,  the  honest,  the
poor, the talkative but most of all for
everyone interested enough in the present and the future of the educational
institution to devote a weekend to dialogue at Paradise Valley.
Bob Rowan from Berkeley (late of
UBC) will keynote, and Frank Bar-
dacke, Mario Savio's articulate and
philosophical right hand will speak.
Basically it's an unconstructed holiday. It has all the trappings of a resort weekend — swimming, horseback-
riding, a fair chance at catching pneumonia and a chance to meet those
wonder people—the profs and students.
Sit on the floor, chew gum, smoke,
hiss, boo, exhibit shock and disbelief
but mostly harang.
Alums, faculty, bureaucrats, apply
by Monday noon at the AMS office. It's
cheap.
This could be the last time . . •
Dr. Sydney Cohen is a personable
and concerned man. He is compassionate and thorough. As a psychiatrist and noted authority on LSD,
he has a sense of responsibility that
expresses itself in a cautious attitude
about the effects of LSD on people.
At an essential level he is concerned with the uncontrolled use of
it (particularly by psychotics and
adolescents) which can bring about
harmful states of mind.
As to the social structure, Cohen
views the use of LSD for kicks, or
the adoption of an anti-social attitude   whose   locus   is   the   drug,   as
PPs dauntless interviewers, Phyllis
Bassett, Steve Garrod and Nelson Miller
talk fragmentarily to Dr. Sydney Cohen.
harmful and unrealistic approaches
for both the individual and the society.
Dr. Cohen cited Timothy Leary as
the leading advocate of the dropout
concept. In terms of what he thinks
Leary means, we asked him what a
person was dropping out of and dropping into.
He commented that Leary is recommending that one drop out of
the games of life. But you can't play
a no game existence. The real goal
is to know your role.
pf: In what context is this role
realized?
C:  Socio-economic.
Tim Leary says you can enjoy the
gameless ecstasy of natural man.
There never has been historically a
natural, primordial state where men
were free.
Stresses and strains are a part of
the human experience. That will always be, but I'm hopeful. If you
take a historical perspective, the scientific revolution has contributed a
great deal to creating a climate of
new humanity.
pf: What about the gross examples
of violence in our own age, for example, the killing of a million or
more people in Indonesia?
C: Aggression is in our genes, it's
in us. I don't think we'll change that
because I believe life is cyclic.
pf: Can LSD perhaps help bring
about a new world?
C:   Can   you   change   your   genetc
pf 2wo
structure?
pf: Yes.
During the press conference, Dr.
Cohen made reference to experiments which test whether creativity
increased with the use of LSD.
Using a selected group of UCLA
students one group was given the
drug; another was given placebos
(speed). He said that by the objective criterion, the LSD group showed no more creativity than in their
previous performances, nor more
than the group who were given
placebos. However the people who
were on LSD felt they were more
creative than before.
He went on to say that whether
the subjective feeling about one's
creativity, even though objectively
no difference in actual creativity is
noticeable, contributes "to making a
more healthy and capable human
being, he (Cohen) didn't know.
In his speech to students Dr. Cohen made constant reference to the
unscientific and illogical nature of
Timothy Leary's claims about the
transcendental effects of LSD. At the
same meeting he said that LSD had
helped him and others.
pf: What kind of conditions do you
set up for any acid trip?
C: The person must willing, must
be in the proper setting, and must
have a guide whom he can trust. The
person himself must have no reservations, internal or otherwise. Never
force a person into the position of
having to take the drug. I respect
anybody who says no, I'm not ready,
this isn't for me, or something of
this sort.
These are the essential conditions.
Sometimes the troubles will happen
in the beginning, in the letting go
period. Some people will hate like
hell to lose control.
Others may run into trouble at the
height of the experience when things
are so wiped out that they get scared they're not coming back. And
others may have difficulty at the
very end.
When you think they are pretty
well recovered they may come again
with more LSD notions.
For example, we took a chap for
a walk on the UCLA campus at the
very end of the thing. He was Mormon. When he saw the temple a few
blocks away he got it into his head
it was the end of the world.
Naturally when it's the end of the
...'. * * V^?
world you take off all your clothes.
So he took off all his clothes and
went strolling down Westwood Blvd.
Well, going down Westwood Blvd.
Without any clothes is liable to attract attention.
You can imagine everybody got
upset and they sent a campus cop
on a motorcycle to haul him back.
The policeman got ahold of him
and he said: "Sit down on the back
of the motorcycle and I'll take you
back to your clothes."
You can imagine the sight. Here's
this guy naked as a jay-bird (laughter) being driven up Westwood Blvd.
by a  campus cop.
All because about eight hours after
he had taken the drug we felt that
he had recovered, because he had
spoken and had made sense.
pf: You failed because you relaxed your setting before he came out?
C:  Well,  he  was not  my patient.
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
ol
"1 3 C
a 'j
■> r.
But we thought he was out, because
as you may know, it comes and goes
in waves. And he had a wave in
which he seemed completely sober.
It was time anyway so we took
him for a walk. Now if he hadn't
been a Morman and hadn't seen that
Mormon temple he wouldn't have
done it.
pf: What about the aftermath of
the trip? Do you attend to any questions or confusion the subject may
have?
C: We respect this greatly. When
we drop the person off we now feed
them; in other words they are with
us for over 13 hours and we have
hospitalization available if necessary.
We drive them home. We don't allow them to drive just in case they
get into an accident. Not that the
LSD will make you drive poorly at
that late hour but in case they do
get into an accident there will be no
legal hassle.
We then assure ourselves that
there is somebody at home with the
subject that knows that he has taken
LSD and knows what has gone on.
We leave our phone number in case
there are any questions.
pf: What is the source of your
supply?
C: My supply, of course, had been
coming from Sandoz. Now it comes
from the National Institute of Health
which has all the legal LSD in the
U.S.
pf: What is the lowest and highest
amount you have given a patient?
C: We've explored the very lowest
in certain studies just to see how
much is required for an effect. So
we have been as low as 25 mg. with
normal people and this is the GOOD
stuff.
pf: What was the reaction?
C: At least 50 to 60 percent Of the
people will feel something with 25
mg., looseness, sometimes a feeling
of lightness. Depending on the study
we go to 200 mg. under certain conditions. When we really want to
blast them we go to 400 mg., pure.
pf: What are length of the 400 mg.
trips?
C: Usually about 12 hours.
pf: I've had 24 hours with 200 to
250  mg.
To pf 4
See:  COHEN
Friday,  January 27,  1967 MICHAEL SNOW
. . . films
HELEN GOODWIN
. . . dance
HUGH LeROY
... art
BARBARA PENTLAND
. . . music
If you like poetry, music, colored lights,
dance, French, markets, experiment, radical
changes, 1967, ecstasy, motion and madness
the Sixth Annual Festival of Contemporary
Arts should keep you happy for ten days.
From Feb. 1 to 10, UBC students win be
able to see, hear and feel what is happening
at the forefront of the arts.
This being Canada's you know what,
works of Canadian artists, musicians, dancers
and film makers only will be included.
The festival errupts Tuesday evening at
the Fine Arts Gallery.
The whole world is invited!
If you're a voyeur and want to see Canada in her birthday suit, read on for info
on where's and when's.
art
Four concurrent exhibits in the Fine Arts
Gallery are designed to stretch ordinary
definitions of art.
About a third of the gallery will be
blacked out for an audio-kinetic environment
verging on the hallucinogenic created by
Zbigniew Blazeje. It will involve electronic
music programmed to turn luminescent black
lights rhythmically on and off.
Eight Montreal artists will represent a
new movement in sculpture which has been
called Constructivism, Minimal art, Rejective
art, Reductive and Conceptual art.
Technologically oriented, the constructions are factory made after being designed
by the artist.
Micheal Morris will exhibit his gouaches
as well as conduct a gallery tour Wednesday,
Feb. 1, at 12:30.
David Samila, whose one-man show completes the exhibit brings the New Scene to
the festival from London where he and
Micheal Morris studied at the Slade School
of art. His giant jigsaw puzzles push back
the boundaries of painting.
"Painters and sculptors hacking their way
into a thicket of new forms" is how Alvin
Balkind, curator of the gallery summed up
the showing.
The thicket will be opened 8 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 31.
dance
Sound, light and dance combine to engage all one's senses in a mixed media exhibit staged by The Co. and entitled Radial
Changes.
It will be performed three times during the festival, at 3:30 p.m. on Monday,
Feb. 6, and Wednesday, Feb. 8, and at 12:30
p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 7.
Mrs. Helen Goodwin, UBC dance instructor who heads The Co. said the exhibit
will break through the normal dance conventions by ignoring the traditional stage
and arena environment, and by utilizing
life sounds and pulsating visuals.
The exhibit will centre around a core
made of three screens on which images will
be thrown by back projection. Dancers will
perform behind the screens and their movements will be projected.
The exhibit core will be located in the
centre of Brock Hall lounge and viewers
will move in a circle around the screen to
see all facets of it.
film
The experimental trend in the visual arts
may also be seen in a program of films by
Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver film
makers.
On Wednesday, the first day of the festival, Danny Singer's Da Vita, the first feature
film produced at SFA will be screened together with Al Sens' short subjects The
Puppet's Dream, The Playground, and something called The See Hear Talk Think Dream
Act Film, in Angus 104.
Friday, Dec. 3, in Buchanan 106 a group
of films made locally by CBC's Vancouver
studio will be shown, featuring Phil Keat-
ley's award-winning How to Break a Quarter-
horse which is set in the Cariboo.
There will be a program of French Canadian films Tuesday, Feb. 7, in Angus 104 by
Camil Adam, Pierre Hebert, and Claude
Jutra. Films from the French unit of the
National Film Board by Giraldeau and
Danserau show imaginative handling of
routine photographic assignments.
Friday, Feb. 10, in Buchanan 106, Joyce
Wieland's Water Sark and Barbara's Blindness will be seen, together with three films
by Michael Snow. Snow, who has been called Canada's leading pop artist, currently has
an exhibit at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He
works out his walking woman theme in one
of his films, New York Eye and Ear Control,
in which his cutout female figure, caught in
an instant of mobility, is placed into various
off beat contexts. His other two films are A
to Z, and Shave. All showings are at 3:30
p.m.
poetry
;}£&*-{i>'v»i -! -■Vhi**li's^?*<<°*si^%\Xx«*'*<' ?'! •»< % ' i>?« -'->^*»!-M«?WWraffi:..t g*&&tZ«
<j*'*oy«,*»v
Friday,  January 27,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Among the poets who will participate
in the Festival are Montreal-born Leonard
Cohen, also known for his prose-writing;
Margaret Atwood, winner of the President's
Medal for 1965, Cecile Cloutier, a young
French-Canadian poet who teaches at the
University of Toronto, and Gwendolyn Mc-
Ewen a young poet and novelist.
Wednesday, Feb. 1, Leonard Cohen will
read in the .Freddy Wood Theatre at 12:30,
and Margaret Atwood in Buchanan 100 at
3:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 3, at 12:30, Cecile Cloutier
will read in French in Buchanan  102.
Gwendolyn McEwen reads Thursday,
Feb. 9, in Buchanan 104 and Daryl Hine
Friday, Feb. 10, both at 12:30.
The idea of the Poets' Market should
prove to be one of the most lively and
unique events of this year's Festival.
The Market will provide an opportunity
for all Vancouver's poets to read and sell
some of their work. Leonard Cohen, Margaret Atwood and Cecile Cloutier, -will also
be present. The Market will begin at 12:30"
noon on Feb. 2, around the lounge in
the Buchanan Building, with readings by a
group of 15-20 invited young poets. These
readings will be interspersed with periods
when the poets will sell broadsheets of their
poems. Then, at about 2:30 p.m., the Market
will be open to anyone who has an original
poem to read or to sell. All this will take
place in a market place created by students
in the School of Architecture and the Department of Fine Arts.
music
For avant garde music lovers two original
works will be premiered.
On Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 12:30 p.m.
Barbara Pentland's Trio Con Alea, commissioned especially for the 1967 Festival
under a grant from the Centennial Commission, will be performed in Buchanan
106.
On Thursday, Feb. 9, The University
Chamber Singers, conducted by Cortland
Hultberg, will give a premier performance
of Istvan Anhalt's "A Cento on Eldon
Grier's 'An Ecstasy'," in Buchanan 106 at
12:30 p.m.
The work was commissioned by the
University Chamber Singers with the collaboration of the Canadian Music Centre,
also under a grant from the Centennial
Commission.
The faculty and students of the music
department will perform modern music for
piano and chamber ensemble Thursday,
Feb. 6, at 12:30 noon in Buchanan 106.
Page 7 r
i
GRADUATE PHARMACIST
Applications are being accepted from Pharmacists graduating this spring for the position of assistant to the
Chief Pharmacist in a 326 bed, fully accredited hospital.
The area has a modern expanding University Centre.
Excellent fringe benefits. Applications with full particulars should be  addressed to:
Mr. G. O. Scott,
Personnel Director,
Sudbury General Hospital,
Sudbury, Ontario.
GRADUA TE PHYSIOTHERAPIST
Applications are being accepted from Physiotherapists
graduating this spring to work under the Chief Physiotherapist in a fully accredited, 326-bed, hospital. The
area has a modern expanding University Centre. Excellent fringe benefits. Applications with full particulars
should be addressed to:
I
Mr. G. O. Scott,
Personnel Director,
Sudbury General Hospital
Sudbury, Ontario.
J
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
British Columbia Forest Products Limited anticipates
several openings for undergraduates of any faculty, any
year, for summer employment. Locations are sawmills at Victoria, Lake Cowichan and Hammond, and
pulp and paper operations at Crofton.
There will a number of jobs available at Crofton
in maintenance and engineering for Mechanical, Chemical and Electrical Engineering undergraduates in the
classes of 1968, 1969 and 1970.
Interested students are invited to register at the
Placement Office for interviews February 1, 2 or 3,
when Company representatives will be on the campus.
Cohen
suggests
caution
From pf 2
C: I'll admit that there are
changes after 12 hours but if
a person falls asleep he loses
it. It's true that if you remain awake you can still
have colored things happening.
You can hold onto it.
Bring it back. Stay with it
Our subjects after 8-12
hours are willing to let go of
it and deny, supress and control it.
And they are able to do it.
They're controlling and
abolishing it, you are controlling and staying with it.
That is the difference.
pf: Can a person control
their own trip?
C: Sometimes it can be
done but when you are in a
really hellish reaction, sometimes you need outside help
to do this sort of thing.
pf: I am determined that I
can't have a bad trip.
C: That's what a guy said
who had had 31 then he blew
it. He went to hell, I've never
had a bummer and I never
will.
pf: Anything can happen.
C: Yeh, okay.
pf: I had a trip with a person I didn't particularly trust
and I made it a good trip.
C: I'm delighted.
pf: What do you think
about a psychedelic church
which says there is going to
RECORD SALE
^'tffts^^^i    TE BlT< BOX7Mono or stero     $6.4
V»Vi,*«^»?S»J*^^^^^--(\ 3 records for only    -    "■"*• *
■•£55*'
THE   BLUES  PROJECT PROJECTIONS
TM-BUJI--HMUECT/H-tUBCnOWS
• Dave van Ronk • David Blue •Butterfield Blues
Band * Ray Charles * Donovan * Tim Buckley *
Woody Guthrie • Phil Ochs • Tom Rush • Abbey
Tavern Singers.
All the Greet Artist.—Latest Hits—
Broadway Musicals—Rock and Roll—
Popular—Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry   down   —   pick   eut   your   favourite   record
and save. Choose tram Paps, Classics, Sttowtunes.
All  ar«  now in stock at our Record  Department.
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN-
ABSOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571  GRANVILLE  (at Punsmuir)
Page  8
MU 2-4846
THE     UBYSSEY
be a controlled environment.
The members go into it voluntarily, understand and use
LSD.
C: I don't have enough
faith myself that the LSD
state will make a person
truly religious in that sense.
I think it does it with some
people but I don't think that
it's inevitable with all people
who join such church work.
pf: What do you think
about the fact that most psychiatrists take experiments
in settings that are alien to
the kind of experience you
are going to go through? I
doubt that you hold your
sessions in a Japanese garden.
C: We hold our sessions in
a Japanese whore house.
pf: Alright, that would be
okay.
C: Actually you are quite
wrong. You have this Leary-
ian notion that if you take it
in a hospital you have a bad
trip. We fix up1 a special
room: tropical fish, music,
drapes, colored stones, exotic
sounds. You name it we put
it in. We want to achieve an
optimal environment.
pf: What about when you
put them in a bad trip?
C: Dr. Baker in Toronto,
straps them into a hosiptal
bed. I suspect he has a lot of
bad trips by restraining
people.
pf: Why does he do that?
C: I don't know, but he
describes it that way.
Book responds
to Toronto talks
Revolution and Response
Edited by Charles Hanley
McClelland and Stewart
$4.50 cloth, $2.50 paper
(Reprinted from The Sheaf)
This collection of speeches
delivered at the Toronto International Teach-in a year
ago has lost nothing in the
printing. Those who listened
to the teach-in at the time
remember the tremendous
response stimulated by the
face-to-face discussions between exponents of the
major philosophies of world
government today.
Professor Hanley's editing
of the major speeches delivered at the teach-in made
them available for a closer
analysis, a refocusing of
ideas, and a reconsideration
of view points.
The teach-in dealt primarily with revolution in
Latin America and in South
East Asia, especially Vietnam. The inclusion of speakers as desperate as Cheddi
Jagan, political leader in
Guyana, V. N. Nekrasov of
the Pravda editorial board,
as well as an assortment of
university professors from
the United States and Canada gave each issue worthy
pf 4our
champions from each viewpoint.
Perhaps the most pertinent
section of the book deals
with the topic of the citizen's moral responsibility to
revolution. The views of
Staughton Lynd, George
Grant, and Fenner Brock-
way force a reappraisal of
our usual complacent attitudes towards revolution.
Donald Evans, one of the
co-ordinators of the teach-
in, has contributed a fascinating chapter entitled "The
Diplomacy of a Teach-In".
It deals with the problems
the sponsors had in getting
representatives of the various government to appear.
American senior officials
felt that to appear with the
Chinese might be misconstrued; the Chinese felt that
participation in the seminar
might be misleading to anyone trying to understand
their policies.
Professor Hanley's editing
has taken nothing from the
speeches themselves. The
committee are to be commended for the presentation
of what has become a major
part of the university political scene to the members of
the Canadian public who are
unable to participate in the
teach-in in person. One
hopes that it will become,
like the teach-in, an annual
publication.
Friday,  January 27,  1967 *«*«£. JCV»o4
Student
play
coming
Judi Freiman, studying
for her Masters degree in
theatre,; is directing Play, a
one-act play by Samuel
Beckett, author of Waiting
For Godot, a work which
should be well-known to all
Eng. 100 students. Judi has
directed one play, last term,
similarly an all-student production.
The time: noon, Thursday
and Friday, Feb. 2 and 3.
The place: Freddy Wood
Theatre.
The price:   25 cents.
Sneak previews show
beautiful girls buried in
something — could it be
sand, or cement, or maybe
jugs? Are these the costumes, props, or stage machinery?
»*»-•**#£  *•*     i,*****
Burn's bit is bosh
ELIZABETH MURPHY
MARIKO  VAN CAMPEN
Half
price
plays
Playhouse Theatre is offering special advantages in
student rates.
Monday to Thursday, students may reserve half price
tickets in advance at the
box office. For Friday and
Saturday performances,
however, half price tickets
may only be obtained that
evening. The box office
opens at 7:30 p.m.
Matinees are $1.00 for
students, but like the Friday
and Saturday night performances, reservations are
not accepted. The half price
offer does not extend to
matinees, of course. Stud< t
cards must foe shown at - e
box office to obtain these
reduced prices.
Further information is
available from Brian Plummer in the Special Events
office.
The Immortal Memory
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Wednesday, Jan. 25, witnessed one of the
strangest phenomena of the literary world.
In different countries and languages, a
number of people who would normally regard poetry with indifference, if not suspicion, gathered together to celebrate the
birth of a poet. Even more curious, the majority of these people have never read that
poet's major works, would not understand
the language they are written in, and would
probably disagree violently with many of
the poet's opinions.
The poet is Robert Burns, born in Ayrshire, Scotland, 1759.
For many people, a Burns Supper is
merely an excuse for consuming a large
amount of Scotch whiskey; for which their
digestions pay the price of having also to
consume a somewhat more moderate portion
of the flesh of a small furry animal which
the Scots call the haggis.
In his native land, many of these celebrations are held under the auspices of the
Church — indeed a masochistic undertaking
for an institution which, in some of its more
bizarre extremities, was the favorite target of
Burns' satire.
But all organized religions — be they
Christian or Marxist — have taken Burns to
heart for his few jolly remarks about the
universal brotherhood of man, ignoring the
magnificent expression of revolt against all
forms of organized society in "The Jolly
Beggars":
A fig for those by law protected!
Liberty's a glorious feast,
Courts for cowards were erected,
Churches built to please the priest!
Nor would . . . etc. The anomalies of the
as the author of Scotland's finest piece of
jingoism, "Scots Wha Hae", entirely approve
of his sentiment
I'm better pleased to maW one more
Than be the death of twenty.
Nor woud . . . etc. The anomalies of the
Burns cult are almost infinite; they would
certainly have formed an ideal subject for
one of his own satires.
Fortunately, the work has been done by
the greatest Scots poet since Burns, Hugh
MacDiarmid, in his poem "Sic Transit Gloria
Scotia".
This brings us to the most serious consequence of Burns' popular deification:
Burns himself is a poet of such stature
that he can easily survive all the nonsense
talked about him; but his reputation is such
that it has eclipsed all other Scottish poets,
past and present. His own contemporary,
Fergusson, who died in an Edinburgh madhouse at the age of 24 (at which age Burns
had written precisely nothing) produced
some of the greatest city poetry in British
literature; yet he is unknown.
Medieval Scotland produced two poets
— Henryson and Dunbar — who are fully
as great as Burns; they receive lip service,
but little more.
And after Burns, the situation is worse.
For an hundred and fifty years, Scottish
poetry is a boggy wasteland of second-rate
minds palely imitating Burns. Not till the
twentieth century was this dominance lifted
by the genius of MacDiarmid; but the situation is little improved.
MacDiarmid's own works are still unavailable in Scotland. The ultimate is reached with the case of Sorley MacLean, reputedly one of the greatest ever poets in the
Gaelic language, whose audience is limited
to about one hundred people — those who
can (a) understand Gaelic and (b) understand poetry.
But none of these reflections will disturb
with facts the already made-up minds of
those sober citizens who this week celebrated
the birth of a poet and heard the familiar
words, so true in themselves but so dreadfully ironic in their context:
"Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the
toast: THE IMMORTAL MEMORY of Robert
Burns."
pf 5ive
td EXCELSIOR LIFE J&****** 0*****?
ESTATE PLANNERS
FOR HEAD OFFICE IN TORONTO
BUSINESS AND PERSONAL
ESTATE ANALYSTS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR
ARTS AND COMMERCE GRADUATES
CONTACT STUDENT PLACEMENT SERVICE
REGARDING INTERVIEWS
JANUARY 30 and 31
taL EXCELSIOR LIFE
HOME
is  where  you
leave your car . . .
why don't you take
your car to  the
UBC
HOME
SERVICE
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE
2180 Allison (in the Village) 224-3939
P.S.   Inquire about  our  "drive  to class"  service
Friday, January 27,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 ^_____________0€__i____<Sw
INTBRNATIONAL
World-Wide 21-Day Group Flights
Are Guaranteed To Go!
Departures every two weeks commencing March 5
Enquire now for dates and fares
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD  (on campus) 224-4391
Representing   AMERICAN   EXPRESS
the company for people who travel
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
•^**f*rt*"
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON ff DRUGS
f
Limited
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
.Vancouver        ^hi^mmmVmm*VMM-WejMM-MM   NeW Was*m",,,,T'
677 Granville     f|T|TTTTTi7lYnTT|      675 Col,,,,,bi,,
Opp. THE BAY    Hm.-KHIl.-Kl LA 14791
681-6174 ■__.__--_--------■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■1 0pp   Army t Novy
Your SKI MYSTERY Entry
presented by
CYVR RADIO-ubc radio society
n
CAS A
duMAURIER   international
I 9 6 7 AT WHISTLER
EVENTS    ORGANIZED    BY    THE    CANADIAN    AMATEUR    SKI    ASSOCIATION
s
The Clues to date:—
1. Birds of a feather flock together.
2. Person, Place or Thing are clues of which you
need remember two.
3. From Sea to Sea Canadians love to ski.
4. Mt. Orford and Whistler are a part — bring them
together and you have a start.
5. There's Gold in Them Thar Hills*.
LISTEN TO    CYVR    FOR DAILY CLUES
AMS ENTRY BOXES ARE PROVIDED
Prize*
1. Pair of skfs
2. Dinner for two atop Grouse
3. Months supply of cigarettes.
YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY
All entries become sole property
of CYVR. Judges decisions final
First 3 correct answers win respective  prizes upon  receipt of entry.
ANSWER   ...  .   .       	
NAME   	
ADDRESS  PHONE	
All UBC Radio Society Members & Employees of duMaurier are Ineligible.
;^\«," ?*&&£$k</'i%sxii£*:s*ksf>-'-.z
A nation of sleep
By PETER LINCOLN
The Canadian dream is
sleep and we've achieved it.
We're a nation that sleeps
through the entire show and
then weeps/laughs over the
shorts. Nothing is in its
right place.
We're a nation that has
money in its pockets, sex on
its mind and time on its
hands.
This is Canada's 100th
birthday. (Don't blow too
hard, there aren't any candles). A hundred years ago
this July for the sake of
mapmakers Canada was created.
However, it was not the
land that required the labelling but rather the inhabitants who could not be and
still cannot be distinguished
from any other national
group.
Their only distinctive
characteristic is a chameleon-like quality which enables them to change into
any shade of grey they
choose to be.
A rugged and beautiful
land (Canada) was conquered by ignorance and non-recognition. With the exception of a few people like
E. J. Pratt and Paul St.
Pierre this most distinct and
individual land has produced the least distinctive individuals.
Simon says do this and
they do it. Or sometimes
some get mad at Simon. Simon always remains the
centre of attraction, their
sole  source of inspiration.
'Switch on the radio. Two
Monkees in a row. And you
thought it was happening
over there, didn't you? After all, Donald Duncan said
it was. So did Words.
And   could    one    million
Canadians be wrong? Could
one   million   Canadians   be
right? Are there one million
Canadians?
Canada has no soul. Just
tight money in tight pants
on tight people. We live on
borrowed blood; scared that
somebody's going to come
and collect all the unpaid
bills.
Our national motto is
"What-me think?" Canada's
death will be preceeded by
a big yawn and end with a
fart.
University is too much with us
A VARIATION ON WORDSWORTH'S THEME
University is too much with us; late and soon
Getting and spending we lay waste our marks,
Little we see in UBC that is ours, hark!
We have given our money away, a sordid boon!
This lecture which bears no knowledge to us,
These lecturers who'll be droning at all hours
Are wilting now like drooping September flowers.
For notes, for term-papers we are out of tune,
It moves us not—Great Mac, Td rather be
A bum suckled on a bottle ot whiskey
So might I standing on Hastings St. less forlorn
Have sight of a brunette's shapely knees
And all round, the approving beeps of traffic horns.
The Bard
Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January 27,  1967 Generating     f^^O
paranoids
By BERT HILL
Item: Buckminster Fuller
holds forth on the benefits
of technology to modern
man. Get everything plugged into a computer and the
world will presently be
ok.
But technology is an ideology all of its own. It commands wide support, it has
many proponents and it has
brought about wide change,
frequently coercive, in
man's existence.
Not only has it influenced
man's material existence but
it has also programmed his
way of thinking.
Item: Talcott Parsons
spoke recently at McGill
University. A famous sociologist suggested* that people
should consider themselves
lucky if they happen to be
smoothly functioning specimens of the human species.
"Modern society does generate psyehopathologic personalities, and in a big way."
The paranoids are going
to get you.
Send me Time
From the UWO Gazette
Dear Mom:
This won't be long, as it's late, and I'm writing by the light
of a flickering peasant. They're rationed here, so could you
send me a Negro, or at least a Peurto Rican? That reminds
me, how is Elizabeth? I'm still carrying a torch for her.
Yesterday we arrived at Tha Dung, which is a lot like Detroit,
except it's less colorful. The natives here sure are friendly,
but it's the reporters you have to watch out for—they outnumber us, too. Yesterday I got interviewed three times in
the same rice paddy by Morley Safer. He'd come up to me,
snake-like, and then a cannon or something would go off and
he'd hit the dirt and scream: "Stop the presses, I'm hit! Where's
a photographer?"
I hear there's still a lot of racial strife back home, but I
don't want you to worry, Mom, 'cause our platoon is integrated.
We have two Negroes and a Jew who always lead us into
battle. Of course it's not always the same two Negroes and
a Jew—the casualty rate and all that.
General Westmoreland talked to us last night over Radio
Free Everywhere. He said he was proud we were "Fighting
Americans", who were defending our country. Of course I
didn't get to see him, as he was speaking from Honolulu. I
hear President Johnson will speak next week. Could you send
me a translation?
I feel proud though Mom, and every time I bayonet a
Commie, I know we're one step closer to peace and understanding with our Oriental cousins. It's easy to tell the
Commies. If they get close enough so you can see the whites
of their eyes, they're Commies.
Our green uniforms and berets are just great disguise,
except the trees here are all brown. We've taken to singing
"The Green Berets" as we swing back through the jungle
with our dead.    Just like that scene with the Seven Dwarfs.
Please, can we send you Phyllis Diller back in exchange
for Barry Sadler? And by the way, there was this television
crew here asking us to sing songs in the company canteen.
Seems they were filming a beer commercial.
Last night my buddy and I (we all have buddies who are
to love and trust even more than you, Mom), well anyway,
we got drunk and emptied all the latrines into beer cans and
put them in our grenade launchers for this morning's battle.
Yes Mom, this sure is a dirty war.   Sorry Mom.
Anyway, I've got to conserve fuel, so I'll have to stop.
Love to all, and if you can, please send me Time magazine
so I can find out what's going on over here. And please, no
more movie magazines.
Your loving son,
Cecil.
P.S.  On the front of our helicopter, we've taped  an  olive
branch.
Made-To-Meosure
PANT
SUITS
Designed by 'Michel'
SKI and
CURLING
PANTS
CASUAL C
EVENING   SLACKS
Designed  by
'Don Manuel'
(paniakvuidu
654 Seymour St.
Tel.: 681-8621
OPART
PLAY WALLS
MUSICAL PLAY
SCREENS
by Gordon Smith
continues to February 26
THE
SCULPTURE OF
ANTOINE
BOURDELLE
opens January 27
The Vancouver
Art Gallery
,o\
Come   and   Discuss
"THE NEW
MORALITY"
in "Talk-Back"
at
University  Hill
United   Church
on  University Boulevard
SUNDAY NICHTS AT 7:30 P.M.
BEGINNING  FEBRUARY STH
Coffee and Discussion 8:30-9:30 p.m.
Feb. 5th-What is the New Morality?
Dr. W. S. Taylor,
Principal, Union College
of B.C.
Feb. I2th-The New Morality & WAR
Dr. John Conway,
Department of History,
U.B.C.
Feb. 19th—The New Morality & Sex
Rev. Jim Taylor,
East Burnaby United
Church   Counsellor,
Pres.  of  B.C.  Conference
Feb. 26th—The    New   Morality   and
The Use of Drugs
Rev. Ted Kropp,
Chaplain, Matsqui Centre
for Drug Addiction
Mar. 5th—The New Morality and
Marriage and Divorce
Dr. Reg Wilson,
Union College of B.C.
Mar. 12th—The   New  Morality   and
Church & Community life
Rev. Ted Nichols,
Executive  Secretary
B.C.   Conference
LSD
talk
Editor, Page Friday:
Dr. Schwarz, speaking at
Lower Mall, showed that
viewpoints which have favored the use of LSD were
not acceptable under medical standards because of the
inconsistency of their own
evaluations.
He outlined briefly the
information that is available
to date. It is possible that
LSD is being made under
unsanitary and /or uncontrolled conditions which
could produce an inferior
product. For this reason
dosages might be inaccurately dispensed.
It is the sensations that
are expanded, and the human mind is bombarded by
intense stimuli. Whether
such concentrated assault is
beneficial   is  doubted.
It seems unreasonable that
an individual would wilfully subject himself to -what
may very conceivably be a
damaging experience. Certainly the lack of dependable research data suggests
caution against its indiscriminate use.
E.   J.   SUMMERFIELD
Phyllis Ross House
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
AUTHOR OF
WAITING   FOR  GODOT
Directed by Judi Freiman
Thur. 12:30 Fri.
Teb. 2 25c Feb. 3
FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
Some things
You DESIRE . , f
Some You Need!
And one of these is education. Imperatively! Once it
was a prerequisite of success. Now you need it just
to get by! YOU know this.
Consult us. Vancouver's
first tutoring college. (Still
here because we get results). To third year University — Our staff is fully
qualified. Success rate?
Above 90 per cent pass in
subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
(Vancouver) Ltd.
571 Howe Street
683.8464
ADVERTISING SALESMAN
WANTED FOR UBYSSEY
The Publications Office requires several ambitious
students (2nd or 3rd year) to sell advertising for The
Ubyssey on a part time basis. This is an excellent opportunity to gain sales experience and to earn worthwhile
commissions. Applicants must be desirous of working
Feb. and March and all next term if employed and
results  prove  mutually  satisfactory.
If interested apply to A. Vince, Manager of Student
Publications, Brock Hall   (after 2 p.m. only).
GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME
ADDRESS
MR. ROY YACHT, Consultant
™» CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
John Harris
Former S.N.C.C. worker and now organizer in Watts
Watts Rebellion
and Why
Tues., Jan. 31, 12:30 -  35c  -  Aud.
Friday, January 27,  1967
'OS*5*      '"i     >,'.-. i-V-V     /<-.-.!'
T H
UBYSSE
Page JJk By IAN  CAMERON
Those who enjoy good professional theatre, and have
been disappointed by the lack
of same around Vancouver
for the past lord only knows
how long,  can take heart.
There is a company in town
that is attempting to fill the
gap, and doing it well.
It is sponsored by the Arts
Club of Vancouver, and I
saw their present production
on its opening night last
Thursday. Last week a gremlin got into my typewriter
and made me name the production Wednesday Night,
when the name should have
been Any Wednesday. A rose
by any other name  .  .  .
And the play is a rose. If
you were an executive of a
large * company, and were
keeping a mistress, and calling her apartment an executive suite for tax purposes,
and a new secretary sent a
client who couldn't find a
hotel room up to the suite,
and then sent your wife up
as well, what would you do?
Yes, well . . . there are lots
of possibilities, and playwright Muriel Resnik uses
them all.
The stage is well arranged,
and the director (Sam Payne)
has the actors facing the
largest part of the audience
at all times, so the situation
is not nearly as irksome as it
might be. The actors exploit
intimacy that does not exist
in a more conventional theatre to the fullest.
The cast are professionals
from the word go. There are
four members, and three are
of equity, and anyone who
makes a living from acting
in this town (as equity members usually do) is pretty
good, considering the limited
scope for his talents.
Angie Gann plays the mistress, and after the first four
minutes turned in a sparkling
performance. (It's cliche time,
kids.) The first four minutes
were hardly her fault, as she
was given exactly no time at
all to warm up to the chore
of running through emotions
ranging from great joy to
tears. Not very kind of the
writer.
Robert Dean, as the executive, was good as any theatre
goer has the right to expect.
pf 8ight
Mother of
Invention
FREAK-OUT!
NOW IN  STOCK AT
The Record Gallery
Robson near Burrard
Student  Discounts
He must have worked as an
executive sometime, for he
has the type down pat.
Douglas Cousins is the nonequity type in the cast, and
it shows to some extent. His
performance was not up to
the others, but certainly did
not detract from them.
He got progressively better,
and I suspect a case of first
nightitis. By this time his performance should. be well up
to par.
Doris Buckingham was the
standout by far. She could be
funny just changing the expression on her face. As the
outraged w^fe who is making
the best of things she stole
the show.
The tickets to this effort
are not cheap, but they are a
good buy. The production is
the best I have seen since A
Thousand Clowns in the road
version, and that is high
praise indeed.
There are more laughs in
this play, and bigger ones,
than there were in Clowns.
One scene where the four are
playing one of these ridiculous word games is worth the
price  of  admission  by  itself.
At one point there is another scene involving balloons that will give anyone
with a quick mind one of the
best laughs he has ever had.
You have to listen hard, however.
Love song of wee Tom
There won't be time to prepare
your face before afternoon.
By STAN LEIBOWICZ
"I dare to eat a peach."
Reckless young fool.
Next thing, you'll be trading off your white flannels
for shorts. You been talking to them damn mermaids
again?
"I shall part my hair behind."
Like hell you will. Young
beatnik whelp, standing
there like a burnt out fag
end of a smoky day. Roll
the bottoms of your trousers up, you'll be a man
someday.
"There will be time, there
will be time to prepare a
face to meet the faces that
you meet."
Not before the taking of
toast and tea there won't.
Half the people in the world
are starving. For that,
young man, you get nothing
but a question dropped on
your plate.
"Do   I   dare   disturb   the
universe?"
Not the way you're going
about it you don't, bashing
about our dry cellar with
your stuffy friends, scattering straw and broken glass
about for the rats to walk
on and whispering in your
dry voices. You'll have the
RCMP on you before you
know it, young man, you
with your thin legs and your
straw-like hair falling all
over your morning  coat.
"But in a minute there is
time for decisions and revisions which a minute will
reverse."
Revisions, hell. Your first
revision, young Tom, is to
clean the muzzle marks the
yellow smoke left all over
the window panes. Between
you and your coffee spoons
and your mother with her
bloody Michaelangelo, it's a
wonder the smell of steak
ever gets down this passageway before six o'clock. Now
shut up while I stuff my
pipe with my short square
fingers; I want to read by
evening newspaper.
Man or machine—which ?
By   HUGH   McGILLIVRAY
The Ubyssey has previously mentioned some of the
blunders of this year's
Christmas examinations.
The question was also
raised, as it is every year,
as to the effectiveness of
the examination as a gauge
of knowledge and ability in
each course.
More extensive research
would have dredged up a
lengthy list of exam results
which serve no purpose as
a guide to the student's
ability.
For instance, within one
school alone, it was reported that four of the six compulsory courses in first and
second years showed a passing distribution from 20%
to 50%.
The characteristics needed
to pass an examination are
well summarized in a text
on production. "Existing
machines appear to surpass
humans in their ability to
do the following:
• Respond quickly to control signals
• Apply great force
smoothly and precisely
• Perform repetitive and
routine tasks
• Store information briefly and  then  erase  it  com-
GRADUATION
- WHAT THEN?
A challenging profession?
A role in rehabilitation?
The Canadian Association of
Occupational Therapists offers an
accelerated course In Occupational Therapy to candidates of
advanced educational standing.
For  full  information  enquire:
Miss Muriel F. Driver, O.T.Reg.,
Director,
School of Occupational Therapy,
Kingston, Ontario.
Page  12
pletely
• Perform rapid computations
• Perform many different
functions   simultaneously."
From the figures given
above, 20-50% of students
in these courses succeeded
in performing the functions
of a machine.
It has always been accepted by the community
that the responsibility of
education rests with institutions such as UBC. The examination — this medieval
vehicle — has finally been
eliminated from the lower
education levels.
Yet UBC,; still janus-fac-
ed, while heralding the new
in every department, persists in using this outmoded
and ineffective tool.
The age-old excuse of
most professors that there is
no satisfactory replacement
cannot be accepted. Gradually, the more forward-acting in each faculty are realizing the uselessness of the
Why Women Act
That Way
Why do women go in for concerts and "culture" so much
more than men? Believe it or
not, the answer's a biological
one! And you'll read it in
February Reader's Digest-
together with other facts that
clear up false ideas most men
have about the opposite sex.
Why are women so clumsy at
pitching a ball? Why are
they such glib fibbers? Why
do they get periodic frenzies
of furniture-moving? Why
are they forever smelling
something burning or hearing
burglars? Women as well
as men will learn a lot that's
surprisingly true in this light-
hearted article in February
Reader's Digest, now on sale.
THE      UBYSSEY
examination, and are weighing it in varying degrees
with the written exercise,
the term paper and the seminar.
These three alternatives
seem to have far greater
competence in judging the
student on his knowledge
and ability.
This other ancient practice of the professors should
not determine his fate in
the community.
"HANS"
TO HELP
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Hans Henneken
Factory-trained specialist.
8914 Oak (at Marine) 263-81II
WARD
Music Ltd.
Instruments
Music
Records
Teacher's Supplies
412 W. Hastings    682-5288
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedo* toils, white dinner
iackots, morning coats.
Formal and Informal business wear — complete
six* range.
MCCUISH   'ORMMWEA*
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 4st - Ph. 263-3610
"But look, the evening is
spread out against the sky,
and you sit there, serving
tea and demanding the right
to smile."
You presume too much,
young man. It reminds me
more of a patient etherised
upon a table, with arms that
are braceletted and white
and bare. I have known the
eyes already, known them
all, and it's not worthwhile
after all. First thing you
know, I digress, is one settling a pillow or throwing
off a shawl turns toward the
window and brays, that is
not it at all, that is not what
I meant at all. Some Hamlet you are, young man.
"I do not think that they
will sing to me."
Arrgh, wiping your hands
across your mouth and
laughing. Just remember,
the worlds revolve like ancient women gathering fuel
in vacant lots. Speaking of
that, unpart your hair and
hide that peach-pit because
your mother is coming.
She'll soon drown you!
UBC  STUDENTS
OF   OBJECTIVISM
For admirers of AYN RAND who are
interested in meeting and discussing
her novels and philosophy call:
DAVID GOYDER        224-6357
or BILL PAUL! AL 3-1767
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE    DINNER    JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED JACKETS
MASQUERADE    COSTUMES
SPECIAL   STUDENT   RATES
CA 4-0034  4397 W. 10th
Huberman
Educational
Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
University Subjects
Morris  Huberman,
Educational Consultant
Knowledge and Success
through I-earnlnsr Fewer
215( W. 12Hi Ave., Vancouver
For Appointment, Phone
732-5535        263-4808
Friday,  January 27,  1967 Friday,  January  27,   1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page   13
 comment
Fill  er up,
please
An editorial reprinted from the McGill Daily, January 10, 1967.
The doldrums of winter have set in. Those of us who
are still having trouble making the required readling list a
regimen will probably find this the ideal time to engage
in certain reveries commonly known as the sophomore
slump (equally applicable to years one, three and four).
For the student as a student the situation is not a
happy one.
• • •
In our world it seems to be the undergraduate versus
everyone. We know we're being groomed for the business-
government juggernaut, but alternatives are few. Tom
Hayden of the Students for a Democratic Society puts it
this way; "The student is essentially an outsider, someone
who takes what he gets or else."
Even at a comparatively small school of 12,000 the
spectre constantly haunting us is depersonalization. Students
are divided against each other in a competitive system of
grading. Students are divided from the administration by
the latter's blinding concern for revenue without loss of
credibility. Students are divided from the faculty by the
sheer weight of their numbers and the teachers unavoidable
commitment to the status quo.
• • •
If undergraduates were to look at themselves in a
collective context they would see that in many ways they
form a class. This is not a group set apart only in terms of
the traditional rebellion of youth. This is not a group that
can be conveniently ear-marked as bohemian (at McGill
let's make that even latently bohemian). The new and growing role of government in education in North America is
enough to indicate a break with the past. If the malcontents
of the '30's were fighting for an ideal community of scholars,
1 at least they didn't have to fight city hall as well.
In general, as the diversified universities eagerly take
on the role of service stations to society, the undergraduates
are pushed farther and farther from the pumps of knowledge.
The choice for us? We can resolve ourselves to the
pursuit of "getting ahead" (this is not as redundant as it
sounds), or we can simply opt out and drop out.
• • •
We could of course demand a voice in the decisionmaking within our institution . . . But then, really, the
university already has us in double jeopardy. They have
our money and they have their unassailable role in loco
parentis over us. Who could imagine McGillians effectively
demaning relevancy of their courses to the outside world?
Who could imagine a senate meeting situation in which
Dr. Robertson looks over his half-rims and says, "Well, Jim,
and how do the students feel about our submission to the
Parent Commission?"
Our primary concern must be for a better education.
And this we know cannot be achieved only by means of
dollars and cents. Our primary concern, yes, but no one
will give a damn if we can't make that concern felt.
V^u     k
ft    A/Vd
Qe&    ^
jjk Iqo
I         1
II f"r A
t0KE
W tRlPJ
L^D^
IHs'De
Then
Wfjfc
3°
QOHn
vfflj
Mf$£X$. COMJiMmB
f
t >
*s
$oof
■^>
r
i >
—from the University of Victoria Martlet
'Plummer bungling
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
There may be many reasons
for not inviting Germany's
NDP leader von Thadden to
speak at UBC. There may even
be reasons to cancel this invitation, but those given by
Mr.  Plummer sound ridiculous
My sympathy with the students of this campus in general leads me to hope that the
telegram which was sent to
Mr. von Thadden will not be
publicized by him. Mr. Plummer comes to the conclusion
that the policies of the West
German government are "detrimental to the cause of democracy and peace"; such a poor
statement reflects badly on his
own ability as well as on the
whole student body.
What he calls "research" is
merely bungling, particularly
if he reached the conclusion
that there would be no difference between von Thadden
and the new chancellor Kies-
inger. It is undoubtedly regrettable that our present
chancellor is a former member of the NSDAP, but it is
ridiculous to conclude that
Kiesinger exemplifies nazism
n Germany, the latter being
"in control of many areas in
Germany".
If this were, indeed, true,
there should be a great
urgency to invite Mr. von
Thadden and give him a platform as broad and public as
possible, to have him reveal
his ideas and state his position,
in order that one may find out
whether his policies are identical with those of the German government.
The emergency laws which
are and will be existing in
Germany are controversial
and, as a matter of fact, may
even be detrimental to democracy. But Mr. Plummer's view
is very naive, if he interprets
them as a means to recover
"lost  territories".
This is not what we (the
Germans) are afraid of. But
what has this to do with cancelling the invitation to Mr.
von Thadden? I myself would
have found it most important
to hear his opinion and comments  on this matter.
Mr. Plummer may not have
been under the pressure of any
group; it appears, though, that
he was under pressure of time
and has been supplied with
material for his "research" by
such a group.
Or is it that one was afraid
that von Thadden's policies
are not quite as objectionable
as emotional commentators
found them in the first place?
Or that nobody would have
been able enough to handle
him? This would, indeed, have
been to his and his party's advantage.
Whatever the cause was:
Friends of mine and myself
were very excited when we
heard that UBC students
would present von Thadden,
we were very disappointed to
hear that the invitation was
cancelled, and we were perplexed and afflicted to see
why.
HANS-PETER   BAER
Dept. of Pharmacology
—from the University of Washington Daily
Free speech doesn't give you the right to  yell 'fire' in a
crowded university classroom.
Tree  country
Editor,  The Ubyssey:
Marches are useless.
To advertise UBC's financial
plight, we wish to get the support of the people and the government. Marches destroy this
support.
Increasingly, the proclamations and marches from UBC
are giving Canadians the impression that we are left-wingers, unproductive, spongers,
and have time for ridiculous
affairs -— all on the public's
'free' money (about $1500/
year/student).
The public is fed up. And
Bennett isn't forced to give us
money, because the voting
public is disgusted with this
LSD-pinko-playpen-student image.
We're cutting our own
throats. Why use the socialist
dogma that we need money?
Why not convince the public
that    we    are    worth     more
money? When you work, you
receive what you are worth,
not what you need.
Instead of Braund-Boylan-
Tato's socialist program, we
could initiate a mature plan
to educate the people. Let
them know how important our
graduates are to Canada's
economy, and to society.
I want education to remain
largely an individual choice.
IC all the money comes from
the government, then UBC
will no longer choose its own
students and standards. The
government will.
In Russia and East Germany,
education is 100 per cent a
government enterprise. The individual has no say. They have
a wall, that the left-wingers
may have forgotten about,
with machine-guns and barbed-
wire, to keep the people in.
Canada is a free country.
Let's keep education the choice
of the individual.
DON   ALLEN
eng.  4
TIME IS
MONEY!
A CLICHE?    CERTAINLY!
But, nevertheless, true! Each moment represents an investment for the student who is absorbing vast quantities
of data while attending university.
READING DYNAMICS has enabled thousands of students,
teachers, businessmen—in fact, people from every walk
of life—to at least TRIPLE their reading speed!
May we help YOU save time—and money.
Attend a FREE Demonstration of
Reading Dynamics
Tonight 8 p.m., in the Prospect Room, Bayshore Inn
Tomorrow, January  28,  8 p.m.,  in the
Prospect Room, Bayshore Inn
READING DYNAMICS
OF B.C. LTD.
Main Office 549 Howe St., Vancouver
Suite 210 685-2374 Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   January  27,   1967
CONFEDERATION LIFE ASSOCIATION
SALES
SALES     MANAGEMENT
Does your future lie in sales work? Perhaps you haven't
considered it. We would welcome the opportunity to discuss with
you   a  career   with   Confederation   Life   Association.
We offer sales work leading to management or the establishment of a professional career in Estate Planning and other areas
of  advanced   Life   Underwriting.
Continuous on-the-job training is a feature of our development
program. Careful selection and excellent salary arrangement will
enable   you   to   embark   on   a  challenging  and   exciting   career.
We will be interviewing on campus February 7, 8 and 9.
Do. come and see us and let us show you the actual steps to a
career   in   Professional   Sales  or   Sales  Management.
ALL THESE  METALS
ARE AVAILABLE  AT
GRASSIES ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR ... 685-2271
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and  Repaired
Tuxedos   Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
NEW ARRIVALS
Speedwell BRM mag wheels
for Volk's. each $59.95
Cable Tire Chains,
set   $21.95
Raydyot Mirrors $ 8.95
Peco Muffler Systems_$24.95
Key Fobs     $ 1.95
WIPAC Adjustable Map
Lights -      - $ 5.95
10% DISCOUNT TO
STUDENTS
Overseas Auto Parts
12 th and Alma
736-9804
MUSSOC PRESENTS
'How to succeed in business
without really trying
Feb. 6, 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Feb. 9 - 12:30 p.m.
— don kydd photo
IT'S HERNIA TIME for rowing team captain Wayne Oster-
hout,   trying   out   team's   new   extronic   leg   conditioner.
Helping  him split a gut is  rower Brian  Rigby.
Ice men out to
break record loss
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds travel to Saskatoon
this weekend for two league games against the University
of Saskatchwan Huskies.
When the two teams met earlier this season, the Huskies
won both games, 9-3 and 4-3. UBC now has a 0-5 record in the
Conference and badly needs a win.
The Birds are at last beginning to play at a unit, and players
like Bob Apps and Mickey McDowell can start to unwind and
play to their potential.
But the squad lacks the fire-power that (both Saskatchewan
and Alberta have shown.
Of the 11 goals scored in their five league games to date,
Al McLean has scored seven.
This has been the difference between winning and losing
in at least three of the five matches. When the Birds catch a
little spark, they will win a few games.
The overall record, including exhibition games stands at
eight won, seven lost, and one tied.
Soccer Birds shot
with one free kick
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds lost Sunday to Columbus
1-0 on a free kick.
In the closely played game seen by 1,600 fans at Callister
Park, both teams had many opportunities to score but nobody
got on the board until early in the second half.
The Thunderbird goalie, trying to get the ball back into
play, inadvertently stepped out of his goal area carrying the
ball. This gave Columbus a free kick which went spinning
crazily past the defending Birds and into their net.
A goal scored later in the second half by the Birds was
disallowed by an offside and the game ended a heartbreaking
1-0.
"It was tough to lose," said coach Joe Johnson. "The boys
matched them all the way."
Pacific Coast Soccer League standings now are: Columbus
with 23 points; Victoria with 22; North Sshore 16; UBC 15.
The next game at 2 p.m. this Saturday at Kinsmen Park
has the Birds battling North Shore for the third-place berth.
Football   meet   goes
There is an urgent meeting for all football Birds and JV's
at noon, Feb. 2.
It will be held in room 211 of the Memorial Gym. All out
please for this important meeting, says coach Frank Gnup. Friday, January 27,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
THESE PINT-SIZED "Globetrotters" give a ten-minute exhibition of fancy ball-handling
and tricky dribbling all done to the beat of popular rcok and roll music. The pace is
fast  during this   half-time   show  at  the Saturday night basketball game.
Husky weekend crucial
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds play
two important games this weekend against
the University of Saskatchewan Huskies.
The two teams will meet in War Memorial Gym at 8:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday
night. Because UBC is not playing a full
WCIAA schedule, each game will be worth
four points to the winner.
A double win for the UBC team definitely puts it in contention for the conference title. The Birds currently hold fourth
place in league standings, behind Calgary
(6-2), Edmonton <5-3), and Saskatchewan
(4-2). Manitoba is in last with (0-8). UBC
has won three and lost three.
Neil Murray with 14.5 points per game
and Ian Dixon with 13.7 pts. per game are
the Birds' leading scorers.
In tonight's preliminary, the Jayvees
take on the powerful Simon Fraser Clansmen at 6:30 p.m. When these two teams
met last fall the SFA hoopstefs won the
game 61-49. The JV's want to win tonight's
game to put the Clansmen in their proper
place.
This will be the last meeting between
the teams as SFA is moving up to Varsity
competition and will play the Thunderbirds
in 1967-68.
UBC   BOWLS  OVER  VICTORIANS
The UBC bowling team soundly defeated University of Victoria last weekend.
On Saturday, UBC won 18 points to six,
behind the fine bowling of Bill Enefer. En-
efer averaged 264 during the four games.
He was followed by Gary Kind with 254
and a high single of 338 — the best of the
tournament.
Sunday was the same story as UBC took
Uvic.   15-9.
The UBC women's team was less successful as they lost to a team comprised of
some of the best women bowlers in Victoria.
Jolaine Oviatt had the high average of
216 for UBC and also the women's high
single of 274.
Indoor-Outdoor
By PIO URAN
Track and field season starts for UBC this Saturday at
10 a.m. with the UBC Indoor-Outdoor Track Meet.
Competing with the UBC team will be fine clubs from
the North-West including the Optimist Striders, The Vancouver Olympic Club, The Nor'Westers, and the Richmond Track
and Field Club.
The program contains 25 events including both a men's
and a women's Zehnerlauf. The Zehnerlauf, which is quickly
catching on in track meets, is a form of relay race in which
10 runners, spaced evenly around the track, run and pass the
baton for 15 minutes, the team covering the greatest distance
in that time being the winner.
"This meet is important to us because it serves as a preview of how we will be later on in the season and will also
show us where we may improve," said UBC track and field
coach  Lionel  Pugh.
"I feel we have a very good team," he added..
The field events and the sprints of the meet will be played
in the Field House while the hurdles and the distance will
take place in the Stadium. The Zehnerlaufs are last on the
program and will be run in the stadium starting at 12:55 p.m.
Steve Spencer, Sam Vandermeulen, and Ron Parker are
people to watch in the high jump. Parker has jumped 6 feet,
6 %  inches.
UBC girls will be well represented too. Leona Sparrow,
a frosh shot-putter, has put 40 feet plus. Pat Pincent holds
the intercollegiate high jump record. In the running department, Joanne Hetherington is a strong contender.
Another girl to watch is Bernice Jessop. Although she
trains under Pugh she will be running for a local club. She
can long jump 19 feet easily and is ranked third best in her
native England.
UBC hopes in distance running will be Don Scott, Dave
Aune, and Ron Haddad. Scott is third best in Canada at the
660  yards.
This is the second year that UBC has sponsored the Open
Club Indoor-Outdoor Track Meet and it promises to be an
exciting   event.
Admission  is free.
Field hockey Birds bad
but opposition worse
Low quality playing did not stop the UBC field hockey
Birds from winning their first 1967 game.
All previous games had been rained out, and the team
came back refreshed to down North Shore 8-0.
Goals were scored by Warren Bell, who led with four,
Jamie Wright with three, and Keith Harrison with one.
The Birds played poorly, passing inaccurately and checking
loosely. The defence was sloppy. But they were matched with
an obviously unfit opposition.
Most of the goals resulted from goal-mouth scrambles,
scored from a short corner, although Harrison and Wright each
got one good goal. The basic problem seems to be passing and
positional play.
THUNDERETTES RUN   UP PRIZE
The UBC Thunderettes brought home the runner-up
trophy from an invitational volleyball tournament held Jan.
20 at Eugene, Oregon.
UBC came second to Portland Molarettes in the eight
team tournament, while the Jayvees placed sixth.
The volleyball Thunderettes travel to the University of
Saskatchewan at Regina Feb. 9 for the Western Canadian
Inter-Collegiate championships.
On the women's basketball scene, UBC travels to Calgary and Edmonton this weekend for WCIAA league play,
and in track and field, UBC plays host on Jan. 28 to an
indoor-outdoor meet.
Strong men stand straight
The UBC team won the Washington State Open Weight-
lifting Championship held at Auburn, Wash., last Saturday.
Winners for UBC were George Tsoi-A-Sue, 123 lbs,; Ted
Iwamoto, 132 lbs.; coach Andy Hinds, 148 lbs., and Claus Hallschmidt and Vince Basile who placed second and third respectively in the 198 lb. class.
Other members of the victorious team were John Grunen
and Wayne Cannon.
WRESTLING
A four-way wrestling meet is scheduled for Saturday at
the Women's gym.
Participating schools are: Pacific University of Forest
Grove, Oregon; Seattle Pacific College; University of Alberta,
and UBC.
The Thunderbirds are still hurt from injuries and lack of
wrestlers in some of the weight divisions.
Starters for UBC are: Wayne Cave, Dennis Boulton, Ron
Turner, Ken Kerluke, Greg Greiner, Dirk Heiss, Jim Fornalli,
and Chris Nemeth. Page  16
THE    U B Y S S.E-Y
Friday,   January 27,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Harlot harangue held
LSM
Discussion on Should Prostitution    Be    Legalized,    Monday,
boon, Bu. 104.
VCF
Stacey    Woods    speaks    on
Christian   Student   Involvement
in  Foreign  Universities,  today,
noon, Ang.  110.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Meeting today, noon, hut 0-12.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting today, noon, IH. Film
Eleves et Maitres will be shown.
LIBERAL   CLUB
MP  Grant   Deachman   speaks
today, noon, Bu. 205.
GERMAN  CLUB
Meeting  with  slides  of  German   universities   today,   noon,
Bu. 203.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Meeting   today,    noon,    Ang.
207.
SOCIALIST CLUB
A Marxist speak', on the History of Marriage and the Family,     open    discussion,     today,
noon, Bu. 221.
EL CIRCULO
A. Waiman discusses Spanish
Jews in the Balkans, today,
noon, Bu. 204. H. Oostendorp
speaks on Espana en Busca De
Si  Misma,   Tuesday,   8:30   p.m.
in Bu. penthouse.
SCIENCE US
Dr. G. T. Wilson speaks, with
slides, on By Train from Leningrad to visit Russian and Chinese Scientists, today, noon,
Henn. 200.
INTERNATIONALISTS
Clive Ansley speaks on China
and   U.S.   Press   Coverage,   tonight,    8    p.m.,    Salish    House
lounge, Totem Park.
AIESEC
Meeting   Monday,   noon,   Bu.
1221    to   discuss   summer    exchange jobs.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Meeting   Monday,   noon,   Bu.
203,  with  speaker on the  narcotics  foundation.
KOERNER   LECTURER
Sociology professor R. T. McKenzie  discusses British Political Parties Reconsidered,  Tuesday, noon, Bu. 106.
ARTS US
Arts, science mixer Tuesday,
noon, Brock lounge. Admission
—guys  25  cents, gals—free.
DEBATING  UNION
UBC meets Alberta in the McGoun   Cup   finals,    tonight,    8
Scholarship dropped
World University Service's scholarship budget has been
cut at UBC.
AMS council voted to decrease the number of scholarships
from six to five. The scholarships budget was cut to $8,400 from
$10,400.
Under the WUS scholarship plan, B.C. students can study
in foreign countries while their counterparts come here for a
year.
Bugging is moot point
The controversial theft of company secrets through bugging
comes before the UBC law faculty's grant moot to be held today
at 8 p.m.
The grand moot, a competition for the Allan S. Gregory
Memorial Prize, is an appeal against a judge's decision that the
bugged company has no right to privacy and no claim for
damages.
Student contenders, Josiah Wood for the appellant and
Selwyn Chamberlain for the respondent, face the Hon. Mr.
Justice J. A. Macdonald of the B.C. Supreme Court, Paul Paine
Q.C., and K. C. Mackenzie, assistant professor of law.
UNIVERSITY
CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL
ST. ANSELM'S
(United)
(Anglican)
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
8:00   &  9:30 a.m.
"Lefs  Face   It!"
Holy Communion
1. Doubt                     11 :u0 a.m.—Litany & Sermon
7:00 p.m. Dessert Party and
"Let the World Write
Annual Meeting
the   Agenda"
HAROLD MacKAY
JIM McKIBBON
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
The election of the Executive of the Students' Council 1967-68 will be held as follows:
First Slate: for President, Secretary, Second Vice-
President. Nominations open January 25 and
continue to February 2, 1967. Election will be
held on February 8, 1967.
Second Slate: for First Vice-President, Treasurer, Coordinator. Nominations open February 1 and
continue to February 9, 1967. Election will be
held on February 15, 1967.
a.m., Brock lounge. Topic: Resolved  World-wide  Federation
is the Answer for Mankind.
UN  CLUB
Documentary film Bethune
will be shown Tuesday, noon,
Bu. 100. Non-member admission ten cents.
FARES?
YES! AND CHEAPER TOO
■K We have all the details
'4fM^ C°" in anytime
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
Hagm't Traval Service ltd.
HAGEN S
7344651
2996 wTSroadway
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
TAKEN! CHEM 311 NOTES FROM
Mall bench, Tues., noon, ph. 732-
5444.  Reward!      	
WALLET LOST BY HITCHHIKER
when he ripped pocket getting
into black TR-3 Jan. 19, 4:30.
Driver took him home down 8th.
Would driver please check, 224-
5958. 	
REWARD OFFERED FOR RE-
turn of briefcase "lost" in Sedgewick Lib. Fri. noon.  Ed 263-5451.
LOST: BIOLOGY NOTES IN HENN
bldg. on Jan. 16. Reward. Phone
Wendy,   738-0428.	
FOUND: Man's ring in the Buchanan men's washroom. Claim In
Publications  Office.
LOST: SILVER INDIAN RING IN
Show Mart washroom on Monday,
Jan.  23.  Phone Jack,  261-3839.
FOUND OUTSIDE PONDEROSA
one earring in the form of a
wooden ring. Phone 731-6438 after
6 p.m.
Coming Dances
12A
MARDI GRAS CHARITY BALL,
Show Mart. Tickets on sale now
at   AMS   office.   $5.00   per   couple.
INTERNATIONAL BALL JAN. 27,
9-1 only. $5.00 couple. Tickets at
I.H.   &   A.M.S.
CRYSTAL BALL DANCING EN-
tertainment, refreshments Jan. 28.
Brock Hall, only $3.50 cpl. Tickets
at   A.M.S.
DON'T MISS THE BIGGEST
Dance in the history of Vancouver. "THE WONDERFUL
WORLD OF SOUL" with the
Shantelles, Epics, Nightrains, and
Soul Unlimited. Fri., P.N.E. Gardens,   8:00 - 1:00.
ARTS MEETS SCIENCE MIXER.
Tues., Jan. 31. Brock Lounge at
noon.  Guys 25c. Gals 10c.
WHO'S   THE   THIRD   BAND?
BY NOW IT IS COMMON KNOWL-
edge that both, the Shantelles and
Shockers will be on campus at
that giant dance, Sat., Feb. 4th.
Add to that list the "frustrated"
sound of the Painted Ship and
you have, without a doubt, the
best in B.C. talent ever to play
at one dance! So save your pennies for this one — it's a can't
miss!    and    only   $1.50   a   person.
ALL THIS AT
CAMPUS  A  GO-GO   (Revisited)
DON'T   MISS   THE   WONDERFUL
World of Soul!  $2.50 per person.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and  see  our  minerals  and  fossils.
TWO GREAT BANDS! INTERNA -
tional Ball Jan. 27. Tickets only
$5.00/couple. Available at IH and
A.M.S.	
A FEW SATURDAY NIGHT
Mardi Gras Dance tickets should
be on sale at the Showmart, 9:00
p.m.   sharp. 	
ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM LIVES!!
Apply at AMS by Monday noon
for meeting Faradise Valley Feb.
3-5 to discuss Education with Bob
Rowan, Frank Bardacke, Alumni,
Faculty - Talk, Argue, fight 7.50
ea.	
ALL ARTSMEN — ENTER THE
Arts Poetry Contest now. Cash
prizes. Deadline Feb. 24. For further information contact Arts
Office  Brock  359.
HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS
Without Really Trying. Student
Performances Feb. 6th, 7th, 8:30,
9th,   12:30.   75c.
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's —
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.
Special Notices (Con't.)
REWARD FO R WITNESS TO
accident at 10th and Burrard on
Jan.   19.   Phone  Jack,   rm.   8,   224-
 9069;	
S ?I?P?DD?S?0?H?Q?E
Watch   this   column!!	
WANT A REASON TO SKIP
classes? Dance to the NOVEL
SOUND of the BRAVE NEW
WORLD  Tuesday  noon  in  Brock.
Transportation
14
PERADENIYA      AGRICULTURE
Faculty  needs  a   tractor.   Will  you
help buy one? Support Share Feb.
20 - 24.
Wanted
15
SAILORS ON BOARD U.S.S. EN-
terprise would like to write to
Canadians. Write Richard A. Frye
AQB2, VAH-2 DET MIKE, c/o
FPO,   San   Francisco,   Calif.
WANTED:   ROLL   BAR   FOR   TR-4
Call   Bob   at  228-8343.
Travel Opportunities
16
STUDY TOUR EUROPE — SUM-
mer '67 — $750. Students under
21 years. Write M. Goodwin, 7011-
20th  Ave.  N.E.,  Seattle. Wash.
TWO AMS RETURN FLIGHT
tickets London-Vancouver. August 25th. Each $195.00. Phone
CA  4-3329.
ONE AMS RETURN CHARTER
ticket from London, $195.00. Phone
321-9775  after  10 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles  For Sale
21
USED   CAR   VALUES
'59   Hillman   Sedan  —  $350.00.
'57    Chev.    Sedan    Automatic
$550.00.
'61   Lark   2-door — $550.00.
Hammond's  Garage
Seymour  &  Pacific
MU 3-8451
DATSUN    DEALER
1954 OLDS' GOOD CONDITION.
Deluxe radio. Excellent motor
$150.00 or best offer. Phone Ross
224-9846.
1955 CHEV. BEL AIRE 4 DOOR
Sedan. Automatic — R & H, 4
new    tires.    Excellent    mechanical
 condition.   Phone  261-9023.
'52 DESOTO—252 HEMI P. STEER-
ing and brakes. New Transmission. Phone 433-6370 — Bruce af-
ter 6 p.m.	
1963 BMW SPORTS COUPE AND
1961 Valiant with floor shift. Call
321-9393.
MUST SELL INMAC 66 HONDA
coupe, 12,000 mi., $1350 cash, or
offer.   Vic.   266-7039.	
1957 VOLKSWAGEN D E L U X~E
Good condition. Radio, new tire.
Mechanic's dream, $350. Phone
evenings,   Peter,   224-7887.
Automobiles Wanted
25
WANTED SPORTS CAR IN GOOD
running order. Reasonably priced.
Phone 581-7525  Evenings.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
INTERNATIONAL BALL, JAN. 27,
Hotel Georgia. Moonlighters' Steel
Band & Brick Henderson. Tickets
$5.00/couple   at   I.H.   &   A M.S.	
GIRLS! LIVE IN TOTEM, LOWER
Mall or Acadia? Meet in Residence House Lounges tonight at
8:30 p.m. For transportation to
E.U.S.   Mixer.   Girls 50c.
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. — "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.
ARTS CHALLENGES AGGIES EN-
gineers and Foresters to a Tug-
of-War. At noon Feb. 1st on Li-
brary  lawn.	
THE  JABBERWOK, ONE OF THE
finest  new  bands in Van.,  available
for bookings in late Feb. and Mar.
Phone:  John,  CA 4-9073 or Lindy,
CA  4-4555.
Scandals
39A
OBVIOUSLY A COMMUNISTIC
plot! The BRAVE NEW WORLD
mixer in Brock Tuesday from
12:30   to   2:30.
20%     OF     KOREAN     STUDENTS
drop   out   each   year   because   of
financial  difficulties.  WUS  provides
scholarships. Share with WUS, Feb.
20 - 24.
IF YOU DON'T LIKE BLEEDING
ears, hire the Jabberwok. They
play vaudeville, too. Phone John,
CA  4-9073  or  Lindy,   CA  4-4555.
THE ONLY DANCE THAT IS
better than Mardi Gras on Friday
night is Mardi Gras on Saturday
night!
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th   &  Granville   St. 263-4530
FAST EXPERIENCED TYPIST IN
Acadia Camp. Phone 224-1441
Special  student  rates.
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurately typed. Elec. machine.
Phone   224-5046   after  6  p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION  —  SCHOOLS
Music
63
FOR SALE: "LeBlanc" Bb Clarinet,
silver keys, deluxe case $225.00.
Phone  Wes  at  299-9275.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts.  736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND History lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
LESSONS  IN  GERMAN FOR STU-
dents and persons eager to learn
to speak the language. $2.00 per
lesson).   Phone   325-4902.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
BRAZILIAN CLASSICAL GUITAR,
hard shell case, Berlitz Spanish
Records, Fort Camp, Hut 4, Room
23,   224-9853.
VW   SKI   RACK   $5.   4   PAIRS   224-
0055 Dinner time.
SKIS: KNEISSL COMBI W, POLES
and BOOTS. (10), all used one
season.   228-8652   (evenings).
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BEDROOMS WITH SHOWER
$35/month each. 2466 W. 20th
Ave.   738-9490  after  5   p.m.
Room & Board
82
TRAFFIC PROBLEMS? MOVE ON
campus and forget them! Room
and board Feb. 1. 2280 Wesbrook
224-9986.
ROOM   AND   BOARD   ON   CAMPUS
$65  per  mo.   Phone   266-4443.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
WANTED MATURE FEMALE
student to share penthouse overlooking Kits beach with working
girl. Adequate privacy for studying.   $50.00  mo.   738-3036  weekend.
GIRL WANTS QUIET ROOMMATE
to share basement house — keeping rooms. Corner Broadway and
Alma.   224-6864.
GIRL    WANTED     TO      SHARE
furn.   suite   in   South   Gran.   738-
6292.
fSWWWP^WlWWW^Wf1^^^

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125952/manifest

Comment

Related Items