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The Ubyssey Nov 29, 1983

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UBC Archives Serial
TA Union to vote on strike action
By GORDON CLARK
Another strike may hit UBC soon
if current talks between the teaching
assistants union and the administration break down.
The TAU, which has been
without a contract since May 31,
has called for a strike vote on Dec. 5
because it feels the administration's
offers are unfair, said TAU president Horacio de la Cueva.
"They won't bargain unless they
see that we have support."
The outstanding issues are wage
and benefits for union members
and language changes to the current
contract. The union originally asked for a five per cent increase, but
backed down to two per cent when
it discovered that Simon Fraser
University teaching assistants had
settled for that amount, said de la
Cueva.
"We realize the university is in
tough economic shape, but we have
to be fair to ourselves. We've been
making offers to the administra
tion, but I don't think
good offers," he added*.
Cuts in university funding this
year dealt a greater blow to SI^J
than to UBC in proportional teems,
but the former managed to give its
teaching assistants a two per cent
wage increase, said de la Cueva.
UBC should be able to do the same,
he added. .
In addition, teaching assist)
want their tuition fees watasdjjet en
sure they will not silrfia% Brtancially,
even if fees are raised. They are also
asking that student/teacher ratios
be monitored to eliminate overcrowding in labs, he said.
"This is not only to protect us,
but to protect students," he said,
adding if the labs are overcrowded,
teaching assistants spend less time
with each student and the quality of
education declines.
The union is also asking for a
clause in its contract preserving
academic freedom, de la Cueva
said.
The administration is trying to
remove a clause in the current con-
Fees may double
Tuition fees at UBC will likely
double over the next three years, according to administration president
George Pedersen.
Margaret Copping, student
board of governors representative,
said the university administration
submitted confidential fee hike
recommendations to the board at its
last meeting.
"No one knows exactly what the
increases will be but the best
estimate of the worst scenario is
double in three years," she said.
The board is "impervious" to the
effects tuition fee increases will
have on university accessibility, said
Copping.
External affairs co-ordinator Lisa
Hebert said accessibility could be
greatly reduced because the B.C.
student aid program is not structured to accommodate large tuition
fee increases.
ct which says teaching assistants
st attend an orientation meeting
the union in the fall. The
ersity claims that advertising
th* meeting   creates   too   much
bureaucracy, but de la Cueva said it
is> actually trying to disrupt communication between the union and
/potential members.
"How will they (the TAs) know
that we are working for them?" he
said.
The board of governors has in-
"Large tuition increases will correspond directly to large debts in
the student aid program," she said.
An Alma Mater Society report
estimates that fees for arts and
science students could rise to as high
as $1,795 in the next three years.
Tuition in the faculties of medicine
and dentistry could reach $2,900,
says the report. UBC's tuition fees
could be higher than Ontario and
Prairie universities by 1986, the
report concluded.
But administration officials do
not think the increases will cause
decreased enrolment, said Copping.
Tuition at UBC has increased 100
per cent over the last four years, but
registration has increased, she said.
The AMS report is one of several
which will be presented to the
Board of Governors Dec. 1 at 1:30
p.m. Students are encouraged to attend the meeting in SUB to voice
their concerns.
Grant cuts to vary
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
While the education ministry awaits the provincial government's decision
concerning the additional funds needed for grants, students still don't
know how much money to expect.
But one thing is certain — they won't all be affected.
Only those students who have qualified for a grant but are not receiving
the maximum amount of loan — $3,200 — could lose some money.
UBC's financial aid officer Byron Hender said the potential loss probably won't be too much. "It's not like they're going to cut half a grant,
but I don't know how much grant money students could lose."
The provincial government could also increase its loan to grant ratio. But
this move will only create larger debt loads for students requiring assistance
and will deter some from attending university next year, said Lisa Hebert,
Alma Mater Society external affairs coordinator.
"Increasingly, students will have to assess whether or not they can come.
More people will realize they can't afford a B.A.," she said.
If the government decides to give more loan money, student aid offices
might be swamped with paperwork, she added. And banks which handle
student loans might have trouble coping with the added bureaucracy, she
said.
"It would be silly to revamp the program now."
But Hender said a change so late in the year would probably be taken
care of in Victoria and that he hopes the government would be responsible
for the increased workload.
Financial aid officials have not been consulted about the impending decision and are concerned about next year's program, he said.
"It's unfortunate that they are making a decision half way through the
year, while at the same time telling us to help students plan ahead. Ideally,
students should know what their expected costs and income are going to
be," he said.
The provincial shortfall is a little over $1 million, Hender estimated. The
government is expected to make a decision by the end of this week, he added.
Dick Melville, information services director for the education ministry,
said he had no idea how much additional money is needed to cover all
students who qualified for grants and when a decision will be reached.
"When you put a ceiling figure on it, it doesn't allow for unknowns. I'm
not going t o speculate. Too many people do that, and it upsets students."
But he did say loan money may be increased to make up for the shortfall.
"It's a tight economic year."
The problem is becoming evident now because the government
underestimated the number of students eligible for grants and decreased its
contribution to the student aid program by 40 per cent, said Hender.
structed the administration to offer
only a zero per cent increase, said
de la Cueva. And he added that
although he understood the administration's reasons for refusing
to consider wage increases, he could
not figure out why it will not discuss
language changes to the contract
which will not cost any money.
Administration president George
Pedersen said he did not want to
comment while negotiations were in
progress, but said the university
would continue to operate in the
event of a strike.
"On Dec. 5 we are going for a
strike vote, but that is different
from a strike. We will have to
decide to strike at a general
meeting," said de la Cueva.
Campus union representatives
said their membership will honor
teaching assistants' picket lines,
which could be set up at UBC's
gates or around certain buildings
such as the library.
THE UBYSSEY
LXVI, No.
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 29,1983    «^j^>4
UBYSSEY STAFFERS ATTEMPTED to get away from writing stories in the nurses's car yesterday. The editorial
collective chased the shy reporters all the way to the printers on a moped. Some reporters fell out and were promptly run over by the editors.
McGill professors 'muzzle' paper
MONTREAL (CUP) — A court
injunction has been served on the
McGill University student
newspaper to prevent further reporting on the controversial private
company owned by two microbiology professors.
The injunction, served Nov. 16,
prevents the McGill Daily from
printing any information about an
invention the professors have
developed. But Daily reporters say
the injunction may have been requested because the professors want
to hide certain business dealings.
Drs. Irving DeVoe and Bruce
Holbein stand to make millions of
dollars with the invention, which
can be used to clean up toxic industrial waste, reduce corrosive
elements in water-cooled reactors,
prevent spoilage in pharmaceutical
products and recover precious
metals from mine tailings.
The two professors have sought
patents in 15 countries, and have set
up a network of companies internationally.
The Montreal Gazette Had earlier
revealed that DeVoe borrowed
$40,000 from department funds and
his federal research grant awarded
for academic use, to finance the
company's research on campus.
Holbein had used grant funds to
hire DeVoe's wife under her maiden
name to work on the invention.
And a former McGill research
assistant, who was hired to work on
the invention, has said his name is
probably not on the patent application,   even   though   he  played   a
crucial role in the invention's
development. Dr. Chun Fai Yam
was also served with an injunction
arid is himself launching legal action
against the company, DeVoe and
Holbein.
The Daily is investigating allegations that DeVoe and Holbein are
deliberately letting one of their
companies dissolve so shares due to
McGill drop in value. The paper is
also examining conflicts-of-interest
surrounding the company's
presence on campus.
Daily news editor Albert
Neremberg said the injunction may
be an attempt to muzzle the paper.
"They've already spent $5,000
(to obtain the injunction)," said
Neremberg. "It looks like Devoe and
Holbein are willing to spend a lot of
money to hinder us in what we're
doing now, which is just research."
He said the Daily has no information on the invention itself, and has
no desire to ruin the professors'
chances of getting an exclusive patent.
Students lift wet T-shirt ban
REGINA (CUP) — Engineering students planning a wet T-shirt contest
were given the green light when the student union lifted a three-year ban on
such events.
"I'm not a moral judge," said student union president Mike Fedyk.
"I'm not going to stop them (the engineering student society) because I
don't agree with it, or because any other particular group disagrees with
it."
Wet T-shirt contests were banned in a 1980 amendment to the student
union's constitution, the result of a large uproar over a T-shirt contest that
year.
"I thought that council (the council responsible for amending the constitution) was exceeding itself by forbidding wet T-shirt contests. It was
taking itself too seriously," said vice president internal David Goodwillie.
Most councillors expect objections to the T-shirt contest but the SU is
not willing to deal with complaints.
"We'll just funnel them over to the engineering society," said Goodwillie.
A representative from the women's centre said, "Our hope is that no
women will show up to participate."
"That type of humor is hard to understand," she said.
The engineering society members are including a wet men's underwear
contest as well. Page 2
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,1963
Zaire sees decline
By MICHAEL WYNNE
Reprinted from the Gateway
by Canadian University Press
EDMONTON — You thought
Canadian universities were
dangerous places?
Universities in other countries
make ours look like wombs of
pedantic security.
Hear about Zaire, for example,
as did Edmonton members of
Amnesty International at a recent
meeting.
An African student studying at
the University of Alberta, who
doesn't want his name printed
spoke about the decline in the *
general quality and safety of life
since President L. Mobutu overthrew the government in 1965.
By 1969, the government he built
included professors, but it had lost
its charm.
"Most intellectuals had fled or
been bribed but students were still
talking," the speaker recalled.
"They petitioned the president
over living conditions at the
Catholic university. So troops came
to the campus, and hundreds of
students were wounded or killed.
The student organizers were drafted
into the army."
In 1971, students remembered
these deaths by burying coffins.
Troops returned. There were more
deaths, and 2,500 students were
drafted.
The government emptied the
university and brought in new
students, but discontent continued.
The government fused Zaire's
three universities and made politicians the academic authorities.
In 1979, students walked to the
presidential palace in protest.
Needless to say, no word of the
subsequent arrests reached the
state-run newspapers.
In December 1981, students again
petitioned for better living conditions; 97 were drafted. Amnesty International worked to free them.
Asked whether he worried about
his words getting back to Zaire
where his family is, the student said
his family was too unimportant for
the government to harass. He said
he told no other African student he
was going to U. of A.
Here there is less danger than in
Eastern Canada, where there are
many Zairian students, some
squealing on their compatriots.
THE UBC BOOKSTORE
IS
PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THAT
ALLAN FOTHERINGHAM
will autograph
copies of his new book
Look Ma...
No Hands
ON FRIDAY. HFC   2nd
12:30 pm to 1:30 pm.
TO RESERVE YOUR COPY
r^CALL 22S 4741
@Di§BOOKSTORE
t)20n UNIVI-Hsil Y iii.V'l)
UF,<   CAMPUS. VAN    Ii C    Y'l/I    iYr>
CHRISTMAS
CELEBRATION
PARTY
DECEMBER 2-4:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE—Upper Lounge
Goodies, Refreshments, Movies, Awards
fashion show and . . . FUN
DROP IN FOR SOME CHEER!
THE "CHRISTMAS CRUNCH"
YULETIDE HOCKEY
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 1/83
MAIN R1NK\VINTER SPORTS CENTRE
7:45—Women's Crunch; forestry vs. Geology
9:30—Men's Crunch; Fiji vs. Beta
$2.00 admissiondonation
DRAWS/DOOR PRIZES/REFRESHMENTS
HOLLYWOOD
3123 West Broadway
738-3211
Week of Nov. 28-Dec. 4
Costa Gavras' Oscar Winner (1982-
Best Original Screenplay).
MISSING
9:35
Peter Sellers "Best Performance"
THE OPTIMISTS
7:30
CLIP THIS AD FOR
ONE FREE ADULT
ADMISSION
Whan accompanied by one
paid adult admission
EXPIRES DEC. 1 (not valid Friday or Sal.)
NOTICE
U.B.C. ENGLISH
COMPOSITION TEST
is to be written
DECEMBER 12 at 8:30 a.m.
Please check the FINAL Examination Timetable for the location. All students writing the U.B.C. English Test must affix
a sticker to the test paper. Stickers may be obtained in one of
three ways:
1. Those students currently enrolled for English 100 and writing the test for
first time will receive a complimentary sticker.
2. Those students who have written the rest at any previous sitting must purchase a sticker from the Finance Department prior to December 9. The fee
is $10.00.
3. Those students who have not previously written the test and have not
received a complimentary sticker should contact the Registrar's Office
prior to December 9.
Students may use a dictionary.
We're
moving
T.C.CJ. Credit Union is opening it's
newest branch at 4445 Dunbar Street (at
28th), Vancouver on November 22nd,
1983. Phone-224-2364
You're all welcome to join!
All new members will receive a
beautiful 18 month calendar with copies
of original B.C. artwork.
Open House
December 3rd, 1983
9 A.M. to 2 P.M. You're invited!
Yes, we're inviting all local residents and merchants to join us in our celebrations. Many of the
Dunbar Merchants have donated door prizes...
and the TCCI main prize is for $600 in CASH!
Bring in this coupon between November 22nd
& December 3rd to be in on the draws.
The main draw will be held at 1:45 P.M.
i&l Credit Union
Dunbar and 28th
COMMUNITY SPORTS
CLEAR-OUT SALE
THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
IN GENUINE SAVINGS
MUMMY-STYLE
SLEEPING BAGS
Reg. $99.50
now $59.50
HOCKEY JERSEYS
Reg. $19.95
now $14.95    «
'ASA'iSSiW
SKI JACKETS
Reg. $159.50
now $99.50
WILSON
SWEAT SUITS
Reg. $39.95
Now? 19.95
20-50% OFF EVERYTHING
IN BOTH STORES
3615 W. BROADWAY     6272 E. BLVD.
733-1612 266-1434
sports equipment! "°V trip t
thousands   £NTER QUR   FREE  pQR    "a*a«   °
$in°PU'. ALL CONTEST    «*%%" Tuesday, November 29,1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 3
CFS conference
disgusts delegate
By CHRIS WONG
The recent Canadian Federation
of Students semi-annual general
meeting was "sickening" because
delegates refused to discuss political
issues, UBC's Graduate Society
president said Monday.
Ramesh, a UBC delegate walked
out of the final plenary session in
disgust after a motion he brought
forward asking CFS to condemn
the UBC administration's negotiation tactics with the teaching
assistants union was tabled. Tabling
the motion was "ridiculous"
because contract talks are presently
occurring, said Ramesh.
Delegates wanted to hear the administration's side of the story
before making a decision, he said,
adding their decision-making
abilities may have been affected by
the long hours maintained at the
conference.
"I'll give them the benefit of the
doubt because it was three in the
morning. But that doesn't deny that
some of them are extremely reactionary if not stupid."
Delegates defended their decision
to stay away from politically controversial issues by saying educational concerns should be addressed
first, he said. "But there was no actual manifestation of that either,"
said Ramesh.
Many delegates were enthusiastic
about setting up a national educa
tion planning committee to discuss
these concerns but few were willing
to become members, he said.
The election of Beth Olley as the
next CFS chair at the meeting
means the leadership of the national
student movement is now as conservative as the membership, said
Ramesh.
But Stephen Learey, CFS —
Pacific region chair, said conservative approaches taken at the national level are not representative of
individual regions.
"I don't think it's indicative of
what's happening in B.C.," said
Learey. "There's more students active now than there has ever been."
Despite Olley's reputation as a
political conservative she still must
follow CFS policy voted on at
meetings, said Learey. Her job involves meeting with politicians,
coordinating the national office and
travelling but she is not "high-
profile," he said.
Structural issues relating to the
CFS's internal organization were
discussed at length, said Learey. A
proposal was brought forward to
amalgamate CFS and its accompanying organization, CFS Services,
he said.
No major referendums are planned in the near future for B.C. but
one must be held by Dec. 1985 when
UBC's prospective membership
period in CFS runs out, he said.
Trudeau 'cruising
for definite failure'
Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's peace initiative plan will not succeed
because Eastern bloc leaders do not think he is sincere, a Simon Fraser
University professor said Monday.
"Eastern bloc leaders cannot respect Trudeau's peace initiatives when he
allows cruise (missile) testing," Bryan Palmer told 30 people in SUB 205.
Canada is an integral part of the arms race, said Palmer. Canadian hi-
tech industry is subsidized to produce components for nuclear weapons,
American nuclear weapons are located on Canadian soil, and the cruise
missile will be tested in Canadian territory, he said.
The Canadian government is viewed as a manipulable institution, said
Palmer.
Mass movements that bypass the state are the only way for Canadians to
help stop the arms race, he said.
"I see the need for a longer term perspective, one in which people would
see the real problem is a lack of communications between the East and the
West."
The arms race is just a side issue of the entire cold war, said Palmer.
"People think the USSR and the U.S. are locked in an intolerable situation in this cold war from which, for ideological reasons, neither of them
can back down."
But four major stages of varying degrees of mutual goodwill between the
superpowers have occurred since WWII Palmer said, noting that during
WWII the two superpowers were allies.
Libraries need resuscitation
GRAFFITI POSES BAFFLING question which has confounded twisted minds of puzzled souls lost amidst the
anarchistic confines of most radically reactionary rag west of SUB ballroom has finally been spelled out in bluntest
of terminology at one of few places in society where all pretentious and materialistic drapings are dropped and we
perform those duties which equate us all and which gives humans a sense of purpose.
Daycare centre to replace huts
A committee recently formed by
UBC's administration will begin
studying proposals to replace the de-
crepid buildings that currently
house UBC's daycare facilities.
Neil Risebrough, vice-provost of
student affairs, said the committee
HALIFAX (CUP)—Books are at
the heart of learning, but cutbacks
have placed many university
libraries in need of pulmonary
resuscitation.
At Dalhousie University, the
senate library committee last year
pronounced a "crisis" in the book
purchasing budget.
This year's report calls the situation "perilous".
Dalhousie spends 4.5 per cent of
its budget on libraries, putting it at
the bottom of the list of 26 institutions on the Canadian Association
of Libraries.
Collections
Garlock   says
librarian   Gale
three   rounds   of
UBC hospital awaits diagnosis
A private firm commissioned by the provincial government has
completed its audit of UBC's health sciences centre, but the results
have nbt been released yet.
Kathy Jang, assistant to health sciences president Robert McDermit* dented that the auditing firm was investigating fiscal mismanagement and said that similar reviews have been conducted by the provincial health ministry.
The ministry may have already received a draft of the firm's report
and the findings could be released soon, Jang said.
"I really don't know what their findings will be."
The audit was called in September to establish an appropriate
hospital budget.
"There has never been a clarification on an appropriate base
budget for the hospital. It's important to have one before talking
about budget increases and decreases."
The health sciences centre became autonomous from the university
in April 1982 and is governed by its own board.
periodical cancellations in 10 years
were severe. "We are down to the
bone in certain programs," she
said.
In the health science library, 200
journals were cut from its list in two
years. Journals comprise 85 per
cent of its acquisition budget, which
increased 1.7 per cent from last
year, and received no increase the
year before that.
The inflation rate on books is 10
to 12 per cent and 14 to 15 per cent
for journals, but vice-president
finance Robbie Shaw does not see a.
major increase in library funding
for next year.
Meanwhile, the University of
Saskatchewan's attempt at saving
book purchasing power by reducing
library hours met with fierce student opposition.
Hundreds of students signed a
petition this fall protesting cutbacks.
University president Kristjanson
said soaring enrolments created
greater demands on library space.
"Given the number of students we
now have, the hours we're adding
back still leaves us at the absolute
minimum," he said.
will begin looking at proposed
designs for the buildings and examine such factors as governmental
restrictions, staffing requirements
and regulations.
"It's not like we just put a
building and say 'this is the new
daycare building'. What we want
and what the students want is a
modern design for a daycare
centre," he said.
The new facility will replace the
wooden huts in which the daycare
centre is now located. The huts have
unreliable heating and plumbing,
toilet facilities unsuitable for small
children, mildew and pests.
The committee is already examining plans submitted by an architect
for the building, Risebrough said.
"We hope to get a design for one
single daycare building. We may
want to add more buildings later
on."
The administration will not fund
the two month study, but costs will
be shared by the Alma Mater Society and the alumni association, he
said. "We haven't worked out the
funding details yet."
Committee members will include
student board representative Dave
Franks and daycare coordinator
Mab Oloman, he added.
The wooden huts housing the
centre were deemed a fire hazard
last year, and according to Oloman,
little  improvement  except  an  in
stallation of a fire alarm system has
been made.
"The conditions of the buildings
remain the same," she said.
The construction of a new
daycare centre was first on a priority list compiled by students in last
year's $20 fee referendum.
Persky renews
bid for top job
Solidarity Times editor Stan Persky is putting in his bid for
chancellor of UBC.
Persky ran for the position twice
before, losing both times to current
chancellor, J. V. Clyne.
Two other candidates are also
seeking the office soon to be
vacated by Clyne.
Robert Wyman, who was
nominated by the alumni association, is chair of a large B.C. investment firm and was recently appointed chair of the Canadian
Chamber of Commerce.
Leonard Sampson, a retired West
Vancouver superintendent of
schools, is the third candidate.
The vote will be conducted
through a mailed ballot in early
1984 and all UBC graduates are
eligible to vote. Candidates cannot
be university employees and must
be nominated by seven UBC
graduates. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,1963
Bah humbug
Stories about the Teaching Assistants Union are The Ubyssey's
equivalent of the "Children's Fund" in the Vancouver Sun. In the month
leading up to Christmas we annually run a series of stories about young
people in our community who are less fortunate than most, and who have
to do without over the festive season.
The TAU story has all the classic characteristics of Dickens' Christmas
Carol. There is the poor Cratchit family, played by the TAU, and there is
Bob Cratchit's nasty and stingy employer who believes that Christmas and
its accompanying joys — kindness, honesty, compassion for fellow
humans — is humbug. The employers, of course, are played by the UBC
administration as personified by their chief negotiator. Bob Grant.
The big difference is that The Ubyssey does not deal in fairy tales. Where
the Christmas Carol has a happy ending, the TAU story never does. This
year the TAU are asking for a piddling two per cent on top of their already
miserable salary. If this year turns out like last year and the year before they
won't get it. Furthermore, they will probably lose even more of the few
privileges they have as the university tries to make it impossible for the
TAU to recruit members and to organize itself.
The puzzling thing is that it makes absolutely no economic sense for the
university to pay its TA's less than starvation wages.
TAs earn less than $6,000 a year (from which their fees are deducted).
This means that for the price of one prof on the bottom rung of the salary
ladder the university can hire four TA's who do precisely the sort of soul
destroying work professor's dislike and start to do very badly after a couple
of years. For example, teaching first year courses, conducting labs and
marking papers.
As money becomes tighter, UBC will be able to afford more teachers if it
hires more of the cheaper TA's who do these nasty but necessary jobs.
The current policy of the university involves keeping TA wages at a level
which the administrators know full well is below the poverty line. This
means that the university will have trouble attracting enough TA's and that
the TA's who do come will be second rate — they will have failed to win
places at the more generous universities which will replace UBC as a
potential graduate student's first choice.
So when you read that the TAU has caved in again, and you see
Scrooge-like Bob Grant, rubbing his hands in glee, you will know that the
real loser was not just the TAU and the human spirit of Christmas, but also
the university as a whole.
Another small step down the staircase to dwell in the dark with the mean
and the second-rate.
e.T. l»j xlx fc£
^/J^-A__AIL
r
THE UBYSSEY
November 29, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the st?T and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department. 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Sarah Cox dealt Neil Lucente a crushing blow when she said that she refused to protect his ego anymore while Muriel Draaisma played
hopscotch on the floor. Kelley Jo Burke had drawn the hopscotch in an attempt to keep Sarah Millin amused. Chris Wong joined in the fun
by skipping in the office. Victor Wong found a fellow comrade in Biil Seymour, the spy from the army. Gordon Clark was teaching private
lessons at home. Robert Beynon made history with his anti-nuke speech. Craig Brooks was screaming "take me out" at the printers. N.J.D.
made an appearance in the darkroom. Don Plant tackled the candidates for chancellor. Harry Hertsceg found the ball in his court and Andrea
Bakke spiked. Doug Schmidt made a late appearance.
Letters
Students should educate themselves on issues
Now that the strike is over and we
can all stop worrying about its effect on our grades, perhaps we can
afford some time to consider the
numerous issues which are still at
stake.
The "Kelowna Pact" between
Operation Solidarity and the provincial government has so far not
borne much fruit. Promised consultation is in the planning stages,
but there are already indications
that the government intends to
renege on some of those promises.
Funding cuts already passed for the
education budget will certainly lead
to fee increases for all of us,
possibly by as much as $1,000 per
year for the next three years. The
government has also provided no
substantive assurances that their
revised Human Rights Code and
Mentally ill nations
need professional help
the Residential Tenancy Act will be
dropped from the order paper.
Most of the issues around which
budget opposition coalesced are still
outstanding and unsolved.
Make no mistake in thinking the
controversy is finished. Operation
Solidarity and the Solidarity Coalition are still working together,
despite press reports of a split. Currently they are involved in the consultation process with the government, negotiating for a fair balance
between the economic goals of the
province and the rights and social
needs of its people. The principles
of rule of law, fundamental rights,
and   the   requirement   that   the
I am writing in response to Jeff
Baturin's letter printed in the Nov.
22 Ubyssey, in which he hopes that
the ABC television network will
"... film a version of the Gulag
Archipelago to show the danger of
not having nuclear weapons."
Baturin leaves the clear implication that the U.S. having nuclear
weapons prevents or will prevent
Letters. We get lots of them.
Short ones. Long ones. Medium
sized ones. Rambling ones, insightful ones, and yes, occasionally funny ones. They come
in many forms. On the back of
'Tween class forms, used
assignments, and. believe it or
not, lunch bags.
While we appreciate these
novelties, we would appreciate
your thoughts triple spaced on a
seventy column line, and on
something other than your
brown bag lunch.
All we ask is that you type
them and that they not be of a
sexist or racist nature. WARNING — the longer the letter is
the greater the chances are it
will   sit   around   for   a   while.
the U.S.S.R. from doing things the
U.S. objects to.
The falsehood of this premise is
clearly shown by the historical
record — did the U.S. having
nuclear weapons prevent the
U.S.S.R. from invading Hungary?
Likewise, did the U.S.S.R. having
nuclear weapons prevent the U.S.
from fighting the Vietnam war? Of
course not — nuclear weapons are
so terrible in their effects that
threats of their use have little
credibility.
Even granting the morality of the
mass murder of innocent civilians as
a response to military aggression,
responding with nuclear weapons
will almost inevitably lead to the
destruction of that which we seek to
protect, be it "democracy" (would
society after a nuclear war be
democratic?), "our way of life"
(will we be here to enjoy it?) or even
Europe (will there be anyone left to
inhabit the "saved" area?).
The possession and threat of use of
nuclear weapons is nothing more or
less than a threat of collective
suicide. We consider individuals
who threaten suicide in response to
their problems mentally ill and in
need of professional help. We
should do the same with nations.
Jonathan Thornburg
graduate student, astronomy
government allocates our taxes fairly and responsibly, are still in
serious jeopardy.
Several events are scheduled for
the next two weeks where the public
can express its opinion. A rally will
be held at Robson Square on
Wednesday, Nov. 30 at noon, in
conjunction with the B.C. Federation of Labour Annual Conference.
A province-wide day of action is
planned for Dec. 10, the 35th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. At UBC, on
Dec. 1, a forum will be held in
Buchanan at lunchtime on budget
issues, particularly relating to the
education sector.
Public demonstrations are not
the only way to register our opinions. Write to your MLA, or to
the minister of education, or get involved with a group whose interests
you particularly share. But participation is critical; hoping the problem will go away is tempting, but
hardly realistic. As university
students we have an interest and a
responsibility to educate ourselves
on the issues, and to take some
form of action.
Susanne Frost
Tim Holmes
and four others
law students against
the budget
Red jackets to blame for image
I read Greg Harm's article on
sexism in engineering (Female
engineers should stand up to sexism, Nov. 22), and though, no surprise — I've known it all along.
Then I read the responses of several
engineers in the next issue, and
changed my opinion.
It is definitely unfair to label the
engineering faculty as a group of
chauvinistic, sexually depraved people. I feel that the faculty probably
has no greater a proportion of these
types than does any other faculty.
However, in no other faculty
does one witness groups singing
lyrics which are almost unanimously degrading to women, such as during Songfeust.
Alright, the Songfeust is just a
big joke — amusing to watch, and
I'm sure that the lyrics really don't
reflect personal opinions of most of
the engineers there — but they still
make me feel slightly queasy — is it
really that funny to sing such
things?
Also, in no other faculty does one
have such a history of "smokers",
and publications such as the Red
Rag, never mind having produced
such things up to only two years
ago. Only students in the engineering faculty drop corks from the sky,
and print up pictures demeaning,
gays.
Only engineering students' disrupt
public meetings, expecting a voice
for their faculty's opinions, but not
extending the same courtesy for
others. Only engineering students
hire prostitutes (or whatever) to
parade naked through campus.
Yes I know this represents a vocal
minority, but the faculty rarely
reprimands or makes their opinion
known on such activities. I am sure
there are people in other faculties
who would love to engage in such
activities, but we never see these
people so organized and so loud in
their behaviour. I know people who
attended this university almost 20
years ago still have negative feelings
about the engineers.
What it boils down to is the old
saying "Give a dog a bad name
..." Rationally, I know that the
people in engineering probably
represent a spectrum of society and
values such as the spectrum I see in
my own faculty, but when I see or
hear of such things as I have mentioned above, I am afraid that I feel
angry and tend to condemn the
engineering students as a whole.
The p^pblem lies with the fact
that whep you see 50-60 people in
red jackets behaving in a manner
offensive to you, the next time you
see a person in a red jacket, you're
not likely to be able to differentiate;
"One red jacket looks like
another." When you only see the
offensive minority, that is what you
remember, not the unheard majority.
That is unfair, but I am afraid
that is what happens. So, the next
time you, as an engineer, receive
prejudice from various people on
campus, think about what your
vocal minority portrays; ask what
you would think if you saw such a
group as the major representative
of an organization.
The engineering students are
responsible for many good things
on campus but as always what remains uppermost in peoples minds
are the negative things; the things
that made them angry, not the
positive things.
Catherine Glass
microbiology 3 Tuesday, November 29,1963
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
1945 finally underst
• :•:•
By KEVIN ANNETT
Hiroshima has always been an
abstraction, a synonym for horror'
and armaggedon but a two-
dimensional image nonetheless.
That changed for me the other night
when I saw an interview with Paul
Tibbits, the pilot of the Enola Gay
perspectives
who personally extinguished 80,000
souls in a millisecond.
Mr. Tibbits was pleased with the
mission; its results were better than
expected. "In fact, I was so
satisfied with things I was able to
catch a nap on the way back to the
base."
Hold on, there's more.
"Sure, we all knew the Japs were
ready to surrender. They couldn't
have held out much longer."
As a matter of fact, peace
negotiations between Japan and the
U.S. were almost concluded when
Hiroshima was incinerated.
Revenge for Pearl Harbour? A
show of force for the Russkies, who
attacked Japanese troops in Manchuria the morning of the Nagasaki
bomb? Take your pick.
Add it all up, and the answer is
crystal-clear: a nation that fried
200,000 people to flex its muscles
won't hesitate to fry another batch
of millions for the same reason.
We can even work it out
mathematically. Since President
Truman declared that the two
Bombs sped up peace negotiations
by several months, we have a
reliable standard to measure future
"justifiable losses" in our next war:
200,000 people will win our rulers
three months of political advantage.
Let's see, that's roughly three-
quarters of a million people per year,
which means America can remain
Big Kid on the Block for the next
twenty years at the price of only 15
million of us. The number is probably a bit higher, actually, taking
into account the marvellous scientific breakthroughs since 1945. Say
30 million. Not a bad price to pay
for democracy.
Christmas Gift ideas/!
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THE
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hair design ltd.
for men and women
THE PROS
is All fully qualified,
professional stylists
(we're not a training
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Monday-Friday 8:30-7:30
Saturday 8:30-5:00
95 basic cut
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and coloring too)
3621 W. 4th Ave. 733-3831
Now I think I understand
meaning of the word.
the
Kevin Annett is a UBC law student. Perspectives is a column of
opinion open to the university community.
S.U.B.
BALLROOM
$1.25/
CLASS
OR LESS!!
ty^i
MON. 3:34* & 4:45*     WED. 3:45* 6r 4:45*
TUES. 3:45* Er 4:46"     THURS. 3:46** & 4:45*
•DYNA-FIT: TOTAL BODY AEROBIC WORKOUT
■BODY CLASS: NO AEROBIC. IMPROVE MUSCLE TONE. ETC.
I
WRITING THE
ENGLISH COMP
TEST?
Is English your native language? If
NOT, you may need our dictionary — The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. This is a great dictionary to take to the ECT, and a great dictionary for
checking your term papers and letters. On sale in the
University Book Store now! A. S. Hornby's dictionary is
internationally recognized as the indispensable
reference book for those studying English as a second
language. It gives detailed guidance on verb forms, use
of prepositions with verbs and nouns, idiomatic
phrases, correct sentence structure, and selecting
vocabulary for particular contexts. Words are used in
context.
Theatre Department
AUDITIONS AUDITIOTJS
AUDITIONS
for
THE SUICIDE
By Nikolai Erdman
MARCH 7-17
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Open to all UBC Students, Faculty and Staff
TUESDAY, November 29, 1:00-3:30, Dorothy Somerset Studio
WEDNESDAY, November 30, 1:00-3:00, Room     206, FWT
THURSDAY, December 1, 1:00-3:00, Dorothy Somerset Studio
Audition appointments must be arranged in advance through the Theatre Department Office,
Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre Bldg. or Telephone 228-3880.
Scripts and Audition Material will be on loan from the Theatre Department
COME ONE ************* COME ALL
AUDITIONS     AUDITIONS    AUDITIONS
CFL ALL-STAR GAME '83
Saturday, Dec. 3
at
B.C. PLACE
t^
vv
^m^l^
&
CARLING
O'KEEFE
SPORTS Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,1983
m
'uieati
TODAY
FOURTH   YEAR   BACHELOR   OF   FINE   ARTS
CLASS
Art exhibit until Dae. 9, 11 to 4 p.m., AMS Art
Gallery, SUB Main concourse.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Slktoahow presentation by tha Royal Winnipeg
Ballet,   Director   of   Communications   Lendre
Rodgera, noon, SUB 207/208.
HILLEL HOUSE
Free salami lunch, noon, HUM Houaa.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Talk, The Paleatiniana: The Future? by Prof. A.
B. Cunningham, SFU, noon, Buch. A202.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Horizon SF Magazine n hara, cooiea available,
10:30 p.m., SUB 228.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICES OF CANADA
Slide show and diacuaaion on hearth care in
Nicaragua by Mary Ann Morriaa, who participated in a hearth care workers exchange there
last spring, includes political update, noon, Buch
A 202.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Bur Garden, 4:30-8 p.m., SUB 212.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting,  12 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre conference room.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
General meeting, gueat lecturer Bogdan
Czaykowski speaking on Poland, 4 p.m., Buch B
221.
WEDNESDAY
LATIN AMERICAN SUPPORT COMMITTEE
AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ORGANIZATION
Slide presentation detailing recent developments
in Nicaragua by Rick Craig, law court educator,
noon, SUB 211.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everybody welcome, SUB 211.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
"Religious Vwion in Patrick White's Novela" by
Prof. Veronica Brady, Auatralian and Comparative Literature, University of Western
Australia, noon, Buch. A2Q2.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, 11-2 p.m., SUB concourse.
UBC THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
T-Birds vs Fraaar Valley Rape, 7:30 p.m.,
Thunderbird Stadium.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Guest speaker — Dale Maranda, "Aquarian Conspiracy — A Tranaformation in Consciousness,"
noon, Buch B220.
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Noon celebration, singing, sharing, short
teaching, noon, Buch A100.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature Table, 11 a.m.- 2 p.m., SUB Concourse.
AMS ROCKERS
General meeting to discuss rescheduling social
event, noon, SUB 213.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY
COMMITTEE AND INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS' ORGANIZATION
Rick Craig, law court educator, will give slide
presentation detailing recent developments in
Nicaragua, noon, SUB 211.
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem 150.
THURSDAY
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film:  Glimpses of China, a NFB production,
noon, Asian Centre, Auditorium.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
AND SCIENCE FOR PEACE
Michael Wallace, Political Science Department,
the    Political    Virginity   of   the    Peace
Movement—Going all the Way,  noon,  Hebb
Theatre.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting, Boeing tour, noon, Henning
301.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Roundtable   discussion   on   Anarchy   for   the
Eighties, noon, Buch D362.
IN SUB
Basement
for a variety
of sandwiches
coffee and snacks
Open daily 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Fridays till 6:00 p.m.
~t
CHILI
Ki
MAKING SENSE
a student's guide to writing and style
The first all-Canadian guide to writing for university students in all disciplines.
This short handbook deals with the general principles of effective writing and
the special requirements of academic work.
practical • readable • compact
By Margot Northey, Associate Professor of English at the U of T.
Now available at the UBC Bookstore       $5.95
COOL
AT-
inis
— All the chili
— bread you can eat
=     &&+?<&■
= (at tha back of the village)
UBC THUNDERBIRD'S MEN'S BASKETBALL
High School tournament, all day. War Memorial
Gym.
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Special guest speaker: Rich Brooks—evangelist,
all welcome, 7:30 p.m., Scerfe IX.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Last Thursday Bronze class for 1st term, noon to
2:20 p.m., SUB partyroom.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
All members, dress neatly for club portrait, suggestions for India weak and help, noon, 206 and
206.
APOLOGETICS  OF  CHRISTIAN  THOUGHT  IN
SCRIPTURE
Hear Dr. J. Nolland speak on how the New
Testament waa compiled, "A Historical Perspective of the New Testament Conon", noon, buch
A206.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Noon hour ride, noon, meet north side of SUB.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Mary-Ann Morris speaka on the situation in
Nicaragua, noon, Buch A204.
Peace camp at the Peace Arch Friday
evening and Saturday. U.S./Canada
solidarity. That is all we have room for.
CORKY SAYS:
We Argo-ing to show
them next year.
HAIfl
CORKYS
STYLING
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
THE
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Wine
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UBC SWEATSHIRTS
OPEN AT 8:00 A.M.
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE: 224-1911
HOURS:
MON   TO FRI   8 AM - 7 PM
SATURDAY 10 AM - 5 PM
VISA & MASTERCARD
ACCEPTED
THE CLASSIFIEDS'
AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
HOW TO PASS THE
ENGLISH
COMPOSITION
EXAM
Attend an afternoon seminar
especially designed for English 100
students and learn all the skills and
techniques necessary to pass. Full
notes provided. Preregistration, by
Dec. 2 is essential due to demand
for enrollment.
1:00-6:00 p.m. Sunday. Dec. 4,1963
SUB 213, fee $35.00. Contact: L.A.
Johanson, B.A. (Hons.) Res:
732-1593. (weekends and evenings)
SILVER BRACELET - Beaded with ivory
bird and two mauve pearl chips on each
side. Small reward. Mrs. Prasad 291-2792.
SONY WALKMAN in ti cale. case in CPSC
Building. Reward, no questions asked. Call
325-3542 after 6, Grant.
40 - MESSAGES
KRISTA BELL where are you. Please call us.
733-3641.
80 - TUTORING
CRITIQUE AND EDIT term papers, theses
in preparation. 7 yrs. exp. as university
educator, Ph.D. Quality assured.
Reasonable rates. Will travel. 669-1284.
85 - TYPING
10 — FOR SALE — Commercial
LIQUID   HONEY   Er   HONEYCOMB   at
Farm Price. Half-way along University Blvd.
at Church. 261-9105 after 7 P.M.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
USED FENCING EQUIPMENT, one each
of the following: Foil — rt. hand St. Paul;
Mask — St. Paul; Ladies Electric Jacket
-Med; Ladies Regular Jacket - Med.; Mens
Rt. Glove - Med., hardly used. Sold as
package $135 or by the piece. Janet - Res:
683-7805, Bus 682-0611 (loc. 571)
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT, GMAT, CAT preparation. Call National Testing 738-4618. Please leave message
on tape. Manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS	
DOMINION AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
Has p/t sales positions available to market
tried & proven necessary car-care service.
Comm. 8- bonus paid daily. Earn between
$40-60 per eve. Call Leo 688-4163 (24 hrs) or
683-3914 (office).
CA. STUDENTS
If you are interested in working in a small office of a National Firm, we are interested
in hearing from you. Please
send your resume to:
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co.
Chartered Accountants
212-4800 No. 3 Road
Richmond, B.C. V6X 3A6
Skat
MARWICK
AUTOPLAN SALES REP - Everyone must
renew their auto insurance - Why not
through you? Earn 70% commission on
each renewal, working on your own hours.
Call 732-1809 or 684-3828.
35 - LOST
CONCORD WATCH in Math building. Old
but sentimental value. Rewardl Please call
Debbie: 524-2458, 524-9744.
SAME DAY SERVICE:! Fast,
accurate, dependable low rates. 734-8451
anytime.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 7 3 1-9857.
FAST. ACCURATE WORD PROCESSING.
10/hr. essays, term papers, letters, etc.
879-5108. Visa accepted.
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS: U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.	
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates for thesis typing, $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Phone Jeeva at 876-5333.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
WORD PROCESSING: & typing: term
papers, theses, mscpt., essays, incl.
reports (tech., equational), letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from
legible work, essays, theses. 738-6829 10
a.m. - 9 p.m. On King Edward bus route.
FAST, ACCURATE typing at reasonable
rates. 732-0834 after 6 p.m.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, essays, thesis,
manuscripts, etc. Choice of type engineering exp. Reasonable 271-6755.
TYPING: experienced typist; reasonable
rates; all jobs, will pick up and deliver. Tel.
421-0818, Mary Lou.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. IBM Selectric,
by experienced secretary. $1.25/pg. Bing.
224-1567.
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional result call Audrey. 228-0378.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
IMAGE DESIGN, 2331 Main St., 876-5586.
15% discount for students on all reg. priced
items. Full line of drafting, engineering &
art supplies. SPECIAL Drafting Table
$139.00 Tuesday, November 29,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC women finish
fourth in basketball
UBC finished fourth at a
tournament in Calgary last
weekend.
They won one and lost two —
both to defending champions
University of Victoria — in a six
team tournament.
Their first defeat was a 57-56
thriller. UBC was two points down
with only seconds remaining when
tournament all-star Cathy Bultitude
stole the ball at half-court and was
fouled, sending to the charity line.
She missed the first shot but made
the second to bring the 'Birds
within one point. But they ran out
of time as they pressed the defending champions in the dying
seconds.
In their second game the 'Birds
faced the University of Saskatchewan, beating them easily to set
up the consolation final against
UVic.
In that game top scorer Linda
Edwards   posted   16   points   and
Cathy Bultitde added 13 but it
wasn't quite enough to stop the
Vikettes (does anybody have any
idea what a Vikette is) who ended
up on the top side by 57-51 and nailed down third spot.
UBC coach Jack Pomfret said he
was optimistic about the weekend's
results. "This year our defence has fj
improved a lot and our offence is ^
becoming more consistent. We've
got a lot of depth on the team and
that substitute strength is a bonus
for us. We do have to cut down on
fouls though."
And the tournament result?
Alberta squeaked by hosts Calgary
71-70.
The team plays against Belco
Electric of Seattle at War Memorial
gym Saturday at 6:30 p.m. and
Sunday at 2 p.m. Belco has a strong
team, including Canadian internationals Debbie Huband and Carol
Turney-Loos.
MONDAY to FRIDAY
9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY
9:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
APPOINTMENTS
224-1922    224-9116
Bernard
Labrosse
hair studio inc.
& Ken Hippert
Hair Co. Ltd.
228-1471
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WE SELL JOICO PRODUCTS
VALUABLE COUPON
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$10 OFF
any perm
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The Society of the Atonement
We Joy
in God
Contact:
Franciscan Friars
Vocation Office
4451 Williams Rd.
Richmond, B.C.
CanadaV7E 1J7"
604-277-8353
Franciscan Sisters
Vocation Office
385 East Cordova St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Canada V6A 114      -
604-685-9987
An international community of Franciscans i-; the Roman Catholic tradition
engaged in diverse ministries on behalf of Christian Unity and Mission.
Name	
Address
City	
Province
Tei. No.
_Postal Code
 Age _
Education
I'm interested in
Priesthood
Brotherhood
Sisterhood
Whistler "Universki Winter Carnival"
Sunday December 18th - friday December 23, 1983
accomodation, lifts, picnics, races, dancing contests, fun
. . . $210.00
Register by December 16th WMGym
108 Ranch   . . .   Cariboo Marathon
February 3 - February 5
accomodation, transporation, all meals, dancing and entertainment,
fitness facilities, and the marathon
. . . $140.00
Register by January 9th WMGym
Blackcomb Mountain Party
Anyday from January 1st —
Lift ticket, lesson, transportation, race, mountain feast
$30.00 own skiis
$35.00 with rental
Grouse Mt. Ski Pa»s
for January 1984
day or night skiing anytime during January
$40.00 sold at SUES ticket Box Office
Grouse Mt. Ski Challenge
Thursday, January 12/84
Dual Giant slalom, movies, banquet, awards, dance, prizes
$25.00
Register November 28-December 9 WMGym
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 29,1963
'Birds volleyball team spiked Victoria
By PETER BERLIN
The men!* ¥etteyfeell team closed
out the first half of their Canada
West campaign with a convincing
win over the University of Victoria
at UBC Saturday. UVic are rated in
the  top  five nationally but  the
'Birds beat them three games to
nothing.
The 'Birds are now 8-0 in conference play. That is the major difference between this year's team
and last year's. In Canada West
tournament play prior to capturing
the national title last year, the
squad habitually allowed weaker
teams to upset diem. This year the
'Birds have not allowed any of their
opponents even a sniff of victory.
Four of last year's starters returned  this  season to give  UBC  a
- i j.d  photo
OUCH! THAT HURT says Saskatchewan player as UBC kicker Tom Dixon shows him who is boss. Dixon accidentally kicked Husky through uprights to score four points, in little known Canadian University football rule.
Dinos frozen on UBC pond
nucleus of experienced players who
have been together for a long time.
The two new starters both have collegiate experience. Brian Beach,
played the last two years for UVic
and six foot six Norm Hanson is a
transfer from Selkirk College. Hanson and Beach are both power hitters, which meant that they were
easier to train and fit into the UBC
system, said starter Paul Thiessen.
Thiessen said that UBC also have
better bench strength than last year.
Thiessen explained that UBC uses
a "multiple player offense" which
makes their system "the most complex in Canada." Brad Willock is
the only setter, responsible for laying the ball up for the other players
to 'spike' it or smash down over the
net with their fists.
While some players concentrate
on spiking and other on blocking
still all five of the non-setting
players will spike at some time in
the game. This means that UBC's
opponents cannot afford to double
team and have to assign one blocker
to each potential spiker.
In order to counter UBC on
Saturday, UVic completely altered
their system by changing their starting line-up and playing players in
different positions. But UBC stuck
to their game plan. They concentrated on blocking along the
sidelines so the UVic players were
forced to spike diagonally across
the court, a shot they are weaker at.
On offense UBC was still able to
avoid UVic's stronger blockers and
spike at their weaker starters.
UBC does not play again until
January when they take part in the
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
"We should be much more competitive sooner next year than
Christmas." UBC men's hockey
coach Jack Moores offered these
optimistic words at the end of last
season. With his team's back-to-
back two-game sweep against
Calgary Dinosaurs, his prophecy
has finally come to fruition.
In Moore's first two seasons
behind the bench, an appropriate
team Christmas present would have
been a name change from Thunderbirds to Sleetpigeons, as the 'Birds
slid into the holiday season in last
place with records of 1-9 and 2-8
respectively.
Whereas Moores has always seen
his 'Birds play .500 hockey or better
in post-Christmas play, he has finally seen it happen before the holiday
break. The 'Birds are now 4-4 after
going to Calgary this past weekend
to sweep the winless Dinosaurs 5-2
Friday and 4-2 Saturday.
Forward Daryl Coldwell lead the
'Birds with two goals giving him ten
goals in league play, tops among
Canada West scorers. The team's
four wins in eight games is a major
improvement over last year when
the 'Birds needed 15 games to win
their fourth.
UBC now goes to Edmonton this
weekend to play Alberta Golden
Bears. The Bears have just finished
a home-and-home series with defending national champions Saskatchewan Huskies. The teams split
their series as the visiting team won
all four games. Alberta swept a
two-game series from UBC at the
Thunderbird Arena earlier this
season.
CANADA WEST STANDINGS
W L P F A
Saskatchewan 6 2 12 37 26
Alberta 6   2   12   36   19
UBC 4   4     8   29   36
Calgary 0   8     0    16   37
T«»2
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IN THIS TOWN."
(Quality Copies that is!)
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
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(604) 222-1688
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UVic international at which top
American
participat
collegiate teams will also
e.
MEN'S VOLLEYBALL
Matches   Games
W   L     W           Pts
UBC
8   0     24     6     11
UVic
6   2     18   10       8
Sask.
5   3     18   14      8
Calgary
3   6     15   17      3
Lethbridg
e           2   7       9   23       3
Alberta
0   8       6   21       0
Women second
The UBC women's volleyball
team maintained their strong form
with a victory over the University of
Victoria, at UBC Saturday.
The team won three games to
none, 15-12, 15-7, 15-13.
The win keeps UBC in second
place, two points behind Saskatchewan. The seven remaining
games count for two points so
UBC, who still have to play Saskatchewan twice, are in strong contention. The first and second-place
teams play-off for the honour of
representing the west in the national
finals in Laval University.
WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL
Matches
Games
W    L
W     L
Pts
Sask.
8   0
24     5
11
UBC
6   2
20    11
9
UVic
4   4
13    18
6
Calgary
3   5
15   17
3
Lethbridge
2   7
10   21
2
Alberta
1    6
10   21
2
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Mail completed coupon to:
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'jgul
AMS
SPEAKERS
in co-operation
with International
House presents:
The Former Jamaican
Prime Minister
MICHAEL
MANLEY
Speaking on:
Caribbean Affairs
and the recent
Grenada Invasion
SUB Ballroom
Sunday, Dec. 4,
1983
7:30 p.m.
Tickets: AMS Box Office
Call 228-5336

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