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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1963

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Array MACDONALD REPORT:
EIGHT MORE COLLEGES
IN B.C. MASTER PLAN
Undergraduate college in Burnaby _ ....  page 1
Produce our own professors      page 2
New board to handle financing    pags 3
Municipalities' money a must     page 4
Crowded classes are biggest hurdle
page 5
#.«^'„ -* -       ' t   *, • ,   ,;^~.    V >,    {-,
THS UBYSSEY
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, B.C., MONDAY, JANUARY 28, 1963
No. 45
Burnaby
re
Dr. JohnTMacdoriald's higher
education report calls for the
immediate, establishment of a
four-year college in Burnaby
The report says" a Burnaby
college would be the riiain step
toward alleviating strain on
UBC.
It also calls for establishment
-of:
• TwOryear > colleges in .Vancouver ajod thie eastern lower
iFraser "Valley.
■ • Victoria College as a University (as the provincial government is expected; to do this
session). !
• A two-year college near
Kelowna, which would become
r a four-year institution by 1971.
• A two-year college in the
Kootenay Valley.
• Colleges in Prince George
and Kamloops and pear Nanai-
mo when they are needed in the
future.
The report says that by 1971,
37,000 students will be seeking
higher education.
27,700 AT UBC?
"If no new institutions have
been established by that time,
it is estimated that 27,700 of
these will enrol at the University of B.C. . . ." the report says
"Such a massing of students
on the Point Grey campus would
create a situation that would
critically distort the whole structure, ;of the University, and it
could not possibly be in the best
rintgggste of higher education."
• Under Br. Macdonald's -plan.
UBC's enrolment will be 17,600
by 1971-72.
Victoria   College,   the   other
(Continued on Page 4)
See: OTHNABY tJOElXGE
* t v < >
,*$♦'.**   i
DR. JOHN MACDONALD
. . . higher education must get moving
UBC enrolment
to stop at 17,000
The Macdonald master plan for higher education calls for
two universities and eight colleges in the province by the 1970's,
It sees UBC with 17,600 students at the pinnacle of a prov- -
ince-wide pyramid of two-year and four-year colleges.
Cost of operation of the system is expected to be about
$100 million a year.
The plan, contained in a 119-page report prepared by UBC
President Dr. John Macdonald, was released today.
Under the plan, Victoria College would become the province's second university.
Colleges would be established immediately in Vancouver,,
Burnaby, Kelowna and the Kootenays.
Four more colleges would be built in Kamloops, Prince
George, the upper Fraser Valley and Central Vancouver Island
in the next decade.
$111   million  a  year
Dr. Macdonald has been preparing the report since he affiveif-
at UBC last July. He says in the report that unless facilities i*
the province are increased immediately, B.C. is headed Mr ecta*"
cational disaster. - .   C
Under the plan, all colleges and universities in the province
will be autonomous.
But an academic commission would Be established to watch
educational standards in the institutions.   !
The report calls for a finance commission to determine the
needs of all institutions and to deal with the provincial government
to get money.
The plan is divided into three stages.
In stage one, from now until 1965, a four-year college would
be built in Burnaby, and two-year colleges at Kelowna and Castle.
gar-Kinnaird in the Kootenays.
King Edward adult education centre in Vancouver would als*
become a two-year college.
in. tlie second stage, from 1965 to 1971, the new institutions
would be consolidated as enrjqlments increased, and planning
would begin, for four more colleges.
Kelowna would become a fbur-year college.
The third stage, from 1971 onwards, would involve establishment when needed of two-year colleges at Prince George, Kamloops, the upper Fraser Valley (between Abbotsford and Hope),
and On Vancouver Island (probably at Parksville, near Nanaimo).
The' two universities and the two four-year colleges would
each grant their own degrees oh the completion of courses.
Board to watch standards
The report suggests the cost of establishing the Burnaby college will be $9 million, the Okanagan college at $3.5 million and
the Kootenay college at $1.7 million.
It says that by 1971, operating costs for colleges in the prov*
ince could be as high as $111 million.
In his report, Dr. Macdonald says B.C. is facing two major
problems in higher education.
He says too few university teachers are being graduated t«
supply enough teachers for the demand in the next ten years.
And he says all levels of government and industry will have
to recognize their responsibility for the financing of higher education.
Dr. Macdonald blames the government failure to provide
adequate funds for UBC for its high failure rate.
The report says lack of funds has resulted in large classes and
a feeling of impersonality at UBC, with the result students aren't
getting the best education they could.
The report calls for the municipalities in which colleges ar«
to be built to contribute to capital costs as well as operational
costs of the institutions. ^
UBC, the report says, will concentrate to a greater degree on
graduate teaching, when its large undergraduate population is
drained off to other institutions. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Monday, January 28, 1963
Lack of home-grown teachers
7*»
sfuniversity
Jr* Colleges should
emphasize service
. Requirements will be lower
for a junior college professor
thkn for a university professor, the Macdonald report
says.
' University professors require six to nine years of
training, and usually a Ph.D.
the report says.
Professors at, junior colleges
will probably need only an
honors or a graduate degree.
The report calls for emphasis on teaching and community
service in the twO-year college,
rather than on research and
the ability to supervise graduate studies.
Dr.  Jdhn   Macdonald  sees   the  shortage   of  home-grown
teachers as the biggest problem facing Canadian universities
His report says 1,000 addition
Grad needs
are 'critical'
Hordes of undergraduates
have throttled UBC's graduate
school.
In his report, Dr. John Macdonald says the costs of providing for mounting undergraduate
enrolment has prevented the
university from developing a
irrst-class graduate school.
"This is a critical situation because the staffing of Canadian
universities depends upon those
who complete post - graduate
studies," the report says.
, The majority of UBC's graduate students took their undergraduate work here.
al full-time teachers will be required at UBC within the next
seven years if the present staff-
student (1-18) ratio is to be
maintained.
This means an increase of 125
faculty members a year.
MANDATORY
"The alarming fact, however,
is that the whole of Canada is
graduating annually only about
280 Ph.D.'s," the report points
out.
The president says a doctorate
is now mandatory for a successful career in university training.
The only solution, his report
says, is more graduate schools
producing more Canadian professors.
Recently, 43 per cent of Can-
adc-'s university teachers have
been recruited from other
countries.
CANADA LAGS
"Unless a change comes about
in the number of university
teachers we ourselves can train,
that proportion can only increase."
He said every Canadian university lags far behind the leading American universities in
graduate schools,.
"And B.C.," his report said,
"with all its wealth and with the
second largest English-speaking
university in the country, is well
behind seven other Canadian
universities and behind the very
low Canadian average.
"The magnitude and gravity
of this situation has not been
grasped by the vast majority of
our citizens."
Graduate schools and faculty
salaries will be among the major
recipients of the increased financial aid requested in the report.
"This is in consequence of the
crucial need to strengthen our
graduate schools and so attract
and retain superior university
professors," the report says.
MUST COMPETE
It said salary levels at UBC
must not only remain competitive with other universities but
also with business and government.
Dr. Macdonald quoted from
an American university report
in 1957 which recommended
that highest priority be given to
the raising of faculty salaries,
with the goal of doubling the
average level within five to 10
years.
The American report also
recommended particular atten-
tio be given to increasing the
spread between the .top and
bottom salaries.
"This objective is likely to be
attained,"  the president said-
"And.it will,be imperative for
Canadian universities and colleges^ to keep pace if they are to
retain, the staff .members they
presently have and encourage
others to join the faculty."
▼mi MILDEST BFSTTASTING cioarbtt.
NOTICE
HISTORIAN Dr. John Montgomery of Waterloo University speaks at noon Tuesday
in Bu. 206 on "A historical
view of Christ."
Ubyssey here today
but not tomorrow
There will no Ubyssey tomorrow.
The Ubyssey which you are
reading will have to suffice until Thursday.
There will be regular editions
both Thursday  and Friday.
The Sciencemen have published a special edition which will
be on the stands today at noon
following this special.
The reason for bringing out
this special edition was to make
the Macdonald report available
to the students at the earliest
possible time.
Take notice that the Discipline Committee is investigating the alleged illegal posting
of  notices   by   the   following:
1. UBC Radio Society
2. Associated Women Students
3. Judo Club
Persons desiring to give evidence in these matters are
directed to the hearing to be
held at 12:30 p.m., Thursday,
Jan. 31, in the student council chambers.
S. S. MERRIFIELD,
AMS DISCIPLINE
COMMITTEE.
BOX OFFICES
OPEN FEB. 4
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University Auditorium      Feb. 21,22, 23
All seats reserved — $2.50 — $2.00 — $1.50
(see next weeks' Ubyssey for date of student
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/ Monday, January 28, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
DR. MACDONALD
We will
pay dearly
for delay
More money and more |
brains.
These are the tools Dr. ;
John Macdonald needs to i
build his "new dimension" j
in higher education.
. Miare   money   to   build  \
more  colleges,  more grad-  :
uate schools and to attract
top  brains   with   top   salaries.
And more brains—Canadian brains—to teach the
predicted 37,000 students
who will be enrolled in
B.C. colleges by 1970.
The "new dimension" is
the theme of Dr. Macdonald's 119-page report on
higher education released
today.
"This is a new world
where the skills of today
become obsolete tomorrow," he  says.
"Education must be designed to permit individuals to interpret the revolutionary changes occurring everywhere."
Dr. Macdonald, who
spent six months preparing
his survey, readily points
out that some of his recommendations will be questioned.
"However,- the urgency
of the situation requires
that a decision be made
promptly," he says. "Delay
is itself a decision for
which we will pay dearly."
The soft-spoken scientist
from Harvard took over as
president of UBC last July,
succeeding Dr. Norman
MacKenzie.
His report is the first to
be produced on B.C. higher
education and is a sequel
to the Chant Report on
provincial education prepared in 1961.
Co-ordinated by board, commission
Academic 'free enter prise' needed
1 The Macdonald report calls for
the establishment of a permanent   commission   to   deal   with
| financing  for  higher   education
1 in the province.
1     It also calls for the establish-
' ment of a board to watch over
I academic standards.
I     Together the two groups will
! co-ordinate Dr. Macdonald's educational complex.
The finances commission, to be
called the Grant's Commission,
would be composed of up to 15
men responsible for financial
projections and   development.
The Academic Board would
consist of nine men initially and
perhaps more in the future.
The purpose of the Grant's
Commission would be to:
• Combine submissions from
all institutions for government
support of operating and capital
-evenue for each.
Report asks
student limit
The Macdonald report calls
/or a limit of UBC enrolment at
17,600.
A table suggests this is the desired 1971 enrolment.
If present growth trends continue until then, however, the
enrolment would be more than
27,000.
It is expected the proposed
system of junior colleges will
-ake off undergraduate growth
pressure to allow the limit on
enrolment.
• Recommend policy to the
provincial government with respect to financing and operation
of higher education.
• Distribute funds received
from the provincial government.
• And to analyze future needs,
aims and plans in relation to
overall provincial needs.
The Academic Board would
be concerned with the standards
of the new institutions.
The Board would pay regular
visits to institutions to aid them
in the planning and expanding
of their academic programs.
Exchange of staff to assist new
institutions and transfer of students would also be facilitated
by the Board.
The report stresses that new
institutions can" achieve - academic excellence only if they
define their own goals and organize their own programs.
The function of the academic
board, the report says, is not to
make-the course of study identical at all institutions, but to allow the communities to adjust to
their own needs.
If there were any indications
high academic standards of the
regional colleges were not being
maintained, the board could
withdraw recognition of colleges.
Dr. Macdonald says, "academic free enterprise"  is necessary
for    the    local    institutions    to
achieve academic excellence.   !
He says each college should
be free to adjust to local conditions and solve its own problem's.
Sciencemen face
Engineers today
Motorized toiletry will be in
vogue when Sciencemen take on.
Engineers and Education in an.
"odds and sods" race Monday
on  the  Main  Mall.
The race kicks off Science
week. (More details will be
found in the Sciencemen's paper,
Ihe Black Plague, v/hich will
appCB.r at regular Ubyssey distribution points today.)
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THE      UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
Macdonald report heralds new era
Dr. Macdonald's report on higher education
plots a new course for the University of B.C.
in more ways tihan one.
The report, of course, sees a complete
change in the role of the university. Instead
of being a factory for the mass-production of
Bachelors of Arts, UBC should become a university in the true sense of the word—that is,
an institution dedicated mainly to research
and advanced sudies.
But the report also marks line turn toward
more responsible and realistic relations between the university and the provincial government.
In effect, the report tells the government:
"Here is documentary evidence of what
this province needs. Let's do something about
it, together."
This is as important as it is novel.
Previously, no one connected with the university bad taken the trouble to examine the
enormity of the crisis which higher education
is facing.
The university administration went blissfully along making requests for finances not
so much on the basis of what was needed, but
on the basis of what certain people thought
the government was prepared to spend.
The approaches that were made protesting
the government's ignorance of higher education were usually made by the students. Sometimes they accomplished something. Other
times they didn't.
Now, Dr. Macdonald, deeply concerned
with the problems of higher education and
anxious to do his part to solve them, has attempted to show not only the provincial government—but also the federal government, industry, labor and the people of the province—
what they must be prepared to do in B.C.
He has not laid the blame where it has been
laid in the past—that is at the feet of only the
provincial government—but he has said that
Dhese other bodies have also failed to recognize
their responsibility.
The effect of this is manifold.
The most important, probably, is that Premier Bennett has been given a chance to make
a new start in his relations with the university
and with the whole idea of higher education
The report is careful to avoid unnecessarily
criticizing the poor support the university has
received in the past; but instead, it attempts
to present a factual, realistic picture of what
the university must have in the next ten years.
Rather than putting the Premier and his
government on the defensive—that is, searching to pick holes in the report, and looking for
outs— the report asks the help of not only of
his government, but of other bodies in overcoming the possibility of educational disaster.
Moreover, the report is not intended to become a political football.
The details are presented in an unbiased
manner. The report is devoid of catch-phrases
which can be easily flung around by politicians
working to their own ends.
Dr. Macdonald's goal, it appears, has been
to present a scholarly rather than an emotional document to the government. Recognizing that he is a new man with a fresh approach
to an old problem, Dr. Macdonald is asking
the government to co-operate with him.
And the results, so far, are encouraging.
In the Throne Speech, Premier Bennett promised to turn Victoria College into a university,
as recommended in the Macdonald report.
Similarly, he said his government would
establish junior colleges at recommended locations throughout the province.
Dr. Macdonald, it seems, by being truly
concerned with the consequences of inaction,
rather than attempting to bully or call-down
the provincial government, has achieved what
he was after—at least in part.
Even more encouraging is the statement
by the Premier that his views and Dr. Macdonald's with regard to higher education are
almost identical.
Maybe, because of Dr. Macdonald's approach, the government will be on the university's side—rather than against it as it has
appeared for so many years—and will work
to make other bodies realize their roles in
building higher education.
If the government doeesn't accept and implement this impressive, but realistic, document, then's time enough to look for some political bedfellows.
Report suggests
Education on three levels
Dr. John Macdonald is asking for three types of institution for higher education —
universities, four-year colleges
and two-year colleges—in his
report.
He is also asking B.C. municipalities to bear some of the
costs of the new junior colleges.
•    •    •
Only the universities and
the four-year colleges would
grant degrees while the two-
year colleges would offer a
variety of programs one or two
years beyond grade XII.
The report recommends 25
per cent of operating costs and
one-third of *the capital costs
be borne by municipalities in
the area because the two-year
colleges would offer courses
embodying the characteristics
of the region they serve.
When the colleges achieve
degree-granting status, the report recommends costs be taken over by the senior governments as the colleges i-wiH? be
then  provincial  institutions.
The total cost of the West
Kootenay and Okanagan Colleges would be $2,018,500 to
the municipalities involved.
„ Provision wiH also be made
for the transfer of students
who wish to go to universities
or four-year colleges later on.
•    •    •
The universities will concentrate on undergraduate education in the humanities, sciences, fine arts, and social sciences
as well as advanced teacher
training and research connected with graduate work and
professional prep aration in
medicine, engineering, law,
etc.
*    •    *
In addition, the report calls
for four-year colleges offering
degrees in the liberal arts,
science, and education.
In the future, as population
increases, some of the four-
year colleges may develop into
comprehensive universities.
m
Senior matric poor excuse
for first year   university
Grade XIII, is a poor substitute for a first-year university
education, says Dr. John Macdonald's report.
Dr. Macdonald said grade XIII should be looked on as
a continuation of high school and not academically the same
as the first year of university.
It has been stated in the past that one method to alleviate
pressure on first-year university classes would be to encourage
students to complete senior matriculation, and then go
directly into second-year Arts or first-year engineering, the
report says.
"Yet the academic environment of Grade XIII is not the
same as that of a university.
AndP the number of course options, are neeessarily restricted:' it adds;
Why
we
fail
Government stinginess is
causing student failures at UBC.
Average annual government
expenditure at UBC is $1,128
per student — $400 lower than
the Canadian average.
As a result, classes are too
large and the program tends to
be impersonal, says the Macdonald report.
*    *    *
"Classes in the first two years
of arts and science average 62
students and in some cases they
are as large as 200."
(One section of sociology 200
has 650 students registered!)   '
"These conditions contribute
to a disturbingly high failure
rate,"  warns the report. j
Outright first year failures
last year totaled 2ft per cent
Only 36.4 per cent of first year
st^wteate-ptMcd aft thw tjuwig.
Monday, January 28, 1963
~THE^UR YSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy, 1961 and 1962
Winner of the Bracken Trophy, 1962
Winner of the Montreal Star Trophy, 1962
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Member Canadian University Press
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver-
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed
are those of the Editor-in-Chief of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C. Telephone CA 4-3242,
Locals:   Editor—25;   News—23;   Photography—24.
Editor-in-chief: Keith, Bradbury
Managing Editor  '. Denis Stanley
Associate Editor Fred Fletcher
News Editor Mike Hunter
City Editor M. G. Valpy
Picture Editor   Don Hume
Layout  Editor   Bob  McDonald
Sports Editor   Ron Kydd
Features Editor Mike Grenby
CUP Editor   Maureen Covell
Editorial Assistant — Joyce Holding
Layout:   GAIL  KENDALL
REPORTERS AND DESK: Dave Ablett, Richard Simeon, Mike
Horsey, Ann Burge.
SPORTS: George Railton, Collin Sabbell.
TECHNICAL: Clint Pulley.
BURNABY COLLEGE
(Continued from Page  1)
presently existing institution,
will grow to an enrolment of
3,700.
Dr. Macdonald's report says
the Burnaby College is required
to handle students from Burnaby, Surrey, the North Shore
and the Fraser Valley who are
not within commuting distance
of UBC.
The report suggests the institution be built along the new
Trans-Canada highway at the
Stormont interchange (near
Lougheed Highway and Government road).
• •    •
The report foresees Burnaby
College as the major lower mainland undergraduate centre by
1970. It would have about 7,000
students, and cost $9 million.
UBC, it is expected, would
concentrate more on graduate
training, as well as doing some
undergraduate teaching.
The institution would be only
two miles from the new Provincial vocational centre, the
Burnaby Institute of Technology.
(The objectives of the Institute are not yet decided. Where
it will fit in with the province's
higher education depends on how
it develops, Dr Macdonald says.
That the institution is only now
being built indicates the poor
state of facilities for higher education in B.C. the report said).
''Such a college site (Burnaby)
would be as convenient (in travel
time) for students living in these
municipalities as the Point Grey
campus is to persons living in
the central sections of Vancouver city," the report says.
Estimated travelling time from
Langley, Haney or North Vancouver   is 30  minutes.
* *    *
The report also suggests development of King Edward adult
education centre along the lines
of a junior college, specializing
in continuing education, terminal academic education and
transfer facilities for students on
the academic program.
And the establishment of a
two-year college in the eastern
Fraser Valley.
King Edward, now offering
grade XIII, will house 2,300 students.
The report says a two-year
college is needed immediately
in the Okanagan Valley. It suggests it be. located on Highway
97 across Okanagan. Lake from.
Kelowna so it wilLbe within an
hour's drive   of   Eeutictere•■•ani
A:similar college is needed in
the Trail-Nelson area. The report suggests it be built midway
between the two centres near
Castlegar-Kinnaird.
• *    *~
The two-year junior college
in the Okanagan and the Koote
nays will serve 3,300 students.
After 1971 new junior colleges1
throughout B.C. will be established. They will be located on a
priority basis in Prince George,
Kamloops, central Vancouver
Island, and the upper Fraser
Valley regions.
The report says smaller centres such as Kitimat and Dawson
Creek should provide Grade
XIII facilities and that the
Peace River area may be sufficiently developed to establish a
two-year college in 1970.
By 1965, initial construction,
will be completed on the four-
year Burnaby college and the
two-year junior colleges in the
Okanagan and Kootenays with a
total estimated capital cost of
$5,280,000.
The Gordon Head Campus at
Victoria will be expanded to
accommodate 3,000 students by
1965 also.
By 1971 Burnaby College
should have increased to 7,000
students and become a principal
degree-granting institution for
the sciences, education and liberal arts.
* •    •
The Okanagan College should
have 2,400 students with a faculty of 120 by this date.
Total operating costs for the
system are estimated in the report to be about $100 million by
1971-72.
Colleges should be
near the students
These are the criteria Dr."
John Macdonald used in deciding possible locations for
colleges: (1) total population of
area concerned, (those areas
with largest population getting
priority.) (2) number of potential students in the area. (3)
number of students within
commuting distance of the particular proposed college centre.
(4) proportion of this number
which seems likely to need
post-bigb-school educ a.t.i oh.
(&>: existing leypl ami Quality.
raf-r-nltiBfgty tiyit ioy :■— i - _      jj •_ Monday, January 28, 1963
Proper teaching hampered
Classes becoming
far too unwieldy
More than 86 per cent of students getting higher education
in B.C. are enrolled at UBC, Dr. John MacDonald says in his
report oh higher education.
THE      UBYSSEY
If this situation continues, Dr.
Macdonald says, classes will become too large for proper instruction.
He says the rapid increase in
enrolment since the post-war low
of 1952^53 has required that
much of the university's efforts
be devoted to the first and
second years, where in many
courses large teaching sections
have become unavoidable.
"Upper year courses are now
leaching a stage where unduly
large classes will become inevitable," his report says.
RESTRICTIONS
If existing conditions continue,
the president says^the university
will have to either greatly extend its facilities or restrict enrolment 7
He cites several studies which
show it is more economical to
develop junior colleges than to
expand a central institution.
A large institution will have
to take on too many educational
jobs to do any of them well, the
report says.
The current and future demand for persons trained to the
most advanced academic levels
cannot he met if UBC becomes
inundated with students, he
says.
"Provision of facilities at a
comparable level elsewhere in
the province will not only equalize educational opportunity but
at the same time enhance the
academic standards Tof the provincial university, and so permit
it to pursue the goals recognized
elsewhere as those of a leading
university."
Victoria College now provides
higher education for 11.6 per
cent of the province's education
students.
AUTONOMOUS
It offers a full four-year degree program and will become
an autonomous university this
year. Its total enrolment is 1,849.
The remaining 1.8, per cent of
students in universities attend
Notre Dame University College
at Nelson (264 students), and
Trinity College at Langley (17
students).
These institutions are private
and have admission standards
similar to those at UBC. Only
Notre Dame has a full degree
program.
It is a Catholic college affiliated with St. Francis Xavier
University, Antigonish, N.S.
Dr. Macdonald recommends
that these private institutions remain separate and autonomous.
NO REASON
"Our tradition of education in
British Columbia, at all levels,
has involved the separation of
public and private systems," he
says.
"As a result, both have been
able to accept their respective
responsibilities. I think that our
tradition has worked in past, and
I see no reason-to depart from
i it."'
;. The president goes oh,  however, to call for overall planning
for   public  education   in   B.C.,
taking iitfb account the private
- institutions.
: °.y '^gpamMc Kgjsswth would lead
-to. sftstiaaitiaed and ^uneconomic
a.result,"be says.
Student dies
in hospital
There was a gap in the Mardi
Gras chorus  line.
Kathleen Joanne Millar, a
member of the chorus line, died
in hospital Thursday from head
injuries received when she was
thrown from her small sports
car in a collision Tuesday.
Miss Millar, 17, was a first
year Arts student.
She was looking forward to
attending Ther, sister's wedding
and left the University between
lectures Tuesday to see about her
bridesmaid's gown when the
accident occurred.
The collision took place at
Twelfth and Waterloo.
Miss Millar lived at 1625
Mathers,   West   Vancouver.
She is survived by her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Jack G. Millar, and
a brother and sister.
PRETTY Kathy Hobson of Kappa Alpha Theta was crowned
1963 Mardi Gras Queen Friday night at annual charity
ball.   King   is   Ray  Wickland.
UBC out of
McGoun Cup
UBC took last place in the McGoun Cup debating trials Friday
night.
berta, took seven out of eight
points.
Last year's champion, University of Manitoba, came second
with five points.
The University of Saskatchewan received four points.
UBC trailed with no points.
The topic of the debate was,
"Canadian self-determination is
a myth."
Page 5
Report gives sources
of the student flood
Where do the students come from who are flooding the University of B.C.?
Dr. John Macdonald's report on higher education provides
some of the answers.
More than 50 per cent of the total enrolment of UBC comes from
the Greater Vancouver area. Forty per cent come from within
the city limits and 17.4 per cent from immediately adjacent areas.
About five per cent come from other countries. Other figures
are shown in the chart below:
DISTRIBUTION  OF  STUDENTS  BY  REGIONS
1959-60
1960-61
1961-62
AREA
Number
%
Number
%
Number    %
Greater Vancouver
*  5,847
54.9
6,548
56.3
7,431
57.4
Fraser Valley
789
7.5
908
7.8
1,029
7.9
Victoria
416*
3.9
357
3.1
359
2.8
Vancouver Is.—~(rest)   515 •
4.8
522
4.5
624
4.8
Okanagan
539
5.1
579
5.1
671
5.2
Kootenays
531
5.0
562
4.8
601
4.6
Kamloops, S. Cariboo 221
2.1
241
2.1
245
1.9
Central  Interior
122
1.1
133
1.1
160
1.2
Coast
211
2.0
226
1.9
241
1.9
North
€4
.6
63
.6
63
.5
Total for B.C.
9,255
87.0
10,144
87.3
11,429
88.2
Canada—(rest)
770
7.2
840
7.2
888
6.9
Other Countries
617
5.8
637
5.5
633
4.9
TOTAL
10,642
100%
11,621
100%
12,950
100%
39.8
*Van. City (incl.)        4,405    41.4        4,713    40.5        5,155
Of Victoria's College total enrolment of 1,849, 61 per cent
are from Greater Victoria, 19 per cent from the rest of Vancouver
Island, and the remainder from the rest of the province.
Largest numbers in this remaining 20 per cent come from
Rossland-Trail and Okanagan areas.
YOU ABE INVITED
TO INVESTIGATE
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
• Sales .Claims
• Actuarial       • Underwriting
• Investment   • Administration
with
D. E. WEAVER, F.L.MJL, Assistant Comptroller
who will be visiting the University of British Columbia
on
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4th
FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 PoM.
Please see placement office for interview
j\/[] The Mutual Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANY  OF   CANADA Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Monday, January 28, 1963
Well-rested rugby team
furns tide on Crimsons
The UBC Thunderbirds rugby squad, rusty from its long
Christmas layoff, still managed to defeat Victoria Crimson
Tide 8-3 in the first game of the McKechnie cup series Saturday.
UBC was forced to play a defensive game for most of the
match, played in Victoria, but made the most of their offensive
opportunities when they came.
Birds will now meet the winner of the other McKechnie
cup semi-final between Vancouver Reps and North Shore on
February 9.
Birds mangle Bears
veto
San Francisco
The UBC Thunderbirds, led by John Cook's 14 points,
scored an easy exhibition victory over the San Francisco "All
■Nations" team in a preliminary game Saturday night in^War
Memorial gym. _   ~       P. i.
Rookie goalie
shutout star
In the feature event, the Harlem Globetrotters clowned their
way to an easy victory over the
New Westminster Bakers of the
city Senior "A" league.
The San Francisco team, which
looked suspiciously like the
Hawaii Islanders who travelled
with the Globetrotters last year
played a rough brand of basketball.
They were all elbows and
knees. One player, in fact, was
charged with six fouls, although
five is the legal maximum.
Last > Thursday night, in another exhibition game, Birds
edged the University of Alaska
Polar, Bears 57-56.
Birds got some help from an
unexpected source over the
weekend in their quest for th e
Western Intercollegiate crown.
The Edmonton branch of the
University of Alberta defeated
the powerful Calgary team in
one of their weekend games.
Calgary still leads the WCIAA
with 14 points to UBC's 10, but
the Birds have four games in
hand.
UBC's soccer squad, aided by
the first-rate performance of a
substitute goalie, and the goal
scoring ability of an injured
forward, shut out St. Andrews
2-0 Saturday in Mainland
League action.
Ed Wasylik, a utility man,
took over in the nets when regular goalie George Hrennikoff
was unable to play because of an
elbow injury he picked up last
week, and .turned in an excellent
performance. It w a s his first
game in goal.
John Haar, playing the game
with a brace on his injured
back, scored both UBC goals.
UBC is now only one point
behind St. Andrews in the
league standings, and the St.
Andrews team has played three
more games.
UBC controlled most of the
play throughout the game which
was played on the granite-hard
turf of Norquay park.
SKI CLEARANCE
WE ARE MOVING
Save From 25% to 50%
STOCKLIE METAL SKIS-5 pr. left) ' "CfT   Ifitlft
Regular 112.50 - Only         © / |9U
DYNAMIC COMBIE CLt\   i%t\
Regular 79.95 - NOW _-„ OVbVw
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SKI RACKS FOR ALL 0%   Al"   and   "f ft   CSV
HARD TOP CARS—   «Jb«79 JL\Jt*&%J
Selection of Sweaters
Jackets 25% to 50% off
7.50 12.50
SKI SLACKS - Hauser, Toni.Sailer, White
Stag — Ladies. -Reg. 49.50 — Now
LOW PRICE LADIES SLACKS
Now Even Lower
SPECIAL   	
BINDINGS
SAVINGS ON ALL TYPES OF POLES - HARNESS
and ACCESSORIES
AH Stock Must
-Help Us Move
ARLBERG SKI HUT
608 Robson St.
MU 5;?411__ v " „  ,
Saie*6"nV at~S68"fio&son*§t.
.,„ ,_    TERMS
All Sales Final
PETER KELLY
. winning goal
Gymnastics squad
tumbles to Yanks
UBC's gymnastics team was
trounced 101.5 to 26.5 Saturday by the powerful University of Washington squad in
a match in War Memorial
gym.
By   GEORGE   RAILTON
Defensive training paid  off for the Thunderbird hockey
team as taey won two games from the Alberta Golden Bears
to put themselves on top of the Western Intercollegiate league.
Friday night they broke a 13-
year losing streak against the
Bears, taking a 5-2 victory. They
doubled their effort Saturday
and came out on top 3-2.
Birds were down two men
five times in the series, but the
defensive coaching of Father
David Baiier paid off in 100 per
cent dividends.
Goalkeeper Ken Broderick
was rarely called upon to work
up a sweat because of the six-
foot wall thrown up in front of
him by def encemen Terry
O'Malley, Dave Chambers, Barry MacKenzie and John MacLeod.
Birds were off and running
from the opening whistle Friday. They won the face-off; and
1Q seconds later centre Peter
Kelly put it past Alberta goalie
Gerry Schultz.
Stu Gibbs to create the main
offence for the Birds.
Kelly totalled three goals to
increase his total to five in four
league games. Lortie got two
goals and an assist Friday, and
added two more assists Saturday, while McDowell, the speedy
Kelowna product, tied the score
at 2-2 Saturday on a neat close-
in play.
But much of the credit for
UBC's startling victories belongs
to the defensive corps who, despite many penalties, held off
the rushing defending cham-
ions.
MacKenzie, a rangy Toronton-
ian, kept the 1,400 fans crammed into North Shore Winter
Club Saturday on their feet
with crunching body checks and
sparkling defensive plays. His
hard   point   shot   set   up   f-o u r
Kelly scored the weekend's j weekend goals, including the
final goal Saturday with less \ winner Saturday,
than two minutes left in the! Goalie Broderick has now let
game to give UBC a 3-2 lead j Dy only seven goals in four
to complete the unprecedented j games. He had to make only 16
sweep.
- All weekend, Kelly had
worked well with wingers Mickey McDowell, Ralph Lortie and
saves Saturday.
i: B; ■■'    	
w
L
1)
■>
0
p
. .   0
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.4
.0
Philips New Battery Tape Recorder
with Honors in Versatility and Portability
Take your Philips Continental '100
along to lecture orrecreation rooms.
Preserve sage words, mad moments
or music. Perfect for parties ordances,
it pl^a,.up.:tft:|^fe@^^jp^^ii..
a single tape. Records and plays back
anywhere because it's transistortzsd
and powered by ordinary flashlight
batteries. Have a listen to this eight
pound, ;SmalLWonder with a Big
.i^oI^.atyoia'^Ju^ips-Eey dealer. It's
all yours to enjoy for only $14^00/ %>ndayr January 28, 1963
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SHOUiPER P£WN, UBj9 forward Cliff Russeh (dark uniform)
crashes into an Albgrfa'defepcertiari as he' pOKes"fhe puck' at'
Golden Beprs goaYi'e'fcaje',rlgfdeK'A^effaV ^'C^Wlhfefey'te^"
(number 3),7w'd1tl to'clear trie'rerJbuhd/LtBC' fbokxbotr) games ;
of the weekend, series"from thVE<JrnoHiori squaB'.'   ""'"" •-'•••
SALE!
COLLEGE SHOP
Jackets $15 95 now $ 15.00
Sweaters $15,95 now $15.00
Mugs    $1.65 and $4.00
Plaques - Assorted
UBC. Scarves $3.35 now
$2.95
AND MANY MORE ARTICLES AT
20% OFF
Remember - BROCK EXTENSION
11:30 a.m. -2:30 p.m.
Two  meets  on  one  weekend
Badminton Birds see double
UBC's Badminton team has a
problem; how to be in two
places at once.
UBC, defending Western Intercollegiate badminton champions, are scheduled to defend
their crown in Saskatoon on
March first and second. It is
the same weekend UBC is supposed to enter the B.C. Championships.
Coach E.B. Stacey would
like to enter his most experienced players in both tournaments, but will have to divide
his strength.
•    •    •
The badminton teams were
late getting started this year;
and coach Stacey had to train
an almost entirely new squad.
Out of a total of 32 players
from four teams last year the
graduating class took 25, leav
ing less than one full team.
But for such an inexperienced team they have built an
impressive record.
•    •    •
Four teams are entered in the
Vancouver City leagues; one
team in the "B" league, Vancouver's top league (there is no
"A" league), two teams in the
"C"league, and one team in the
"D" league a new league this
year.
During  the first  term  the
teams collected seven wins  in
nine  games; three of the four
teams were unbeaten.
.•    •    •
Last week in the city championships UBC won two events
and were runners up in another.
Natsuko Nimba and Ann
Knotte won the ladies doubles;
Eric Sandstrom and Miss
Knotte won the mixed doubles,
Miss Namba was runner-up in
the ladies singles.
The number of players in the-
running for UBC's WCIAA
team has been narrowed to ten
—five men and five women.
From these ten six will be
chosen to complete the team.
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS
EVERY SUNDAY AT
S*. Timothy
Lutheran Church
11:00 Worship
10:00  Bible Study
For U.B.C. Students, Professors and
Transportation —
Itinerary -
Cost (Roundtrip)
Eligibility -
By Canadian  Pacific Airlines  Bristol  Britannia.
Non stop Vancouver/London June 1st, 1063.
Non stop Londbn/VancOuver Aug. 22nd, 1963.
$368.00.  All  passengers  must  leave on  the same
"flight from  London.
Full-time bona fide students at the University of British  Columbia,   professors,  their  parents  (father and
mother  IrvTHgf in fHe"~s"ame  household),  their spouse
arid deperidertt children  (whether student, professor
or staff member is travelling or not).
_..    .       _ 66  Ibs7 baggage allowance, first class catering  ser-
Flight Features —   v&S, &mp1Srrie"rittiryJibr facilities, free CPA overnite
A7l!rriited number of infants under 2 years of age at
tlrrW'of'dep'qrtUre from Vancouver on June 1st are
elj^ible fob '*fV$ewpassage.
Chifcfreri over 2 years'of age and under 12 at time
of 'departure from aVncouver June 1st, 1963 will
occupy" 'individual  seats and  will  pay  regular fare.
Infants' Fare -
Children's Fare -
FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION
AND APPLICATION FORM:
Alma Mater Society Office
Brock Hall;
University of British Columbia
TELEPHONE INQUIRIES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED
Clearance  Sale
RECORDS
$139
Hundreds of Long Play Records
Classical — Standards — Pops
Selected Group of Long Play Records
Classical — Popular — Jazz —'■ Covers may be scuffed, records
guaranteed perfect. Discontinued from Catalogue.
All Boxed Albums
Opera and instrumental
407o off
307o off
All Our Complete Stock of Classics,
Popular and Standard Albums
25<ro off
DIAMOND NEEDLES
Most popular styles — Mono or Sfereo
SAPPHIRE NEEDLES, each $1.50
$4.98
ALEXANDER
AND
APPLIANCES
4558 WEST 10th AVENUE
CAstle 4-6811 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Monday, January 28,  1963
Meredith got in with trouble--
Kennard just got in trouble
Ottawa (CUP)—James H.
Meredith was not the first
Negro to seek admission to an
all-white, state university in
Mississippi. Clyde Kennard, a
native of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, had tried earlier to enter
the University of Southern
Mississippi.
Meredith was accepted at Oxford; Kennard is serving a
seven-year sentence at Parch-
man Penitentiary, 67 miles to
the southwest.
Kennard had studied at the
University of Chicago for three
-years in 1955, he returned
home to support his mother^
and disabled father on their
small farm, a 15-minute drive
from the University of Southern Mis^ippi. Kennard hoped
to continue his education there.
• •   •
He first applied for admission in 1958. He was summoned,
to Jackson, the state capitdl,
for a meeting with Governor J.
P. Colemen and university president W.D. McCain. Kennard
was told that if he withdrew his
application he could select any
college in America which would
accept him, and the state of Mis-'
sissippi would pay his expenses. He, refused.
Governor Coleman asked
Kennard to withhold his application until after the elections. He did.
• *   •
Fall, 1959, Kennard ^formally
applied for admission. After a
brief interview with president
McCain, attended by the chief
investigator of the state's segregation-enforcing Sovereignty
Commission, he was rejected.
The grounds were "deficiencies
and irregularities" in his application.
From the interview, Kennard returned to his parked
car, was met by two waiting
constables and arrested for
reckless driving. Questioned at
the police station, Kennard was
confronted with five pints  of
Excellent Boom, and Board in private home near McKenzie and 89.
Bedroom, .and .adjoining' .study
room with T.V. Kec. room, for en-
tertainin?. lunches packed. 970
sharing -— 976  single. Ven  Only
REgent   3-6477
Matz & Wozity
548 Howe St.       MU 3-4715
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for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
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in
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Uniforms
EYEGLASSES
UP
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EYE EXAMINATIONS
whiskey, claimed to have been
found in a search of his car.
Illegal possession of liquor was
added to the charges. A justice
of the peace found Kennard
guilty; he was fined $600 and
costs. An appeal was later denied.
After the 1959 application
had been rejected, governor
Coleman is reported to have
said that, "If Clyde did reapply,
there'd be no way of holding
him out, because his record was
sufficient. There'd be no alternative but to close (the
school)".
On Sept. 25, 1960, the Forrest County Co-operative Warehouse was robbed of five sacks
of chicken feed, valued at $5
each. An illiterate 19-year-old
Johnny Lee Roberts confessed
to the theft.
As a witness for the state, he
claimed the burglary had been
instigated and planned by Kennard. He attributed to Kennard
knowledge of the warehouse,
and watchman's schedule that
Robert's own testimony later
showed Kennard never possessed.
Roberts received a five-year
probation sentence. But on his
testimony Kennard was convicted of being an accessory
to burglary and sentenced to
seven years.
In* a year and a half, James
Meredith would have received
his degree from the University
of Mississippi. Clyde Kennard,
however, will never receive a
degree from any university in
Mississippi: state law prohibits
anyone convicted of felony
from enrolling in a state institution.
'tween classes
Ministers on atheism
Six ministers will debate atheism, noon, Thurs., in Armory.
Questions are solicited from the
audience.
* *    *
GUSO
Dr. Belshew of the UBC Anthropology Dept. speaks 7:30 tonight in IH Lounge. This is the
first of a series of weekly seminars on Overseas Service. All
welcome.
* *    *
cuso
Bill Biggin will talk and show
slides on Guatemala noon, Tues.,
Bu203.
PRE-MED  SOC
Dr. K. G. Nickerson will lecture and show a film on modern
obstetrics noon, Wed., West-
brook 100. ,
*     *     *
DANCE CLUB
Bossa Nova will be taught
noon, Friday, Dance Club
Lounge. "Bossa Nova Bash" Sat,
Feb. 2, Dance Club Lounge.
THE   LUTHERAN   STUDENTS
present
DR. JOHN MONTGOMERY
B.A., B.L.S., B.D., M.A., S.T.M., ?H.D.
WATERLOO UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
TUESDAY, JAN 29, 12:30 Noon, Buchanan 106
"What does a historian know about Jesus Christ?"
TUESDAY, JAN. 29,8:00 p.m. b^
"Where is history going?"
(Admission 50c)
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30, 12:30 noon, Physics Bldg. 200
"The Divinity of Jesus  Christ"
Kevin Kavanagh, B. Com. (Manitoba, '53), age 30,
Assistant Group Superintendent, Great-West Life —
one of many recent university graduates "going places"
with The Great-West Life Assurance Company.
Upon graduation, Kevin decided upon a career in Sales
Management— and he liked the opportunities available
to him at Great-West Life. Following a year's training
at Head Office, he entered the Group Insurance Sales
field in Winnipeg, later transferring to Toronto. In 1959
he returned to Head Office as Assistant Group Superintendent — today, a key man in the development and
management of his Company's dynamic Group Insurance Sales operation.
Kevin's progress with Great-West is not an exceptional
case — he is but one of-60 graduates from universities
across Canada who, since joining the Company within
the past ten years, have rapidly advanced into responsible management positions in all phases of t|*e
insurance business — investment, law, sales, actuarial,
accounting, business administration.
Because Great-West Life's international operations are-
expanding so rapidly, the Company needs qualified future management personnel throughout its organization,
principally at the Winnipeg Head Office. Not many
companies can offer today's graduate such opportunity
for rewarding careers in so many challenging and interesting fields of business activity.
Ask your student placement' officer for a copy of
our descriptive booklet on career opportunities at
Great-West Life.
Graduating students, both men and women, in COMMERCE — ARTS — SCIENCE — LAW, are invited to discuss their career plans with representatives of Great-West
Life on campus FEBRUARY 7 and 8.
Appointments for interviews may be arranged through
your student placement officer.
THE
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANY

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