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The Ubyssey Feb 23, 1971

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Array Branch plant Canada at Cherry Point
By DICK BETTS
an analysis
The ecofreaks hit the border Sunday in a symbolic
show of protest against the transport of oil through the
Straits of Juan de Fuca in supertankers.
The demonstration which attracted a little over 1,000
people was organized by the New Democratic Party and
the Sierra Club. Both groups emphasized the pollution
and environmental aspects of the proposed oil transport.
The Sierra Club, which is a conservation group,
drafted a leaflet and telegram protesting the oil transport
plan while the NDP provided the chairman and
entertainment. Except for the young people in evidence it
might have turned out to be a protest of the highest
establishment order.
The Yippies changed all that.
While the speakers droned on at the stage site a
hundred yards north of the peace arch, drums and tribal
dancing started at the peace arch itself. The chairman of
the NDP-Sierra protest urged people not to go to the
counter-demonstration for fear of violence.
The fears of the NDP-Sierra types were unfounded.
There was no violence and no repetitious speeches. The
people at the peace arch were obviously not interested in
listening politely to ten different politicians and eco types
saying the same thing.
Many of the counter-demonstrators were obviously
tired of the liberal analysis and parliamentary type
solutions. Those who went to the counter-demonstration
at the peace arch were generally convinced that Canada's
branch-plant service-depot status will not be redressed by
committees of MP's and MLA's lobbying with
governments whose sole purpose is to sell us out.
True, the drums and dancing of the Yippies is no
solution in itself unless it is linked to political analysis and
action. It did get the authorities uptight. Formerly they
were yawning with the rest of us at the official
demonstration.
Now the cops had reason to get itchy fingers about
what was going on. Now there was the basis for action and
not just listening.
The cameras of the cops started clicking once again -
this time isolating the radical elements of the
demonstration.
Parliamentary radical establishment versus the
counter-culture youth. This is the theme that has overrun
many political actions and demonstrations. It is the
antithesis between action and passive words protest.
The actions of the Yippies are generally independent
of tactics and analysis.
As such they are often incomprehensible and lack in
real political force. They do offset the establishment
"radicals" in the NDP or Sierra Club who, in this case,
sought only a gut reaction to pollution with no
comprehensive analysis and no creative
extra-parliamentary moves to stop the onslaught of the
U.S. business interests in Canada and in the rest of the
world.
FRIENDLY WASHINGTON POLICE officers work hard to restrain themselves from
joining in the fun at the  'peace   arch' Sunday. As demonstrators made speeches.
Vol. Lll, No. 33 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4*r 1971       °^S^>is        228-2305
&
AMS election on trial
By MIKE SASGES
The position of Hanson Lau, Alma Mater
Society president-elect is at this time, most tenuous.
AMS treasurer Stuart Bruce said Monday that
he intends to go through with his promised action
before the student court and ask them to have the
presidential election annulled.
"The student court is meeting Tuesday," he
said. "We have a very good case."
Bruce said that six people at Wednesday's
evidentiary meeting were able to give additional
information on election irregularities.
"We're asking the student court to set aside the
presidential election due to the materiality of the
defects," Bruce's counsel John Parks, law 3 said
Monday.
"The student court will then be asked for
further direction to hold another election to fill the
position."
Parks said that the 227 vote difference was not
much of a difference and the compulsion to vote
preferentially could have changed the outcome of
the election.
Hanson Lau feels that Bruce has no grounds for
such action.
"I don't feel that the iregularities were that
blatant," Lau told The Ubyssey Monday.
"Bruce, in my opinion, doesn't have much of a
case," he said.
Lau had said that he intended to resign his new
position of president in an interview with Peter
Choate, of the campus radio, CYVR.
"That interview was made on Wednesday night
after it was clear that the human government had
taken the second slate,"^2^-33d~?fte^Jbyssey
Monday. ^'^ U^-V)' "-^
"I thought I ^jiioytd resign and recomnwnd
Steve Garrod (of Ahe human government slat«)\ior
president," he saitf. r r p  o <   < "   1    g )\
"Thursday morning, people were comirig 4nto
the office and teUftigifte not to resign."    c?"/
"It was the numbef%fijo^bio.w^'5tudents who
came into my office and talked to me that made
me change my mind and keep my name on the
position," he said.
to page 3: see: SLATE
-david bowerman photo
counter-demonstrators wondered whether American ownership of most of Canada
means that the U.S. also owns the arch.
Blacks unite
TORONTO (CUP) - Two thousand blacks met at Harbord
Collegiate here over the weekend for a conference on "The
Liberation of Black People in Canada."
Although the conference sessions were closed to the white
press, Rocky Jones, a Halifax delegate explained to reporters that
the black revolutionary movement must be against capitalism if it
is to "destroy the basis of exploitation and racism."
"We must operate internationally to fight this racism," he
said. "We serve notice to the white community that we are
building our own counter-institutions."
Speaking to an open meeting Sunday night Jones
commented, "Rap Brown says violence is as American as cherry
pie ... well, Canadians are as American as cherry pie."
Twenty-five members of Toronto's Rising Up Angry (a
radical group) walked out of the meeting, after a member was
told: "You haven't got the right to call us brother. Call us
anything you want, but never brother until we tell you so."
Some of the resolutions passed at the three-day conference
recommended:
* That the federal bill of rights be amended to ban all
housing discrimination against blacks and reimbursement for
previous victims.
* Establishment of black agencies to encourage
separate black educational systems to eliminate currently racist
streaming procedures.
* Emergence of black women from their position as
domestics in white society.
* Organization of black adoption agencies and foster
homes.
* Aid to African liberation struggles morally and
financially. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 23, 1971
Makaroff: abortion between doctor and patient
By KATHY STEWART
Dr. Robert Makaroff said
Monday if he was given back his
license to practice medicine, he
would probably continue to
perform abortions.
Makaroff, who was suspended
from the B.C. College of
Physicians and Surgeons and spent
three months in jail after being
found guilty of practising
medicine illegally gave a lecture to
law students on Abortion and the
Law.
Makaroff said the best solution
to the controversy over abortion
is to remove the subject from the
Criminal Code entirely.
"Abortion should be between a
doctor and the patient, like any
other medical matter."
He said that although there is a
general trend to obliterate the
laws of abortion,  there  is  little
activity, especially among lawyers,
towards it.
"Young lawyers should more
actively promote change than
they have in the past."
Over the past year, there has
been a sharp increase in the
number of abortions performed,
he said.
In the. first few months of
1970, there were 237 abortions
recorded in all the hospitals of she
provinces in Canada. Now there
are 75 abortions recorded a week
in Vancouver General Hospital
alone.
Makaroff does not believe that
legalizing abortions would
decrease respect for human life.
He said that removing the fetus
at such an early age as one to
three months cannot be
considered murder.
"I think that concern over the
life of a fetus stems from
dogmatic views of morality."
"People who are concerned
over the fetus' life are not
concerned over, for example,
infant mortality in the Northwest
Territories."
'This seems to me a paradox."
When asked if the concept of
abortion conflicts with the
doctor's oath to preserve life,
Makaroff answered that if doctors
don't perform abortions women
will go to back-alley quacks who
could cause injury or even death
to the woman.
So the doctor would indirectly
be causing death to the woman.
Makaroff deplored the current
trend of doctors to focus their
efforts on very specialized aspects
Students refuse to endorse
principal's conduct demands
MONTREAL (CUP) - Students at the CEGEP
Vieux Montreal are still on strike following weekend
meetings with Robert Lemieux, the Montreal lawyer
recently released from prison following the Front de
Liberation du Quebec crisis.
Lemieux told the students the letter the
principal had sent them which said the students had
to promise not to participate in any activity that
might impede the normal class routine and to
promise to conform to rules outlined in the student
handbook before students would be readmitted to
their classes, is "a flagrant and disgusting violation
of the Canadian bill of rights."
On Thursday teachers and members of the
teachers union expressed their unconditional
support of the strike and demanded the
unconditional return of the students.
Students at the CEGEP occupied their social
science pavilion after college officials refused to
allow them to continue their free course program.
The program allows students to choose what
they want to do in the classroom.
On Thursday, in a letter from the
administration, students were told if they wished to
return to class after leaving in protest they would
have to sign a declaration to observe new rules.
Students refused to sign the letter and 800 of
them demonstrated outside the school chanting "we
want to have our classes and we will not sign the
letter."
The students then occupied an arts building
with the support of arts and science faculty
members who agreed not to give regular classes until
the students were readmitted without repressive
measures being taken against them.
Thursday night the students were evicted from
the building by riot police who snuck in when a
student opened the door for an administrator who
asked to be let in to discuss things.
Since Thursday students have been protesting
outside their school and say they will not return to
classes unless they can do so without signing
"fascist" documents and if they can continue their
classes as they had done in the past.
° PIHAt
PATIO
EAT IN 'TAKEOUT- DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Tansar Crafts'
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4m. avenue
"We being many are one body"
ASH WEDNESDAY
EUCHARIST
*
Wednesday, Feb. 24
SUB Clubs Lounge     12:30 o'clock
Sponsored by Anglican United Campus Ministry
of medicine, rather than more
general aspects.
He said medical men ignore the
large problems which occur today,
such as abortion and high
mortality rates among more
primitive peoples.
"They are not taking advantage
of their ability to save lives."
He does not think that
legalizing abortions would cause
women to be freer in their sexual
behavior.
"No woman wants to go
through the painful and
unpleasant experience of an
abortion, if she can help it."
"Contraceptives are much
commoner now, and the
development of newer and better
contraceptives will soon make
abortions obsolete."
From Quebec to UBC
Jacques Larue-Langlois, one of the Quebec Five, will be speaking
in the SUB ballroom Thursday at noon.
Larue-Langlois, along with four others, was acquitted on charges
of seditious conspiracy to overthrow the government of Canada.
However, the five are still charged with membership in the Front de
Liberation du Quebec. Larue-Langlois' trial on the latter charge is next
week.
Larue-Langlois is a producer for Radio-Canada, the French
language arm of the CBC in Quebec.
The noon address will be co-sponsored by the Vancouver
Committee to defend Political Prisoners in Quebec and the Alma Mater
Society.
WHERE AU
THE ACTION IS
3
Sensational
Clubs in
1
HARRY'S
ENTERTAINMENT
COMPLEX
OILCAN'S
DANCE to the sounds of
NIGHT TRAIN
THE BACK ROOM
The atmosphere of the
Roaring 20's
From   Los  Angeles
MAC TRUQUE
DIRTY SAL'S
Listen to the unique voices
of JUDY & JIM GINN
-OPEN-
MON. THRU SAT.
752 THURL0W ST. 683-7306
A
We've Moved!
The TRAVEL OFFICE
has moved from
SUB 237B to
SUB 100-A
NEW PHONE NUMBER TOO
228-2083
HOURS REMAIN THE SAME
12:30 - 4:30 Daily
Drop In At Your
Campus Travel Office Soon!
Western
Student Services
Students in all faculties:
A CAREER IN
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANCY?
Learn How and Why
Thursday, Feb. 25, 1971
12:30 P.M.,
Room 106, Buchanan Building
Members of the Institute of Chartered Accountants B.C. and the
U.B.C. Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration will be
on hand to:
-Show a film "Men of Account" describing the work of a C.A.
—Discuss the Licentiate in Accounting programmes and other
U.B.C. pre-C.A. training programmes.
—Discuss the opportunities afforded by employment in training
with practicing chartered accountants. Chartered accountants
play a decisive role in Canadian business, industry and
government.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
530 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C. 651-3264 Tuesday, February 23, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Slate landslide
from page One
The human government slate now controls
seven of the eight positions on next year's Alma
Mater Society executive.
The slate took the positions of treasurer,
external affairs, vice-president and internal affairs in
Wednesday's second-slate election.
Bob Smith had 1800 votes to take the position
of internal affairs. That was 200 more than John
Olson of the Lau slate.
It took three counts of the ballots cast for
treasurer before David Mole was elected.
John Wilson, deputy AMS treasurer came
second, 500 votes behind Mole.
Don Palmer, Lau slate candidate was third and
behind Mole by a 1000 votes.
Rob McDiarmid had 1992 votes for the
position of vice-president — 500 over Michael
Robinson, a Hanson Lau candidate.
Sharon Boylan's 1,900 votes were enough to
defeat another of Lau's candidates Adrian Belshaw
for the position of external affairs.
Lau plans to wait for Tuesday's decision from
the student court and run again if there is another
election.
"If they decide not to direct another election, I
will sit down with the human government people
and see what we can come up with," Lau said.
"Ideologically we're not that far apart," he
said. "Our major disagreements would be over the
means of execution of a project."
Lau feels that he would be more realistic in his
approach to an AMS project.
You can't beat an appealing banner like human
government, he said.
Rob McDiarmid said that he expects differences
of opinion within the human government collective,
but the general direction will be together.
This feeling was echoed by the other three
members of the second slate.
Sharon Boylan said that she hopes to hire a
woman to teach a woman's history and get the
course accredited.
Microbiology firing final?
—keith dunbar photo
DISGRUNTLED THUNDERBIRD ENTHUSIAST Ronnie the
Ridgeback seems to feel there must be a better way to spend a
Satuday night than at War Memorial Gym watching a basketball
game. Leaving the cheering Alberta supporters, he decides to
widdle away his time elsewhere. He later returned to help UBC
post a victory.
The case of assistant
microbiology prof Joe Clark, who
has charged he is the victim of a
personality firing, is now pending
investigation by the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers.
Clark said Monday he has
heard from the CAUT that it will
look into his case.
Microbiology department head
John Campbell said Thursday that
Clark's case has gone as far as
possible at the university level.
"This decision not to renew
Clark's appointment was
unanimous among the senior
colleagues in the department,"
Campbell said.
He said Clark's "senior
colleagues" in the department
consisted of two full professors
and six associate professors. Seven
of these people sat on the tenure
and promotions committee that
decided to fire Clark.
Campbell, one of the full
professors, did not sit on the
committee. He stressed Thursday
that the microbiology is a "young
department" and that the people
reviewing Clark's case within the
department were not "old men".
Campbell also said the decision
not to promote Clark, and finally,
not to renew his contract, was
upheld by committees outside the
department. (He was referring to
the   Dean's  committee   and   the
Faculty Association's personnel
services committee which were
both involved in reviewing Clark's
case at different times.)
Campbell said the termination
of Clark's contract was "a
broadly-based decision."
"Particularly on tenure you're
looking at the total individual and
the department," he said.
Campbell was asked about
Clark's contention that his
academic credentials are
impeccable, and that the firing
must therefore be the result of a
personality conflict between Clark
and Campbell.
"I guess I'd have to say no
comment on that," he responded.
PM asks Quebecers to destroy the 'myth' of subjugation
MONTREAL     (CUP)     -
Continuing his role as party
fund-raiser -Saskatchewan two
weeks ago, Toronto two weeks
from now — Prime Minister Pierre
Trudeau pulled about $100,000
into the Liberal treasury here
Sunday night.
About 3,000 party supporters
paid $50 each to attend a Quebec
Liberal party dinner in the Queen
Elizabeth   Hotel   and   listen   to
Pierre the PM talk about Quebec
and unemployment (in
Saskatchewan they had to reduce
the price to $25 a plate).
Trudeau called for French
Canadians to fight for "high
positions" in trade, industry,
business and technology and thus
destroy the "myth" that the
French minority in Canada is
"subjugated, dispossessed and
humiliated".
Need to eat cheap?
By THOM WESCOTT
Everything For Everybody is the title of the new British Columbia
access catalogue, and while it is obviously an exaggeration, it will
probably come closer to fulfilling this promise than any other
publication available.
Everything For Everybody will be a collection of information
about institutions that promote health and well being, cheap sources of
food and materials, land and land use, craftsmen's guilds and
apprenticeships and much more.
Dan Rubin, the catalogue's originator, sees the catalogue as a
publication for people who want to get involved.
So far, there has never been any publication of this kind. By
limiting circulation to British Columbia, with most of the resources
centered in Vancouver, Rubin is putting together a person to person
reference service.
Unlike the original Whole Earth Catalogue, which consists mainly
of book reviews, Everything For Everybody will act as a personal
introduction to the many interesting institutions and individuals around
Vancouver and the rest of the province.
For anyone who would like to contribute time or ideas, or just
find out more about Everything For Everybody Rubin can be reached
at 8794982.
Any contributors whose ideas are used will receive a copy of the
first edition, which will be available in early April. If you don't have
any ideas but would like a copy, send three dollars along with your
name and address to 3262 Fleming Street, Vancouver.
"Three dollars should cover the first three issues, unless we can
drop the price to fifty cents per issue," said Rubin.
The fact that very few French
speaking people in Canada have
any power is very conducive to
perpetuating this "myth" and if
French Canadians would just
hustle their way to the top, the
"myth" could be destroyed.
Those who believe this myth,
"are taking the easy way out,"
said Trudeau.
The PM strongly denied
charges that increased
centralization of political power
in the hands of the federal
government is part of an attempt
to reduce the social difference
between Quebec and Canada.
"It is a declared purpose of the
government to protect our rich
diversity as one of the conditions
of our existence as a nation," he
declared.
And he suggested that Quebec
is "more typical of Canada than
any other province because of the
proportions of its ethnic and
llinguistic groups." (Quebec is
about 80 per cent French
speaking.)
Trudeau also warned that
Quebec would suffer
economically if it did away with
existing English language rights.
"Quebec experienced the
Canadian duality where it lies," he
said. "It is part of its deepest
self."
"If Quebec were to deny, or to
claim to lessen or neglect this vital
dimension of its being, it would
commit an injustice, a betrayal of
its responsibility which would
result in continuing
self-impoverishment."
Speaking on unemployment,
Trudeau said that Canadians must
face the fact that their
unemployment will always be
higher than other industrialized
nations such as the United States.
This higher rate of
unemployment is not due to the
existing economic structures,
though. The climate and the
effect of winter on employment is
"a reality we just cannot avoid,"
according to our prime minister.
B. C. poet reads Thursday
Distinguished poet and
playwright Rona Murray Haddon
will give a poetry reading
Thursday at 8 p.m. in Henry
Angus 104, from her two books,
The Power of the Dog and The
Enchanted Adder.
This utterly enchanting
evening is sponsored by the
creative writing department
which cordially invites the public
to attend. Admission is free.
Rona Murray Haddon was one
of the first graduates of the
University of Victoria, and is
currently completing her
doctorate from the University of
Canterbury while teaching at
Selkirk College, at Castlegar, B.C.
\
RONA HADDON
another CW coup Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 23, 1971
TMtimstr
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241 K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 23, 1971
Cherry Point
So there was another big demonstration at the
peace arch Sunday.
A couple of thousand people protested the
proposed Cherry Point oil refinery just as six thousand
protested the Amchitka bomb test over a year ago, and
you remember how much effect that one had.
The sad fact is that the construction of the
refinery is inevitable and 1,000 "giant tankers a year will
eventually be heading down the B.C. coast.
The second inevitability is that B.C. will soon see
the same kind of disastrous oil spills that have hit
California, Nova Scotia and England. With 1,000 tankers
a year, there is absolutely no way that at least one of
them won't screw up.
The Cherry Point refinery is demanded by the
corporate profit motive, so the will of the people or
possible dangers to the ecology don't mean a damn
thing.
The Atlantic Richfield oil company could get
along without a refinery at Cherry Point except for the
fact that their Alaskan oil reserves are the only ones
they own in western North America. Therefore, they
have to buy oil from other companies and their profit
margin, though still healthy, suffers accordingly.
The goal of Sunday's demonstration was to
convince the U.S. government to veto construction of
the Alaska pipeline, thus ending the possibility of the
tanker routes and the Cherry Point refinery.
But although the pipeline has never been
approved, the oil industry has already invested
considerable amounts of cash in materials for it and
Atlantic Richfield has already ordered tankers.
(American law says that any ships travelling between
American ports must be American-made. Because
American-made ships are more expensive than any
others, it would cost them too much to buy the tankers
and use them on other routes.)
The oil industry now has a vested interest in the
Alaska pipeline and the U.S. government has never been
noted for its resistance to the oil lobby.
The U.S. government also wants control over as
much of its oil reserves as possible and will not look
kindly on a Canadian pipeline route. Apparently, they
are afraid Canadians will soon choose a government with
enough courage to turn off the taps — we wish we could
be that optimistic.
As long as our lives are dominated by corporate
profits there will be a thousand more Cherry Points and
all our Sundays at the peace arch won't make the
slightest bit of difference.
The Quebec Trials
Yes folks, not to be outdone by Greece, South
Africa or the U.S., the Canadian government is now in
the midst of staging its very own political trials.
It's all happening in Montreal and makes great
newspaper copy. But on Thursday we will get a chance
to find out what is really going on when a victim of that
federal persecution, Jacques Larue-Langlois, speaks in
the SUB ballroom. It should be worth listening to.
"I'm certainly happy we hold elections in the off-season, this gets me in shape for filling out racing
forms."
LETTERS
Editor: Nate Smith
News . Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire    John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Out of the pubs and onto the streets
— a week devoid of existence. Showing
up were David Lee, Leslie Plommer,
Mike Sasges (of worker's cap fame),
Josephine Margolis, Kathy Stewart,
and of course Shane McCune who
managed to pull himself away from the
bottle for a few hours. Sandy Kassand
John Gibbs greeted Gin Gait, back on
the job. Ken Lassesen, Thorn Wescott,
Dick Betts and Kathy Carney added
their two-bits worth. Jinny Ladner
showed, too. Bill Ruby and Steve
Millard jocked.
Jan, Maurice and Jennifer were sick
and Gee! Mr. Rayner, we were
impressed.
Palmers reply
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I challenge you to print all of
this.
On Friday, Feb. 12, I picked
up a copy of the glorious
Ubyssey. On the front page was
one outright lie about me. On the
editorial page was another. I
achieved front page billing, being
accused of manipulating the UBC
Reports editor into printing an
article on student government
financing.
The first point about this is
that I asked UBC Reports to
publish the article in their January
edition. Only lack of space
delayed it until February. The
article could hardly be called
political, seeing that its prime
purpose was to promote the
passage of a bylaw at the spring
general meeting of the AMS. And
if anything, the article calls for
radical change — my secondary
point being that a guaranteed
income would be a radical
improvement. It puzzles me that
all year long The Ubyssey and its
political hacks attack student
councillors for not
communicating with students and
then turn around to slam me for
doing just that.
Mr. Banham was misquoted by
your reporter. Jim Banham never
said he had been duped by me. He
said that he would have printed
my article on another date
(before or after February 11), if
he had known I was going to run
for AMS treasurer. I did not
make up my mind to run for sure
until after I read the Smolensky
article. Up until the weekend
before nominations closed I had
planned to back another student
councillor for treasurer.
On the editorial page, you, Mr.
Smith, accused me of being
responsible for the late opening of
the Buchanan polling station. It
was suggested that I had
deliberately done this in order to
affect Steve Garrod's vote.
Point one is that I never had
any responsibility for the
Buchanan poll or any other
polling station. From the outset I
would not accept the
responsibility to volunteer for
polling duty. The responsibility
lies with the AMS election
committee and whomever they
recruited   to   run   the   polls.   If
someone in the Arts Undergraduate
Society volunteered to man the
booth, he volunteered as an
individual student and not on
behalf of the Arts Undergraduate
Society. By the Arts Undergraduate
Society constitution, the president
of AUS and nobody else is the
sole representative and spokesman
for the Society. On top of this,
nowhere does it say that
undergraduate societies have any
responsibility for AMS elections.
I must say that while The
Ubyssey was terribly upset and
righteous about the Buchanan
poll, no mention was made of the
Sedgewick poll that opened later
than Buchanan, nor the education
poll which did not open until
noon. Undoubtedly, Hanson Lau
must have lost votes at the
education poll.
So, as I was saying, I picked up
a copy of The Ubyssy. Well, I felt
a little depressed and angry with
all the BS about myself as well as
the Smolensky article and the
total support given an opposition
slate whose headquarters was the
Ubyssey office. Then an idea
struck me and I was chuckling —
If I cannot compete with 16,000
copies of a paper, at least I can
pull a stunt to rib The Ubyssey
editor. I stuffed no more than a
hundred copies of The Ubyssey
with the campaign platform of the
Lau slate. I knew this would get
back to the editor of The Ubyssey
and he would have a small fit.
From what I have been told my
predictions were accurate.
Some might claim my action to
be a little indiscreet - some might
say it was unfair. I don't
personally feel my actions to be
very wrong. I stuffed the papers as
a joke, obviously not to compete
with 16,000 Ubysseys. I did not
slander anyone in stuffing the
papers. At the time I felt
reasonably provocated and The
Ubyssey had plenty of time to
make a fuss and rebuttal — which
it did the following Tuesday.
However, perhaps I should be
sorry because I realize such an act
can still be used as a red herring to
discredit my other actions.
There is no ballot box
tampering nor any plot to
manipulate the UBC Reports. You
may not like what I do but I am
fed up with you putting political
bias on everything that I do.
.    DON PALMER
President
Arts Undergraduate Society
Dimension
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Dick Betts' article on "the
confusion in thought of social
democrats in Canada today"
(Ubyssey, Feb. 12), seemed
autobiographical. To speak of
"the FLQ reformists" is a
paradox, for they seek to destroy
and not reshape existing political
and social structures.
Not content with tearing off
Canadian Dimension's arms to
beat it, Mr. Betts damns the
magazine on the basis of what he
reads between the lines (viz. "One
almost reads 'Third World Rabble'
into CD's smug remarks").
Students of Quebec history
will be left breathless by the
assertion that "the FLQ took
drastic measures precisely because
things have not changed since
1760 in Quebec". How can one
deliver a sermon on fuzzy
thinking and then conclude with
the following sentence: "National
feelings based on the desire for
freedom marks the time when
nationality in the era of the
multi-national corporation
becomes a meaningful force."?
In short, the great sin of
Canadian Dimsension seems to be
that it has not fully embraced Mr.
Betts' credo that Quebec is a
"colony within a colony". The
Ubyssey performs a useful
service in providing an alternative
to the commercial press but the
article by Mr. Betts only reflects
credit on the latter.
PETER MOOGK
History Department
Grad gift
The Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Environmental Crisis
Operation received a $5,000 class
gift from the '71 Grads. I would
be grateful if you published this
letter, thus allowing E.C.O.
members to thank the '71 Grads
most sincerely for their support.
The underlying mood of the
Grad meeting was one of concern
that the gift money be spent on
relevant, important issues. E.C.O.
recognizes this and we will do our
utmost to use the money in a
manner reflecting the concern we
and the Grad Class share for
maintaining a quality
environment.
WREN Q. GREEN
E.C.O. Tuesday, February 23, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Inside the AMS office:
the people and the work
By ROSEMARY SUNG
Rosemary Sung, a 1970 graduate who recently
resigned as AMS receptionist, writes about the
working conditions of AMS employees.
It has been said that no-one is indispensible in
the Alma Mater Society and I, for one, am in
complete agreement.
In fact, the turn-over of AMS staff has been
exceedingly high and will continue to be high until
this organization can learn to co-operate with and
consolidate its staff. Only with this combined effort
can AMS become a more serviceable organization
for students and employees alike.
The students scream for equality — to be heard.
Well although I can only speak for myself, I wish to
air my grievances in the hope that someone will
have a sympathetic ear and perhaps something
concrete can be done to alleviate the situation for
all.
The AMS has been under considerable attack as
of late (as it probably is every year around this
time) and I do not wish to add insult to injury. I
will not discuss the AMS in political terms. My main
concern is" why its executives and managers run the
offices with so much bureaucracy when they
themselves shun such practices from the
administration.
The primary concern of the AMS, I should
think, is to act as intermediary between the students
and faculty to eliminate as much of this red tape as
possible. Instead, certain executives like to play the
game of cat and mouse themselves. They choose
who they wish to see and make a professional liar
out of the receptionist.
In all reality, some like very much to hold a
title and feel important, but when it right down to
the nitty gritty of the job they probably abhor the
work and the demands it entails. Let it be said,
however, that not all of the executives hold
themselves in such high esteem. Few - a very few -
are genuinely interested in student welfare.
But what about the welfare of the staff? Many
are students trying to earn an extra buck or
graduates biding their time until they gain
experience. We are not misfits who out of the
generosity of AMS were given jobs. We are capable
human beings willing to do jobs and responsibilities
assigned to us as best we can. Yet, we still have to
tolerate all the injustices to keep in their good
graces.
One inequity suffered is the abominable pay
rate. I cannot believe that a group of supposedly
perceptive students (excuse me, I meant executives)
cannot or will not understand the plight of fellow
workers. They have been around themselves during
the summer, receiving minimal wages and grateful
even to be employed. Why then are AMS staff
workers not even getting standard wages? When the
shoe is on the other foot, don't they feel the pinch
as well?
At the time of my employment, I was quoted a
starting salary of $325 a month and no lower than
$315. According to the university pay scale (as
quoted to me by the UBC personnel office) the
equivalent pay rate for clerk/typist is sorriewhere
between $325 and $350 starting salary.
Complaining is a waste of time. Certain
executives and administrators turn a deaf ear. But
not only that, the recommendations for raises and
other fringe benefits have to go through so many
channels that this inevitably gets lost (purposely or
not) in the shuffle. (Therefore, I dare not submit
this to the administrators or executive branch of the
AMS for this too will never pass through but a few
hands.)
In addition, the staff is subjected daily to the
abuse and extreme arrogance of many executives
and their helpers. Granted, we do work for them,
but just because we are paid with AMS money does
not mean that a little more discretion and respect
could not be used.
In fact, I have been intimidated and harassed,
particularly by the Ombudsman. He has repeatedly
used unprofessional words in addressing staff and
has flung out insults in his usual callous off-hand
manner. Needless to say, if there is no rapport
between workers, how can the AMS even hope to
operate efficiently?
In essence, there is a total lack of
communication within the organization and an even
more frustrating lack of co-operation. I was under
the illusion that being on campus and working in a
student atmosphere would be a pleasant experience.
My complaints are with the people who run the
AMS and whom I had no voice in choosing. You can
do something about it.
I write this as a concerned alumnus. If this
situation is allowed to perpetuate year after year the
AMS will mean nothing, the university will be
more bureaucratic than ever, and the students will
have no voice, no power, nothing. Let's not get
bogged down at this level and let's hope the new
council and new administrators (?) will be more
effective and more receptive.
Hunger strike at the Sorbonne
PARIS (CUP) - A group
of students and professors at the
Sorbonne are on a hunger strike in
their arts and science faculties as a
protest against the fate of political
prisoners in particular and jailed
Frenchmen in general.
Among the professors on strike
is Bernard Teyssedre who taught
at the University of Montreal two
years  ago  and who is currently
working on a history of Canadian
art.
The   professors  and  students
maintaining the hunger strike are
supporting a similar strike by the
prisoners. The parallel strikes have
two precise objectives: that all
political prisoners are recognized
as such by the state, and that the
medieval penitentiary system be
revised.
(ft
JHE CURRY HOUSE
3934 MAIN ST.
(at 23rd)
Tel: 879-7236
finest EAST INDIAN food
$3.00 for groups of 10 or
more - CLOSED MONDAY
SAVE UP TO 50%
oil   over   1000   New   and   Used
Standard Portable and Electric
TYPEWRITERS
Adders, Calculators, etc. at the
World's 1st Office
Equipment Supermarket
Absolutely the largest selection
and lowest prices in Canada
Expert Repairs
Trades Welcome
STUDENT RENTALS
LOW RATES
WE DELIVERS PICK-UP
POLSON TYPEWRITERS
458 W Broadway - 879-0631
Open Daily inc. Saturday—9-6
Friday 9-9
Lots of Free Parking
■MM
NOTICE OF MEETING
A.M.S. Committee
Inquiring into Tenure
Any interested student, faculty member, or member
of the community who wishes to present an opinion
on any aspect of tenure is invited to attend a
meeting of the tenure committee. Points raised at
the meeting will be considered for inclusion in the
final report of the committee.
The meeting will be held in SUB Room 212A
(behind clubs lounge) at 12:30 P.M. on Friday,
February 26. For further information, call Rob
McDiarmid 228-3973 or 434-9954.
■MM
■MM
"PEOPLE"
Applications are now being accepted from students for the
position of DIRECTOR of the programme "PEOPLE - AN
EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN RELATIONS AND HUMAN
SEXUALITY", '71-'72. These should be directed to Sean
McHugh, Office of Interprofessional Education, Woodward
Library, Rm. 324.
Letters should include  all material   that  the  applicant
considers relevant to the position.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL LYNN, 228-3083
 "A HAUNTING,
LYRICAL FILM!
Maggie Smith
takes the film
into the realm
of immortality."
—Rex Reed,
> SUB Film Soc presentation—
FRIDAY 26 &
SATURDAY 27
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 28 - 7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students - 50c
General Public — 75c
    0,
tfae'jftrime
^Jam^Brodie
magfieSmith
DEBATE
G-D
ii
AFTER AUSCHWITZ"
G-D —
The G-d of Creation,
of productivity,
of light and life,
of Moses and Jesus,
of Protestant,
Catholic and Jew.
DR. RICHARD RUBENSTEIN
M.A. Ph.D.
Harvard University
Noted    theologian    and    thinker
ordained   rabbi   who  denies the
existence of a personal G-D
G-d,
the always present,
all powerful,
all pervading spirit.
Where    was    He    at
Auschwitz?
Where was He while
millions suffered inhumane deaths?
Where was He during
man's greatest inhumanity to man?
DR. IRVING GREENBERG
M.A. Ph.D.
Harvard University
Professor  of philosophy Yeshiva
university     fulbright    visiting
professor   of   history   Tel   Aviv,
university
The Intellectual Debate
SUNDAY, FEB 28th, 8:30 p.m.
SCHARA TZEDECK AUDITORIUM
3476 OAK STREET
Adults ■ $3.00 ■ Students ■ $1.50
^^^= DEBATE I Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 23, 1971
TUESDAY
HISPANIC   AND   ITALIAN   STUDIES
Professor Danilo Aguzzi-Barbagli lectures in Bu. 204 at noon.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   ALLIANCE
General meeting at 1776 Alberni St.
at 7:30.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Third program on the failure of UBC
in SUB 125 at noon.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Meeting in Wesbrook 201 at noon.
CANOE CLUB
General meeting on this week's trip
on Chilliwack River in SUB 119 at
noon.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Crepe party for members at 7:30.
cuso
CUSO information night at International House in Room 402 at 7:30.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting in Bu. 104 at noon.
WEDNESDAY
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Free "Castrall" film presentation in
SUB 105A at noon.
ALUMNI  ASSOCIATION
Dr. W. Hardwick speaks at Cecil
Green Park at 7:30.
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Meeting in Bu. 232 at noon.
UNIVERSITY   CLUBS COMMITTEE
General compulsory meeting in SUB
215 at noon.
VARSITY   DEMOLAY
Meeting in SUB 113 at noon.
ANGLICAN   UNITED  CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Ash    Wednesday   Eucharist   in    SUB
Clubs Lounge at noon.
PRE-DENTAL   SOCIETY
General meeting for elections of executive in SUB 213 at noon.
'tween
classes
THURSDAY
CAMPUS  CRUSADE  FOR CHRIST
Discussions in SUB 213 at noon.
AMS
Political prisoner Jacques Larue-Langlois of the "Quebec Five" speaks in
SUB Ballroom at noon.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Meet in front of Wesbrook 100 at
noon. Bring cars if possible.
AQUA SOCIETY
General meeting at noon in SUB 206.
VCF
Bible-study and prayer in SUB 113 at
noon.
UBC  BIKE CLUB
Meeting in SUB 205 at noon.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Film — Le Misanthrope — at 12:30
and  7:30.  Admission is 25((.
T-BIRD WARGAMERS
Meeting in SUB 119 at noon.
FRIDAY
WOMEN'S  INTRAMURALS
Manager's meeting in SUB 213 at
noon.
FLYING   CLUB
Meeting in SUB 105A at noon.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Meeting in SUB 207-209 at noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
FRIDAY   FEB  26
Lecture by F. W. Walbank on "Nationality in Roman History" in Bu.
100 at 12:30.
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare  or  Straight  Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIA1   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10th
PATia
EAT IN 'TAKEOUT* DELIVERY"
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In — Take Out
Open Every Day
4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.       224-6121
In the Village
Creating
Intelligence
Introductory Talk
12:30, Thurs. Feb. 25, BU. 203
further info: 266-0862
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDIATION
Maharishi Mahesh
Yogi
Special Events and the Contemporary
Arts Festival
A JOURNEY THROUGH OUTER & INNER SPACE
A NEW EXPERIENCE IN MULTI-MEDIA AND VISUAL
PERCEPTION UTILIZING QUADRIPHONIC SOUND
Let the Retina Circus take you on a trip that transcends
time and space. A visual journey into the formation
of the universe. Experience high energy patterns
and the beginning of form. Travel through the galaxies to the beginning of the earth and the coming
of man.
\.v\\>\\^ c^.v.^:x^>><^^s^\^\\\\\^v\uui//y/y/y///7///.v,///////////M///,.///////, -yyy/.
TWO
perfoi
.ly
>rmances
'Friday, Feb. 26 12:30 p.m. and 8 p!m;
*N\\ ^--^Special Student Rate: $1.00 - Non-students: $2.00 ^~
avaiJable.at the door
,.*V»
*^*i?^.^_
mm^x^-^^
Dont miss the original     LEON MANDRAKE
in a special exploratory performance into new worlds of voodoo, esp and magic
Special Student Rate $1.00
Non-Students $2.00
THURS., FEB. 25 - 8 p.m.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before
publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
THREE PAIK GIRLS SKI BOOTS
left red Volks. Thurs. ride from
Whistler. Contact Hanneke, 731-
9348. __
FOUND TWO CAR KEYS BI-SCI
Faculty staff lot Wed. Feb. 17.
all J'ohn,   987-2737  eves.	
LOST SET OF 5 KEYS ON ST.
Christopher key chain in Education.  Phone 683-6355 evenings.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
•THE PRIME OF MISS JEAN BRO-
die'. You've heard about it! Now
see it! SUB Aud. Fri. and Sat.,
7:00' & 9:30;   Sun.,  7:00. AMS card
holders, 50c.	
TRUMPET PLAYER WANTED TO
play   in   Chicago   style   band   just
starting out,  988-7216.	
DO YOU OWN TIBETAN MUSI-
cal instruments? If so, please call
me at 733-0500.	
FREE  VACATION-STAY   PLAN
USA  -  Canada  -  Europe  -  etc.
"FOR   STUDENTS   ONLY"
Discover  how  qualified,   responsible
people are saving hundreds of $$$$$
while     widening     their     vacation
worlds.   Details   on   request.   Write:
Student Vacation   Registry,   Box  73,
Station 'N' Toronto 14, Ontario.	
ASH WEDNESDAY EUCHARIST:
12:30 Wednesday in SUB Clubs
Lounge. Sponsored by Anglican
United Campus Ministry.	
SAVE   $20.
Waterbeds   all   sizes   and   shapes
Phone Florence 738-3464 2-6 p.m.
Mon. - Fri.
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa, Hong Kong.
106—709  Dunsmuir St.,  Van.   1,  B.C.
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS   ON   A
BUDGET?
Then visit your Youth Hostels information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian Union Hostels Association
1406  West   Broadway
Vancouver 9, B.C. Tel. 738-3128
SUMMER WORK IN SWISS ALPS
for room & board. Kitchen & farm
help. (M & F). 266-5246 for details.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1961 ZEPHYR. NEW MOTOR, NEW
battery. Needs generator. Good
condition $150.00. Rick, 733-2891
after  six.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
1970 YAMAHA ENDURO 250 EX-
cell. cond. 1000 miles. Call Tim,
224-7884,   4515   W.   12th.	
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care 8c Baby Sitting     32A
Photography
34
CUSTOM    PHOTO    WORK;    ALSO
' your   film    developed   &   printed.
Phone 733-9423 til 8 p.m. — Steve.
Scandals
37
"GIVE ME A GIRL AT AN IM-
pressionable age and she is mine
for life." Quote from Miss Jean
Brodie, SUB Aud., Fri. and Sat.,
7:00 & 9:30;  Sun.,  7:00.	
IT'S COMING! ARE YOU GOING?
Febteber-Fest. This year's happening. Save Feb. 27 for it. Stay
tuned!
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ESSAY AND
thesis typist. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.   Ann  Treacy.   738-8794.	
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING, IBM
Electric — 35c/page. Call after
noon,   733-4708.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
Experienced Typist, Eleetri Type-
writer.  731-8096.	
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al and Technical Typing, IBM
Selectric—Days, Evenings, Week-
ends.  Phone:   228-9304—30c per.
TYPING SERVICES BY MALE
Secretary, Manuscripts, General
Typing, etc., Evenings and weekends. IBM Selectric Typewriter.
Pick up and Deliver. Reasonable
rates to students. Phone 522-8378
after  4:30  p.m.
Typing
40
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
—experienced in all types of technical thesis. Reasonable rates.
Call  Mrs.   Ellis,   321-3838.	
— AMS TYPING SERVICE —
30c  per   page   with   1   day   service.
12:30   -   1:30   in   SUB  Co-ordinator's
office  weekdays,  879-0095.  Evenings
and weekends.
 — SEE US FIRST! —	
NORTH VANCOUVER. WILL
your thesis or manuscript. Experienced — reasonible rates. Phone
988-5*420.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, thesis. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
EXP. TYPIST WITH THESIS,
will type my home. No hand written essays please. Vic. P.N.E.
Phone Rosie at 255-8853.	
TYPING—ESSAYS,   THESIS,   ETC.
Phone Mrs.  Brown,  732-0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
"'GUARANTEED SUMMER JOBS
in Europe for students. Program
includes orientation, sickness/accident insurance, various cultural
activities. Reserved for BESTS
members. For full details and ap-
plication forms send $1.00 to
BESTS (Canada), Queen's Uni-
versity,  Kingston,  Ontario."
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
PRACTICAL GUITAR LESSONS.
No "sit by the notes and suffer
sessions." $1.75. Priv. lesson! 874-
9761.
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
COACHING FOR ENGLISH 100
students for whom English is a
new   language.   261-6410.	
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101.
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
ratis. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3  p.m.	
FRENCH TUTORING, TRANSLA-
tion into French, experienced
Parisian teacher. 687-6494. Alain
Neumand  (804),  1949 Barclay St.
IS ONE OF YOUR COURSES A
drag? Need help? Come to the
UBC Tutoring Centre. Almost all
subjects, SUB 100B, 228-4583, 12-
2 p.m.,  daily.   $3.00 per hour.	
GERMAN TUTORING: CONVER-
sation & Grammar, by qualified
ex-University Teacher, Native-
Speaker, Group & Quantity Discounts.   Eves.:   731-0156.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
PORTABLE STEREO CASSETTE
recorder/player; perfect condition;
$110/offer; 224-7615.
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS   FOR   RENT,   MEN  ONLY.
Near   UBC.   $40.00   a   month.   Call
682-2581.
Room 8c Board
■2
FREE ROOM AND BOARD FOR
girl student in exchange for help
with children. Near UBC Gates.
224-6192.
Furnished Apts.
83
EXCHANGE OR SUBLET; APRIL
to Septembtr, modern 2% (Faculty), everything included, downtown Montreal, close to McGill;
write Daniel LaTouche, Dept. of
Political Science, McGill Univer-
sity.	
MALE GRAD STUDENT LOOKING
for another to share 2 B.R. apt. IN
VILLAGE!  Call Frank,  228-8213.
SENIOR STUDENT (MALE) TO
share 2 bdrm. suite with another,
$65.00. Near 4th & Macdonald.
Available  now,  731-1625.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
FEMALE GRAD STUDENT wishes
same immediately to share cozy
furnished house near campus $65.
228-9504. Tuesday, February 23, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Puck Birds
finish second
(CALGARY) - University of
B.C. Thunderbirds defeated
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
6-3 Saturday in a Western Canada
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association hockey game marked
by two goals into an empty net
and a benches-empty brawl in the
final minute.
The fight resulted in four
major penalties and 19
misconducts. Doug Buhr of UBC
received a minor, two majors and
a misconduct, while John Jenkins
and Greg Charlton of Calgary
were assessed majors and
misconducts.
Eight players on each team
were assessed misconducts for
leaving the bench to join the fight.
Prior to the outbreak only six
minor penalties had been handed
out - six to UBC.
Thunderbirds won the brawl as
well as the game.
UBC scored their final two
goals after Calgary had pulled
their goal tender in favour of a
sixth attacker. The goals came at
19:30 and 19:34.
In wrapping up second place in
the standings, the 'Birds led 3-1
after the second period, but the
"Dinnies" tied the score 3-3.
Norm Park tallied the winner with
4:43 left.
Rich Longpre and Roy Sakaki
scored two goals each for the
winners. Doug Buchanan got the
other tally.
UBC outshot Calgary 39-38.
Calgary beat UBC 4-2 Friday
after the 'Birds led 2-1 a halfway
through the second period.
Barry Wilcox got both UBC
goals.
The same two clubs meet in a
best-of-three semi-final series this
weekend in Thunderbird Arena.
The games will go Friday,
Saturday and, if necessary,
Sunday at 8 p.m.
The other semi-final will match
first-place Manitoba and
fourth-place Alberta.
Track results
from indoor meet
University of B.C. finished second in
both men's and women's divisions at
the Western Canada Intercollegiate
Athletic Association indoor track and
field championships in Pacific
Coliseum Sunday.
The University of Saskatchewan
won both divisions with 115 points in
the men's and 67 in the women's. UBC
managed 99 and 48 respectively.
Outstanding UBC performances
were turned in by Rick Cuttle with
firsts in the high jump and long jump;
Norm Trerise with firsts in the men's
mile and 1000-yard races; and Telma
Fynn who captured the women's
800-metres and 1,500-metres.
RUGBY:
(HAYWARD, CALIFORNIA) —
University of B.C. Thunderbirds
defeated University of California
(Hayward Campus) 34-9 Saturday in
an  exhibition  collegiate rugby match.
Thunderbirds downed the University
of California at Berkeley 22-6
Thursday.
Ray Banks, who kicked 16 points
Thursday, kicked another 19 Saturday
as he converted all five tries and added
three penalty goals.
SWIMMING:
(WINNIPEG) — University of B.C.
women piled up 112 points to capture
the women's division by nine points at
the Western Canada Intercollegiate
Athletic Association swimming and
diving championships over the
weekend.
The University of Alberta women
finished second, but the Alberta men
took that division's honours with 156
points to UBC's 106.
UBC's Shirley Cazalet was named
outstanding female athlete as she won
gold medals in the 100-yard
backstroke. UBC's Karen James won a
gold in the women's 220-yard
individual medley event.
UBC won two men's events as Dan
Cooper took the 50-yard freestyle and
Phil Dockerill the 200-yard breastroke.
IntraiAurah
THE BALL BELONGS TO ANYONE after a rebound, and your guess is as good as ours concerning the
outcome of this scramble. The chances of Birds' Ron Thorsen (left) and Terry MacKay (24) don't appear
too good, however, as Alberta's Dick DeKlerk looks up for a better solution.
Birds win two, move on to finals
By BILL RUBY
In weekend basketball the UBC
Thunderbirds hosted the
University of Alberta "Golden
Bears" in their last home games of
the 1970-71 season.
The action saw the Birds win
the best of three semi-final series
in two straight games.
On Friday night UBC jumped
to an overwhelming 40-14 lead
which saw the Birds play perhaps
their best 11 minutes of
basketball all year.
What SHOULD have followed
is something the Birds haven't
been able to do all year.
With this lead the Birds should
have walked away with the game.
They didn't. They stumbled,
stalled, and almost turned the
game back to Alberta.
In the second half the Birds
slowed the pace down in an
attempt to bring Alberta out of
their 1-2-2 zone. All it did was
keep the Birds' score down and
give Alberta a chance to raise
theirs.
With 10 minutes remaining in
the game, Alberta went to a
pressing man to man defense in an
attempt to gain possession of the
ball. The Birds again began to run
and shoot, finishing the game with
an 82-67 victory.
UBC's Ron Thorsen led all
scorers with 25 points while
Derek Sankey scored 21 and
Terry MacKay added 17. Sankey
also played a strong defensive
game by holding Alberta's main
scoring threat, Dick DeKlerk, to
only 14 points.
The following night UBC won
the second semi-final game by a
score of 65-61.
What happened was a rerun of
Friday's game. The Birds again
slowed the pace down, attempting
to bring Alberta out of their zone.
Only this time UBC didn't have a
25 point lead to play with.
Leading by only one point at
the half, the Birds were unable to
pull away. Their biggest lead in
the second half was nine points,
but it was whittled down to two
points with 50 seconds remaining.
The Birds hung on, however, to
narrowly edge out the "Golden
Bears" and end their season.
Sankey shot well for the Birds,
scoring a game high of 21 points.
The other scorers were well
distributed with Thorsen getting
13, Jack Hoy 12, MacKay 11, and
Stan Callegari eight.
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NO APPOINTMENT NECESSAR Yi
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Basketball — Playoffs are now under
way, check the schedules if you have
not already done so. The Division I final
game is on Feb. 24, at Gym A.
2-Mile Walk — Will be held on
Feb. 25 at 2:30 on the Memorial gym
field.
Arts 20 — Registration will be accepted until Wednesday Feb. 24.
Track and Field — Registration will
be accepted until Wednesday Feb. 24.
The meet will be held on Saturday
March 13.
Unit Managers Meeting — Will be
held tonight in Room 211 War Memorial
Gym, at 7:00.
Co-Recreational Volleyball — Will be
held as usual today at 12:30 in War Memorial Gym.
Banquet — Don't forget the banquet
on March 15. All persons receiving
awards must be in attendance to receive
their award.
4si
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4450 West 10th Ave. — Just outside the Gates
INTERCOLLEGIATE
ICE
HOCKEY
WCIAA SEMI-FINALS
(BEST OF THREE)
UBC THUNDERBIRDS
vs
UNIV. OF CALGARY DINOSAURS
Feb. 26-27
Winter Sports Arena
Under the Jurisdiction of
The Western Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Association
STUDENT PRICE $1.00
GENERAL ADMISSION $1.50
CHILDREN UNDER 12
50 CENTS Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 23, 1971
fixin1   to
PART FIFTEEN
By THOM WESCOTT
A lot of people want to know if there is any
problem with drugs in Viet Nam. There isn't.
Vietnamese grass is the cheapest, easiest to get and
some of the best in the world.
That may sound facetious, but it's true.
Marijuana is used extensively by the majority of the
troops in Viet Nam and in itself does not affect the
combat efficiency of American units.
It is hard to estimate the exact extent of the
use of pot among the men over there. The main
reason is that people tend to be slightly secretive
about it.
Statistics have no relation to the truth. In the
first place the commanders don't relish the idea of
having the dopiest unit in the division, so a lot of
men caught with dope are let off without official
action so the offense will not go on the unit's
records.
The other reason is that most of the officers
looking for marijuana users still believe that a man
will start raving about the big hairy spiders chasing
him after he does his first joint.
Because of this, any estimate of the amount of
dope smoked in Viet Nam has to come from the
personal experience of enlisted men. I would
estimate that in the units of the area I was in, at
least a quarter of the men are stoned five nights a
week or more. Another half use it regularly but less
frequently and only one man out of 10 goes the
whole year without any experience.
Despite the wide use of marijuana among the
enlisted men (I'm sticking to the enlisted men
because no officer ever offered me a joint) and the
fact that half the kids who offer you grass can also
sell you opium from the other pocket, hard drugs
are less of a problem than alcoholism.
The matter of how dope affects the morale of
the men is more complex matter. Morale in Viet
Nam is poor, but marijuana is not the cause. The
cause is that nobody believes American belongs in
Viet Nam, but it is easier to spend your year over
there than it is to stay at home and fight for
decency and a human government.
But to say that dope is the symptom of poor
morale is oversimplifying the situation. Smoking is a
result of poor morale, but so is alcoholism and there
is a vast difference in the effect.
The drinker becomes either despondent or
belligerent, and is a problem either way. The dope
smoker is off on his own trip and does the best he
can to enjoy himself.
He pursues a policy of "optimum
non-cooperation." In other words, he has as little to
do with the authorities as possible. If it were not for
the pacifying effects of dope and the let-it-be
philosophy that lets the men face the war one day
at a time, mutiny and assassination of officers
would be a far more serious problem than it is.
The illegality of their actions has knit the men
of each unit into a tight organization. I remember
one night when our unit suffered one of its rare
busts.
A suspicious staff sergeant had taken the
colonel to the barracks of a man he had a personal
grudge against. They had found some dope and
called for the officer of the guard to come up and
place him under arrest and organize a search of the
rest of the camp.
The only thing they hadn't counted on was that
the telephone operator was a head and always
monitored calls when he had a chance. Before the
officer of the guard had the man in custody every
stash in the camp was hidden outside where the
owner could not be implicated.
One of the things people are most worried
about when they think of dope in a combat zone is
the ability to respond to an emergency. Because of
the controlability of a grass high, this is rarely a
problem.
One evening I was sitting in a bunker with five
other men, wrecked out of their heads, when we
heard a shot outside. Before the shot had stopped
echoing we had our helmets, rifles and ammunition
and were outside the bunker just as ready for a
battle as we'd ever be.
Marijuana has its dangers. You can get busted.
Some people even claim it can cause insanity, and
although I have never heard of anyone going crazy
because of dope or the lack of it, I have never seen
algebraic proof that it is impossible.
One friend of mine, after staying stoned for
three months and having to give it up because he
was on an operation and surrounded by officers did
take to eating dead bodies. His favorite cut was a
thigh bone that he chewed on for a week. I really
don't know what that's supposed to prove, but it is
for real.
The main danger is that a heavy user tends to
neglect his personal health and is liable to suffer
from malnutrition. The only real drug casualty I
knew of was Aragon. He was sent to the hospital
after 10 days of mixing grass, pure caffeine, rot-gut
whiskey, opium, no food and no sleep.
His mind was intact, even if it was a little fuzzy,
but his stomach was functionally non-existent.
Portnuff declared AUS  pres
Human Government candidate
Colin Portnuff, arts 2, has been
acclaimed Arts Undergraduate
Society president.
He was acclaimed when his
only opponent John Sproule
withdrew his nomination in
favor of Portnuff on Thursday.
But on Saturday - after the
deadline     for     nominations    —
Sproule decided to re-enter the
race.
His decision coincided with the
decision of Alma Mater Society
president-elect Hanson Lau not to
resign. Sproule is a former
campaign worker for Lau.
It was then up to Portnuff
whether or not Sproule would be
allowed to re-enter the race after
the   deadline.   Portnuff  decided
against Sproule.
"It seemed to me that Sproule
couldn't be a very serious
candidate if he was continually
changing his mind about
running," said Portnuff.
Arts students vote Thursday on
the other executive positions.
HILLEL
Under the auspices of
THE CANADIAN COUNCIL OF CHRISTIANS AND JEWS
Presents
REUBEN SLONIM,
Associate Editor, the Toronto Telegram,
speaking on
THE POLITICAL SITUATION IN THE MIDDLE EAST
of HILLEL HOUSE
Tuesday, February 23, at 12:30 p.m. .au wblcome
Reuben Slonim has been covering the Middle East since the establishment of Israel in 1948. l-fe
covered the three Arab-Israeli wars and Nigerian War from the front lines and interviewed
personalities on both sides of the Middle East conflict — Gamal Abdel Nasser, King Hussein, and
the four Israeli premiers, Ben-Gurion, Moshe Sharett, Levi Eshkol and Golda Meir.
He appears regularly as commentator and panelist on international and Canadian affairs on CBC
and CTV, ■	
 "A HAUNTING,
LYRICAL FILM!
Maggie Smith
takes the film
into the realm
of immortality."
—Rex Reed,
a SUB Film Soc presentation—
FRIDAY 26 &
SATURDAY 27
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 28 - 7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students - 50c
General Public — 75c
      0,
*Ihe?flrime
*»&
Wag&e Smith
INFORMATION
WANTED
Those who witnessed or who have any
information concerning the disruption of the
meeting and film showing at the main lounge of
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE at 12:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, February 9 are requested to contact D.
S. SIGURGEIRSON, Barrister & Solicitor, No. 1,
11961 88th Avenue, Delta, B.C. Telephone
594-5488. Replies shall be held in confidence.
YOUR STUDENT CARD
IS WORTH A PILE OF BREAD AT
Steieo iiiiirt-
613 GRANVILLE • 681-1825
DISCOUNTS ON STEREO COMPONENTS TO ALL
U.B.C. STUDENTS UPON PRESENTATION OF
VALID STUDENT'S CARD.
OPEN THURSDAYS AND FRIDAYS 'TIL 9:00 P.M.
We carry everything in Stereo Sound!
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE  I
ELECTIONS
The following positions are open for the next year's £:•:
council of the Science Undergraduate Society: ?:•:
President
Vice President
4 AMS reps g;
Treasurer
Academic Coordinator
Athletic Coordinator
Social Coordinator |i
Public Relations Officer
Publications Officer
Secretary |;
Last year's elections were a real farce. This was due &
mainly to apathy on the part of you, the student body of g;
Science. If you want an undergraduate society that will work ;g
for you, then get out and run for office. Nomination forms are g:j
available in the Science Undergraduate Society office in Hut jg
0-7, behind the Education Building. Nominations close Mar. jg
2nd. Election Mar. 9th. §i
IT'S UP TO YOU
^GET INVOLVED!
tiS&SS8SSS8S8$S8$S9R#S8S$2H&.
GET INVOLVED!
GETJNyOUfEDjJ

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