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The Ubyssey Mar 11, 1986

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Array XJBC Aichives
Serial
Senator fasts for Katimavik
OTTAWA (CUP) — Liberal senator Jacques Hebert announced yesterday in a letter
to Prime Minister Brian Mulroney that he is
on an unlimited hunger strike in the senate
until the government announces substantive
measures to help Canadian youth.
Hebert, chair of the senate committee on
youth which released its stinging report
Feb. 19, wrote that he will not eat "until
you and your government act in such a way
as to restore my faith in your intentions to
effect positive change on the present and
future lives of Canadian youth."
Hebert is also the founder and president
of Katimavik, the $20 million youth
volunteer   program   cut   by   the   federal
government. He said he would stop the
hunger strike if funding to Katimavik is
restored.
"Perhaps, more than any other gesture, a
decision by your government to resume
funding that program would signal a new
sensitivity and awareness towards youth
and inject new hope in a generation in
despair,"   the  grey-haired   senator wrote.
The fast began yesterday at noon.
The senate report said 20 per cent of
Canadian youth — about 70,000 15-24 year
olds — are out of school and are
unemployed or have stopped looking for
work. However, the report contains few
specific   recommendations   for   helping
youth.
Although the senate report of the
NDP Task Force on Youth came out a week
before the federal budget, the only specific
mention of youth in the budget was the
elimination of Katimavik.
"Where is the compassion of a government that ... has the audacity to bring
down a budget that insults the young people
of Canada by reiterating its decision to
cancel the internationally heralded program
Katimavik, to destroy the Department of
Youth by stripping away its budget . . . and
offers youth nothing to replace it?" asked
Hebert in his letter.
The omission of spending estimates for
the Ministry of Youth in the budget and the
desertion of youth Minister Andre Champagne's three key personnel recently suggest
the ministry will be abolished at the end of
the fiscal year, March 31.
Asked in the House of Commons last Friday about Statistics Canada figures released
that day which show youth unemployment
has risen from 15 to 16.4 per cent, Champagne said.
"More than 200,000 youths are now or
will be involved in employment programs
this year. That is what the government has
done. The unemployment level has gone
down to the lowest level ever and this trend
will continue."
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. 43
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 11,1986
228-2301
AMS prez nabs unauthorized cash
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
AMS President Simon Seshadri
authorized payment for an ad in the
March 4th Ubyssey from an AMS
external affairs account for which
he had no signing authority.
The Ubyssey obtained a copy of
the contract, dated March 3, for the
$110 ad for a foreign service competition lecture and seminar. It lists
"AMS external affairs" as the
.advertiser, has an external affairs
account number for billing, and is
signed by Seshadri.
AMS external affairs coordinator
Carol Pedlar said Monday she
didn't know anything about the ad
and did not authorize payment for
it out of her account.
Margaret Copping, 1984-85 AMS
president, said "the president has
no signing authority on the external
affairs account."
"It is weird that he (Seshadri)
would take it (the money for the ad)
out of someone else's account," she
said.
AMS vice-president Rebecca
Nevreaument said the four signing
officers of the society, the directors
of finance and administration, the
vice-president and the secretary of
the student administrative commission, are the only officers authorized to sign for AMS purchases.
Seshadri could not be reached
late Monday after the Ubyssey obtained the copy of the contract.
He said earlier Monday student
council did not take an official vote
to sponsor the $85 "How to succeed
in the foreign service competition"
seminar.
Seshadri said recently the AMS
gave Ottawa-based Foreign Service
Examination and Career Counselling, Inc. the free advertisement and
free and half-price room bookings
because they offer a student discount on the regularly $120 rate for
their seminar.
AMS administration director
Martin Cocking said the student administrative commission approved
the free room booking for a free introductory lecture March 5 and a
half price booking for the March 9
paid seminar. He said SAC took the
available student discount into consideration.
Cocking also questioned the procedure by which AMS sponsorship
was authorized.
"I think it should be voted on by
the AMS," he said.
Nevreaument said she was not
told the AMS was sponsoring the
event.
Copping said student discounts
aren't enough reason to give special
consideration to businesses.
"Half the businesses on Tenth
Avenue have student discounts and
they don't get free advertising," she
said.
Hugh Hiscox, regional director
for the public service commission of
Canada which runs the foreign service exam and hiring, had little to
say about the seminars.
"It's a private firm. He's a
private entrepreneur marketing a
product," Hiscox said.
See page 2: FEW
Cash won't help
-steve chan photo
"RACE IN PROGRESS, stay the hell away," says ominous sign being painted by Intramural's SWAT (Speedy
Women Advertising Triathlon) team outside SUB on sunny Friday afternoon. Signs warn people to stay clear of
path of Triathlon racers lest they be flattened accidently. Triathlon was held Saturday. (See story, page 8).
Bookstore lifts ban on AMS clubs
By NANCY CAMPBELL
Alma Mater Society clubs will
be welcome customers once again
at the UBC Bookstore, starting today.
Since early February, the
AMS's relationship has been less
than cordial with the Bookstore
because of director John
Hedgecock's decision not to
honor purchase orders issued by
the society.
The Bookstore claimed the
AMS owed $17,000, a figure
which included nearly $10,000 in
interest charges.
But AMS Director of Finance
Jamie Collins said Monday that of
the approximate $7,600 worth of
invoices in contention, about
$2,200 had been paid and $1,400
not received. Of the remaining
$4,000 not paid, $3,500 is for one
account dating from 1982.
Collins would not comment on
the   interest   charges,   most   of
which appear to be due to the
$3,500 purchase of stethoscopes
by the Nursing Undergraduate
Society.
A meeting today between Collins, Hedgecock and Bookstore
operations manager Neville Ebert
resulted in an agreement to
resume the blanket purchase order
system used by AMS clubs, with
one change. As before, clubs will
be issued a purchase order for a
fixed sum to be kept with the
Bookstore with access limited to
the club treasurer and designated
persons. The Bookstore will now
ask for ID from people signing for
purchases.
Although the banning of purchase orders was an inconvenience, Collins said it appeared to
be a pressure tactic by the
Bookstore to bring its accounts
payable up to date. The UBC
Finance office recently turned
over control of the Bookstore's
finances to the Bookstore and it is
trying to get its accounts cleared
up.
As for the outstanding $3,500
bill, NUS claimed it had paid the
bill in the past but cannot come up
with supporting documents, Collins said.
By KAREN GRAM
Canadian University Press
British Columbia's student aid
budget will more than double next
year but no college or university
students will benefit.
Post secondary education
minister, Russ Fraser announced
March 6 he will plug $6.2 million into financial aid bringing the total
budget to $10.9 million from the
$4.7 million alloted in 1985-86.
"The additional money will
enable the ministry to move into the
second year of a three year phase in
program for student aid," said
Fraser. A portion of the money will
also be used to help students attending private trade schools, he said.
Byron Hender, UBC financial
awards officer, said the funding increase would probably not have any
effect on UBC students.
"It looks to me they are providing funds for programs they announced last year," said Hender
referring to the loan remissions and
scholarships programs the Socreds
announced in August, 1985.
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation of Students pacific region chair
said he thinks the money will go
toward interest payments of all the
students who get student aid in the
three year period beginning in 1984.
"The three-year phase-in program refers to the first three years
of the government's all-loan program," said Hunt. Each year they
will have to'increase the funding to
cover the interest charges on each
new class of students he added.
Hunt said the announcement
won't help students at all. "They
are just continuing the problem,"
he said. "Students will still have
huge debts when they graduate."
In 1984, the Social Credit government eliminated student aid grants
replacing them with loans. The
government spent $25 million on
grants to students in 1982-83 —
$15 million more than the total for
next year.
Prof sues UBC over forced retirement
A UBC professor has joined a growing list of people
using the Charter of Rights and Freedoms to challenge
the mandatory retirement age.
Surgery professor Dr. R. Cameron Harrison is suing
the university for retiring him at age 65 December 31.
His birthday, which fell after July 31 — UBC's
other retirement date — did not affect his job performance, Harrison said Monday.
In a writ submitted to presidential advisor Charles
Bourne Monday, Harrison argues his contract should
remain in force until the end of June. The writ also
sites the Charter to challenge mandatory retirement.
UBC's current rules require employees to retire on
the earliest July 31 or December 31 after reaching age
65.
Faculty association president Sidney Mindess said
Harrison's challenge joins several across Canada. A
UBC assistant registrar's challenge will go to court
next month, as will two academic cases in Ontario.
"One of these cases is going to make it to the
supreme court," said Mindess. "There will be a case
law within the next few months."
The faculty association will provide "some financial
support" for Harrison's case, said Mindess.
But he added the defeat of mandatory retirement
would restrain the university from hiring younger
faculty members as quickly.
"As a faculty association we haven't discussed with
out membership what we think of mandatory retirement." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11, 1986
Seneca College student council
folds press over tastless spoof
TORONTO (CUP) — The student council at Seneca College has
shut down the student newspaper
after confiscating 5000 copies of a
spoof issue it calls "malicious and
libelous and in no way humorous."
The Feb. 27 issue of OBT, dubbed OBTease, contained among
other things a photo of a decaying
cat, an ad for an "open-minded sex
slave, M or F, 4-13 years," and an
article alleging sexual activity by the
student president in the council office.
The council, the paper's official
publisher, was not amused. President Emily Thomson said OBT was
shut down so that its "policies and
procedures" could be reviewed by a
committee of newspaper staff and
council members — with the staff
"probably" forming a majority.
The paper will re-open, but maybe
not this year, she added.
In a bulletin posted on campus,
the council defended removing
about one-half the 10,000 copies of
OBTs (the rest were distributed to
Seneca's other four campuses).
Few find jobs
after exams
From page 1
He added the public service commission "isn't in a position to confirm or deny whether or not we'll be
recruiting for foreign service of-
ficersfor next year."
The next exam will be in October
to screen 1987 university graduates,
he said.
In 1982-83, the latest year with
complete figures, 4,447 people
wrote the foreign service exam the
firm's seminar covers. Of that
number, 640 were interviewed, but
only 25 got jobs with the foreign
service, according to public service
figures.
The exam was cancelled in
1983-84 and last October.
PRIZZI'S HONOUR
[Thurs.-Sun, Mar. 13-16
7:00 & 9:30 p.m.
[SUB AUDITORIUMI
^W?T
UBC Ope
POS
Marcff 17,1», 21 & 22
UBC OldjHitorium
Tickets &lnH 228-3113
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Grey for
the last 27 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices — including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
and Sundays
1:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
4556" W. 10th Ave. - 224-1912
We accept Chargex
"We do not feel this is an issue of
censorship or freedom of the press
but rather of an organization acting
in a responsible manner," the
notice said.
editor Clark Davey, though Davey
said she told him he had been
dismissed.
Davey, who said he apologized
for any harm done, had mixed feel-
Thomson denied actually firing    ings about the closure.
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and have a clean credit record, you can get
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That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
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As well as shopping for yourself.
Of course, the American Express Card
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So call 1-800-387-9666 and
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Federal budget called regressive
By MARTIN DE JONGE
The recent federal budget is
regressive and unfair, the New
Democratic party house leader said
Friday.
Ian Deans told about 30 people in
SUB 208 that Michael Wilson has
been avoiding questions and debate
on the budget.
"I have seen 25 budgets come
through the house, and this is the
least progressive and most unfair
I've ever seen," said Deans. "Not
only has there been a shift in the tax
burden from the rich to the poor,
but also from businesses to individuals and families," said
Deans.
"This latest budget goes against
Mulroney's promise to provide tax
fairness."
SJL Babb
declines
press debate
OTTAWA (CUP) — South
African Ambassador Glen Babb
decided March 4 to refuse the
Carleton University Press Club's invitation to a debate this month. His
decision came after he learned his
opponent could be Donald Woods,
former editor of the East London
Daily Dispatch in South Africa.
"Mr. Woods was news to us,"
said Babb's Second Secretary
Wesley Johanneson in a telephone
interview, "we never knew Mr.
Woods would participate."
Now living in England, Woods
had to flee South Africa in 1977.
"It's obvious his journalism is antagonistic to the government," said
Robert McKenzie, vice president of
the Press Club.
On Feb. 3, Babb accepted the
club's invitation to debate
"Freedom of Expression in South
Africa". Johanneson said at the
time Babb's opponent was expected
to be Peter Kent, a journalist with
NBC TV in Miami.
But when McKenzie called the
South African Embassy to set a
date, he said Johanneson told him:
"We won't debate Donald
Woods."
The Press Club then decided to
withdraw its invitation because
Babb's objection to Woods was
against the "spirit of our
invitation", said McKenzie. Last
month, the club frequently argued
for "freedom of expression" when
students objected to providing
Babb a platform for racism.
McKenzie said this is not true.
Journalists were sought only after
the club received Babb's response,
he said, therefore "it's impossible
that we could have mentioned Peter
Kent."
"We had to pursue several people, since they are all busy. Peter
Kent agreed first."
Kent and Woods are the only two
journalists who agreed, in principle,
to the debate. Woods is preferred
because he has more knowledge of
South Africa, said McKenzie.
The principle at stake is freedom
of expression, said McKenzie.
"They're asking us to deny one
man's freedom of expression in exercising another's.
For now, it's a resolution to a
debate that saw Carleton's biggest
political student gathering this year.
Packed by more than 100 spectators
and television cameras, the Feb. 20
council meeting was the scene of
three and a half hours of increasingly emotional debate over apartheid
and freedom of speech. The Press
Club was decertified that night for
inviting Babb.
Deans said a family that brings in
$40,000 a year will be paying $812
more in taxes in 1987 than they did
when the Tories came to power in
1984. But, the family earning
$60,000 will be paying $1,201 less,
and the family earning $150,000 will
be paying $5,470 less.
Deans, who has represented the
affluent Ontario riding of Hamilton
since 1979, said the budget also
neglects women.
"An overwhelming majority of
low-increase earners are women,
but no budget action recognizes
this," he said. "Moreover, there is
nothing in this budget that provides
for something that study after study
shows we need — universal day
care."
Deans also criticized the recent
actions of two Tory members of
parliament.
Youth   minister Andree   Cham
pagne's plan to use the ministry to
recruit young members to the Progressive Conservative Party, and
her subsequent denial of this shows
the government's "new line of denying everything they said,
everything they wrote, as if gremlins
are making the decisions."
Deans also criticized Quebec
Tory back-bencher Marcel
Tremblay, who has gone on record
to say that more than $1 billion in
untendered public works contracts
should be awarded to companies
that contribute to the Progressive
Conservative government.
Canadians must challenge
budgetary measures, put pressure
on the government to remove Mme
Champagne from office, and encourage the Conservatives to live up
to their obligation of providing
equality between men and women,
Deans said.
STUNNED STUDENT is first unwilling victim of UBC library system's
new "Electro-scan" security system. Seemingly harmless looking exit
gates detect book thieves, library fine fiends and people in need of a shock.
Steve wou photo
Librarians gleefully plan expansions which may seek out and destroy people who leave food in the stacks. Flashers are next for pyrotechnic punishment.
Youth minister admits buying support
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
Ministry of Youth is a political tool
to recruit young members to the
Progressive Conservative party,
Youth Minister Andree Champagne
wrote in a Jan. 6 letter.
In the letter, leaked by NDP
Youth   Critic   Howard   McCurdy
March 6, Champagne writes "2.5
of 4.5 million young Canadians
(15-24) will be casting a vote for the
first time in 1988. Support to the
recruitment efforts of the PC Youth
Federation will be a pre-writ priority for the government."
Champagne's   letter,   addressed
simply to "My dear colleague," attempts to win support, presumable
from fellow Tory MPs, for "Year
Two" of the Ministry of Youth.
The Ministry spent its $24 million
budget last year organising activities
and funding projects to celebrate
International Year of Youth.
Research holds up hoppy herd
REGINA (CUP) — Devastation
by herds of grasshoppers may no
longer threaten prairie crops if
research by a University of Regina
biologist takes off the ground.
For ten years, geneticist Bill
Chapko has been studying the
migratory grasshopper, "One of
the four big grasshopper pests in
this part of the world," he said. The
grasshopper is responsible for
millions of dollars in damages in
Saskatchewan farmers alone.
But Chapko says he is more interested in pure science than in the
applications of his work. Through a
process called gene mapping,
Chapko plots the development of
certain genes when various factors
are introduced or withdrawn.
"My main thrust is studying the
incidence of chromosomes in the
natural construct. From the point
of view of grasshopper control, I'm
not really interested in that right
now," he said. "(But), by the
nature of the beast, I guess there
must be some applications."
Chapko's research indicates a
strain of semi-sterile grasshopper
could be created and later introduced to prairie farms. If the grasshopper population drops, so does the
chance of crop damage, Chapko
says.
"We'll be in the position of being
able to predict (grasshopper
population) outbreaks. There's a
good indication of a connection
between population and genetic
variability, or between the amount
of variation and abundance," he
said.
However, Chapko hesitates to
guess when chromosomes, which
contain genetic information of a
species, will be "reshuffled"
enough to be introduced into a
natural environment.
Chapko says his work also will
allow farmers to gauge use of different pesticides once grasshoppers
develop immunity to certain
chemical controls, but again does
not know how long it will be until
farmers can use his findings.
"Your guess is as good as mine.
Replacing grasshoppers in the field
with ones of your own design,
hence genes of your own design,
that's further on down the road. It
all depends on the resources that are
available," he said.
He says while federal funding
through the Natural Sciences and
Engineering Research Council has
been generous, provincial and industry interest has not. "I think
that's partly because of a lack of
comprehension about genetics,"
Chapko"said.
"Public expectations created by
IYY require careful management,
especially in light of the significant
diminution in youth-related spending (close to $100 million since the
election)," Champagne writes. The
$100 million is her figure.
"The "diminution" possibly
refers to Katimavik, cut by $30
million last year and eliminated in
February, saving an additional $20
million. It may also refer to the $33
million cut from the Challenge '86
student summer job creation programme, announced in Dec. 1985.
In light of this, Champagne
writes, "The package (the Ministry
of Youth) is modestly priced at $7.5
million."
Asked about the letter in Question Period March 6, Champagne
said she did not know what letter
McCurdy was referring to. The next
day, March 7, she acknowledged
the letter and admitted to signing it.
Challenge shortchanges students
By DEBBIE LO
B.C. students are getting the short end of the
Challenge '86 stick, which pays B.C. students the
lowest wage subsidy in Canada, the Canadian
Federation of Students executive officer said Friday.
Stephen Scott said Challenge '86, a federal-
provincial youth employment program, is unfair to
B.C. students because the program does not pay a
standard minimum wage across the nation.
"We feel students in B.C. are being shortchanged
in this year's program," he said. "Especially when
we have the second highest youth unemployment rate
in Canada."
The B.C. minimum wage, currently the lowest in
Canada, is $3.65 per hour. Saskatchewan pays the
top rate of $4.50 per hour.
Said Scott: "The program should treat Canadians
the same way, regardless of the province they live
in."
CFS is planning a letter writing campaign to
federal employment and immigration minister Flora
Macdonald, urging her to establish a standard wage
of $4.50 across Canada.
"The program should be properly funded so
students can make enough money to return to school
in the fall," said Scott.
Pat Brand, UBC Canada Employment Centre
manager, said several students have requested
Challenge '86 forms to use as tools for marketing
themselves to employers.
The federal government announced its contribution of $210 million, up 2.5 per cent from last year's
$205 million in mid-February.
The provincial contribution has still not been announced, but it is expected to be revealed in the next
provincial budget. Last year the provincial contribution was 19.4 million, down 15 per cent from the
previous year's $16.6 million.
The Challenge program is part of a four part youth
job creation program which includes providing
students with loans to start their own summer
businesses and paying EXPO site employers job
training subsidies.
This year's Challenge '86 program, which promises to create 18,000 jobs, closely resembles last
year's Challenge '85 program, which promised to
create between 15,000 and 17,000 jobs.
Despite the job program last July 22,000, or 18.5
per cent, of B.C. youths were unemployed. This was
4.1 per cent higher than the national average. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
fuesday, March 11, 1986
Stream of consciousness
the edit topic, well, what do people really
need to know? seven ubyssey journalists searching for common ground:
well, there's nuclear awareness week, at
ubc, this week, but what can you say about it
that's really new: everyone already knows
about the 50,000 bombs and hiroshima, that
nuclear war is bad, we don't want it all the old
stinking lies. 1986 as the united nations international year of peace, but there is more: it's
about star wars and summit meetings and how
we select information, how we learn what we
need to know to survive.
notes on nuclear war/the atomic cafe/goodbye war/stanford star wars debate/and what
about the debate surrounding south african
hennie du toit's scheduled speech at the centre
for investigative journalism's convention this
week in Vancouver?
don't discussions of south africa always
degenerate into a defense of apartheid as a
system? or would this help us discover information being distorted or suppressed or rearranged until the reality becomes less substance and
more shadow, nothing you can really see or be
sure of. what about freedom of speech? media
coverage as providing credibility or examining
half-truths which usually slide by unobserved?
censoring censorship with censorship or exposure?
nothing is as simple as it seems at first glance
out there: words and actions pushing the world
in different ways, the media selecting, forming,
editing and distributing information, the audience receiving, do they receive entertainment/information? will they act? how?
someone mentions the new film, the "big
snit". how difficult it is to co-exist, contrary
values all around and no resolution in sight,
seven individuals co-existing with nuclear war
and south african speakers as edit topics/non-
edit topics, then, a flash, a blast, fire and
darkness.
UBC Social Credit Club says "Thanks Russ
))
We would like to thank the
honorable Russ Fraser for coming
out to UBC and speaking with
students and faculty on February
18. Mr. Fraser was frank, honest
and informative about the government's plans for the future of post-
secondary education in B.C. His
speech outlined "Excellence in
Education" which will be the major
vehicle for distributing the government's multi-year educational spen-
We're sorry
As the Filmsoc member responsible for the "Myra Breckinridge"
film advertisements that were
posted around campus, I would like
to offer my sincerest apologies to
those who found them in the least
bit offensive. Initially, I had hoped
that the flyers would be taken in
good humour.
The explicitly descriptive caption
was written by a noted reviewer and
is not a Filmsoc concoction. One
must realize that such a depiction
would hardly be viable in a film of
its age.
In reply to Jamie Andrews'
Ubyssey letter of Mar. 7, 1986,
"Filmsoc is Unclear", I would like
to state that the flyer's blurb mentioning that the UBC Engineers had
been unfairly sanctioned is not
universally the AMS or Filmsoc's
opinion. I realize now that it was
presumptuous of me to expect that
every member would possess a
similar view. I surmise that the large
turnout of engineers at the film
presentation was a result of the
blurb.
I feel it necessary at this point to
remind the readers that the UBC
Film Society is a non-political club.
We try to offer films that appeal to
a wide range of audiences offering
three different film series six nights
a week at the SUB auditorium.
Such varied film presentations include next Monday's horror night
with Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho"
and March 24th's Ronald Reagan
classic, "Bedtime for Bonzo".
I hope such a controversy will do
little to tarnish Filmsoc's established reputation. In future advertisements I will strive to be more
cautious in my promotions so as not
to insult any society or faculty.
David Mitchell
cinemawest president
UBC film society
ding package — an additional $110
million in the first year alone.
Mr. Fraser is well suited for the
'Post-Secondary Education' portfolio. In his first full week in office
this UBC graduate has visited both
the campuses of UVic and UBC to
meet with students and faculty.
During his years here Mr. Fraser
was actively involved, serving a
term as EUS president while obtaining his degree in Engineering. His
proven commitment to the consultation process is a definite in-'
dication of his concern about the
education system in our province.
It was unfortunate that certain
people in attendance did not see fit
to remove their earplugs and listen
to the minister as he has vowed to
listen to us. These individuals
repeatedly chose to ignore any of
the positive potential of the government's program and instead concerned themselves with negative nit
picking. They refuse to
acknowledge reality and the
economics of the 80's, preferring to
live in the bygone era of unlimited
spending. Since these individuals
are student representatives we
would hope that they would
become more familiar not only with
the present situation but with student attitudes in general before they
decide' to speak for us.
Mr. Fraser's appearance is only
the beginning of what we believe
will be positive government
presence on the campuses. This will
be a great opportunity for students
to become more familiar with and
to become more active in the process of post-secondary education.
We hope that UBC students will
respond in kind.
We would like to congratulate
Mr. Fraser on his appointment —
he is a welcomed asset to our educational system, and we would also
like to thank the EUS for sponsoring his visit.
John Landis, president
UBC Social Credit club
commerce 3
Deposed president deserves trial
Regarding the letter in the March
4th issue of the Ubyssey entitled
"Marcos' Island," I must say that I
am glad there are people with clear
heads. People like Marcos and
Duvalier must be returned to their
respective countries to be tried for
the crimes they have committed
against their people.
I would like, however, to go further than that. I would like to see
the American new colonialists put
to trial, too, for their support, and
"Don't be fooled" on April first
"Don't be fooled"""on April first,
warn student societies from around
B.C., as they launch their "Don't
Be Fooled: Vote for Public Education" campaign. The campaign will
culminate with the Provincial Day
of Concern for Education, on April
first.
You may remember last year
when students from the lower
mainland drew media attention and
heightened public awareness by
demonstrating on bridges, taking
petitions to their MLAs, and converging on Robson Square to protest provincial education cutbacks.
The 22,000 UBC students, and
several hundred from the local colleges, joined in the Great Trek and
drew media and public attention to
the $20 million difference between
federal transfer payments for post
secondary education, and the
amount spent in B.C. The public
was shocked to hear that the provincial government was essentially
pocketing $20 million in funds earmarked for education, while making further cuts to the services
available.
The problems which motivated
students to embark on the Great
Trek still exist. B.C. still has the
highest tuition in Canada, and is the
second most poorly funded institution (next to Newfoundland). And
the only all debt student assistance
urogram make the burden of post
secondary education very difficult
for students. The last five years of
funding cuts have resulted in an exodus of professors who can earn
more elsewhere, reduced library
budgets and hours, crowded
classrooms, higher tuition for a
lower quality product and the list
goes on.
This year's provincial day of concern must raise public awareness
once again to the fact that our
education system is in a state of dire
need. Education must become an
issue of importance in the upcoming provincial election. It is vital
that all parties running see education as an election issue of importance, and that they all develop
policies towards education which
will restore education funding to at
least 1980 levels.
In order to increase public
awareness and make education an
election issue the external affairs
committee needs your help. Anyone
interested in helping to plan for the
provincial day of concern for
education is welcome to attend a
planning meeting in SUB 250
Thursday, March 12, at 12:30.
Freyja Bergthorson
arts 2
often installation of these regimes
against the popular wishes of the
people. The American regime, as
well as their puppets, should know
that they can no longer oppress a
nation, plunder its wealth, torture
its people, and kill the best minds
and most conscious members of its
society, and then at the end, take
off with billions of dollars and live
in Hawaii. As if they really deserve
a vacation!
President Aquino owes it to the
Filipino people to demand Marcos'
extradition, along with the billions
of dollars of the nation's wealth.
But I am not holding my breath,
and you, my friend, should not
either. Because putting Marcos to
trial would mean the unveiling of a
lot of America's dirty work. They
will not return him to face trial even
if they have to kill him — a natural
death (Shah), or an unnatural death
(Somoza)!
I must say that I am glad to see
letters like this being printed in the
Ubyssey. It shows Canadians are
becoming more politically aware. It
was only five years ago when a
similar situation developed in Iran.
Iranians historically being trend
setters demanded the return of the
Shah and all of the nation's wealth
stolen by him. At that time I
remember that public opinion here
was one of condemnation for the
Iranians. But now, Canadians demand that the Marcoses and
Duvaliers be returned to face trial.
BRAVO Canada! That's the way to
go!
K. Abbaspour
soil science
/ hate Reagan
I don't like Reagan. For twenty
years, since he first ran for public
office in California, my family and
I have been voting against him.
Nevertheless, on the election of
Aquino and Marcos' departure,
Reagan should be cautiously congratulated .
In view of the fact that President
Aquino has publicly stated her intention not to ask for the extradition of her husband's murderer,
The Ubyssey editorial advocating
his forced return only goes to show
that Americans don't have a
monopoly on intruding where they
have no business.
Lou Shapiro
regent college
THE UBYSSEY
March 11, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Camille Dionne was taken aback in wild amazement as Steve Chan and Martin de Jonge vaporized
into the seventeenth vortex. Steve Kontic then attempted to bend time and follow them, but the
meketric supplicants, Stephen Wisenthal and Debbie Lo, had already begun to engage in the rectification of the voldronai. Jennifer Lyall gazed in awe at this divergent resplendence, as Ed Mou and Nancy
Campbell were already doing the polka to the driving beat of Gordon Clark's cowpunk baroque accor-
dian. Megalimbomania abounded and centrifugal configurations materialized when Steve Wou returned from the eighteenth vortex, accompanied by — you guessed it — James Young! Tuesday, March 11,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
7S"^
MUSSOC displays no dignity
I am wriiing in response to
MUSSOC's rebuttal (The Ubyssey,
March 3) to Michaei Groberman's
review of Fiddler on the Roof (The
Ubyssey, February 7).
While Groberman's review was
more passionate than average, it
was the honest opinion of an audience member frustrated and insulted beyond objectivity. Believe
me, MUSSOC, he wasn't alone.
The production was lifeless and
wooden — quite a feat when one
remembers how vital the show can
be. Only Mark Hopkins as Tevye,
apparently director-proof, managed to overcome poor staging and
what were obviously line-readings.
A few points in answer to
MUSSOC president Walter Quan's
concern that Michael Groberman
failed to familiarize himself with
Jerome Robbins' original
choreography. First, looking up old
productions is not a reviewer's job
in any sense. How ridiculous. Second, to quote a colleague's
response to MUSSOC's complaint,
do we bow three times a day
towards New York? It could have
been Mikhail Baryshnikov's
choreography; Groberman and
many others, myself included,
would still have found it dull and
inappropriate (and here I must
point out Grace Macdonald's own
oversight in having failed to make
better use of a dancer of the calibre
of Suzanne Ouelette in the part of
Chava). If those moves were the
best that Broadway had to offer,
shame on Broadway. Lastly, if it
was Jerome Robbins'
choreography, why was Grace Macdonald credited as choreographer?
As for MUSSOC's contention
that Michael Groberman obviously
hates Grace Macdonald, the
criticisms in Groberman's review
were levelled at the person responsible for the production. If the name
in the program had been my own,
or any other, his response would
still have been the same.
If Mr. Quan feels that Groberman strayed from the duties of a
reviewer, perhaps he ought to be
more careful himself in future to
keep to the subject at hand. What
began as a rebuttal ended as an
obsequious thank-you and apology
to Grace Macdonald. I found it
oldd that MUSSOC felt it necessary
to attempt so strenuously to clear
the name of a woman who has for
several decades maintained a very
successful career in musical theatre.
More puzzling still was Quan's
feeling that silence on the part of
MUSSOC could have been construed as agreement with the
review. On the contrary, what really
makes one wonder is the effort with
which Mr. Quan attempted to ingratiate MUSSOC with Grace Macdonald.
Silence would have been the
clearest indication of the confidence, dignity, and professionalism that MUSSOC obviously
wished to exhibit, but failed to.
Katey Wright
theatre 3
UBC
rp (E-X-C-E•• L- L-E-N -T) xr
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738-5298
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CAMBIE OPTICAL
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River Rafting is one of the fastest growing
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Being a guide by profession is fun and
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In just a few short weeks you can earn
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738 5917
17th and Cambie
879-9494
ROCK & ROLL
SEMINAR
What is the Truth
about Rock & Roll?
Very Controversial?
You will love it!
Fact filled with
concert footage
Tue. Mar. 11, Scarfe 100
at 7:00
Wed. Mar. 12
University Hill High
School at 7:00
Maranatha 228-8554
GREG BALL
"Worldwide Evangelist"
Spoken on College
Campuses    in    Canada,
USA, Australia
THE GREATEST
EVENT IN HISTORY
or
"What your history prof
never told you"
Thur. Mar. 13 Woodward I
7:00
Fri. Mar. 14 Woodward I
7:00
Maranatha Christian Club
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
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HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
5732 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(One block from campus in the Village)
Mon.-Fri. 11:00 a.m.-lO p.m.
Sat., Sun. & Holidays 4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
224-1313
METRO TYPEWRITER
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HOURS:
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Sat. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
If you are in third or fourth year and you're looking
for a career in the business world, come see us. We're
Chartered Accountants from downtown firms who will be
on campus March 11 to talk about career possibilities in
one of the most stable professions — chartered
accountancy.
There are jobs available in chartered accountancy for
non-Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered
Accountants come from all backgrounds, bringing new
skills and diversity to this growing dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for
accounting and auditing in Canada and, because of their
education and training, are in demand by business around
the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal
basis and explore opportunities. You may be an ideal
candidate for Canada's fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to;
A "Beverage" and Cheese Evening
Music Room
UBC Faculty Club
Tuesday, March 11
7 p.m.
For more information contact Lisa Kershaw
at 681-3264, The Institute of Chartered
Accountants of British Columbia.
Wtl
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11,1986
Uj/A
('l0&fi
TODAY
THE UBYSSEY YEAR END BANQUET
COMMITTEE
Meeting to plan the year end banquet — all first
year staffers are part of this committee so be
there, noon, SUB 241K. Also, get your position
papers up for sub editorial positions.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock hall 304.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginner's Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop in classes at $5 per class, 8:30-10 a.m. and
2:30-4 p.m., SUB plaza south.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rock and roll multimedia presentation, 7 p.m.,
Scarfe 100.
THE UBYSSEY
Voting for next year's editorial collective, see
Camile for ballots, voting ends Wednesday, SUB
241K.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Video from Gwynne Dyer's "War" series:
"Notes on nuclear war", noon, SUB 215. Film:
"The atomic cafe", 7 p.m., SUB auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
AIESEC UBC
Travel days '86,10 a.m.-4 p.m., SUB concourse.
THE UBYSSEY
Final day for voting for next year's editors, see
Camile to vote, SUB 241K.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture: "You mean life realty does know what
it's doing?",  guest speaker Jonathon  Beats,
noon, Buch B221.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Drop in classes at »6 per class, 8:30-10 a.m. and
3:30-6 p.m., SUB partyroom, 5:30-7 p.m., SUB
plaza south.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Video   from   Gwynne   Dyer's   "Wsr"   series:
"Goodbye war", noon, SUB 212.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery lounge.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night featuring James Hill, 8:30-11 p.m..
Graduate student centre. Garden room lounge.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Speaker:   Enrique   Torres,   "Human   rights  in
Guatemala", noon, SUB 206.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rock 'n roll multimedia presentation, 7 p.m..
University Hill high school, 2896 Acadia Rd.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
General  meeting,  election  of officers,   noon,
Angus 226.
THE UBYSSEY
Deadline for position papers for sub editorial
positions, CUP-editor, tweens, vista, photog,
business manager, etc. Screenings begin at 3
p.m., SUB 241K.
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
General meeting, 6:30 p.m., SUB 125.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, elections of executive, slide
show on hiking and climbing, noon, Chem 150.
THURSDAY
THE UBYSSEY
Elections for sub editorial position's, all day, SUB
241K, come in and do a news story while you're
here.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediate Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Greg Ball — worldwide speaker, 7 p.m.. Woodward 1.
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Valid with presentation of this ad
224-1922
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M% CO-OP OUTDOOR
vV^ GEAR SWAP
Want to sell those hiking boots that
never really were ydur size? Buy the
gear you need to go summer backpacking without spending a
bundle?
The Co-op's Spring 1986 Out
door Gear Swap is the answer.
Call 872-7858 for more details.
P.S. you don't have to be a
Co-op member to
participate.
Win a
Pentax
Binocular
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a
Pentax Mini Binocular to be given
away at 3 PM the day of the Gear
Swap. No purchase necessary to
win. Binocular is courtesy of
Pentax Canada Inc.
A
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
Gear Swap
Sunday, March 16,10**-3**
428 W. 8th Ave., Vancouver
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
This is it, annuel general meeting complete with
elections for new executive, noon, SUB 205.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING
Yea . . . we're still meeting, noon, Hebb 12.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting clesa, 4:30-6p.m., Asian centre
604.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Prizzie's Honor", 7 and 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Nominations:  (Blue sweetshirts: pick up from
Brian, Gage N 14 A 6). Reminder: Storm the
Wall is March 17, are you signed up?, noon, IRC
FRIDAY
UBC SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
Speaker Svend Robinson, "Equality rights in the
'80's", noon, Graham house lecture hall A,
School of Social Work, Cecil Green Park Rd.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Greg Ball, world wide speaker, 7 p.m.. Woodward 1.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch 8317.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Prizzi's Honor", 7 and 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
NDP leeder Bob Skelly speaking today, noon,
SUB auditorium.
EXPERIENCE
THE VOLUNTEER WAY
Immediate openings for:
— science-related exhibits explainers
— victim/witness crisis workers
— Children's Festival volunteers
— computer instructors
— hospice workers to work with the
terminally ill
—sports coaches
Contact: VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
BROCK HALL 200
228-3811
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
Free Lecture
THE LOGICAL
CERTAINTY
of
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
HEALING
BRUCE FITZWATER, C.S.B.
Member of the Christian
Science Board of Lectureship
WED. MARCH 19
12:30 p.m.
SUB RM 207
SEMINAR
PERSONAL    CONTACT
MARKETING
SAT. MARCH 15
8-4:30 p.m.
GRANVILLE ISLAND HOTEL
CONTACT: 734-8407 or
434-6427
Student Rates
10 - FOR SALE - Commercial
"SHAME THE DEVIL" by Lyn Morrow is a
career woman's novel: inside government,
press gallery, politics, publicity, using well
known characters. ISBN 0-9692-0-2820-1,
$15.95 postpaid. Lynmor Publishing,
Osoyoos, B.C. V0H 1V0.
NEWLY OPENED
Village Antiques
& 2nd Hand
4231 Dunbar St.
228-8787
WE BUY & SELL.
10% off with this ad or student card.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
IBM-APPLE-MAC PROG. $5-$20/disc.
Academy Software. #17—712 Robson St.
681-4184.
ONE-WAY FLIGHT - Vancouver to Toronto
leaving April 30. $150. Call Mike at
224-9431.
81 HONDA 900 A1 SHAPE. Proven tour
bike c/w extras. $1800 obo. Must sell. No
reasonable offer refused. 228-1282.
AIRLINE TICKET VAN-WINNIPEG return
— female. $190. Mar. 31-Apr. 6 Easter wk.
Phone Ray 224-7619 - Eve. 228-4224 - Days.
15 - FOUND
SMALL CHANGE PURSE. No identification.
At corner of Univ. Blvd. & Main mall near
Chem. Bldg. on Fri. Mar. 7. Identify
266-6965.
30 - JOBS
«MONEYM 1 days training. You can
make M00-$1200 p/time working from
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WORK FROM HOME full-time, part-time
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and earn excellent income - 688-9076.
TEACH ABROAD. For details write to
Mr. Information, Sort 675, Box 955,
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30 - JOBS
MALE COMPANION wanted for slightly
handicapped male senior citizen. Some
help with maint., garden & yard. Other help
kept. There is a friendly trained dog & cat.
Renumeration to be discussed. 228-9255.
EARL'S GONE
FISHING
Earl   is   looking   for   high   energy,
responsible individuals for his new
200 seat seafood restaurant, CAFE
FISH, located at Broadway & Fir:
waiters,   waitresses,    hostesses,
buspeople,    bartenders,    kitchen
supervisors,    cooks,    preps,    &
dishwashers. Apply in person at:
Centennial Motor Hotel,
898 West Broadway
Sat. & Sun., Mar. 15 & 16
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
40 - MESSAGES
PLAY DOUBLE-UP, circular 2-man strategy
game. Tournament possible. For free instructions write: Double-Up Club of Montreal, Box 5453, Station B, Montreal,
Quebec, H3B4P1.
70 - SERVICES
SPEAKEASY has pamphlets and posters
on bus routes, health, movies, campus
events . . . drop by SUB Concourse.
FEMALE VOLUISTTEERS
REQUIRED FOR DEPT. OF
MEDICINE STUDY
If you are taking oral contraceptives and are willing to
come to VGH for six appointments, we will pay you
$45.00. All records are strictly
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By doing your own tax return, you may
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Personal Tax Returns,
Accounting & Financial
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228-1024
80 - TUTORING
NEED A TUTOR?
Achieve   goals   you    thought
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G. & C. ASSOCIATES
#110 - 1089 W. Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
V6H 1E5
TUTORING IN
ENGLISH
Private Assistance for students
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W.S. Parker, B.A., M.A
733-4634
85 - TYPING
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type theses,  resumes,   letters,
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WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing
{Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
FAST. ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
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JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue, 263-0351.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your word
processing. Greek, math. P/U & Del. on
campus. Stud, rates. Mastercard/Visa.
985-4250.
WORDSWORTH wordprocessing. Hardware: IBM. Software: wordperfect. Call
Kerry Rigby. 876-2895. 12th & Commercial.
TYPING — fast, accurate — reasonable
rates. 734-8451.
ACCENT word processing / translation
French - English - Italian — $18/hr. Del. on
campus. 536-7172/536-9214.
TYPING & WORD PROCESSING. Reason
able rates. Call Gail, 732-8311 or 266-2879.
ACCURATE & EXPRESS-LY FOR YOU.
Typing starting .@$1.00/pg. dble-spaced.
Call Marlene 736-4675 to reach or leave
message. I'll get back to you.
WORK PROCESSING TYPING. Special
rates for students. Terra Business Service,
731-9273 or 732-6653.
YEARAROUND EXPERT essay, theses
typing from legible wk. Spelling/grammar
corrected. 738-7829, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. King
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SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
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mail lists/labels. Days, eves., wkends.
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Electronic typing
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201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333       Ihrs. 9-4:30 p.m.)
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.   939-2703
SUPPORTTHE
UBYSSEY! Tuesday, March 11,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
A Wine and Cheese reception will
be held Thursday following a panel
discussion on Site C and Energy
Policy in B.C. sponsored by the Environmental Law Group. Discussion
starts at 12:45 in the Moot Court
Room in the Curtis Law Building.
For your nuke awareness, UBC
Students for Peace and Mutual
Disarmament have organized a
videotape showing of a Star Wars
debate on Thursday at noon in IRC
1, and a talk on Soviet arms control
proposals on Friday noon in SUB
207/209.
•
Unsure of what you want to do
on your summer vacation? Then
come to Travel Days '86 sponsored
by AIESEC on March 12. Thirty
travel exhibitors will be participating. This event will inform
students about the many travel opportunities around the world and in
Canada.
•
Y'all come on down to hear why
Cowboy Bob Skelly wants Buffalo
Bill Bennett's job. Cowboy Bob will
be here in the flesh at the SUB
Auditorium for a roundup of all
young NDP's and any other whip-
persnappers interested in the
rootin' tootin' world of B.C. politics
at 12:00 this Friday.
PH3 NOMINATIONS NOW
OPEN FOR
Appointments to
BUDGET COMMITTEE
OMBUDSPERSON
and
EDITOR, INSIDE UBC 1986-87
Nominations close Applications
4 p.m., Friday, March 21        Available SUB 238
*••••••••••••••••••*•••****
DANCE
presented by
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
ALL WELCOME
SAT., MARCH 15
8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM NO MINORS
Tix $5: AMS Box Office, War Mem. Gym
••••*•••*•••••••••••*••••
*
*
*
*
BROWNLEE OFFICE OUTFITTERS LTD.
1774 WEST 2nd AVE. VANCOUVER, B.C. V6J 1H6 • 732-3331
TYPEWRITER "TUNE-UP"
(Portable Typewriters, Manual & Electric)
• Complete check over • Clean & oil
• Basic adjustments • Re-surface roller
• Install new quality ribbon ^^
$39.49
All of this for ONLY
(tax included)
Typewriter Rentals
• Royal Electronic "Correcting
• Olympia Electronic "Correcting"
• SCM Electronic "Correcting"
• IBM "Correcting" Selectric II
LOW STUDENT PRICES
6 RENTAL PAYMENTS CAN BE APPLIED TOWARDS PURCHASE.
for men and women
FREE SHAMPOO
(with this coupon)
till Mar. 31, 1986
BASIC CUT
3621 W. 4th Avenue, Vancouver
6
.95
733-3831
FOR THE ENTREPENEUR
SEEKING A SEASONAL BUSINESS
This portable Clown Kiosk will provide a fun way of earning high
returns on investment (of $5000 and up, depending on equipment
package).
All prime locations still available.
A viewing is arranged for March 18, 1986. Interested parties should
contact:
CLASS "A" FOODS
533-4541 or 530-2792 (evenings)
AN APPOINTMENT WILL BE MADE FOR FURTHER DECISION.
NO ONE HERE GETS
OUT ALIVE
ROCK AND ROU SEMINAR
Tues. March 11
Scarfe 100
Mick Jagger said a few years back. "It's only rock
and roll." Sure, most young people like it and it is only
just rock and roll ... or is it? Vladimir Lenin said that
the quickest way to destroy a society is through its
music. Could it be that someone is trying to brainwash
you through your stereo or the cassette recorder that's
pluaaed into vour ear?
Find out through a fact-filled mini-seminar that includes tapes and concert footage. The truth just may be
the most startling thing that's ever happened to you.
Maranatha Christian Cub
7PM
Wed. March 12
Univ. Hill Highschool 7 PM
No-Admission Charge
mm nominations m
NOW
OPEN FOR
APPOINTMENTS TO
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Management Board
Aquatic Centre Management Board
and
Student Representatives on the following Presidential Advisory Committees:
Child Care Services
Concerns of the Handicapped
Food Services Advisory
International House Board
of Directors
Land Use Committee
Men's Athletics
Safety, Security El-
Fire Prevention
Student Placement
Student Services
Student Union Building
Traffic & Parking
United Way Campaign
Walter H. Gage Memorial
War Memorial Gym Fund
Women's Athletics
Youth Employment Program
Nominations Close
4p.m. Friday
March 21
1 position
1 position
3 positions
1 position
1 position
3 positions
1 position
1 position
2 positions
1 position
4 positions
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
Applications
Available
SUB Rm 238 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 11,1986
Cassidy tops
triathlon IV
Runners from the community
topped the race results for UBC Intramurals fourth annual triathlon
held Saturday.
An outstanding performance was
turned in by Tracy Snelling
(1:37:01) who placed second overall
in the women's division. She had
the second fastest time in the pool
out of all competitors, male and
female.
The top three men were: Simon
Cassidy (1:23:57), Paul Quinn
(1:24:43) and Peter Louis (1:25:11).
Top three women were: Sharon
Keogh (1:35:41), Snelling, and
Carolyn Daubeny (1:39:19).
Cassidy, 18, finished in the top
three last year when he was in high
school. This year he is attending a
local college. Quinn, 24, runs for
the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. A contender for the Athlete of the Year
award, the forestry student was
recognized as male runner of the
year (85-86) in the Intramurals runs
program. Louis, 23, is a TA in
geology.
Keogh and Snelling are not UBC
students. Daubeny, female runner
of the year (85-86), is in the physical
education faculty.
Of the 240 registered participants, 229 swam half a mile (16
lengths), biked 15 miles and ran 5
miles in the gruelling event.
"The weather was fantastic,"
said first time competitor Steve
Gustavson. "It was cool enough for
the hardcores although it was a little
windy for the first heat of cyclists."
takes 1-2-3
Despite lack of snow and poor
conditions, the UBC ski team won
the Western Canadian Ski Championships at Rossland this weekend.
The men captured four out of
five placings in the giant slalom
event on Saturday. Kenny Stevens
lead the ranks with Bob Walton
placing third. In the women's
events Susan Hagen finished third
and Andrea Jaegli finisheu fourth.
In the slalom event held on Sunday, Stewart finished first and
Stevens finished second. Hagen
finished first for the women and
Jaegli finished fourth.
The combined title was taken by
UBC with Stevens, Stewart and
Walton finishing one, two and three
respectively. Hagen and Jaegli
finished first and second overall in
the women's combined.
The event was the final one for
the UBC ski team this year as
Stevens and Stewart ended their
careers.
**     ••••••
*
*
*
*
3420 W. Broad wa>
734-2233
VIDEO
 cafre-
•••••
FINE ARTS VIDEO & ESPRESSO BAR
$5.95
VCR & 2 MOVIES
SUN.-THURSDAY
20%
OFF
ANY MENU ITEM(S)
(With UBC or AMS Card)
VALID UNTIL MARCH 20/86
OPEN EARLY. OPEN LATE!
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Get Involved!!
ELECTIONS HELD MARCH 19
Nomination forms for:
President ^
Vice-President
Treasurer
Public Relations
Social Coordinator
Intramurals Coordinator
AMS Council Representatives
Available at Buchanan A107
Deadline for nominations
4 p.m., Friday, March 14, 1986
3250 West Broadway
at Blenheim
5% DISCOUNT
Off Your Grocery
Order
Ask at the cashiers
for your Student
Discount card.
Student/AMS card I.D. required. Minimum purchase $30.00
Details at Store.
GRADUATE STUDIES AT McMASTER
•Join us in 1986-87 for our Centennial Year*
Twenty-seven programmes at the Master's and Doctoral level are offered in the three Faculties of Science
(Science, Engineering and Health Sciences), including:
ENGINEERING
SCIENCE
HEALTH SCIENCES
• Chemical Engineering
• Biology
•Biochemistry
• Civil Engineering and
• Chemistry
• Design, Measurement and
Engineering Mechanics
Evaluation
• Electrical and Computer
• Computer Science and
• M.Sc. Health Care
Engineering
Systems
Evaluation
• Engineering Physics
• Geography
• Medical Sciences
• Materials Science and
• Geology
Engineering
• Mathematics and Statistics
• Physics
• Psychology
Teaching Assistantships and Scholarships are widely available for entering and continuing Master's and
Doctoral students. Supplementary awards to recognized winners of NSERC, MRC and OGS Scholarships
will be available in 1986-87 to entering students, and will be renewable.
For further information write to the Department of your choice or to:
Mr. J.A. Williamson
Secretary, School of Graduate Studies
McMaster University
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L8
You may also call: (416) 525-9140, ext. 4204.
McMASTER UNIVERSITY
School of Graduate Studies
SefVicf
(sur«viss)n. 1. work done for others
2. helpful or useful action 3. benefit,
advantage 4. friendly help 5. Kinko's
FREE SELF-SERVICE TYPING AVAILABLE
FOR A LIMITED TIME
IBM-SELECTRIC
kinko's
5706 University Blvd.       222-1688
M-Th 8-9  F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
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WESTERN OPTICAL
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Mon. - Fri. 8:30 - 5:00
2nd & Burrard
d 742 w. 2nd Ave.)
736-7516
vivj   CALL FOR    \±d
APPLICATIONS
A.M.S. Summer Project Coordinators
The Alma Mater Society is now receiving applications from students interested in employment
as summer project coordinators. These positions
involve working for the A.M.S. on specific projects
as determined by the A.M.S. Hiring Committee. In
the past, projects have included the A.M.S. Used
Bookstore, High School Orientation activities and
the A.M.S. Tuition Fee Lottery. The complete list
of projects will be presented to candidates during
interviews.
The successful candidates will:
-be returning full-time U.B.C. students
-have had previous responsibility for staff or
budgets
-will be self motivated
-have the ability to work independently
-be   able   to   work   well   with   others   and
communicate effectively
Experience in marketing or public relations;
knowledge of the A.M.S., its operations and services; and supervisory or managerial experience
would be assets.
Period of employment will be a minimum of 12
weeks.
Applications can be obtained from and returned
with current resume to the A.M.S. Administrative
Assistant in S.U.B. 238.
DEADLINE for Applications:
4:00 p.m. March 21, 1986

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