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The Ubyssey Jan 7, 1986

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Array s?
UBC Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No.27
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 7.1986
Sissy biker
connects the
dots	
from Nietzsche
to Maranathas
Inside the cavernous confines of
UBC's Dorothy Somerset Studio,
everything is dark: the walls, the
floor, the mood. As the lights dim
further and the haunting timbres of
medieval music begin to reverberate
in this theatrical never-never-land,
one senses evil doings are afoot.
By the conclusion of the
Darkhorse Theatre's Collective's
production of Sternberg 1492, the
prediction of nefarious activity proves close to the mark. The final tally
reveals the two-act play has one
stabbing death, two tongue
removals, two hand slashings, one
suicide, one rape and an off-stage
burning of 21 people at the stake.
It's not exactly Rambo, but it sure
ain't Bambi.
The person responsible for conjuring up the characters and situations in Sternberg 1492 which are
coming to momentary life this week
at the Dorothy Somerset, doesn't
look like the kind of guy who
possesses a devious, somewhat
disturbed mind. Then again, appearances indicate Bob Twaites
isn't your average playwright. The
24-year-old UBC student who has
received kudos in the form of the
William Read Fellowship, two B.C.
Cultural Services awards, the Grant
Redford Memorial Playwrighting
prize and the unique honour of being ejected along with his University
Hill classmates from the old courthouse steps for performing Julius
Caesar, has a peculiar ambiguity to
him.
Twaites, now studying in the
Master of Fine Arts program in the
departments of creative writing and
theatre, looks and talks like someone who lives in the twilight zone
of artistic fashion. His big bad
black boots, zipper heavy leather
jacket, military-style brush cut and
hokey Joe voice present a confusing
impression; the man is part easy
rider, part G.I. and part sissy.
Still, Twaites acts very much the
playwright, displaying both insecurity and sublime self-
confidence about his work. In one
breath, he says: "I always firmly
believe in what I'm doing." But he
continues:    "That's   my   greatest
fault. I always take myself too
seriously."
Both moods were evident Sunday
when Twaites sat at the back of the
studio observing the Collective's
dress rehearsal of Sternberg. Like a
proud parent watching the last of
his kids leave home, Twaites showed signs of worrying about whether
what he begot would turn out the
way he planned. At the same time,
he let out the occasional chuckle
and gulp at especially intense
moments which seemed to say:
'Yes, Virginia, this is exactly what 1
had in mind.'
Just as Twaites eludes easy
definitions, so does Sternberg, his
first full-length play which has been
brought to the stage. As the program notes state, "Sternberg 1492
is a historical play of sorts." The
genesis of the play came from
Twaites' discovery of a little-known
bacterium, Serratia marcescens,
which produces a red liquid
resembling blood. His research
revealed the bacterium had a "long
and sordid" history. In medieval
times, the bacterium would grow in
granaries and occasionally sprout in
hosts, the eucharistic bread. When
the liquid produced from the
bacterium flowed from hosts,
Christians used the seemingly
miraculous occurrence as an excuse
to seek their wrath on the Jews.
Sternberg 1492, directed by Craig
Duffy, is based on a true story involving bleeding hosts. It revolves
around a corrupt man of the cloth
in the town of Sternberg who upon
discovery of the hosts, embarks on
a campaign of Christian warfare in
which there is much suffering — all
supposedly in the name of God.
The Catholic priest's actions succeed in ruining others while helping
to realize his own self-aggrandizing
and quasi-righteous aims.
Sounds like yer basic every-day
tale of plunder and despair. Not
quite. In the first place, Twaites had
to muster up every speck of
dramatic license he could find to
create the play. Relying solely on
historical facts was out of the question; all he had to go on was a
woodcut and a few paragraphs
from written sources to pen Sternberg. "Spotty information is the
best kind to have," says Twaites.
"You can make up the rest and
connect the dots . . . Once I found
out everything I could about the
period, I tried to forget about it so I
wouldn't write a museum piece."
Further complicating the
historical bent of the play are its
modern influences. That is, while
Twaites has visions of bleeding
hosts from medieval times dancing
about his head, he came face-to-
face with a modern phenomenon
known as the charismatic Christian. They are a far cry from the
medieval versions who sliced and
diced their opposition into submission. But it was the walking and
talking — particularly of the
Maranathas — which irked Twaites
the most. "I found it very difficult
when one couldn't wander around
the campus without hearing someone preach from a soapbox," he
says. "I often thought as a good
atheist, I knew the scriptures better
than they did."
Twaites points to Friedrich Nietzsche to explain the link between today's charismatic Christians and
heinous Christians of the past. How
cunningly appropriate. Who better
to cite than the philosopher who
declared that God is dead. Twaites
says Nietzche put it best when he
noted that somewhere along the
line, there was an enormous "slip"
in Christianity which made it starkly un-Christian. The once oppressed Christians became the oppressors, and the Christians started
throwing heretics in the fires where
they once burned.
So is Sternberg a malicious
polemic on Christians who wallow
in self-righteous indignation? "I
was in the mood to write a polemic
which (Sternberg) is not. It's not
just about Christians. It's an experience in abuse. It's about people
who do things with the best of intentions and firmly believe what
they are doing is right . . . And it
shows what happens when the
system   works   —   the   people   in
charge become monsters."
Twaites says he expects a diverse
audience will enjoy his play, including "micro-biologists, Christians, atheists and feminists. How
they react is their own business."
But he doubts theatre-goers who
fall under the neo-classicist camp
will be as moved. Twaites has been
influenced by expressionism, absur-
dism and theatre of cruelty —
all genres free from the extra baggage of neo-classicists who he says
are obsessed with unity of time and
place. "If people can't go into a
theatre and suspend their disbelief,
then forget it. There's just no
point." Page 2
THE
1D(Tc2
U BYS S EY
Tuesday, January 7, 1986
AoaHia ovtonHc honofil-c    [LjBRowNLbt office outfitters ltd
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By SAMANTHA BRENNAN
and ELIZABETH DONOVAN
Canadian University Press
WOLFVILLE, N.S. (CUP) —
Acadia University will soon become
the second university in Canada to
extend spouse benefits to the partners of gay and lesbian professors.
After six months of debate, the
financial benefits committee of the
Acadia faculty association and the
board of governors have agreed to a
request by two faculty members
that their lovers receive benefits,
pending approval by the
university's insurance company.
Faculty at Acadia University
receive a three part benefits package
— a 50 per cent tuition fee discount
for spouses and children, pension
and medical insurance.
The professors involved, who
wish to remain anonymous, say the
pension and tuition fee discount
have already been resolved, while
medical insurance is pending.
Faculty can automatically will their
pension benefits to whomever they
choose and the tuition discount has
been approved informally.
Both professors' partners are
now taking classes at Acadia and
paying only half regular tuition
fees.
The professors say they had no
particular axe to grind but are
disturbed it took so long to resolve
their request.
"If we had been a heterosexual
couple, we wouldn't have hadi'the
same problem," said on«'|
He approached the university
with his request in May when his
lover decided he was interested in
taking classes.
"He (the university president)
was basically supportive. He put the
question to the board of governors.
There was no problem with the tuition discount but he thought there
would be some problems with the
medical benefits because of the
third party involved — the insurance company," he said.
The two faculty members are
confident the insurance company
will approve the university's decision.
York was the first university in
Canada to allow gay and lesbian
faculty members to claim benefits
for their lovers. In 1979 York's
faculty association launched a
grievance on behalf of a gay faculty
member who wanted to claim
benefits for their lover and won the
case. Brenda Hart, an executive
associate for the York faculty
union, said since then the issue has
been resolved informally between
the university and individual faculty
members. She did not say how
many professors are now claiming
benefits for lovers of the same sex.
The faculty association at
Acadia, though, hopes to have the
agreement formally written into its
collection agreement the next time it
comes up for negotiation.
"The position of the association
is that gay partners should get
essentially the same benefits as
husbands and wives," said its president, Ralph Stewart. He said gay
partners are now eligible for
benefits if they have been co-
habitating for more than a year.
A survey conducted last week by
the Canadian Association of
University Teachers showed only
eight of 49 universities surveyed did
not offer protection against
discrimination to lesbian and gay
professors in either their collective
agreement or faculty handbook.
Most universities interpret the
non-discrimination clause to apply
to promotion and tenure, but do
not extend the policy to benefits.
According to Richard Belair, a
professional official for CAUT,
most   universities   use   the   legal
definition of spouse, which excludes same sex partners.
Belair said this may change with
proposed amendments to the
Charter or Rights and Freedoms.
The Parliamentary Committee on
Equality Rights recommended in its
Oct. 1985 report Equality For All
protection against discrimination of
the basis of sexual orientation be included in the Charter.
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CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
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Close of Nominations:
4:00 p.m., Friday, January V
Nomination forms can be obtained from the AMS.
Admin. Asst., SUB 238
Submit Nominations to the AMS. Administrative Asst., SUB 238 Tuesday, January 7, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Canadian researchers flee to U.S.
WATERLOO (CUP) — Researchers receive such little respect in
Canada that they are often better
known in the United States, and
can't be blamed for leaving the
country for greener labs abroad,
says a professor studying research
in Canada.
"The research community in this
country is very small and spread
thin across several disciplines.
Many people don't know where
there are areas of strength in Canadian research," said Tom
Brzustowski, academic vice-
president of the University of
Waterloo.
Brzustowski sent copies of a
survey on Canadian research to
1,000 academics, administrators,
and researchers across the country.
Although he has only received 230
replies, the results indicate that
Canadian research is severely
undervalued. Some respondents
said leading Canadian researchers
have received awards and acclaim
for their work abroad, but little
recognition in their own country.
The surveys received so far show
the leading areas of research in
Canada include chemistry,
hydrogeology and thermal
engineering.
Brzustowski said Canadian
researchers that leave the country
do so for more than money. "Some
of it is salary, but most of it is
resources. If research in Canada is
to improve, there should be
resources and support for the full
cost of research for a lifetime."
Five year funding requests from
the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and Social
Sciences and Humanities Research
Council have also called for increas
ed federal funding for university
researchers. However, both plans
are still under review by the ministry
of state for Science and
Technology, and no work has
been given on when the status of
NSERC and SSHRC funding will
be announced.
Tom Siddon, the former minister
of    state    for    Science    and
Technology, was promoted to the
fisheries portfolio on Nov. 14
following months of trying to see
the plans to cabinet, which makes
the final decision. Siddon's successor Frank Oberle, who doesn't
come from a science background,
has dodged the funding question in
Parliament.
Stephen   Beatty,   an   aide   to
government house leader Ray
Hnatyshyn whose office sets the
cabinet agenda, said no date is set
for research council funding, but
"that's not the sort of information
we talk about."
In the House of Commons,
Liberal science and technology
critic David Berger said the govern
ment should move swiftly on funding the proposals. There are
"thousands of Canadian whose
careers are in danger," he said.
Brzustowski agrees. "If researchers were just funded a little more,
it would be better for everyone.
That's sort of a cheerleader statement, but I honestly believe it," he
said.
INVISIBLE GHOST HAUNTS empty student newspaper office shortly
before major tidying campaign. You too could haunt Ubyssey office, SUB
251k, if you dropped by and talked to the staff.
-dan andrews photo
Right wing Americans call for Soviet divestment
By CATHERINE BAIN BRIDGE
of Canadian University Press
MONTREAL (CUP) — A right-
wing foundation in the United
States, taking its cue from
"misguided" drives against investment in South Africa, wants to bring its Soviet divestment campaign
to Canadian universities.
The campaign, called Save the
Oppressed People (STOP) is underway on over 15 college campuses in
the United States, according to
Bonner Cohen, International Director of the YOUNG Conservative
Foundation. Seventy-five more college groups have applied to the
foundation for information on how
to start a campaign.
The Washington-based foundation, set up two years ago, is calling
on student groups to get their
universities to sell stock they own in
companies doing business with the
Soviet Union.
Targetted companies include
Pepsi-Cola, General Motors, Ford
Motor Company and Xerox.
The expansion into Canada will
be started by January or February,
according to Cohen. "We have
contacts in Toronto and
Montreal," he said, "so we will
probably start on a campus in one
of those cities.
"We will probably concentrate
on one university," he said, "using
ads and staging a protest to get
things moving."
The main thrust of the campaign
is a reaction to the successful South
Africa divestment campaigns
sweeping American universities. "It
is our hope to reshape, restructure
and redefine the foreign policy
debate taking place in North
America," said Cohen.
The Young Conservative Foundation is funded by tax deductible
private contributions. Cohen, who
is neither young nor a student, is
one of several full-time paid
employees of the Foundation.
"We believe the Soviet Union is
by far the world's worst human
rights violator," he said, "and it
comes out looking considerably
worse than South Africa."
International focus on South
Africa is not a priority, said
Cohen, because the Soviet Union,
unlike South Africa, is an expansionist superpower. Business should
stay in South Africa or blacks will
lose jobs. Business should get out of
the Soviet Union because economic
losses will force them to spend less
on arms, he said.
Nigel Crawhill, head of the
McGill South Africa Committee,
sees serious flaws in Cohen's
arguments.
"South Africa is the only country
in the world with constitutionalised
racism," said Crawhill. "And the
day the Soviet Union enshrines
racism in their constitution, I'll
fight them too."
"They (the conservative student
groups) do not give a hoot about
the Soviet Union," he said, "They
are out to sink us, not to divest
from the Soviet Union."
Crawhill also said divestment is a
particular strategy and not appropriate in every case. In South
Journalists discussed racism
By DAVID FERMAN
ABBOTSFORD — How does the
media, university newspapers
especially, deal with racism? Poorly, acccording to experts.
Racism was the theme of the 48th
annual conference of Canadian
University Press (CUP), a cooperative of more than 50 college
and university papers.
The 180 delegates heard a panel
of local experts, including Hayne
Wai, of the Canadian Human
Rights Commission, Najit Aujilah,
a multi-cultural conference coordinator, Val Dudoward, a journalist, and Tamio Wakayama an
editor of a Canadian Japanese
newspaper, speak on racism in the
press and in their lives.
After the panel, a forum on
racism within campus papers and
offices made it clear racism is still
an active force. Non-white
reporters are often "ghettoized" into covering all the ethnic and
cultural   events   because   whites
assume only non-white reporters
know and care about all ethnic
events.
Supplementing the speakers was
a resource room with documentaries on East Indians in Canada,
the internment of Japanese Canadians, the problems of the Micmac
Indians, as well as other films and
literature.
Conference programming also in
cluded lectures and forums on cen-
sorsorship, the Third World's
response to the news institutions of
the West, and practical seminars on
investigative reporting, layout and
libel.
Africa, polls taken by U.S. polling
agencies show that the majority of
black South Africans want divestment — if they suffer now in the
long run it means a better life for
their children.
Crawhill referred to Henry Kissinger's views on divestment from
the Soviet Union. "Constructive
engagement (of business) makes
much more sense in the Soviet
Union because it is already quite
autonomous," said Crawhill.
"Henry Kissinger said long before I
did that if the West isolates the
Soviet Union, it will have much less
leverage with it, which is really
dangerous and destabilising."
Technology bridges continents
An unprecedented use of communications high technology enabled over 700 viewers to watch the
broadcast of the 1985 Beyond War
Awards at the Hyatt Hotel on Dec.
14.
Nine television satellites and
more than a dozen earth stations
created a live two-way link or
"global spacebridge" between
North and South America, Africa,
Asia and Europe.
"No one has ever attempted a
global spacebridge before," said
UBC alumni and Vancouver event
coordinator Udo Erasmus. She said
imcompatibilities between the
satellite systems in the different
countries posed immense technical
problems.
Moderating the program from
San Francisco, and appearing on an
enormous video screen, Beyond
War  president   Richard   Rathbun
Summer students housed
There will be enough space in
residence this summer for all UBC
students who apply, UBC's student
housing and conferences director
said Monday.
Students are concerned because
the pre-Expo media hype predicts
masses of tourists occupying all
available accommodation.
UBC residences are commonly
used during the summer for conferences, said Mary Flores.
Conference bookings are up this
year because many organizations
are booking at UBC so delegates
have easy access to Expo. But these
are all independent groups and conferences and are not directly conn-
cected to Expo, Flores said.
Normally five floors of Gage
residence and all of Place Vanier
residence are allocated to students
registered in spring or summer session courses. There will be no
change in this policy, Flores said.
Official Expo 86 delegates will
not occupy on-campus summer student housing as the fair has all of
the new Fairveiw Crescent
residence, not yet officially open to
students, booked booked but no
other residence space.
said, "Today's technology
threatens us with extinction, but
also enables us to come together in
something more important than our
own personal financial interests."
The 1985 Beyond War award
went to the Five Continent Peace
initiative, a series of proposals for
nuclear disarmament started in May
1984 and expressed in the Jan. 1985
Delhi Declaration.
Awards were given to six world
leaders who advanced the initiative,
namely Argentinian president Raul
Alfonsin, Indian prime minister Rajiv Gandhi, Mexican president
Miguel de la Madrid, former Tan-
zanian president Julius Nyere,
Swedish prime minister Olof Palme
and Greek prime minister Andreas
Papandreou.
Beyond War member Carmen
Sutton, education 3 said she was
moved and impressed by the awards
ceremony.
"There's a touch of irony here
because people have been using
high technology for the purposes of
war and now spacebridge is using it
to create peace, ' she said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7, 1986
Be the Centre
of Rttention!
Come to the Ubyssey
office ot 241k SUB,
write news stories, do
reviews, type stuff, or
Just be a basic good
egg, and you too may
get a swig of the
magic potion before
fighting off hordes of
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U.B.C. DEPARTMENT OF
STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of
SENIOR RESIDENCE ADVISOR FOR 1986-87
Single Student Residences
The ideal applicants for these positions will be students
who are in their final undergraduate year, are
unclassified, or are graduate students and who have
substantial experience living and working in residence.
This position will be attractive to those who have skills
and interests in working in an extensively people
oriented field. Major responsibilities include the following:
( a ) Supervising the residence's Advisors
( b ) Being the contact person between the Department
and the Residence Association
( c ) Ensuring that proper standards of behavior are
maintained.
Those interested in applying to be a Senior Residence
Advisor should submit a resume and letter explaining
their reasons for being interested in the position to Pat
Buchannon, Assistant Director of Student Housing, at
the Ponderosa Housing Office (mailing address: 2071
West Mall, University Campus, Vancouver, B.C., V6T
1Y9) on or before Friday, January 17, 1986. Please
phone Pat at 228-5778 for further information about
this position.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Agreement reached on layoffs
By DEBBIE LO
UBC administration and faculty
have tentatively agreed on layoff
procedures which allows dismissal
of tenured faculty in a declared
fiscal emergency.
"We feel it is quite a good agreement," faculty association president Sidney Mindess said Monday.
"It has an appropriate combination
of administrative flexibility and extremely strong appeals for faculty."
Mindess gave UBC administration president David Strangway
much of the credit for the agreement which also contains settlements for early termination of 10
of the 12 faculty fired last year by
the university. The faculty will be
asked at their Jan. 16 meeting to
ratify the agreement which will be
voted on by mailed ballot and be
counted on Jan. 31.
Strangway said it was not easy
trying to find a mutually acceptable
agreement.
"I think it (the agreement)
preserves the sense of what tenure is
about. — to protect against arbitrary dismissal," he said. "The
other side is that in difficult times
we have to have the capability to
make tough decisions."
The agreement also includes:
• The formation of an independent review committee with complete access to the university's
financial records to determine if the
university is facing a real financial
emergency.
• The power to override the committee's recommendations and lay
off professors in a financial
emergency.
• Withdrawing the universities
current termination procedure based on faculty redundancies.
• Establishing a new appeal procedure for fired faculty to ensure
they were not fired on political or
vindictive grounds.
• Making lay off criteria more
detailed  when  determining  which
facutly members will be laid off.
UBC professors are granted
tenure only after they have
undergone a thorough review and a
five-year probationary period.
Traditionally tenure was used to
protect professors  from dismissal
views, but faculty members can still
be dismissed for incompetance,
neglect of duty or misconduct.
Strangway said he hopes additional layoffs if university funding
is inadequate again this year can be
avoided with early retirements and
early attrition.
leave or retire per year. UBC had a
faculty of about 1900 said Mindess.
"Natural attrition does give you
a powerful tool to deal with cutbacks," he said.
The severance settlements for the
nine tenured professors and three
instructors fired in June were not
released   but   Mine ess   described
based on their political or religious An average of about 100 faculty    them as "generous"
Job program criticized
Ubyssey Staff and
Canadian University Press
Challenge '86 will be just that for
job-seeking students across Canadian campuses this summer.
Although funding for the program increased to $210 million from
$205 million in 1985, inflation and a
$25 million diversion to the Census
Bureau reduced this year's federal
committment to $180 million for
the eight components of Challenge
'86.
And a planned 30 per cent reduction in funding to Canada Employment Centres — On Campus (CEC-
OC) will likely compound job accessibility problems.
Additional promotion and advertising for Challenge '86, to be paid
out of the $180 million, has not had
a specific budget assigned yet, according to Alan Sackman, of the
department of employment and immigration.
HALIFAX (CUP) — A student
member of Dalhousie University's
board of governors, who has visited
South Africa, says he's putting a
discussion of apartheid on the agenda for a board meeting next week.
Stevan Ellis said he has "personal
experience with just how horrible
the system is there."
"One institution should take a
leading role in the rest of the
business community by divesting,"
Ellis said.
Dalhousie has almost $5 million
invested in companies that deal with
South Africa, Canadian University
Press discovered.
UBC has refused to reveal information on whether UBC has investments in South Africa. UBC
currently does not have a divestment policy.
Ruben Cohen, the New
Brunswick lawyer who chairs
Dalhousie's investment committee,
said a move to divest would have to
come from the board.
"Our responsibility is to earn the
most money from the investments
we make," said Cohen.
But at least one of the six-
member investment committee is
opposed to the whole concept of
divestment.
"It (the issue) came up a few
years ago. We decided then that
we'd invest in whatever we decided
to invest in. We don't have any
direct investment in South Africa,"
said Frank Covert.
"If General Motors had a plant
in south Africa and we decided to
invest   in   General   Motors,    that
wouldn't faze us a bit," he said.
Andrew MacKay, Dalhousie
University president and a member
of the investment committee, said
the university has the "second or
third largest endowment fund of
any university in Canada," so the
committee's work is "very important in terms of university financing
in the long term."
MacKay said he finds divestment
a "frustrating" debate.
"You can't start looking at every
company and its practices and
policies. Do you start looking at
every moral and ethic of every company you want to invest in? You'd
probably find that you'd have
reason not to make any investments," said MacKay.
Paul Huber, an economics professor at Dalhousie and the university faculty association's rep on the
investment committee, agrees with
MacKay.
"Some people would argue, and
I'm in this group, that there's no
way you can have clean hands and
invest. Somewhere, sometime, your
money is going to connect with
some government you don't like,"
-shari bte abdulla photo
said Huber.
"In an indirect way, investments
are always involved with politics, if
one thinks about it," he said.
The university also owns shares
in the following companies that
directly or indirectly do business in
South Africa:
* Interprovincial Pacific Limited
* Seagram Company Limited
* Trans-Canada     Pipelines
Limited
* Canadian Pacific Limited
* Canadian Pacific Enterprises
* Gulf Canada Limited
* Imperial Oil Limited
Community pays price for Expo 86
By DEBBIE LO
At least one group of Vancouver
citizens is not pleased about Expo
86.
"We don't want to come to Expo," said Stephen Learey, a
Downtown East Side Residents
Association official.
Leary told a crowd of about forty
student journalists at a Canadian
university press conference over the
Christmas break Expo tourists
wandering through his
neighbourhood will be a big problem for the east side community.
He added Expo will create 12
hour rush hours in the downtown
area and emergency vehicles will be
unable to get through the
neighbourhood because of the traffic jams.
Expo will also leave many of the
East side residents, who are older
males on welfare, homeless because
the hotel owners have jacked the
price of their low rent rooms up for
Expo, without concern for where
their tenants will find similar low
rent places to stay, he said.
UBC economics professor Chuck
Blackorby, who is also a member of
the Pacific Institute for Policy
Alternatives said Expo is not an efficient way to spend money to
create jobs.
"It's not an investment when we
are left with a big bill," he said.
Blackorby said it is a myth that
cities experience an increase in
tourism by hosting world fairs.
"Ever heard of anyone going to
San Antonio or Spokane?" he said.
Wendy Frost from People First
'86 said she sees Expo as a giant
"PR gimmick".
She said Expo is being used as
"the occasion to push for the
Socred agenda."
She said her 20-member group is
planning a campaign to distribute
fact sheets on Expo.
A series of demonstrations will
lead up the opening day. A
"peoples pavilion" for the
unemployed is planned for Thornton Park across from the main Expo gate during the exposition.
Fair officials estimate an average
of about 100,000 visitors per day
will pass through the Expo's gate,
and a total of 15.25 million will see
Expo.
While conceding tfiat cuts will be
made to CEC-OC's, "streamlining
can take many forms," Sackman
said. He said he did not remember
the extent of the cuts planned.
Federal Employment Minister
Flora MacDonald predicted
118,000 jobs will be created when
she announced the program Dec.
19. "Challenge '86 . . . develop(s)
summer jobs that meet the future
needs of the Canadian economy
and allows students to develop the
skills they have learned in the
classroom," MacDonald said.
Career related jobs are planned to
account for 93,000 of the total
created.
But critics say the numbers are
deceiving.
Higher education critic Howard
McCurdy (NDP-Windsor Walker-
ville) slammed MacDonald's program, accusing her of using money
intended for job training for subsidizing 25,000 jobs for the census.
And age restrictions (minimum
18 years), a lump sum payment plan
and a starting date of June 1 may
dissuade many students from applying, his aide added.
The jobs are not full-time.
Average census workers can expect
to work 100 hours at an average
salary of $7.30, says Wayne Smith,
Statistics Canada public relations
officer.
Of the eight components of
Challenge '86, the Summer
Employment Experience Development (SEED) program will receive
the largest portion of the $180
million. SEED will provide $127
million in wage subsidies to
employers in both the public and
private sectors to create career-
oriented jobs for post-secondary
and vocational high school
students.
Other component:; are:
• Student Business Loans. Up to
$4 million in loan guarantees offered to students but the actual $2
million cost to the government will
come from SEED monies;
• Canada Employment Centres
for Students, to receive $13.6
million;
• Native Internship Program,
$2.7 million;
• Work Orientation Workshops,
$4 million to assist disadvantaged
secondary students and potential
dropouts with life-skills training;
• Cadet and Reserve Training
Program, $13 million;
• Supernumeray Special Constable Training Program, $1.2
million to hire students as special
RCMP officers;
• Business Drive for Jobs, $1.3
million, essentially for advertising,
to promote corporate and business
hiring of students.
Last year, more than 101,000
jobs were created through
Challenge '85. But problems encountered that involved regional
disparities in both monies awarded
and work offered have not yet been
addressed in Challenge '86.
Provincial allocations were still
being "worked out, ' Sackman said
Dec. 20.
And Diane Flaherty, aide to McCurdy, said the employment
ministry has not yei indicated how
it will correct the advantages
Challenge '86, a career-oriented
program, gives to students who live
in regions where a lot of private industry is present. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7,1986
Travelling treasures survive war
By NORM RAVVIN
History is often discussed in
terms of cycles — rise and fall are
familiar words — and the same
words could be used to describe the
public interest in certain segments
of history. The Precious Legacy exhibition, which has been touring
Europe and North America for
three years, appears at first to be
evidence of the rising interest in the
Holocaust.
The Precious Legacy
at Calgary's Glenbow Museum
until March 9th, 1986
In the last few years there has appeared a number of films, articles
and a good deal of literature on the
Holocaust. The appearance of The
Precious Legacy in the midst of
these things is more of a coincidence than anything else. The
people who originally envisioned a
travelling exhibit drawn from the
Czechoslovak State Museum's col-
lectin of Judaic treasures began
their footwork seventeen years ago.
And the massive collection of
Judaic treasures now housed in
Prague had a uniquely grotesque
conception. Amidst the business of
occupying Czechoslovakia, Hitler
ordered his invading forces to make
careful work of confiscating all
Jewish possessions of artistic and
historical value. These objects were
shipped to Prague where a small
staff of Jewish curators were temporarily spared from death in order
to create a "museum to an extinct
race" that would justify the Nazi
Final Solution.
What existed at the war's end was
a collection — fifty warehouses full
— of items taken from synagogues,
from family homes, and even from
graveyards — stones broken from
the ground to stand as some ironic
reminder of what was past. To the
credit of the Nazi's skill at extermination there were very few
Czechoslovakian Jews alive in 1945
to reclaim their personal possessions or to rebuild their synagogues.
Hitler had not succeeded in extinguishing Czechoslovakian Jewry,
but he had diminished it to the
point where its ritual objects were
museum pieces, its personal objects
useless.
Now showing at Calgary's Glenbow Museum, The Precious Legacy
is a carefully chosen fraction of
these objects. It is more a celebration, though, of the culture that it
commemorates than a meditation
on the nature of genocide or the
sources of Nazi evil. The Jewish
community in and around Prague is
the oldest continuous Jewish community in Europe, making it both
historically and materially wealthy.
Its synagogues contained intricate
Moravian tapestries, and its communal societies were housed in im-
pressive neo-Romanesque
buildings.
The Precious Legacy offers a
careful depiction of communal life,
by devoting separate displays to
synagogue articles, articles from the
home, and by presenting a summary of the history of the Prague
community from the year 1000 until
the outbreak of World War II. The
cycle of life is traced by displays
related to Jewish ritual of birth, of
marriage, of daily worship and of
death. One of the most impressive
parts of the collection is a series of
portraits depicting the method by
which man is buried: the Burial
Society is shown saying prayers by
the deathbed; washing the body;
making the burial shroud; lowering
the body into the ground; and
mourning after the funeral. The
portraits portray a Jewish communal bond that is now nonexistent, outside of a few enclaves on
the east coast of America and
Canada, and in Israel. The men are
dressed inconspicuously though,
with little to separate their appearance from that of the average
gentile of the era.
The theme of multiculturalism,
or the place of diverse minorities
among a benevolent majority, is
one much in discussion in Canada,
and it provided the context by
which the guests of honor at the exhibition's opening couched their
messages. Alberta's Lieutenant
Governor, Helen Hunley, and
Canada's Minister of Communications, Marcel Masse, made an effort to highlight what they see as the
diversity of Canadian culture.
The urge to see The Precious
Legacy as a sign of exchange and
tolerance between cultures is inevitable and not invalid. The Canadian government undertook lengthy
negotiations with Czechoslovakia
officials to bring the exhibition
about, and international support
among museum curators facilitated
a tour that crossed Europe and
North America.
But against this optimism that the
exhibition generates there is a feeling of deflation as one looks at
religious articles pinned to walls and
cooking utensils displayed in rigged
setting. The positive value of their
being there, as lessons of history or
figures of beauty, is overcome by
their ultimate uselessness.
It is to the credit of The Precious
Legacy that the devastation of the
Holocaust is implied in this way,
through a celebration of what was,
rather than a diatribe over what was
done.
It is a bewildering vision — all
this beauty housed meticulously in
the Glenbow Museum — when it is
remembered to be the legacy of
Auschwitz and Treblinka. But as a
challenge, this bewilderment is stirring and appropriate.
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Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, January 7,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Minister indifferent to Youth
Canadian federal government
policy for International Year of
Youth was balloons, cake-cuttings,
posters, contests and conference
after conference. Youth of absolutely every denomination went
off to endless conferences to talk
about themselves. The federal
government blew $24 million in taxpayers' money.
Youth are people between age 15
and 24. Even though the UN decided in 1979 that this would be Youth
Year, the term youth has only been
around since the last recession,
when youth unemployment in
Canada climbed to 18 per cent.
After that the term "youth"
became popular with everyone from
politicians to free-lance magazine
writers. And in its last year, the
Trudeau government gave the concept credibility as a public relations
tool when they appointed the first
Minister of Youth. This did nothing
for youths; but the recession ended
and youths went back to fast food
restaurant jobs.
The rest of the world's youth are
worse off. The UN's "IYY Facts"
says the world youth population in
the year 2000 will be 60 per cent
higher than in 1975. The youth
population of the west will grow only five per cent, while the youth
population of Africa, Asia and
Latin America will almost double in
the next quarter century.
"The increase of the youth
population is likely to have adverse
effects on economic growth and
social progress, aggravating most of
the problems young people are facing today such as unemployment,
lack of education and training opportunities, the irrelevance of
education to their future productive
.participation in the development of
their society, poor health services,
malnutrition, etc," the UN document says.
Some countries, like the
Netherlands, decided to use Youth
Year to point out that youth are in a
bad way world-wide and that things
aren't getting better. In a Nov.,
1984 letter to the lower house of the
Dutch parliament explaining IYY
policy, Holland's minister for
welfare, health, and cultural affairs
writes "The working party has
selected the following priorities for
attention during the Year in the
Netherlands, with which the
government is in complete accord:
youth unemployment, young people from cultural and ethnic
minorities, the state of being a
minor, youth culture, peace and
development." A Dutch brochure
shows all different youth: black,
white, punks, drug addicts, school-
kids, five year-olds clowning
around.
In the United Kingdom, actress
Julie Walters and pop star Paul
Weiler of the Style Council co-
chaired the IYY committee. Activities included establishing
unemployment action committees
and youth centres as well as a national anti-drug abuse campaign.
In the United States quite a bit
less went on. Although the private
organisers squeezed a speech out of
President Ronald Reagan, activities
were simply an IYY photo contest,
a commemorative stamp, monthly
newsletters and official proclamations from different levels of
government.
The international themes for the
year, "Participation, development
and peace," are vague enough that
Conservative Minister of State for
Youth Andree Champagne could
sprinkle an abundance of small
grants, brochures and goodwill
across the country while saying
nothing at all about any of youth's
By PETER KUITENBROUWER
NATIONAL BUREAU CHIEF CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
problems, or coming up with any
remedies.
For Quebecois, Champagne is
probably the most instantly
recognisable member of Mulroney's
cabinet. They know her as
Donalda, the "tender, submissive,
ill-married but hopelessly faithful
heroine of Les Belles Histoires Des
Pays En Bas, an extremely popular
daytime drama of the late 1950's and
early 1960's," according to Benoit
Aubin, a writer for Quebec's
magazine L'Actualite. In the show,
Champagne's Donalda had a secret
crush on a young, poor settler, but
kept her place and stuck by her
destiny married to the rich, cruel
power broker Seraphin.
Luc Martin, 26, a New Democrat
co-ordinating youth activity at the
Canadian Labour Congress, noticed that Champagne's statistic of
how many youth were in trouble
steadily decline as International
Year of Youth went on.
"In the first interview (Champagne gave to reporters) 15-20 per
cent of youth were disaffected, in
the second 15 per cent, in the third
10-15 per cent. By the fourth interview only 10 per cent of youth were
having problems," Martin said.
Martin, one of 24 youth Champagne appointed to the IYY Consultative Committee that will have
met a dozen times by year-end, said
he didn't mind that Champagne's
Youth Year emphasises successful
young Canadians, including Sylvie
Bernier, Alex Baumann, Steve
Fonyo, Wayne Gretzky. "I was also
tired of hearing about unemployed,
drugged youth," he said.
Champagne spent $500,000 on
five regional forums for youth, but
then didn't stick around to hear
what youth had to say. At four of
newspapers on Champagne, 29
were in French, 10 in English. And
the coverage is not sunny: article
after article complains of the
minister's insensitivity to disadvantaged youth.
We learn a bit about the minister:
she was "always a girl of the private
sector," she disapproved of the
peace camp and opposes abortion.
And a writer takes up a whole page
in Quebec's Le Soleil complaining
that he couldn't obtain an interview
with the minister.
Champagne did grant an interview to Canadian University Press,
after a letter of request, constant
phone calls and about a two-month
wait. Waiting a half-hour in her
outer office at Parliament's confederation building, a reporter
perused the available magazines:
Pegasus, a magazine by Mobil, The
Canadian Composer, Maclean's,
The Ontario Corn Producer, Northwest Exporter, Chartered General
Accountant magazine, Executive —
"the magazine for presidents" and
Financial Post magazine with a
cover story on "What to look for in
a Lawyer."
No youth were in sight. Champagne, fluently bilingual, sits in a
huge office painted a light pink. She
explained her role. "The PM's
mandate to me is co-ordinate youth
activities, listen to youth and report
to government, and also outside to
business, and labour, about the
situation of youth. Also, I must
prepare what's after IYY. It would
be terrible if all their (youth's) work
came out nowhere," Champagne
said.
"I'm very busy and I must meet
the greatest number of youth possible," Champagne said. Here's what
she's found out so far: "Youth told
the minister's role after IYY will be
is a concern. The minister is working on it now, and will be presenting
her recommendations to cabinet
before Christmas on what she
thinks the role of the ministry
should be."
Champagne's philosophy during
this year has always been present-
tense. The conferences, the concerts, the exchange trips to France,
the video projects: all these arc
things that happened, and are now
over. "Youth are not just part of
the future," Champagne told CUP,
"but part of the present." And
Champagne may soon be part of
the past.
"We talked about the peachy-
keen kids," Martin said. "I don't
question (Champagne's) sincerity.
But there are many youth who
don't have jobs. It's not in ignoring
these youth that they will go away."
The ministry received $24 million
to accentuate the positive. Of that,
$12 million went directly to other
federal departments: $1.65 million
to communications, $1.05 million
to external affairs, $450,000 of that
to commemorate the U.N.'s 40th
anniversary, $600,000 to Justice,
$700,000 to Indian Affairs, and
$635,000 to Transport Canada. Of
the remaining $12 million, just over
$4 million went to pay salaries for
24 employees, and print and
distribute brochures and posters.
The secretary of state also put out a
youth year magazine, and a national listing of all youth groups,
each distributed in 7,000 copies.
They spent $500,000 on five
regional forums in different parts of
Canada.
The other $7,757 million went,
according to a list updated to Nov.
22, in 926 grants across the country.
"While we have this one-year honeymoon we
(should have) put together a permanent program for youth.
Do we need a minister to put on performances?"
the five weekend meetings, she
showed up Friday afternoon, met
with her consulting committee,
made a tour, spoke at the opening
banquet, and then left. "It's a
criticism that came out of almost all
of the forums — that she wasn't
there," Martin said.
What did the forums accomplish? A one-page Nov. 5 press
release from the youth ministry
summarizes the Ontario forum in
Orillia on Oct. 25-27 "Topics
discussed included the armaments
race and Canada's role in the Star
Wars initiative, problems of environmental protection and international terrorism, and issues dealing
with health, human rights, culture
and official bilingualism in
Ontario." Delegates also called for
a permanent ministry of youth and
a standing advisory committee to
help the government write laws that
affect youth.
Was it necessary to spend
$100,000 to find out that these are
the things Ontario's youth are
thinking about?
One piece of evidence on the
youth minister's visibility is the clipping file on Champagne in the
Library of Parliament. Of the
stories written in Canadian daily
me they wanted to take part in the
decision-making process. Youth
don't feel represented — they don't
know how government works.
"I'm gone (consulting youth) in
the evenings but I'm here during the
day," Champagne said. "This morning I was in a cabinet meeting."
Asked if she spoke of youth, Champagne said "I raised certain points,
i was a good spokesperson for
youth at this meeting."
If anyone in the government does
open the door it will be the Ministry
of Employment and Immigration
with more co-op education programs, or the Ministry of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
with more say by youth over their
region, or perhaps the secretary of
state with more funding for post-
secondary education. Maybe the
CRTC will do it by licencing Young
Canada TV. Maybe the Prime
Minister will do it by appointing
youth to positions of power.
In fact, the ministry of youth is
right now frantically looking for
ways to justify itself in 1986. "I
don't think anything has been
decided (about the future of the
youth ministry) Van Deusen said in
mid-November.
"Obviously the question of what
Apart from huge inequalities: —
though B.C. and Alberta have
almost equal populations, B.C. got
almost twice as much IYY money as
Alberta, and Quebec and Ontario
got almost the same amount Of
money, though Ontario has three
million more people — the list
shows that money went to two main
types of projects: cultural activities
and conferences.
The second-largest grant,
$132,384, went to IMAJ '85, a
Quebec group which according to
Ann Dadson, director of the IYY
Secretariat, distrubuted the youth
magazine Hors d'Ordre in schools,
organised a Quebec week of youth,
and gathered people for a series of
meetings to put together a couple of
performances called "Super-
Booms." Money streamed out for
youth orchestras, youth theatre
productions, youth newspapers. To
a lesser extent, money went to
women's groups, aboriginal
groups, and those working with
disaffected Canadians: the Services
for Marginal Youth Awareness
Committee in Halifax got a mere
$3,569.
None of these are lasting programs. "While we have this one-
year honeymoon we (should have)
put together a permanent program
for youth. Do we need a minister to
put on performances?" asked Martin.
He suggested more long-term
youth projects could have included
peer counselling for marginal
youth, those either unemployed,
addicted to drugs, or alcohol. In the
Netherlands, a project for people
from minority groups included
distribution of information on
career guidance, opportunities in
training, legal position and "how
to organise things yourself."
Champagne's indifference to
youth who are not white, middle-
class and successful has been obvious. Her consulting committee
had no blacks or handicapped
youth, and the great majority are
middle-class kids. Ten of the 24 are
card-carrying young Progressive
Conservatives. A big colour poster
for a writing contest the IYY
secretariat organized depicts four
youth: beautiful, white, well-
groomed. Champagne gets points
for her own staff, whose average
age, 27, is much ower than that of
other federal ministers — but most
of her staff are white francophones.
Aside from ignoring disadvantaged youth and the situation of world
youth, Martin thinks Champagne
missed out on what could have been
the cheapest and most important
Youth Year project: giving youth
more of a say in government. "Are
there youth on the CRTC(Canadian
Radio and Television
Commission)?" Martin asked.
"Are there youth on the committee
that decides student loan applications?"
"It's youth who have to take the
situation into their own hands,"
Martin said. "But the government
has to make sure that they're heard.
(Champagne) could act to get youth
on committees — get them to participate in committees." But Martin
did not note and applaud Champagne's testimony at the CRTC on
behalf of Young Canada Television.
Champagne's spunky predessor,
Celine Hervieux-Payette, did stomp
around the country shouting at
Chamber of Commerce lunches for
business to promote youth hiring —
and without the weight of a UN International Year behind her. Champagne preferred to shower gifts and
"consult" youth. And apart from
posters and the appearance of the
Youth Year logo on government
envelopes, phone books etc, there
was no advertising budget for the
year.
Champagne's own personal
behavior is perhaps even more
bizarre. The VIP Flight Manifests,
available through Access to Information from the Department and
Transport Canada show Champagne, though perhaps the most
junior cabinet minister, flew around
as much on chartered jets as then
Finance Minister or the Minister of
Employment and Immigration.
Champagne, accompanied mainly
by her assistant Patricia Thomson
and her press secretary Lisa Van
Duesen, hopped planes that touched down four times in the Atlantic,
12 times in Quebec, six times in Ontario, six times in the prairies, and
once in British Columbia. This article does not mention Champagne's
far more frequent commercial
flights — she says she spends about
half her time on the road — because
those records are only available by
written application through Access
to Information. Every flight returned to Ottawa the same day or the
next morning.
■:&"
"■>«s.<S*i«ss Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7, 1986
First harmony
UBC broke an old tradition over the holidays.
Opposing groups, the faculty association and the administration, talked
at each other and accomplished something.
The parcels they exchanged held assurances of academic freedom for
faculty and a way to deal with financial emergencies for the administration.
This means the furore created by the last summer's dismissal of 12 tenured
faculty should end.
Perhaps, more importantly, both groups showed a willingness to compromise and abandon adversarial positions.
The faculty association and university administration spoke of compromise but were happy with the agreement — UBC administration president David Strangway even called it "absolutely delightful."
It is a good omen that, so soon after being appointed amid high hopes,
people on campus are ready to credit Strangway with bringing about the
agreement.
There remain a number of campus unions with a grievance yet to be settled (hint: the initials are Ritchie and Associates). Perhaps their concerns
about the efficiency evaluators, which have led to a work-to-rule campaign, will be addressed along with job security problems in this newfound period of harmony.
An organization with its house in order is better prepared to deal with
authorities like the provincial government. We can hope President
Strangway, with active support from the board of governors, will be able
to extract an "absolutely delightful" committment to higher education
from our friends in Victoria if December's trend continues.
^rcnv£
/
The anarchist isn't
An anarchist is one who wants to,
overthrow established governments
and have a world without rulers and
law. A hypocrite is one who
pretends to be what he is not.
Horacio de la cueva's letter,
Council responsible if Godiva ride
goes ahead (Ubyssey, Dec. 3),
would have been n>ore accurately
titled "de la cueva takes shots at
Council again under false
pretences". This "anarchist" is
nothing of the sort, as he shows in
his letter.
He starts off by saying the student council must act to stop the
crime of public nudity. First of all,
by the first definition above, he
doesn't even want a student council
(as he makes clear in the seventh
paragraph, ". . . student council is
not capable of handling student affairs and is of no use at all"). Second of all, by the same definition,
he also doesn't want laws so
therefore public nudity is not considered a crime by him.
He also makes the statement,
"sexist acts are not defined by a
majority ballot." But since he is an
anarchist (or so he thinks), he
believes that all decisions that affect
a body of people should be voted
on by the individuals in that body.
Therefore, he believes, contrary to
his statement, that sexist acts
should be defined by a majority
ballot.
So, Horacio, if you truly believe
you are an anarchist, keep your
nose out of matters that don't per- ■
tain to you. If you don't like the
Godiva ride, the simplest answer is
to avoid and ignore it. It's easier to
do than you think. And while
you're at it, convince the others
who were planning to protest with
you to avoid it also. Any violence
"generated by those in red jackets"
will surely be evoked by your
presence.
Also, a note to Danica Gleave,
Engineer's ride degrades Godiva,
(Ubyssey, Dec. 3). How do you see
a woman, of her own free will, unbound and riding in such a way that
the spectators are forced to look up
to her as an act of domination?
Jan Kat
science 1
Pawley's comments disappointing
I would like to bring attention to
one of the outcomes of the recent
First Ministers conference in
Halifax. I quote a recent Ubyssey
story 'Premier pack pounces on
budget cuts' (Dec. 3) which states,
"Pawley said Mulroney's argument
that the provinces have to bear a
fair share in order to reduce the
federal deficit is 'phony* ".
I found this position to be very
disappointing, not only because of
the attitude that is taken by a Canadian Premier but because of the example that it sets for all Canadians.
It is extremely unreasonable of
Mr. Pawley to deny any responsibility for the federal deficit — why
does he think that there is one? The
majority of the federal budget is
comprised of transfer payments to
the provinces. The culprit of the
Godiva should express herself freely
The current debate over the Lady
Godiva ride in a recent Ubyssey article and its subsequent follow-up
and numerous negative reader comments have blown well out of proportion. The argument here is not
whether the ride is immoral or nec-
cessary or even as a reader put it,
"how women are perceived by
engineers." The argument here is
the tendency amongst the general
population to look at only superficial solutions to often complex
and controversial events within our
community.
For example, if others do not
wish to see the naked Lady Godiva,
then they should not participate in
the event, even though participation
by the protesters usually means opposition to the event. Heated oppositions to the ride only result in a
more glamorous event the following
year. Like a vicious circle, the
popularity of the ride most assuredly would increase as more and more
attention is given to it.
The freedom to express oneself is
the root of democracy. Admittedly,
if one's expression is deemed immoral by the majority, then it
should be abolished. However, it is
not up to the protesters (or just any
lunatic off the street) to abolish any
event they choose to disagree with.
The persons with decision making
power to act in favour of the majority are the elected officials, who
THE UBYSSEY
January 7, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"The hacks are coming! The hacks are coming!!!" Magee screamed Stephen Wisenthal as Steve
Kontic and Debbie Lo broke through the wall. "Can I help?" asked Charles Campbell, hoping he
couldn't. Angus Fraser and Chris Wong volunteered advice. "Don't go to the printers with them, you
should see what happened to Camille Dionne and Lise McGee." "What happened?" hollered Norm
Rawin clutching his camera. Just then Karen Gram staggered in. "The cuppies are loose in the city."
Janice Irving fainted and Neil "Blast from the Past" Lucente, seeing the hordes descend followed suit.
Proudly staggering in, came the CUP brigade — Peter Kuitenbrouwer. In the ensuing rout Stephen
was left . . . alone. But Nancy Campbell, David Ferman, Beth Weisberg, Gordon Clark, and a cast of
thousands cheered him up anyway.
in  this  case  include  the  student
council members.
The fact that student council
members elected by us, the
students, to make decisions for
ourselves further solidifies the argument. The council has already rejected the motion to ban the Godiva
ride. It is obvious the majority
wishes the event to remain, and
continue the engineering tradition
despite the biased objection by protesters. If some protesters view the
rejection of the motion as a lack of
council members participation then
why did they elect them in the first
place? Keep in mind that since the
engineering population does not
make up 50°/o it could not have
elected the entire council.
There may exist certain inter-
faculty tensions and disagreements
within the campus. However, it is
not up to a minority to dictate the
engineers' behaviours and habits,
for they are still citizens who are entitled to the freedom of speech and
free expression. Expression, the
Godiva ride in this case, will not be
banished because of futile objections from a vociferous minority.
The morals of a society are based
on a majority consensus within that
society.
Minority objections should not
be expressed toward specific groups
within the society, but toward society as a whole, for society dictates its
idea of the "right morality."
James Yang
mech eng 2
problem can be found in the very
foundation of this country itself, as
set out by Sir John A. MacDonald
and friends. Over the years 'their'
federal state of Canada has evolved
to its present form where the taxing
privileges are controlled federally,
but the spending is largely a provincial responsibility. It was felt the
federal government needed this
financial control to maintain national economic control.
The unfortunate consequences of
this arrangement have been with us
ever since. On the one side we have
the federal government doing the
'dirty work' of collecting taxes,
while the provinces heap the praises
and glory of the spending. To
change this relationship is a constitutional dilemma that nobody has
managed to solve in some 120 years
— and I have no intentions of trying to do so in a few lines here.
The point of my argument is simple — for Mr. Pawley, or any of the
other Premiers, to deny having any
responsibility for Canada's deficit
situation is a gross misrepresentation. There is no accountability for
spending in Canada today; and the
majority of our provinces take advantage of that situation. What Mr.
Pauley likes people to know is how
much of a success story Manitoba is
— what he fails to mention is that
without Equalization Payments
Manitoba would quickly go from
being one of Canada's 'bright
spots' to being one of its 'eyesores';
economically speaking. Deception
of this type does not come without
its costs.
More importantly, however, this
political argument is even more
disheartening for the message that it
conveys to the average Canadian. If
the Premiers of our provinces abscond from having any responsibility
for the deficit then why should the
average citizen give a care about it?
Anybody who thinks that the
deficit is meaningless is being
downright naive. Government
bonds compete with private attempts to raise investment; they
pressure interest rates and the
availability of capital, which affects
virtually every economic decision
from housing starts to automotive
sales; every year a large portion of
our tax money goes to paying off
old debts — we are in the hole before
we even begin!; carrying a big debt
hampers our ability to be flexible.
Paying for previous debts inhibits
us from expanding programs when
they are really needed — like right
now during a recession. Yet, these
'extra' costs are never included
when we speak of Government programs.
The message is clear. The federal
deficit is a Canadian concern.
Canadians at all levels should take
responsibility. Unfortunately, this
is obviously not the case. The conflicting signals of our political
leaders represent the Canadian attitude fairly accurately.
In the past 3 years B.C. Cana- •
dians have elected 2 governments —
one provincially and one federally
— on restraint mandates. We speak
of cuts and responsibility with
toughness and resolve, as long as it
refers to somebody else. Yet, what
do we expect? How long can we go
on spending $1.30 when we are only
making $1.00? How long are we going to continue to deceive ourselves
into believing that it really does not
matter?
If we are really to show concern
for our social services then we had
better take a good look at them.
Spending more does not necessarily
imply spending better. The
Mulroney government is committed
to deficit reduction. This will only
mean that things are going to get
worse — not better. It is time that
we begin to actively work with this
in mind.
Mr. Bennett has recognized
something which is important to
our province. Nobody could say
that he has played 'brownie'
politics. He has taken the unpopular stance of cutting spending
and endured the political fallout.
As students we condemn Mr.
Bennett and his government for
their 'shortsightedness'. Something
as unpopular and subjective as
spending cuts is always 'wrong'.
You can never please everyone; yet,
everybody always has the 'right'
way. This is a political reality. But
to condemn the government for
something because of emotional
feelings is hypocritical. Few
students look beyond U.B.C. to the
provincial picture. The government
has the responsibility to many programs; health, welfare, education
and transportation being but a few
— but it has an obligation to the
future, as well as the present, of
these programs. We should appreciate our government for their
resolve and foresight, for they are
lacking in Canada — our economic
health for the future requires much
more like it.
John Landis
industrial relations Tuesday, January 7, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
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Pseudo-Science of selling self won't solve problems
It is the time of year again when
companies send recruiters to
scavenge our campus for the best
and the brightest. The University
and College Placement
Association's Career Planning
guide, and dozens of bestselling
jobhunting manuals, tell us that the
person who will get a job is seldom
the person who can best do it, but
the person who knows the most
about how to get hired.
In the scramble for jobs people
are urged to get ahead of their peers
by acquiring polished job search
and interview techniques. The ef-
Caption kindly corrected
I am most distressed that the final
copy of The Ubyssey (December 6,
1985), printed before the Christmas
break, contained a photograph,
captioned incorrectly, which in-
dicatd the "ceremonial university
object" was being carried in the
President's installation ceremony
by the chancellor, Robert Wyman,
rather than myself.
The long delay between the
original error and its correction
(which I am sure you will wish to
record) would be sufficient to allow
my wife, on the assumption that I
had actually become chancellor, to
purchase a whole new wardrobe.
Actually, I should share a few
realities with you.
a. The "ceremonial university
object" is, in fact, a mace. Its traditions stem from the Middle Ages
when it was used to defend leading
public figures from assault.
Presumably, such protection is
needed today only to discourage
budget-cutters and other aggressive
elements.
b. Despite all of the serious constraints which the university has
had to confront, the stage has not
yet been reached when the
chancellor is required to carry his
own mace.
c. One look at the pained expression on the mace bearers' face must
confirm him to be a faculty
member. As an "outsider" the
chancellor would have displayed a
much more relaxed and serene air.
I hope these observations will
help correct the impression created
by your picture that the Chancellor
is hired to shoulder all the burdens
of the university.
John D. Dennison
department of administrative,
adult and higher eduction
fective job hunt relies on mass mailings of resumes, working your connections, introducing yourself to
employers under false pretenses,
and of course, plenty of feigned enthusiasm, embellishment of your
past and outright clever lying about
fake volunteer work and similar accomplishments.
A new pseudo-science — whose
practitioners call themselves career
search counsellors — has sprung up
to coach the bewildered jobseeker
to present a front of absolute
perfection to the recruiter. "Just be
yourself," they advise, and often in
the same breath: "Sell yourself!"
The secret to selling yourself lies in
transforming your resume into
advertising hype, dressing for optimum conservative appeal,
simulating interest in a company by
quoting from its annual report, and
asking   ingratiating   questions   to
project a go-getter's image.
After the interview thank your interviewer warmly and by all means,
send him a love letter next day.
"Remember you are a salesman,
and the product you are selling is
yourself." Thinking that society
owes you a job is an attitude problem. The positive attitude is not to
complain about what you cannot
change — the jobhunting process
— but to do what is in your power:
outhunt the competition!
"Everyone for himself", "It's a
dog-eat-dog world", "Only the
strong survive" and "The devil take
the hindmost" — such is the in
sight, stated or implied, with which
jobhunting advice is liberally
sprinkled.
Jobhunting techniques share the
feature that, as more and more people resort to them during dire job
shortages, their use becomes both
less effective and ever more difficult
to dispense with. Is here nothing
wrong with promoting, and subjecting oneself to, techniques which
will only escalate the problem of
job competition without making a
meaningful contribution to its solution?
Kurt Preinsperg
phil. grad studies
LOOK
Soft Contact Lenses
Daily Wear
Natural Tinted Lenses
Varied Shades	
$59.95
$120.00
Plus Initial $20 Sitting Fee
CAMBIE OPTICAL
17th and Cambie
879-9494
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1986-87
These positions are open only to full-time registered
U.B.C. students. Successful applicants will be required
to live in the residences. Application forms and detailed
job descriptions are available at the Ponderosa Housing
Office and at the Front Desk of each single student
residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier, W. H. Gage,
and Acadia/Fairview.
Applications will be accepted from January 6 to January
17, 1986 at the Front Desks of the Single: Student
Residences, or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
Come To An Open House on Thursday, January 9th, 1986, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Rooms in Fairview Crescent Townhouses Now Available for Grads
EXPO '86 has leased the entire Fairview Crescent Townhouse complex from UBC for one
year, November 1, 1985 to October 31, 1986,
in order to guarantee accommodation to the
staff of exhibitors who will be working at EXPO during the fair. EXPO has now agreed,
however, to let the University rent some of
their surplus rooms to full-time students.
To be eligible for accommodation this Winter
Session at Fairview, you must be either 23
years   old   by   December  31,   1985,   or  be
registered as a  graduate student at  UBC.
Students who are assigned to Fairview now
will be given reapplicant status for 1986/87,
and EXPO has agreed that these students can
move in again in September, 1986. During the
summer.   May   through   August,   1986,   all
students must move out of Fairview; rooms in
the Place Vanier staythrough houses will be
available for students. After the 1986/87 Winter Session, those
students assigned to Fairview may continue on with an annual
contract  not  requiring summer student status May through
August.
Most of the available townhouses in Fairview Crescent, located
behind the University Village, are four-bed room units. Each four-
bedroom townhouse has 114 bathrooms, a living room and dining area, and a kitchen equipped with a large fridge, electric
stove, and a dishwasher. The townhouses will be completely furnished including linen in the bedrooms. Kitchen utensils and
cleaning equipment however, are the responsibility of the
tenants. Electric heat, water, and satellite television are included
in the rent.
Fees for Fairview Crescent will be based on a daily rate, and will
be due in monthly instalments in advance on or before the 15th of
each month. Rates will vary by the size of single room as follows:
Small Single = $8.25 per day ($247.50 for 30 day/month or
$255.75 for 31/day)
Medium Single = 9.00 per day ($270 for a 30 day/month or $279
for 31/day)
Large Single = 10.00 per day ($300 for a 30 day/month or $310 for
31/day)
A late payment penalty of $10 will be added to rents after the 15th
of the month. Parking is available in an underground parkade for
an additional $20 per month. Surface parking is also available
nearby in UBC's B lots.
A cleaning deposit of $50 per person is required when paying the
first instalment of fees. This deposit will be returned, with interest, after inspection of the unit following departure.
All other terms and conditions of tenancy in UBC's single student
Residences will apply to occupants of Fairview Crescent.
Applications for FAIRVIEW CRESCENT, or transfer applications,
may be made at the Student Housing Office, 2071 West Mall,
UBC. Assignments of eligible students will be made on a first-
come-first-serve basis. Students wishing to share a townhouse
should apply together. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7,1986
HilA
ViJ0&fi
TODAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly meeting — Bible readings, testimonies
of healing, noon, SUB 211.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Committee meeting  —  all members welcome,
noon, SUB 213.
WEDNESDAY
UBC LATIN AMERICA SOLIDARITY
COMMITTEE
Organizing for film festival, noon, SUB 237.
Great law trials on the silver
screen.
Jan. 9 "TWELVE ANGRY MEN".
Jan. 16 "AND JUSTICE FOR
ALL".
Jan. 23 "INHERIT THE WIND".
Jan. 30 "JUDGMENT AT
NUREMBERG".
Feb. 6 "A MAN FOR ALL
SEASONS".
Feb. 13 "THE BROTHERS
KARAMAZOV".
Feb. 27 "THE CAINE MUTINY".
Mar. 6 "COMPULSION".
Mar. 13 "RASHOMON".
Mar. 20 "ANATOMY OF A
MURDER".
Passes are $15 for 10 films or $2
at the door. Passes go on sale Monday, Jan. 6 until Wednesday, Jan.
8 noon hours in front of the
Distribution Centre in the Law
Building. The films will be shown
on Thursday afternoons beginning
at 12:30 in rooms 101 & 102 of the
Law Building.
All proceeds to the Lee Paikin
Memorial Scholarship Fund.
Centellebrate
Welcome back! Along with second term, January 1986 brings the
beginning of Vancouver's 100th birthday celebration. The Vancouver
Centennial Commission, an independent body appointed by city
council, is coordinating centennial
activities.
Don Holubitsky and I are
members of the commission and as
such, represent all Vancouver
students (elementary, secondary
and post-secondary).
What we are seeking from you
(or any groups with which you are
associated) is input. If you would
like to hold a centennial related
event, or would simply like more information, please contact us via
SUB room 238 (228-3971). Happy
Birthday Vancouver!
Simon Seshadri
AMS Director of Administration
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION
General council meeting — alt members invited,
noon, Buch B327.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Organizing for film festival, noon, SUB 237.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff meeting,  everyone welcome,  especially
new staff, planning for recruitment campaign,
noon, SUB 241k.
THURSDAY
GREAT LAW TRIALS ON THE SILVER
SCREEN
"Twelve Angry Men", 12 at the door, noon, Law
101/102.
CAMPUS CRUSADE. INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP. NAVIGATORS
Joint worship for UBC christians, noon. Woodward 2.
FRIDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
NORAD and nuclear war: letter  ~ writing to
MP's, noon, SUB 205
The pro-choice public is invited
to attend a tribunal, or people's
court, which will put the present
abortion law on trial. Women of all
ages are invited to come forward to
tell their own stories about trouble
getting a legal, or having to
undergo an illegal, abortion. Many
women have stories to tell of being
denied an abortion, or of facing
delays in getting approval, of being
forced to travel, or to pay high fees,
or to submit to physical damage to
obtain an abortion. A panel of prominent people who support choice
will act as sympathetic judges, and
they will recommend a verdict to
the audience, acting as the jury. We
expect that the law will be found
guilty of crimes against women.
We urgently request women
who have suffered under the law to
come forward with their stories.
These can be presented in person at
the Tribunal, or they can be
presented anonymously.
We also need help in organizing
the Tribunal. Contact us through
The Ubyssey.
The Tribunal will meet at 2 p.m.
on Jan. 25 at St. Andrew Wesley
United Church (Nelson and Burrard).
The why and the how of teaching
children about peace.
Teachers or teachers-to-be,
parents, and others working with
children will be especially interested
in this presentation. Starting with
the basics, Mike Zlotnick will
discuss the following topics: Why
Peace Education?; Objectives of
Peace Education; Teaching ideas
and techniques; Responding to opposition from colleagues or
parents; Where to find more information and materials.
All this and more will be discussed at noon on Jan. 13 in Scarfe 100.
7Vie University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
presents
MAJOR
BARBiRA
By George Bernard Shaw
with Leon Pownall as
Undershaft
Directed by Antony Holland
JANUARY 15-25
;»»^i
Special Previews
JAN. 15 & 16
2 for 1
regular admission
fi;in:iii.ai:aiiK»
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Thurs., Mat. Jan. 23 at 12:30
Student Tickets: $4.50
FREDERIC W001 THEATRE
Box Office    Room 207
Support Your
Campus Theatre
Come and help your
soon-to-be-fellow
Ubyssey staffers to
type, photograph,
design and Duck
hunt. SUB 241k. Be
there.
NEW
RETURN POLICY
On Course Books
• Course books bought for
Second Term courses may
be returned for full refund
any time up to January
31st (the ten-day rule has
been eliminated).
• Books must be unmarked
and in saleable-as-new condition.
• Returns will NOT be accepted without the original
SALES RECEIPT.
After January 31st all sales of
course books will be NON-
RETURNABLE.
REMEMBER
to keep your receipt.
BOOKSTORE
4
fM^S
On 4th Avenue
2006 W. 4th Ave. (Corner of 4th & Maple-Upstairs)
GREAT VIEW, GREAT FOOD
YOUR KIND OF PRICES
10°7o OFF
MON.—THURS.
WITH UBC STUDENT CARD
Pas-Xc* *°'e''
THE AFFORDABLE FOOD EXPERIENCE
UBC
rr.(E-X-C-E ■ L-L-E-N -T) ^r
The  eat eri
FREE BURGER
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF ErTOFU BURGERS ONLY.
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5296
i
FASHiONWORKS!
4476  West   Tenth  Avenue
FOR MEN & WOMEN
-THE CLASSIFIEDS-
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines. 1 day $4.60; Additional lines 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
25 - INSTRUCTION
COME TO AN OPEN HOUSE ON THURS.,
JANUARY 9th. 1986
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
IN THE FAIRVIEW CRESENT FACILITY
"SHAME THE DEVIL" is a career woman's
novel. LYN MORROW writes it inside
House of Commons, Press Gallery,
W.P.T.B., Civil Service, sex, & liquor.
Publicity, Buttle Lake, S. James. $15.95
postpaid, ISBN 0-9682282-0-1. LYNMOR
PUBLISHING, Osoyoos, B.C.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
FEBRUARY 15, 19BS LSAT
on January 21, 25, 26, 1986
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT PREPARATION COURSES.
1-800-387-1262
30 - JOBS
15 - FOUND
1   CALCULATOR   Dec.   9/85.   Please  call
263-1014.
20 - HOUSING
ACCOMMODATION is available in the
U.B.C. Student Residences. Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s newest residence facility, is
accepting applications from students who
are 23 years of age by December 31st, 1985
or who are graduate students. Totem Park
and Place Vanier Residences have immediate vacancies for men and women of
any age for room and board accommodation. Come to the Student Housing Office,
2071 West Mall, or phone 228-2811, for
information. DONT FORGET: OPEN
HOUSE ON THURSDAY, JANUARY
9TH. 1986. 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. IN THE
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT FACILITY.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Student preferred.
5 min. walk from campus. Nice apartment.
No furniture needed. 228-9698.
MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME AT THE
DEKE HOUSE - 5765 Agronomy Road.
Live without rush hour & within minutes of
SUB! Rooms are NOW AVAILABLE FOR
RENT. INCLUDES-3 meals per day - 8
washrooms kept tidy by our weekly cleaning service — free parking — cable TV &
TSN, movies, music — use of stereo
system.
Our prices per school term are $1350.00 for
a shared double room & $1600.00 for an exclusive single. This opportunity is open to
all UBC men.
Please phone either Terry Marleau or Erik
Madsen at 222-1135 or 222-2619 for details.
STUDENTS' DELIGHT. Earn $400-»1000 per
month part-time working from your home.
Call Mr. Morgan, 687-3927.
LUCRATIVE INCIDENTAL GAIN! I'm
looking for students who have enough
courage to deal with perfume articles with a
guaranteed profit of 25% or more or using
only for own need I These articles, 32 different fragrances of a French newcomer are
unknown in Canada but heavily used in
Europe! Samples are partially free of
charge! Try it and enjoy itl For more info
please write: Rainer Brueckersteinkuh! Am
Teckenberg 61, 4030 Ratingen 6, West Germany.
70 - SERVICES
LICENSED ELECTRICIAN for hire. New installments, rewire and repairs. No job too
small. Phone Maurice, 591-1637.
SPEAKEASY has pamphlets and posters
on bus routes, health, movies, campus
events . . . drop by SUB Concourse.
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type theses,   resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
TERM PAPERS Et ESSAYS. Minimum notice. 222-4661, Mon.-Fri. 12-5 p.m. only. Tuesday, January 7, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Classic college tourney aids 'Birds
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The Centennial Hockey Classic
provided Vancouver hockey fans
with the best entertainment since
Cyclone Taylor led the Vancouver
Millionaires to a Stanley Cup in
1915.
UBC finished an impressive third
while Cornell won a hard fought
game against Yale to take the championship.
The tournament at Thunderbird
Arena and the P.N.E. Agrodome
featured the finest in American and
Canadian collegiate hockey. Both
evening games at UBC were packed
and fans were well rewarded by excellent, fast paced hockey.
Cornell Big Red won the final
Sunday afternoon at the Agrodome
in a close 5-3 decision over the Yale
University Bulldogs. Cornell used
its tough checking, disciplined style
of hockey to keep Yale off balance
all night. Chris Norton, the Big
Red's star defenceman, was named
tournament most valuable player.
Only three Americans play for Cornell, one being the third string
goaltender.
"We believe that defence will
create offense and our transition
game from defence to offense was
excellent. We did not cave in defensively because our philosophy is
that if we have the legs to skate then
we will stick to what gave us the
lead. The main thing was that we
did not give their defense time to
wheel with the puck," said Cornell
coach Lou Reycroft.
UBC athletics director Bob Hindmarch said, "the U.S. teams play
a very disciplined brand of hockey.
The most disciplined team is the one
that is going to win. They play the
blueline like it was a 20 foot
cliff—you don't see many offsides,
the players play their positions and
do their jobs."
Earlier in the day the UBC
hockey team defeated the University of Manitoba Bisons in a 7-6
thriller. Trailing 5-2 midway
through the second period, UBC
scored two goals before the period
ended to narrow Manitoba's lead to
one. The 'Birds build a 7-6 lead in
the third period on goals by Keith
Abbott, Steve Lapointe and Mark
Trotzuk, and hung on to win the
game.
Trotzuk was outstanding
throughout the tournament, earning a position on the second all-star
team. Mike Coflin once again supplied brilliant two-way play as did
Paul Achtem. For his efforts Coflin
was selected to the first all-star
team as well as collecting a game
star award for the second time in as
many games.
"We don't like to make a differentiation between offense and
defence — our offense does its job
by checking people and getting
them in trouble. I think we surpris-
The Ubyssey
desperately needs
people to cover and
write about varsity
sports events. This request also and
especially includes
women. Covering
sports Is fun. If you are
Interested please let
us know at The
Ubyssey office, SUB
241k.
o
- bill Cunningham photo
UBC'S MARK TROTZUK, a second team all-star looks for goal in game against Seibu of Japan.
ed Manitoba by doing some of the
things that they do and threw them
off guard for much of the game. In
a checking role our goal is to take
the five man offense down to four,
then to three and ultimately to two
men, nullifying it," said UBC
coach Fred Masuch.
Perhaps the best matchup of the
entire tournament took place in
front of the largest crowd of the
year at Thunderbird Arena on Friday evening. Despite losing to eventual tournament champions Cornell, UBC probably played its best
game of the year.
Displaying a spirited attack, UBC
had numerous opportunities to
score but were constantly thwarted
by the excellent netminding of tournament all-star Doug Dadswell.
Peter Natyshak scored a natural
hat-trick in the third period to be
named game star for Cornell.
UBC's Mike Coflin played brilliantly together with linemate Paul
Achtem on "the small line" to gain
his first of two game star awards.
"Upward mobile young players
come to play hockey in the U.S.
colleges. I think size is valued over
speed in Canadian college hockey
and the game is a lot chippier," said
Cornell coach Reycroft.
"The American collegiate system
is designed more specifically
towards producing players that will
someday play in the N.H.L.," said
former Cornell and Montreal Canadian great Ken Dryden in a radio interview.
The tournament started off with
a bang as the Yale University
Bulldogs played the University of
Manitoba Bisons at T-Bird Arena.
Behind the stellar goaltending of
Micheal Shwalb and the brilliant
playmaking of centre Darren Ache-
son the Bulldogs won 8-5.
"We spread out defensively and
got some timely goals to help us win
this game. They (Manitoba) are an
advanced hockey club — they clogged up the neutral zone and took
away the middle of the ice early in
the game," said Yale coach Tim
Thomas.
Next afternoon Yale played the
University of Toronto Blues and
lost 6-5. The well played game
featured some outstanding two-way
hockey by both teams. Toronto
scored two third period goals to
edge the number 5 ranked team in
the U.S.
"To be successful we had to take
the game to them — a big part of
that is hard work — we had to take
away their strength which is offense
by taking the puck away. The
American teams skale better and rely more on speed. Canadian teams
are generally more defensive," said
Toronto head coach Paul Titanic.
Toronto ended up in fifth place
by walloping Seibu, which finished
last in the six team tournament,
14-4. Despite a losing 1-2 record
Yale finished the tournament in second place.
All proceeds from the tournament will go to the father Bauer
scholarship fund. 'Hopefully the
tournament will attract enough attention and money in the future so
that we can lure B.C. stars such as
Joe Murphy to our team instead of
seeing them go to the U.S.
colleges," said UBC coach Masuch.
Canadian college hockey is slightly more physical ind defensive
minded than its American counterpart. The real difference and consequently the real issue is the lure of
the American Universities to the
prospective young Canadian
hockey player. High priced scholarships and quality education make
many young Canadians leave home
and cross the border
Another major difference is fan
support. While UBC is lucky to get
100 fans to a game Yale will average
3,000 a game. The National
American championships are held
in N.H.L. rinks with capacity
crowds. It is a mystery to coaches,
players and media alike as to why
students north of the border do not
support their teams.
Our best college teams have proven time and time again that they'
are better than or just as good as the
American teams. If the quality of
the product is just as good then why
aren't there more fans coming to
the games. UBC is a quality team
gearing up for a better performance
in the second half of the schedule.
What they need more than anything
else is the support of the students.
Fan support makes a difference at
every level of the game and especially this one where the price of admission is always free for the best
entertainment value in town.
SALE
DRESSES, SUITS, SLACKS
JACKETS, SWEATERS
BLOUSES
20-75%
OFF
OPEN DAILY 10-6
FRIDAYS 10-9
SUNDAYS 12-5
We also carry a wide selection
of holiday and cruise wear.
Cnda c5. c^as/tion
YOUR NATURAL FIBRE FASHION SHOP
4325 West 10th Avenue
Vancouver   228-1214 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 7,1986
PURSUI THI TOTAL IXPIRIINCI
A COMPRIHINSIVI NON-CRIDIT INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM IN LIISURI PURSUITS
Courses are available ro all students, faculty, staff, alumni, their spouses and the general public   f*EC   UBC Membership is
required for all facuitv   staff, alumni and tneir spouses Idoes not apply to studentsi
REGISTRATION for ah courses will take place during regular office hours
Monday-Friday 9:00 am   11 30 a.m.. 12:30 p.m  3:00 p.m
Jd— .                  WHERE DO YOU REGISTER?                                                                                                                                                                        ^si=
r^=_ Room 203, lA/ar Memorial Gymnasium   PHONE: 228-3996 'or further information.       -
2ND TERM REGISTRATION:
Thursday, January 2 — Friday, January 10, 1986
i j_    ■■' PLEASE NOTE:
A   "\ —Late registration does not ensure a place in the course.
( ' —All classes are subject to last minute changes, cancellations, or additions.
d —Classes will be cancelled on the following days, Thursday. Friday £r Saturday (Feb. 20, 21 Er 22, 1966)
REFUND POLICY:
—We cancel, you get a full refund.
— You cancel, before 3:00 p.m., Friday, January 17th, there will be a $5.00 processing charge.
— There will be NO REFUNDS after Friday, January 17th, without medical documentation.
:tX   >TN
COURSE & LEVEL
FITNESS & STRENGTH
Strength Training Courses = $35.00
KhXhm Fit  - $40.00
101
102
103
104
105"'
107<2'
STRENGTH TRAINING
STRENGTH TRAINING
STRENGTH TRAINING FOR WOMEN
STRENGTH TRAINING FOR WOMEN
STRENGTH & WEIGHT TRAINING
WORKSHOP
Students: $15.00. Non-Students: $20.00
FACULTY/STAFF FITNESS
(taught by Dr. Stan Brown)
RHYTHM FIT—
"THE FITNESS GROUP"
Mon./Tues. &
Thursday
Mon./Wed.
Tuesday
Mon./Wed./Thurs.
Tues. / Wed. /Thurs.
(1) The $25.00 fee is the cost of membership in the RECREATION UBC PROGRAM
(2) The $40.00 fee allows participation in ALL RHYTHM FIT classes.
MARTIAL ARTS
Monday
Wednesday
Tues./Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
Saturday
6:00-7:30 p.m.
6:00-7:30 p.m.
6:00-7:30 p.m.
6:00-7:30 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
1:30-2:30 p.m.
3:30-4:20 p.m.
4:40-5:30 p.m.
W.M.G.—Weight Room
W.M.G.—Weight Room
W.M.G.—Weight Room
W.M.G.—Weight Room
W.M.G.—Weight Room
GYM E-OSBORNE CENTRE
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
WAR B WEST-OSBORNE CTR.
Faculty/Staff and Spouses & Acadia Residents.
$35.00 PER COURSE
201*
JUDO (LEVEL 1)
Tues./Thurs.
8:30-10:30 p.m.
202*
JUDO (Competition Level)
Saturday
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m
203*
TAI CHI (LEVEL 11)
Tues./Thurs.
7:30-9:00 p.m.
204*
SHOTOKAN KARATE (LEVEL 1)
Mon./Wed.
8:00-9:00 p.m.
206*
SHOTOKAN KARATE (LEVEL II)
Mon./Wed.
9:00-10:00 p.m.
207*
SHOTOKAN KARATE (LEVEL III)
Saturday
10:00-11:30 a.m.
208*
VOV1 MEDITATIVE CONTEMPLATION
(Soft Martial Art)
Tues./Thurs.
5:00-6:30 p.m.
209*
AIKIDO
Tues./Thurs.
7:00-8:30 p.m.
210*
KENDO
Tues./Thurs.
6:30-8:00 p.m.
211*
TAE KWON DO (LEVEL I)
Tues.
5:30-6:30 p.m.
Wed.
5:30-6:30 p.m.
Saturday
3:00-4:00 p.m.
212*
TAE KWON DO (LEVEL 11)
Wed.
5:30-7:30 p.m.
Saturday
3:00-4:30 p.m.
213*
TAE KWON DO (COMPETITIVE LEVEL)
Saturday
3:00-4:30 p.m.
214*
WU SHU
Mon./Wed.
6:30-8:00 p.m.
Saturday
1:00-3:00 p.m.
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
ARMOURY-ROOM 208
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
ARMOURY-ROOM 203
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
ARMOURY-ROOM 208
GYM B WEST-OSBORNE
GYM B WEST-OSBORNE
GYM B WEST-OSBORNE
GYM B WEST-OSBORNE
GYM B WEST-OSBORNE
GYM B WEST-OSBORNE
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
GYM E-OSBORNE CTR.
MARTIAL ART WEEK AT UBC April 21st-26th EVERY NIGHT A DIFFERENT DEMONSTRATION AND MASTER CLASS.
CALL 228-3996 FOR DETAILS.
RACQUET SPORTS
$55.00 PER COURSE
301
303
304
306
404
406
410
413
501
502
503
504
505
601
602
603
604
605
606
SQUASH (LEVEL I)
SQUASH (LEVEL 11)
RACQUETBALL (LEVEL 1)
RACQUETBALL (LEVEL II)
Mon./Wed.
Mon./Wed.
Tues./Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
4:15-5:45 p.m.
4:15-5:45 p.m.
4:15-5:45 p.m.
4:15-5:45 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
THUNDERBIRD WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
THUNDERBIRD WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
THUNDERBIRD WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
Jan. 13-Mar. 17
Jan. 15-Mar. 19
Jan. 14-Feb. 13
Feb. 18-Mar. 20
Feb. 8
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 13-Mar. 20
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 13-Mar. 19
Jan. 13-Mar. 12
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 14-Mar. 22
Jan. 15-Mar. 22
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
Jan. 13-Mar. 19
Jan. 18-Mar. 22
Jan. 13-Feb. 12
Feb. 17-Mar. 19
Jan. 14-Feb. 13
Feb. 18-Mar. 20
OUTDOOR PURSUITS
SEA TOURING KAYAKING
$40.00
($80.00 — off campus)
WHITEWATER KAYAKING
$50.00
($100.00—off campus)
WILDERNESS SURVIVAL $35.00
ST. JOHN'S 1ST AID CERTIFICATE $40.00
DANCE
ADVANCED CONTEMPORARY DANCE
ADVANCED JAZZ
BEGINNING BALLET
JAZZ DANCE (LEVEL I&II)
BALLROOM DANCE (LEVEL I)
FEES LISTED UNDER EACH COURSE
ACTIVITIES
BRIDGE (LEVEL I)
BRIDGE (LEVEL II or NON-BEGINNER)
CHOIR FOR EVERYONE $25.00
LEARN TO SKATE (LEVEL I)
GOLF (LEVEL I)
YOGA
Tuesday
Thursda;
Tuesday
Thursda;
Monday
Wednesday
Saturday
Tuesday
Thursday
Tues./Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
Tues./Thurs.
Mon./Wed.
Mon./Wed.
Wednesday
Monday
Tuesday
Tuesday
Tues./Thurs.
Sat., Mar. 15
Mon./Wed.
7:00-8:00 p.m.
5:30-7:00 p.m.
5:30-7:00 p.m.
5:30-7:00 p.m.
5:00-7:15 p.m.
7:30-10:30 p.m.
WAR MEM. GYM—RM 213
UBC AQUATIC CENTR
POOL
AQUATIC CENTRE POOL
AQUATIC CENTRE POOL
OPEN WATER
WAR MEM. GYM—RM. 211
OSBORNE CTR.—RM. 203A
$40.00 PER COURSE
12:30-2:00 p.m.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
5:00-6:30 p.m.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
6:00-7:30 p.m.
ARMOURY—ROOM 208
GYM B WEST-OSBORNE
ARMOURY—ROOM 208
ARMOURY—ROOM 208
ARMOURY—ROOM 208
$35.00 PER COURSE
7:30-9:00 p.m.
7:30-9:00 p.m.
7:00-8:30 p.m.
4:15-5:15 p.m.
1:30-2:30 p.m.
4:30-5:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
(GATE 4)
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
2845 Acadia St.
THUNDERBIRD WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
GYM E-OSBORNE CENTRE
UBC GOLF COURSE
ARMOURY-ROOM 203
March 4
larch 6
March 11
larch 13
March 10
March 12
March 15
Feb. 11-Mar. 18
Jan. 14-Mar. 4
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 14-Mar. 20
Jan. 13-Mar. 19
Jan. 13-Mar. 19
Jan. 13-Mar. 19
Jan. 15-Mar. 19
Jan. 13-Mar. 17
Jan. 14-Mar. 18
Jan. 14-Mar. 18
Feb. 11-Mar. 13
March 15
Jan. 13-Mar. 19
PLEASE NOTE:
LEVEL I   —for participants entering an instructional program for the first time to acquire basic activity skills.
LEVEL II —for participants who have learned basics of activity and wish to continue developing personal skills.
LEVEL III—for the experienced person wishing to acquire advanced techniques.

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