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The Ubyssey 1986-11-04

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 ym Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 17
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 4,1986
.r*69*
228-2301
Campbell calls for cooperation
By RICK HIEBERT
Gordon Campbell, the Nonpartisan Association mayoral candidate in the November 15 Vancouver municipal election, called
for private sector job creation, a
ward system and a positive,
cooperative attitude to lead Vancouver into the future during a campaign visit to UBC Friday.
Campbell told about 50 students
in SUB auditorium that a
politician's   job   is   to   serve   the
public. "Our job (in government) is
to act as a servant for you," said
Campbell. "It used to be called
public service when you got involved in politics. We have to get back
to that traditional idea, that politicians are there to serve the public."
Campbell, an NPA alderman
since 1984, said Vancouver's
unemployment problem can only be
solved "one job at a time."
"1 am tired of the mega-project
mentality," he said.
Campbell added the civic government should concen:rate on helping
small businesses which, according
to Campbell, account for ninety-
five per cent of the new job opportunities in Vancouver.
Campbell attacked the present
civic government's policies on parking regulations and the store closure
bylaw that have hurt small
businesses.
Helping   small   business   grow,
providing services to the Pacific
Rim, and developing tourism will
help provide jobs for Vancouver's
unemployed, he said. Campbell
said he is frustrated that his main
opponent, Committee of Progressive Electors' candidate Harry
Rankin, does not understand the
importance of tourism to the local
economy.
"In July, he (Rankin) went to a
Chinese Rotary Club lunch and
said, tourism, well, it's okay, but it
doesn't create real jobs — what we
have to do is create manufacturing
jobs and get some smelters going.
That's nonsense," said Campbell.
Campbell supports a ward system
in Vancouver. He argued the adoption of a system where members of
city council represent specific
neighborhoods instead ofthe city at
large would lead to a more responsive and representative civic government.
"1 believe you get that (kind of
government) when people understand what they're voting for, who
they're voting for and what they
stand for," said Campbell. It is virtually impossible to do that in a
system where you have 27 people
lined up and you pick the best ten. 1
think it's easier for people to look
at four or five people and say 'I
understand all of them'."
Vandals strike hall
Ghosts and goblins weren't the
only unwelcome visitors to Carey
Hall this Hallowe'en.
Vandals fouled the dining hall of
the Baptist residence early
Hallowe'en morning, smearing
sugar, syrup, feathers, soap and fire
extinguisher exhaust on the floors
and windows.
Doug Johnson, dean of Carey
Hall residence, described the vandalism as a "prank that just got out
of control."
Johnson said a fire extinguisher
had been emptied on the carpets
and tables, and soap smeared on the
windows. The words "Hi Baptists"
were scrawled on one window.
Johnson said when he and the
RCMP were called in to investigate
the crime, both thought the vandalism may have been a cult activity, because eight years ago someone
burned the name of the dean into
the lawn beside the residence.
Johnson said he changed his
mind, however, when he received a
"rumour" as to the identity of the
culprits from a student at Carey
Hall.
Johnson refused to give details of
the rumour, saying the RCMP told
him it would hamper the investigation.
Johnson did say evidence suggests the vandalism was planned
more than a week ago.
"They came through an open
window," he said. "It took two or
three people 10-15 minutes to do it
...It's incredible we didn't hear
them."
The RCMP constable in charge
of the case refused to give details,
but was confident the case would be
resolved by Wednesday.
Despite calling the crime a prank,
Johnson thought it was necessary to
go to the police.
"Pranks shouldn't go this far.
There should be some penalty,
especially if the damage is great,"
he said.
If the carpet has to be replaced,
Johnson estimated the damages will
cost $3,400.
Ballots challenged
THE ONLY RELIABLE time machine reaches upward from the humble grounds of UBC disguised as the Clock
Tower. The immense amounts of energy envolved in time transitions is evident from the fog that is omitted from the
pinicle of the tower as a result of the vaporization of the very web of time and space.
By JENNIFER LYALL
Many students are in danger of
being disenfranchised when the Section 80 votes cast in the provincial
election are counted today, said
NDP campaign organizer John
Pollard.
"The system is designed to easily
disenfranchise people who move a
lot, young people and especially
students," said Pollard.
In order to be eligible to vote in a
riding you must be a permanent
resident of the area and must have
lived there for at least eight months.
People who were temporarily away
from their home ridings on election
Amateur radio society's equipment "abysmal
n
BRAD NEWCOMBE
If an earthquake hit Vancouver
tomorrow and phone lines were
down, UBC ham radio operators
would be hard pressed to handle
local communications because some
equipment is in "abysmal shape",
said the president of UBC's
Amateur Radio Society.
VHF transceivers and antennae
are needed to handle local ham
radio communications. Last year
HamSoc purchased a new high frequency short wave antenna which
can literally "reach the world", but
very high frequency equipment is in
dire need of replacement, said Sid
Kemp, HamSoc president.
HamSoc      emergency      co
ordinator, Greg Franklin agrees.
"We fill a gap that no other
emergency service provides.
"We're like the fire station - you
don't need it until you really need
it, then everyone expects you to be
there."
HamSoc's new high frequency
antenna enabled HamSoc to be in
contact with people in El Salvador
following the earthquake in October. All other lines of communication were down and ham
radio operators in El Salvador were
able to transmit messages from El
Salvador to HamSoc members who
then contacted concerned relatives
and friends in Vancouver.
Members of UBC's HamSoc are
ready at all times to volunteer services in the event of an emergency.
The club, however, was unsuccessful in its application last year to
be recognized as a service organization club by AMS.
Jamie Collins, AMS director of
finance, said he is not interested in
discussing "what might happen",
such as a natural disaster scenario,
when considering wtiether HamSoc
is a service organization, although
he recognizes that ham radio
operators provide a valuable service.
The HF antenna was purchased
with assistance from the AMS and
the Walter Gage Memorial and
Alumni Funds. Collins said "while
I'm not sure HamSoc should look
to the AMS a second time for funding, I'm always open to
proposals."
Franklin wants the AMS and the
university community to recognize
the benefits ham radio operators bring to society as a whole.
"We'll never withhold services"
said Franklin. "Equipment will
simply break down."
Alumni keep their membership in
HamSoc and professionals are on
hand to provide assistance. Ham
radio emergency services were used
extensively during the 1979 evacuation of Mississauga when a train
carrying deadly chlorine gas derailed.
day could cast absentee ballots.
Lawyers representing each party
will be present today when ballots
are counted to challenge any Section 80 ballots they think may be illegitimate. Temporary residents,
many of whom are students, are
among those who may be considered ineligible to vote.
But the time to verify residential
status is when voters are registered,
not when ballots are being counted,
said Pollard. "If a deputy returning
officer on election day accepted the
identification presented as proof of
residence, then that decision cannot
be overturned," he said.
"I wouldn't be surprised if Social
Credit lawyers try to challenge
(ballots cast by temporary
residents)," said Pollard, adding,
"It's our position that the only way
a Section 80 ballot can be challenged is if someone voted twice or is
not on the voter's list."
Approximately 5,000 Section 80
ballots were cast in Point Grey by
voters who registered on election
day and Pollard predicted a majority of them will be for the NDP.
"I think it will be close and the
result of the election may well be
overturned," he said. NDP candidate Darlene Marzari finished
about 650 votes behind Social
Credit MLA Pat McGeer on October 22.
Social Credit information officer
Bernie Smith would not comment
on his party's opinion concerning
temporary residents. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1986
Condoms spark controversy
MONTREAL (CUP) — An entrepreneur's dream of installing
condom vending machines in
Quebec Junior College washrooms
may never come true, if opposition
to the plan continues to mount.
Jocelyn Morin, a former X-ray
technician, has been approaching
CEGEPS throughout Quebec and is
reported to have an exclusive contract with an American condom
manufacturer, National Sanitary
Lab.
But education minister Claude
Ryan said the plan is absurd and
should be abandoned.
"As I understand it, there are
places where these things can be
procured by people who want them
— there are pharmacies," he said.
"I'm not too familiar with this, but
I can't see these things being installed in colleges. It would be too
ridiculous."
Itidal Sadek, director of Dawson
College's Selby campus, doubts
condoms will be available there.
"We don't sell anything in
dispensers, not even sanitary
napkins.
"It's basically a fear of vandalism and although (condoms
would) be good for educational
purposes, they're not needed for
emergencies. I just haven't heard
any convincing arguments."
Tom Nowers, head of student
services at Marianopolis College,
says the potential for vandalism is
too great.
"The minute you put money into
a machine, you've got a problem,"
he said. "I can understand both
sides of the argument, though, of
having birth control versus the implied tactic approval of sexual activity."
Oooooops
The Ubyssey made a ghoulish error in the last Hallowe'en issue
when it announced Jeff Shyluk as
last year's graphic winner. In fact
Shyluk was last year's ghost story
winner. The winner of the 1985
graphic contest was Philip Rosco.
<ftwfu- &<L'fu
A rather unique restaurant
A restaurant
for people who understand
that Lamb with Basil and
Rosemary doesn't mean chops
with the people next door.
We are pleased to offer a FREE
ENTREE of Lunch or Dinner
when a second entree of equal or
greater value is purchased.
SUNDAY BRUNCH
Also Available
4473 W. 10th Ave., 228-8815J
open 10 am-midnite daily
THE COMEDY
SHOPPE
at The Skyline
presents
"slide show" comic
CARL
WOLFSON
Nov. 5, 6, 7
Call 278-5161
For Showtimes & Tickets
SKYLINE AIRPORT
HOTEL
3031 No. 3 Road, Richmond
John Abbott College official
Irena Fish agrees. "If you have
them available, you could be seen to
be promoting sexual promiscuity,
but on the other hand, you're also
promoting health," she said.
"The idea will have difficulty
passing here because of parental
and community reaction," she said.
But Mary Farrell, a Dawson College health services worker, has no
problems with condoms on campus.
"Even the department of health
is promoting the use of condoms. It
should be up to the students. If they
want them, they should be
available," said Farrell.
Trois Rivieres College director
Alain Lallier said Morin approached him about the plan, and said he
found merit to stopping transmitted
diseases and unwanted pregnancies.
' A FREE LECTURE! ^
THE WORLD BEYOND BELIEF
RICHARD HEINBERG, is a scholar, researcher and visionary thinker. His
major works include MEMORIES & VISIONS OF PARADISE, HOW
PEACE WAS DISCOVERED and THE AWAKENING, and he has lectured
in major cities across North America.
HIS BOTTOMLINE:
". . . We all yearn for the sense of knowing and being known — a knowing
deeper and more genuine than Ihe intellectual cataloguing process drilled into
us in school. In place of knowing we have substituted beliefs, opinions and
theories.   But  those  who   voluntarily relinquish  their beliefs are finding
themselves part of a burgeoning movement away from the exploitive, opinionated mainstream and toward a responsible wav of life beyond belief.
BE THERE: Thurs., Nov. 6. Buchanan B225
12:30-1:20 p.m.
Contact: Dale, 266-0513
w Integrity in Action Club a
A GREAT PLACE TO MEET
FOR YOUR 'APRES-GAME'
DRINKS AND ENTERTAINMENT
JOIN YOUR FRIENDS IN OUR SPORTS LOUNGE
OVERLOOKING THE HOCKEY AND CURLING ICE
AND ENJOY YOUR FAVOURITE SPORTS ON
OUR BIG SCREEN TV.
LOOK FOR OUR GRAND RE-OPENING IN MID-
NOVEMBER WHEN WE WILL BE OFFERING A
FOOD SERVICE FOR THE FIRST TIME.
HOURS: M-F-5:30-l:00 WEEKENDS-11:00 a.m.-l:00
THE THUNDERBIRD WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
6066 THUNDERBID BLVD.
228-6121
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Wednesday Noon-Hour
Concerts
Nov. 5:    Alan Rinehart, guitar
Jane Martin, flute
Taped for broadcast by CBC Radio
Nov. 12:    Canadian Music Festival
Works of Canadian composer Brian
Cherney performed by the faculty of the
School of Music. Composer in
attendance.
Nov. 19:    John Rudolph, percussion
Kathleen Rudolph, flute
Gaye Alcock, piano
Taped for broadcast by CBC Radio
Nov. 26:    Stephen Boswell, guitar
All concerts take place at noon in the
UBC Recital Hall (Music Building).
FREE ADMISSION — DONATION REQUESTED
For further information or a
concert calendar call 228-3113.
MUSIC
X NEW YORK SELTZER presents *
I PUNCHLINES!! i
FREE COMEDY
WITH PAUL PALMER
TOMORROW - WEDNESDAY
NOVEMBER 5th-12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM - FREE
WIN $ $ $ $ $
* WIN $ $ $ $ $ j
ON THE BOULEVARD
, hair and suntanning co.   i
CUP   20 SESSION - $69   wolff^ystem   0.
Jl 20% Student Discount ^
j on Hair Services |
j 5784 University Blvd. 224-1922 j
j (in UBC Village) V4 Blk. away 224-9116 j
i "Offer valid with presentation of this ad! - ..        ft.
L ^ - XP   °V _l
Summer management openings
College Pro is actively searching for undergraduates who are
achievers with a drive for excellence.
College Pro offers you responsibility with authority. You will
be required to manage an independent profit centre in the
summer(s)   before  you   graduate.   We  will   train   you   to
accelerate your experience in the world of business.
College Pro is the largest residential painting organization in
the world. Along with interior, exterior and commercial painting operations, we also have window cleaning divisions.
RECRUITING PRESENTATION
TODAY!
TUESDAY, NOV. 4
12:30-2:30
HENRY ANGUS BLDG.
ROOM 213
I
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A  season filled with excitement & festivities.
/I  Throughout the month of November, we
J.   JL have organized a few special events that will
interest everyone. We have scheduled author visits,
product days, annual November Book Sale, Artists
in Action Week, Christmas Promotions and much
more! Look for our ads here in the Ubyssey paper
or pick up a calendar of events at the Bookstore.
Our Christmas decorations, cards and
accessories will be on the sales floor
by the first week of November. Keep
us in mind in the month of November.
Come on over and enjov the events!
mMbookstore
228-4741 Tuesday, November 4,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Campus needs womens programs
Canadian University Press
and The Ubyssey Staff
As one group of women is attempting for the third time to
establish a women's studies program at the University of Regina, a
professor there is accusing the
university of institutionalizing sexual discrimination.
Pamela Anderson, a representative of the Saskatchewan Action
Committee on the Status of
Women, says two failed attempts in
the last 10 years to establish a U of
R women's studies program is a
result of gender bias.
"The men on our senate do not
empathize with women's issues and
they can not understand the
relevance of women's studies," said
Anderson, a senator herself.
Anderson said because men
dominate the university's senate,
decisions are rarely made in favour
of women.
According to Sally Shrofel, a
professor leading a group fighting
for women's rights on campus, the
male to female imbalance on senate
is symptomatic of a larger problem.
Of the 355 professors and lecturers at the university, only 55 are
women, said Shrofel. Last year, only three of 116 full professors were
women.
"The problem is built directly into the system," said Shrofel, adding
men have often used weak excuses
to brush off the problem.
Shrofel said "it's time the U of R
caught up" with other universities
in implementing schemes to rectify
the imbalance. She said salary equity and affirmative action programs
would ensure more women are
hired, and that their salaries would
be equal to those of male counterparts.
Reid Robinson, U of R associate
vice-president, said the university is
already considering an affirmative
action program, and that it adjusted its pay scale following a 1975
study which showed women at U of
R were paid $2,000 less than men
with the same degr:e.
Women comprise only 19 per
cent of UBC's faculty. Out of 72
department   heads,  only  two  are
women.
Nadine Wilson, a UBC professor
and former president of the
Academic Woman's Association,
said there is a real need for affirmative action programs at UBC to
increase the number of women
teaching in higher ranks. But she
said a lot of women are hesitant to
take a job earmarked for women.
"I'm outspoken but a lot of
women are scared to be active," she
said.
Shrofel said watchdog commit
tees should be formed to investigate
suspect cases of discrimination in
hiring and pay.
Anderson said a women's studies
program is an excellent way to
eliminate gender bias. "Women
need to have the tools if they are to
actively promote these social
changes," she said.
Anderson said faculty in the
departments of Education, English,
Human Justice, Social Work and
Sociology are supporting a
women's studies program, and
some are already teaching women's
studies courses.
Drug test unfair
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian students would benefit
if Brian Mulroney's support for
mandatory drug testing disappeared
in a puff of smoke, says a Simon
Fraser University psychology professor.
"Mandatory drug testing is a
hopeless idea — it creates humiliation and indignation and cannot
solve the problem of drug
dependence as it is supposed to,"
said Bruce Alexander.
On a trip to Vancouver in
September, the prime minister said
the government was examining the
legality of mandatory testing under
the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms, and agreed he would implement such tests if possible.
While Mulroney later denied the
statements, which were recorded
during a press conference, the Vancouver Sun stood behind its original
report.
Psychologist Alexander, who has
researched drug problems for 15
years, says there are many reasons
to oppose drug testing legislation.
"I have met quite a lot of people
who lost their jobs in the U.S.
because of testing," he said.
"There are a lot of cases before the
courts right now — people are arguing that the test results are wrong
and it is unfair to dismiss them."
Alexander said the tests have a
false positive rate of about five per
cent, with one man fired for opium
use after eating bread covered with
poppy seeds.
For   the   past    several    years,
millions of people have been forced
to undergo testing in the U.S., including employees of one-third of
the 500 largest companies, the armed forces, and departments within
the federal government, said Alexander.
Another argument against testing
is its effect on employee relations.
"You go to work and have to pee in
a jar — how many people want to
work in that kind of atmosphere?"
Alexander asked.
Even the premise for testing rests
on very shaky foundations.
"It is predicted on the idea of
rampant drug use in Canada and
that's not true — 90 per cent of the
people who use cocaine and marijuana, for example, do not have a
serious problem, but are using
drugs recreationally and not harming anyone."
"If  you   fire  people   for  using
marijuana  at   a  party  two  weeks
ago, you are only harming them," ,
he said.
Alexander said that many politicians who succumb to anti-drug
hysteria are simply naive, while
others, like U.S. President Ronald
Reagan, use it to distract from
other domestic issues and as an instrument of foreign policy.
"It serves all of us to have a
scapegoat to blame for high taxes
and unemployment — politicians
are caught up in the same mentality
as every one else," he said.
It is something of a trap, like the
way people in the middle ages burned witches.
Homecoming disturbs city
KINGSTON (CUP) — Police
over-reacted when they arrested
more than 100 Queen's University
students during recent Homecoming celebrations, sty the organizers
of the university's annual weekend-
long festivities.
Police made 36 alcohol-related
arrests Oct. 24, and 73 the next day
at and near the annual street party,
which for the first time was approved and legalized b\ city council.
Councillor Helen Cooper said
council would probably "not give
them another chance" if students
asked to have the event sanctioned
again.
U of Calgary drug testing unfair
CALGARY (CUP) — Caught up
in the Olympic spirit, the University
of Calgary has decided to test all intercollegiate athletes for drugs banned by the International Olympic
Committee.
The U of C General Faculties
Council (GFC) approved a policy
Oct. 24 that would allow the university to test 330 U of C athletes participating in Canadian Intercollegiate Athletes Union sports.
Under the new policy, athletes
who refuse to submit to the mandatory test will be ineligible for
training or competition.
The universality of the test was
made possible courtesy of the
Calgary Olympic Committee, which
is organizing the 1988 Winter Olympics.
Robert Corran, director of
university sport programs, said if
the committee was not paying for a
new drug testing lab at the Foothills
Hospital, "it would have been extremely difficult, if not impossible
to test on the level we want."
The university had planned to
test fewer athletes until the
Foothills lab indicated it wanted to
practice drug testing procedures for
the Olympics.
The only other Canadian lab
which conducts the tests is in Montreal. Athletic directors at other
universities say the $200-$300 per
student per test price is too expensive.
Corran said once the testing discount at the Foothills ends, the
university will test 50 to 60 athletes
a year, either randomly or only
newcomers to university athletic
programs.
But one of a handful of GFC
representatives who oppose mandatory drug testing said he was
"troubled" by the policy.
"It's rather as if we randomly
searched students going into exams
to make sure they weren't
cheating," said Michael McMordie
of the faculty of Environmental
Design.
The policy says the university's
athletics program "does not intend
to usurp the role of civil and
criminal authorities with respect to
the non-medical use of drugs that
do not appear on the list of international (sports) federations of the
IOC."
The major categories of drugs used to enhance performance and
banned    by    the   IOC       include
stimulants, beta-bloken. (used to
slow body functions, including
pulse rates), narcotic analgesics
(such as codeine, u.'ecl to stop swelling), anabolic steroids and
diruretics (used b, athletes who
wish to compete in another weight
class).
"We are not interested in recreational drugs per se," said Corran.
"There is a tremendous difference
in terms of intrusion into student
life."
A convenience store was vandalized, and the owner reportedly
stood in front of the store's entrance with a metal pipe trying to
reclaim shoplifted merchandise.
Students were allegedly clearing
shelves and urinating on the floor.
Queen's students also vandalized a
downtown pub.
A member of the university marching band sustained a serious leg
injury in a collision with a police officer who was tackling a fan at the
annual Homecoming football
match with a Carleton University
squad.
Three hundred tickets were also
issued for alcohol-related violations. Local hospital emergency
wards were swamped by injured
students. Other patients complained rowdy students in and near the
hospital were keeping them awake.
Despite these charges, Queen's
University student union president
Jim Hughes said that this year's
Homecoming was "low-key" and
that the legal street party, organized
by the student union, succeeded in
keeping other, illegal parties under
control.
"It was pretty casual," said
Hughes, adding he had "reservations" about how arrests were made
at the street party.
"I guess they (police) got pumped
up for this event too," said Hughes.
"They had a very confrontational
attitude. They were telling (student
and alumni) constables what to do,
and were very tough and aggressive
in their ticketing."
Deputy police officer William
Hackett said the sanctioned event
was the cause in the increase of arrests, which he said numbered
about 80 per cent more than last
year's Homecoming. He said the
police force will urge the university
to cancel further celebrations.
But Queen's representative Dick
Bowman said the university has no
intention of cancelling Homecoming. "Queen's has been proud of
this event for 10 years . . . the most
spirited universities have the most
spirited Homecomings," he said.
A university statement praised
police for showing "patience and
restraint" in dealing with incidents.
Hackett said the most common
ticketted offence was display and
consumption of alcohol, while the
most common arrest charges were
for public intoxication. Many
assault charges were also laid.
A fire cracker was thrown in one
officer's face, said Hackett.
Students propose to abolish tuition
MONTREAL (CUP) — A proposal that would abolish tuition
fees in favour of a special 'education tax' has been presented to the
Quebec government by the Concordia University student council.
Under the Post Obligatory
Education Tax (POET), brainchild
of Concordia student Pete
Wheeland, students would defer
payment of fees until they had
graduated.
"I see it an alternative to the current system which requires students
to go into debt in order to study,"
said Wheeland. "Ii is also a solution to the problem of increasing
educational  funds without raising
tuition."
Wheeland said graduates would
pay up to two per cent of their
salaries one year after finding their
first job. The tax would be collected
for three years for every year a student spent in CEGEP or university.
A graduate earning below the
POET 'floor' of $20,000 would not
be taxed.
Although POET was last year
adopted as official policy of Concordia's student council, the idea
has long been around in one form
or another, says former council
vice-president Francois Desrosier,
who presented the brief to government.
"The tax would (be) much more
accessible, and would recognize the
responsibility of students to society
in assuming part of the financial
burden," he said. "It would also
shift the emphasis from the
student's ability to pay to the student's ability to learn."
Government would be responsible for implementation of the tax,
and verification of payment.
The youth wing of the Parti
Quebecois recently adopted a
similar proposal, which calls for
abolition of tuition fees with a 1.5
per cent tax to be paid 10 years after
graduation. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1986
Take it off
Tonight, on campus, a crowd of beer drinking, leering students will
salivate as the object of their lust parades naked before them.
No, the engineers are not sponsoring another drool-fest, but you might
recall that last year, as a result of their hiring a stripper to perform in Hebb
Theatre, the engineers were prohibited from holding events in buildings
administered by the university.
Tonight, our own Alma Mater Society will host a similar event: The
Seventh Annual Ladies' Night at the Pit.
The ad reads "girls only", but we assume women, not children, will
comprise the majority of the childish, sexually-exploitive clientele.
The engineers were criticized extensively for their Godiva ride. It was
widely held that their annual event was degrading to women because it
protrayed them as sexual objects. The parade of naked, or nearly naked
"bachelors" at the Pit tonight is open to the same criticism.
The audience, responding as a group, finds it acceptable to applaud and
whistle as the objects strut before them, because the audience does not
perceive the performers as real human beings, as people with thoughts and
emotions. The audience derives its pleasure by dehumanizing the performer, denying him his depth of character, staring at his body.
The Godiva ride, and Ladies' Night, portray and foster sexism. Both
events are demeaning to all of us.
By its public silence, it would appear the Coalition Against Sexism on
Campus, so vocal in condemning the Godiva ride, supports Ladies Night.
More disturbing is the support afforded the event by the AMS. We
might have thought our student government, sensitive to the university
population's outrage at the Godiva ride, might have reflected their constituents' concern by cancelling Ladies' Night.
It is dangerous for us not to recognize that the Godiva ride and Ladies'
Night are the same thing, for a condemnation of the Godiva ride and
silence on Ladies' Night amounts to hypocrisy, and the Godiva argument
loses its credibility.
The women who attend tonight, the men who perform, CASC, and the
AMS are promoting another ride as they participate in this degradation of
men.
f      a. OMS ON   \}(K%y.
Campus misinformed about need for club
Over the past few weeks we have
experienced numerous cases of vandalism at our office. For the most
part the incidences have been
minor.
But they display more than just
the ignorance of a select few
homophobic people on campus. It
is a lesson to us that the majority of
people on this campus may be
potentially misinformed about the
reason and the need for a Gay and
Lesbian organization on this campus.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
(GLUBC) has been a high-profile
and recognized member of UBC for
17 years, and is the largest gay and
lesbian student group in Canada.
We not only provide social outlets
for young gays and lesbians and the
campus community as a whole, but
as a service organization offer
counselling, information and
phone-line services from our office
in the Student Union Building.
There are probably at least a few
thousand people on this campus
(and this is a conservative estimate)
who have had at least one homosexual experience, be it a gay or lesbians experience. This experience
may play a major role in the
person's life, or a minor role, but
more importantly is an orientation
and lifestyle that deserves as much
respect from people as a purely
heterosexual lifestyle. The prejudice
and hatred of homosexuals, or even
the indifference towards homosex
ual issues by a large part of society
is totally uncalled for, and is based
on illogical fear and hysteria.
No one should be condemned for
the way they choose to express their
love to other people. The ability to
be able to love who we want, when
we want, is one of our basic human
rights as people.
We are not blind to censorship.
We fully realize the position we are
in, and we do not label these misinformed people under any specific
category. The freedom to choose is
a personal right and should be seen
as a personal right.
The recent hype around the
AIDS epidemic has not been helpful
in our search for equality, and has
given opponents of the homosexual
movement a fuel they have used to
unjustifiably spread ideas of hatred
towards us. Unfortunately, the person who plastered 'AIDS kills fags
dead' on our door one day is misinformed. AIDS can kill anybody
dead. It is a disease that our entire
population should be addressing,
because it does not stop to check
your sexual identity. You will not
catch   AIDS   from   breathing  the
same air that a homosexual
breathes, or from hugging her or
him. You may, however, find that
hugging a homosexual can be an enjoyable experience. There is nothing
to be afraid of.
We do not mean to address this
problem to only the heterosexual
population on campus. There are
many gays and lesbians who refuse
to get involved with our organization, claiming apathy, or that we
never tackle as many issues as we
should. We have an enormous
amount of work to do every week
with the varied services we offer.
We say to those people, of which
there are many, — if you want
things to get done, why don't you
give a bit of your time to get them
done? Every homosexual or bisexual on campus should actively participate at one time or another in
the activities of the organization,
and every heterosexual should feel
comfortable enough to be able to
ask for information and/or to attend one of our social functions.
We do not want to be exclusive. We
want to educate.
It is because young gays and les
bians experience prejudice every
day of their lives that we exist.
There is no heterosexual organization on campus because there is no
need for one. We are an invisible
minority and there may be more of
us than you think.
We are not perverts. Gay men are
not necessarily effeminate. Lesbians are not necessarily masculine.
The point is that we have the right
to be what we want to be. We are
med students and law students, artists and anthropologists, engineers
and theology students. We are a
legitimate grouping of people
within a larger community, and we
should be ideally be fighting
together to make our community a
healthier, friendlier one.
The vandals and haters on this
campus will do nothing to stifle our
fight for equality, and I would be
surprised if they thought they
could.
If you are heterosexual, find out
about us. If you are a gay or a lesbian, come out to our functions!!
Stop procrastinating and participate. Maybe, then, our campus
community can become a better
place to be educated in.
Scott Beveridge,
vice-president,
gays and lesbians of UBC
Style signals fresh start
English misinterpreted
H. Michel feels slighted by
his/her geography lecturer's "racist
slur" (Lecturer slights native Indians - Oct. 28). Apparently this
person was hapless enough to refer
THE UBYSSEY
November 4, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department. 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Back at the Fenwichiean Embassy, intelligence officer Brad Newcombe was in a state. He knew
very well what would happen to diplomatic ties if the documents which 008 had acquired from the
Western connection, Michael Groberman, were to be discoverd by NATO officials. He could not bear
the possible consequences for Corinne Bjorge and Steve Chan whowere still in the field, and could not
be contacted without the somewhat unreliable service of Malcolm Pearson who alway had his own interests at heart. Embassador Evelyn Jacob could not be told for this would compromise her safety. Instead, a scrambled TELEX was sent to David Ferman, head of national defence. The message,
however, was lost somewhere between Kevin Adams and Kristi Blocker in the process of information
degodeling.
Meanwhile, Janice Irving, Neil Lucente, Jennifer Lyall, Steve Neufeld, Svetozar Kontic, Peter
Berlin, and Rick Hiebert were in the infirmary being tested for illicit drug use.
Sam Micner arrived late and missed the whole kafuffle.
to them as "pagans".
Hopefully, he/she is enduring no
more abuse over this than one letter
to the Ubyssey. Michel believes that
the word "pagan" means
"something less than human ... a
person who has no concept of God
or a creator."
Because I have considered myself
a pagan for a long time, and
because I hate to see the English
language twisted for political purposes, I'd like to clear this one up.
The word "pagan" can mean
"an irreligious or hedonistic person" (not "something less than
human"). This is due to its misuse
as an insult. However, Webster's
first definition, and what this lecturer probably meant, is "a
follower of a polytheistic religion"
(Polytheism: belief in or worship of
more than one god). In other
words, Michel's lecturer was being
accurate, not derogatory.
Carol Pedlar
English 3
Despite all the mud throwing by
the NDP leader before the election
and despite how heavily the Socreds
were criticized by the Ubyssey, such
as when Mr. Victor Wong nearly
came right out in telling people to
vote NDP (in the article 'Zalmbo'),
the people of B.C. knew better and
voted for Mr. Vander Zalm instead.
During the campaign the Socred
leader maintained his style even
during unfriendly situations. He did
not participate in any mud throwing
or name calling games.
Basically the NDP's party mandate has something to do with the
defeat. The party leaned too much
to the side of the labour and conflicted with the interest of the
business people. The last time NDP
were in government they only proved to be big spenders. The NDP had
also encouraged the power of the
trade unions to grow out of proportion over the years. Today, aside
from the original purpose of helping workers, the unions also interfere with management's policies
and hiring decisions.
If a government has no incentive
in encouraging a healthy business
atmosphere, then it is also hard to
maintain a good management-
labour relationship.
Today many young people in the
work force do not want to be involved with unions anymore.
Especially after understanding
about fair wages and that many
jobs are actually overpaying.  For
example $12 per hr for letter sorters
and near $25 per hr for
longshoremen. Many of these jobs
can be done by lowering the wage
and hiring more. This way people
who are unemployed and want to
work can go back to work.
The people have faith in the
Socred government that long term
benefit to the overall province can
be achieved. Not just benefit to
small groups and special interest
groups as the NDP would offer. By
electing Vander Zalm we are given
the chance of a Fresh Start because
we look forward to it.
Laurence Ho
science 4
No snails please
I have all the respect for slow
drivers even though they have this
innate urge to cruise down 41st
highway at 70 km/h. However, it
causes distress to my mental health
when these four-wheel snails prefer
to impede traffic in the fast lane. Of
course, this results in the typical
spontaneous formation of the 41st
Centipede, which is a string of 20
cars ridiculously crawling behind a
half-dead piece of metal. (Well, at
least everyone will be late together.)
Anyhow, my message is simple: if
you can't beat me, please don't join
me!
Polly Chan
Bio 3 Tuesday, November 4,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Ladies' Night promotes sexist stereotyping
There are some people who like
looking at naked men. They see it as
a healthy, natural consequence of
their sexuality. I would neither try
to deny that nor try to always prevent them from looking at naked
men.
But in contrast to sexuality, the
natural expression of our sexual
desires, is sexism, the discrimination of people on the basis of sexual
stereotypes in matters having
nothing to do with sex. And in-
between sexuality and sexism is a
broad grey area which is very difficult to talk about.
The belief that something is sexist
is mostly an emotional gut feeling.
To put it into words often makes it
sound intellectual, dry, sterile.
Nevertheless, I will try to analyze
what it is about the Pit's upcoming
"Ladies' Night" which makes me
think of it not as just a bunch of
heterosexual women deciding to go
out to look at naked men, but as a
sexist expression of how men are
evaluated in our society. If you
don't see my point, don't blame
me; it's the nature of the beast.
What happens on Ladies' Night?
Some UBC men get up on stage in
the Pit and do a striptease to music
for the all-female audience. At the
end, the women vote on who is the
"most eligible bachelor" amongst
them. Do you think they're going to
vote for the one who is the most
The Write Stuff
Ledes, bullets and
dirty copy — learn
about it all Friday in
SUB 241 Kat 3:30 when
reporter extraordinaire,
Patti Flather stoops to
speak on news writing.
Ms. Flather, a onetime
Ubyssey editor, has
written for The Vancouver Sun and has
freelanced for
numerous esteemed
publications in North
America and Asia. Ms.
Flather will bring a fresf
start to a hackneyec
subject. The Ubyssey:
get in on the action.
Be there!
compassionate, the mos; interesting
to be around, the most committed
to equal partnership — the kinds of
things some men have been trying
to get people to value them for in
the last few years?
Fat chance. They're going to vote
for the one who is the tallest, most
muscular, or best able to strut and
pose in that way that is so familiar
to us from everything from jeans
posters to Miami Vice. But this contest is not advertised as a "bachelor
who is closest to the classic male
stereotype" contest, it is advertised
as a "most eligible bachelor" contest. The implication is that the man
who is most "fuckable", most marriageable, most desirable to have as
a boyfriend or lovi:r or husband, is
the man who can strip in the most
stereotypically masculine way. In
other words, discrimination is being
made on the basis of sexual
stereotypes, even in aspects of a
male-female relationship which
has  nothing  to  do  with  sex.  In
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other words, the Ladies' Night is
sexist.
My conclusion from all this is
that the Pit should discontinue the
Ladies' Night, or at least put it in
some other setting than the "Most
Eligible Bachelor Contest". But
you don't have to agree with this
conclusion even if you agree it is
sexist.
Well, there, I've said my peace. I
probably don't speak for the
women who are planning to go, or
for the men who are going to be
stripping. But I think I speak for
the many men on this campus who
are tired of being devalued as men
or as people, simply because they
don't look, talk, move, or act like
Rambo or Sonny Crockett.
Now, I could follow this up with
an analysis of the Godiva Ride . . .
but if it really is well and truly
buried, I hope I won't have to. To
use a Rambo turn of phrase, I've
been fighting that battle too long.
Jamie Andrews
Science 7
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228-4741 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1986
tween dosses
TODAY
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Lunch, 12-2 p.m., Hillel House.
ENTREPRENUERS CLUB
Speaker George Ninkovich, noon, Angus 425.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
General meeting, noon, Hebb 12.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worehip, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Important executive meeting, noon, Sedgewick
foyer Tools For Peace Nicaragua Week, speaker
and slide show David Chadnovsky, noon, Scarfe
204
WEDNESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible Study and fellowship, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox Rd.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Exhibit  of  Canadian watercolour and  Chinese
calligraphy,    11    a.m.-7   p.m.,    Asian   Centre
Auditorium.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners   Madarin   classes,   noon,   Buchanan
B325
SCHOOL OF MUSIC (UBC)
Concert   Alan   Rinehart,   guitar,   Jame  Martin,
flute, noon, UBC School of Music Recital Hall.
SIERRA CLUB
Irving Fox on the proposed C-Site Dam, 8 p.m.,
Robson Square Media Centre.
UBC MARXIST-LENINISTS
Literature table, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Buchanan
A Block Entrance.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Hillel's 40th anniversary dinner party, 6 p.m.-8
p.m., Hillel House.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Atari   users   meeting,   4:30   p.m.   SUB   212A,
Amiga users meeing, 12:30 Buchanan B319.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Weekly group  meeting,   meet the new leader
William Chow, noon, Buchanan B319.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS ASSOC.
General meeting, noon, Buchanan D205.
CINEMA 16
Film    Marianne   and    Juliane   directed   by
Margarethe Von Trotta, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.,
SUB Auditorium.
UBC CHAPLAINS & FINN EST INSTITUTE
Seminar Liberation and the Canadian Church,
noon, Buchanan Penthouse.
JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Dinner    (potluck)    and    discussion,    6    p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Free   film   South   America    Footholds,    noon,
Buchanan A202.
ISMALI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tutorials, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Brock House.
THURSDAY
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Special speaker: Paul Woerhle on human sexuality, 12:30 p.m., Scarfe 210.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
CANADIAN PROFESSORS FOR PEACE
IN THE MIDDLE EAST
Lecture: Israeli Politics at the Crossroads, 11:30
p.m., Buch B318.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jazz   l/ll   from  8:30  a.m.-10 a.m.,   Dancercise
THE DINER
from 12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.. Tap from 1:30 p.m.-3
p.m., now offering 5 class tickets for $20. All
classes SUB Plaza South, Jazz l/ll, SUB Partyroom.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Special seminar, part of the "Micro and Macro:
Interactions of scale in Asian Rural Society"
seminar series. Lecture conducted by Dr. James
Scott "Everyday forms of peasant resistance in
rural Malaysia," 5 p.m. Free admission, Asian
centre, seminar room 604.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners Cantonese Class,  12:30 p.m.,  Buch
B325.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
"Field trip"  to Children's  Hospital,   12:30-2:20
p.m., Woodward G30.
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Information meeting — for 1st year Engineering
students/2nd year Electrical Engineering, noon.
Computer Science room 200.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University Chamber Singes,  Corland Hultberg,
director, 8 p.m.,  UBC School of Music recital
Hall.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Student Composers Concert, noon, UBC School
of Music Recital Hall.
SUB FILM, PART OF UBC FILM SOCIETY
The Colour Purple, 12:40 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
UBC STOP THE WARSHIPS CLUB
Meeting   —   Speakers  from  Vancouver  Peace
Flotilla  Coalition,   12:30  p.m.   SUB   111,  enter
through cafeteria.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Informal   conversations,   7-10   p.m.,   Upstairs
lounge, International House.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
A talk given by Richard Heinberg entitled, "The
World Beyond Belief,"  12:30-1:20 p.m.,  Buch
B225.
AMS WOMEN'S CENTRE
General meeting, noon, SUB room 130.
AIESEC
Job Interview Workshop, noon, Angus 426.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Meeting for "Commodore" people,   12:30-2:30
p.m., Buch B319.
PRE-DENTAL CLUB
Preparation for D.A.T., Chalk carving practise,
noon, Wood 5.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Seminar, noon, Brock 223.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Study and discussion group, all welcome, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC HANGGLIDING CLUB
Theory lesson and level I exam, 6 p.m.,  SUB
205.
ISMAELI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Floor Hockey, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Osborne Gym F.
ISMEILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Committee meeting, 5:30 p.m., SUB 213.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Dr. Neil Yorkstonon "Our Identity in Christ", noon,
Woodward 4.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Club photos and general meeting. Important, all
members please attend.  Refreshments served,
12:30 p.m., Scarfe 208.
FRIDAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
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PRE MEDIACAL SOCIETY
Football Challenge, 4:30-6 p.m.. Grass field
behind Osborn Gym
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Kuhlau Bicentennial Concert, 8 p.m., UBC
School of Music, Recital Hall.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University Chamber Singers, Cortland Hultberg
Director, Repeat of Nov. 6 concert, noon, UBC
School of Music Recital Hall.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Bzzr Garden, 4-9 p.m., SUB Room 206.
SUB FILMS, PART OF UBC FILM SOCIETY
The Colour Purple, 6:30 and 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Second Sports Nite featuring volleyball and badminton. Members and friends welcome, $1 admission, 8-9:30 p.m., Osborne Gymnasium.
UBC CHAPLAINS
Seminar: Mark Thompson "Morality and the
Marketplace," noon, St. Marks College.
UBC CHAPLAINS
Audio visual and discussion: Bryan Teixeira and
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BOOKSTORE
228-4741
Brad Newcombe —  Is the Free Market Setting
Canda Free?, noon, Buch Penthouse.
LA CHALLA (SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB)
Invites those interested in some vino, tapas, and
guitarra to the International House, Gate 4 at 8
p.m.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film "Arms Bazaar", a disturbing look at how
the defence industry markets its products to the
Pentagon, noon, SUB 205.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Dance IPost-Bzzr Garden Bash), 7 p.m., SUB
Partyroom and patio
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Post   Expo   tack   tourist   night,   6   p.m.,   Gage
residence lounge.
THE UBYSSEY
Newswriting seminar, 3:30 p.m., SUB 241 K.
TOOLS FOR PEACE
Nicaragua  Week,   slide  show  and  discussion,
noon. Graduate Student Centre.
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Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
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75 - WANTED
BUD THE SPUD. Jack & his beanstalk, and
the Friendly Giant are members! How about
you? Join AGORA FOOD CO-OP, Dunbar
& 17th.
SKI & PARTY this New Years!! Join 1500
skiers Dec. 28-Jan. 2, 1987. 5 days & 5
nites, only $249. 25 buses!! Ski Big White &
Tod Mtn. Call Dan today at 736-6166.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1969 VW VAN, partly camperized, rebuilt
1986. $1650 OBO. 984-6423 evenings,
weekends.
15 - FOUND
MEN'S SEIKO WATCH found at Woodward
Library Fri., Oct, 31. Please call 922-5075
evenings.
20 - HOUSING
WANTED: A graduate student in psychology
capable of assessing a 6-yr.-old who probably has perceptual problems. Call Al
Fahrig 266-8779.
80 - TUTORING
FRENCH OR SPANISH courses with PhD
Franco-Argentine student. High school,
continuing education, Univ. help experience. Translations. Call Oscar 738-4102.
85 - TYPING
STUDENT
HOUSING
Available in Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s
newest single student residence. Occupancy from November 1st. Situated
just behind the University Village, all 4-,
5-, and 6-bedroom townhouses are completely furnished and rent includes all
utilities. Amenities include dishwashers,
deluxe furnishing and satellite television
reception capability. Prices start as low as
$250 per month and applicants must be at
least 21 years of age by December 31st,
1986 in order to qualify. Please apply at
the Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall (weekdays 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.) or
call 228-2811.
GAGE. TOTEM PARK, PLACE VANIER &
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT: room and board,
and room only: Available for men & women
in the student residences. For information,
apply at the student housing office, 2071
West Mall, Ponderosa Bldg., or call
228-2811, Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
35 - LOST 	
LOST HP41 Calculator, late Thurs., Oct. 9.
Reward, leave message at EUS Cheese Factory, 228-3818.
40 - MESSAGES
A.B. BABY — In deepest sympathy from
Mr. T., Monghong, Dr. Bruce, Crit
chenmeir and Casper.
MINIMUM   NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS. quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORDWEAVERS — word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
ACADEMIC and BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reas. rates. Days/evenings. 263-4862.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U &del.
9 a.m.-10 p.m. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
WORD PROCESSING, EDITING, writing:
resumes, theses, papers, letters. Pick-up &
delivery avail. 324-9924.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
YEAR-ROUND. Expert essay, theses, typing
from legible work; spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., King Ed.
bus route.
TYPING. Fast and accurate. $1.50/pg.
Rachel, 224-0866 or 228-3881. Satisfaction
guaranteed.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
24 hrs. Tuesday, November 4, 1986
THE    UBfSSEY
Page 7
&*£*$:.:»
Medical
science .111
,-• -\ ■';■>*?:■+
■: d\?*$
needs /^6$
■■••'•■■■■■        ■.■•':■■       ■:. ■'■' ■■.-.■ :,-:.i :■'*,■*;)■
yourlips^
v*%'
'*
MWmy^»$'"
• If you are occasionally bothered by cold sores or fever blisters (chapped lips
and cracked mouth corners don't count)...
• If these sores feel tingly or itchy and then pop up at the edge of your lip...
• If they look blistery...
• If you are healthy, over 16, and unquestionably not pregnant...
• If you wish to participate in a study of a new cream treatment called
undecylenic acid...
• If you don't mind that the study is "Placebo-controlled" (Yz of the entrants
get a "fake" cream with no active drug)...
• If you would accept a $50 honorarium after completion of 6 to 8 study visits
to the UBC Herpes Clinic...
please clip this
■«>:-'?:^vfeSV^ij(j^
WHEN YOU GET A RECURRENCE NEXT
TIME CONTACT US IMMEDIATELY!
IF . . .
• You awoke with a warning or a sore or
• You just developed one during the day
• It is between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. (7 days) and
• You are interested in finding out about participation
in a drug study and
• You are planning to be in the vicinity for the next 14 days
THEN follow these instructions as soon as possible. Do not wait for
blisters or sores to form. CALL 687-7711 NOW and ask the operator
to page beeper 2887 (give your name and a phone no. you will be
available at for the next 10-15 min.). If it is after 5 p.m., it is too late
to do the study this recurrence, so hold on to the paper and call next
time if before 5 p.m.
NOTE: These instructions are for informtion only. A decision about
entry into a study will occur only after the research assistant has talked to you further and you have decided you wish to participate. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1986
'Birds smash lethargic Huskies
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The Saskatchewan Huskies wish
they could have hidden in the thick
Saturday night fog after taking a
brutal 45 to 17 beating from the
UBC football squad at Thunderbird
stadium.
The 'Birds, using nearly every
player on their roster, coasted to an
easy victory over a Saskatchewan
team that put on a post-halloween
performance which would have sent
chills up the spine of any coach. lead at 3:52
The victory left the UBC team when quarti
with a perfect eight and zero record fired a 34 ya
for the Western Intercollegiate Foot- to receiver I
ball League season, and makes them bled the bal
heavy favourites to win the Vanier on for the to
Cup later this month in Toronto. originally be
"We played really well. A lot of play a circu
our younger players got the oppor- stadium's pc
tunity to play and did well," said Gagner tl
UBC coach Frank Smith. down the s;
UBC opened up a seven point Vlasic who
of the second quarter
rback Jordan Gagner
rd pass over the middle
•avid Groves who bob-
but managed to hold
uchdown. The ball had
:n deflected, giving the
i-like effect under the
or lighting.
rew an 18 yard pass
de to tight end Tom
scooted into the end-
UBC GUARD PAUL JOHANSSON gets ready to score against helpless opposition. Johansson attributes his
great success to having written a story for The Ubyssey. He totally admits that it chanced his life forever.
Hoopsters court success in opener
By CHEW WONG
The UBC Basket-'Birds opened
the season in high style with victories over Brock University and
Lakehead University in Vancouver
this weekend.
On Friday night at War
Memorial Gym the young Thunderbird team played like a veteran
squad downing Lakehead 78-54.
"I was really happy with the
game — especially with the
defence," said head coach  Bruce
Enns about the Thunderbird victory.
UBC co-captain Paul Johansson
led all scorers with 17 points. Dave
Barkwell netted 12 points for the
visiting team from Thunder Bay
Ontario.
UBC easily handled the
Lakehead defensive press and controlled the game from start to
finish.
"Kevin Hanson and Paul
Johansson   anchored  our  defense
UBC rvgger men victors
A solid effort From the offence enabled UBC's Rugby squad to
defeat Capilano J5-9 this past weekend.
The low score was indicative of the "spoiling style" of defensive
game Capilano is notorious for.
UBC had allowed a try before the game was two minutes old due
to loose play. Enter Adam Kendall and his scoring touch, the UBC
veteran booted two penalty goals drawing the Blue and Gold to
within three points of their opponents at the half.
The 'Birds doninated the Caps in the second half winning the majority of rucks and shutting their opposition out. Kendal added nine
more points on two penalty kicks and a well executed drop kick.
Coach Barry Legh said the 'Birds high level of fitness compensated
for the size advantage the Caps enjoyed.
"If we cut down on ball handling errors we will be much more effective on offence," he said.
Coupled with a sound trouncing of highly respected U of Vic. the
team's 6-3 season record looks impressive in the national rankings.
Even though 1/3 of the roster is stacked with rookies, UBC's
tTugby future looks bright.
and   showec.   the   newcomers   the
way," said F.nns.
UBC wot a hard fought 84-76
overtime game against the Brock
University Badgers the following
night in SFU's West Gym.
Johannson again led the 'Birds
with 23 points while Kevin Moore
replied with 24 points for Brock.
"I though: Kevin Hanson played
a great game tonight — he set the
tone defensively for us," said F.nns.
UBC controllec. the game throughout regulation time and led by
as many as nine points. A late surge
put the Badgers on top 67-66 with
12 seconds remaining in the game.
With three seconds left Johansson
was fouled and converted one of
two free throws to send the game into overtime, tied at 67.
In the overtime period UBC was
led by rook.es Alan Lalonde and
John Carlson who controlled the
boards at both ends of the floor.
Lalonde converted four free throw
attempts to power the 'Birds past
their St. Catherines Ontario opponents.
"The overtime victory showed
that we have a lot of heart and spirit
on this team," said co-captain
Kevin Han;on. "The rookies,
especially Jchn Carlson, played a
big part in tl e win."
zone, leaving the 'Birds with a 20-10
lead at the half, following a Saskatchewan field goal.
Craig Keller was on the receiving
end of another Gagner pass, for a
36 yard touchdown, at 3:39 of the
third quarter. Keller caught the ball
amidst a throng of Huskie
defenders, broke several tackles,
and made a spectacular spinorama
move before he finally stumbled into the end-zone to give UBC a commanding 28 to 10 lead over the
hapless Saskatchewan squad.
Gagner left the game in favour of
backup quarterback Eric Putoto
who had started the game. Gagner
completed eight of 13 passes for 116
yards and three touchdowns.
"We threw for a total of 321
yards today and our passing game
has constantly improved
throughout the year," said Smith.
Putoto took over just where
Gagner left off, hitting receiver
Mike Bellefontaine over the middle
again for a 41 yard touchdown with
zero seconds left on the clock in the
third quarter.
The UBC festival of scoring ended early in the fourth quarter when
Putoto combined with Tom Munro
on a 14 yard pass completion play
thai made the score 45 to 10.
Putoto finished the evening having completed nine of 14 attempts
for 205 yards and two touchdowns.
The backup quarterback scored
another touchdown on a one yard
plunge through the offensive line
early in the second quarter.
UBC now gears up for the WIFL
championship game next week
against Calgary at T-'Bird stadium.
It will be the third meeting between
the two teams this season.
UBC defeated Calgary 18 to three
earlier in the year at home, and 25
to 19 on the road. The Dinosaurs
are the defending Vanier Cup
champions and will be difficult to
beat three times in a row.
"Its going to be a very tough
game. Calgary has a lot of experienced players and a well-
balanced offence which we have to
contain. Their defence has improved considerably," said Smith.
The winner of the game goes on
to meet the winner of the Ontario-
Quebec conference in the Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union national semi-final.
UBC's outstanding defensive
back Mark Norman caught one interception Saturday night, and
finishes the season with a league
leading twelve.
Koreanstootough
By KR1STI BLOCKER
LIBC held its first international
men's volleyball tournament called
THUNDERBALL at War
Memorial Gym this past Saturday
and Sunday.
When the smoke cleared, UBC's
Sister University from Korea, Sung
Kyun Kwan University, had captured the gold medal.
Besides the hosts, UBC and the
Koreans, THUNDERBALL
featured the Stanford University
Cardinals from California and
Canada West contender, University
of Alberta Golden Bears.
On Saturday in the semi-finals,
the S.K.K. team (Korea) flexed
their muscles by routing the Cardinals of Stanford in straight games
(15-3, 15-9, 15-7). The Koreans
were led by ace attackers Dong
Chcon Kim and Sung Goo Cheon
with 15 and 16 kills respectively.
The S.K.K. setter from the
Korean National Team, Sang Sun
Nam, constantly confused the Stanford as he directed their fast attack
combination system. Stanford was
led by Ail-Americans Scott Fortune
and Steve Blue who made 13 and 12
kills respectively.
In the other semi-final the host
Thunderbirds beat Canada West
rival Alberta in four games (9-15,
18-16, 15-7, 15-8).
In the first game, UBC rushed to
a 6-1 lead only to have the Bears
roar back to a decisive 15-9 win.
Game two was the pivotal game of
the match with both teams having
many chances to win but the 'Birds
pulled it out 18-16.
The Birds' ace attacker, Greg
Williscroft put on the best hitting
display of the tournament as he
pounded out a THUNDERBALL
high of 32 kills to lead the Birds
past the dispirited Bears.
Veteran Walter Janzen came off
the bench in game two to spark the
T-'Bird win finishing with 18 kills.
Thunderbird Coach Dale Ohman
said, "it was nice to see our guys
come from behind to win. The
match was on the line in game two
and we toughed out the victory."
On Sunday the bronze medal
match brought the most excitement
of THUNDERBALL with Alberta
edging Stanford at deuce in the fifth
game (7-15, 15-8, 11-15, 15-8,
15-13).
Each team's ace attacker, Stanford's Scott Fortune and Alberta's
Dean Weiler, took turns hammering bullet spikes into the floor in the
critical fifth game. At match's end
Wellers 28 kills spelled the difference as fortune finished with 20.
Unfortunately the T-'Birds fortunes changed in the gold medal
match as they faced the formidable
Koreans from S.K.K.U. The Birds
seemed a little intimidated and
played tentatively throughout the
Korean three game sweep (15-7,
15-4, 15-8).
Korean national team player and
S.K.K. Captain, Jin Soo No, led the
way with nineteen kills and Kwang
Chung Cho chipped in with 11 kills.
The Birds were led again by
Williscroft who banged out twenty-
two kills.
Ohman said, "our preparation
for our November 14 Canada West
home opener is right on schedule.
We were most pleased with the
strong play of middle blocker Kevin
Hooge this weekend. His improved
defence and front row play is giving
us good depth at this position."
The Thunderbirds travel this
weekend to the prestigious University of Manitoba tourney where
they will open against the 1986
NCAA champion Pepperdine
Waves on Thursday night.
TOURNAMENT RESULTS:
Gold — Sung Kyun Kwan University. Silver - U.B.C. Thunderbirds.
Bronze — University of Alberta.
Fourth — Stanford University.
Most outstanding player: Jin
Soo No, S.K.K.
Water-'Birds plunge
The UBC men's water polo team
takes the plunge this Saturday when
they open their season with a home
match against the University of
Washington.
UBC played to a tie with the
Huskies in their opening match last
year.
The two teams have built up an
intense rivalry over the last few
years.
The match is at five p.m. at the
UBC aquatic centre and will act as a
warm-up for the start of UBC's
campaign in the lower mainland
senior water polo league which will
start this month and run through
the spring.
The water polo team is still eager
to recruit new players. You do
not need to have played before, if
you can swim and are looking for a
fun way to keep in shape then just
go along to one of the club's practise sessions at the aquatic centre on
Wednesdays at 10 p.m.

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