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The Ubyssey Jan 21, 1986

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Array rTRC Archives Sdvd
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVIII, No. ?&
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 21,1966
228-2301
UBC professors oppose proposal
By JAMES YOUNG
Two UBC professors want their colleagues
to reject the proposed agreement on faculty
firings in times of financial emergency.
Economics professor Gideon Rosenbluth
and philosophy professor Gary Wedeking are
circulating a two page statement urging rejection of the proposed agreement between the
faculty association and the university administration.
"In my opinion it is a bad agreement",
said Rosenbluth. "In really important
respects it is not different from the agreement
rejected in 1984", he said.
Under the proposed agreement, tenured
faculty could be fired if a department com
mittee reviewed an individual's performance
and found it significantly less than satisfactory.
Dismissed professors could appeal to a
panel chosen by the administration president
and the faculty association.
"You are really violating the basic principle of tenure with this process of review,"
Rosenbluth said. "And then you are throwing people on the labour market with the personal stigma of being found inferior", he added.
"You are creating a situation in which people will say: "if I don't pick "X" as unsatisfactory, then someone is going to pick
me", said Rosenbluth. Rosenbluth warned
that this will tear departments apart in terms
of collegial relations.
Firing people according to seniority, with
the people most recently hired the first to go,
was amore fair, simpler and a more usual firing practice, said Rosenbluth.
The faculty association president
disagrees.
"In terms of criticism of the document
itself, it is clearly a compromise", said
Sidney Mindess. "But we think it is a
reasonable agreement", he added.
"We have seen the damage that results
when the university brings down a policy
unilaterally", Mindess said refering to last
year's firing of 12 UBC professors.
"We are much better off having an agreement than giving the university the freedom
to impose whatever kind of policy seems appropriate at any given time", he said.
Mindess said approval of the agreement
wold be one small step toward the normalization of university life and would not affect
tenure.
"Tenure is protection against arbitrary
dismissal and I think this proposal does not
affect this principle", Mindess said. "We
have always recognized that there could be
dismissal if the university did run out of
money", he said.
Rosenbluth said financial exigency could
See page 2: RETURN
Indian lobby
threatens chair
MONTREAL (CUP) — The Indian government is succeeding in a
secretive federal lobbying campaign
to block the establishment of a
chair in Sikh studies at L'BC.
The Federation of Sikh Societies,
a national Sikh organisation, has
applied for a grant with the department of multiculturalism to set up a
program in Punjabi language,
literature and Sikh studies — the
first ever in Canada. In just over a
year, Canadian Sikhs across the
country raised over $300,000 for the
chair. Under multiculturalism's endowment assistance program, this
amount would be matched by
government funds.
Gurcharan Singh, past president
and secretary of the federation told
Canada University Press the Indian
diplomats have been lobbying External Affairs in an effort to thwart
the creation of the Sikh chair.
"The Indian Government
doesn't want to see the demands of
the Sikhs met", said Singh. "They
see the chair as a threat to India. If
any government does good for the
Sikhs outside of India, the Sikhs in
India, the Indian government fears,
will get too excited."
Gar Pardy, director of the South
and South-East Asia relations in
External Affairs, did not deny his
department had been lobbied by the
Indian diplomats.
"This is an extremely sensitive
situation," Pardy said. "One could
say this (lobbying) is an interference
in the rights of Canadian citizens
(Canadian Sikhs), but if the shoe
was on the other foot, Canada
would be doing the same thing in
India".
"External Affairs believes in
balancing the needs of Canadian
citizens   with   the   concerns   of  a
foreign country," said Pardy.
"I don't see anything untowards
with this kind of lobbying," he added. ..
The Indian High Commission
(embassy) in Ottawa flatly denied
lobbying External Affairs.
"We have not done any lobbying. A Canadian citizen doing
something in a Canadian university
doesn't concern us," said Mr.
Dahr, a counsellor at the commission, who refused to give his full
name and title.
Many Sikhs are concerned about
India's interference in their lives as
Canadians. A prominent
spokesperson of the Montreal Sikh
community spoke to CUP on the
condition that he remain
anonymous.
"This is all really a problem with
the Canadian government," he
said. "The money for the chair was
raised by Canadian citizens in
Canada. We satisfied all the rules
and regulations. I just don't understand how the hell Canada can let India interfere with that — even entertaining such an objection", he said.
"The only guideline the Canadian government sets for lobbying
by foreign diplomats is article 41 of
the Vienna convention for
diplomatic relations: foreign
diplomats have a duty not to interfere in the internal affairs of their
receiving states.
"You can't blame India for what
it is doing but the Canadian government should be smarter than to
listen," the spokesperson said.
"The Indian government is trying
to discredit Sikhs in Canada," he
said. "It is easy for them to control
the Sikhs in India but here we are
free to express our opinion and that
See page 7: SIKHS
— kent kallb«rg photo
SEXUAL ORGAN transplant is now necessary for female warrior receiving vicious blow from monster opponent.
Andrea Belczyk, whose brother Felix is on national ski team, drives for basket against Victoria Vikettes. UBC lost
71-47 in weekend action.
settles for one per cent
The Canadian Union of Public
Employees, local 116, ended 21
months of negotiations with UBC
administration last weekend when it
approved  an  administration  con-
No more free rides on B-lot
By IAN ROBERTSON
Students will be singing a new refrain to "The
B-Lot Blues" come September, when drivers will
have to pay a small fee for each visit to UBC's infamous parking wilderness.
"We will be operating on a free-in, pay-out
system" Al Hutchinson, director of traffic and
security, said Monday.
Hutchinson said drivers will be admitted free until
each lot is full. "To exit each driver must pay a
nominal fee," he said.
The exact fee will be decided by the board of
governors, although board secretary Nina Robinson
said she had not received a B-lot fee proposal yet.
The new system is expected to save money for infrequent B-lot users, Hutchinson said. Students who
park on a regular basis will spend approximately $24
during the school year — the same price charged for
the current sticker system.
The new system will electronically count the
number of cars entering a lot. When each lot is full,
signs will light and a gate will prevent further entry.
Hutchinson said this will prevent students futilely
searching for a spot in an already full lot.
The free-in system will also prevent line ups during
the peak hours of 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Hutchinson added.
Hutchinson said students in residence who park in
B-lot on a long term basis may pay using a different
system, with a slightly higher cost than the current
sticker system.
Installation of the new B-lot system will cost
$100,000. Hutchinson said this will be offset by
greatly reduced traffic and security costs due to
decreased administration costs and patrol frequencies.
tract offer which grants a one per
cent wage increase.
Union president Ken Andrews
said he is "less than happy" with
the "stingy" offer.
"The contract is now what I
would call fair," said Andrews.
"An increase at least equal to the
current inflation rate would have
been more equitable.
"We have, however, retained our
contract language and made no
compromises on our benefits
package."
CUPE is the largest union on
campus and includes members who
work in the physical plant and the
Subway.
The union has been without a
contract since April 1984 when its
agreement with the university expired. Since then, CUPE has continued to work under the terms of
the expired contract.
Andrews said CUPE originally
demanded seven to nine per cent
wage increase but settled for only
one per cent so that its members can
resume work under a contract.
"Twenty-one months is a long
time to work without a contract,"
said the union president. "We've
been negotiating sporadically during that time and nothing seemed to
come of it. Having a contract this
year should help us in future
negotiations."
The newly-approved contract will
create a "springboard" for next
year's contract negotiations said
Andrews. The union president
pledged to fight for wage increases
that would be "higher than the inflation rate."
UBC's vice-president of finance
Bruce Gellatly said he is "pleased"
with the settlement. He said the
Board of Governors will vote on the
agreement at its next meeting on
February 6. Gellatly said he is "certain the board will approve the
agreement." nr^m-w^»^
1
Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 21, 1986
UBC increase
Fees anger students
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day. Th* armerad ankvloawma* «nd (tagOMuro coma naitt with EO'a Q« 4.12 to
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datanaa, out tlia apifcad tan of ttagoaaw* Imply aoma aatlva fighting and Incnaaad
oanavteraf complaxity.
UBC students already paying the
highest fees in Canada, are angered
by the proposed four per cent increase in next year's tuition.
"It incenses me to pay more
when you know you're getting
less," says Lionellarts 4.
UBC students fees have been raised 44 per cent in the past two years.
Students have complained of the
increasing numbers of overcrowded
classes, labs, reduced course offerings, extra course material costs,
and the declining numbers of
teaching assistants available.
Glenna Chestnutt, alma mater
society president, said an increase
in tuition fees means UBC will
soon cater only to students in the
lower mainland area. Chestnutt
said students she encountered while
on an official visit to the B.C. interior last summer, were scared by
the monetary commitment required
by this institution. They must pay
for residence fees, as well as tuition.
Nancy Bradshaw, student board
of governors representative, sees
tuition as, "the most visible fee,"
instrumental in discouraging out-
of-town students. She added stu
dent aid in B.C. is deficient when
comparing current levels.
Bradshaw said, the board of
governors has known of the increase since November of 1985 and
added, it is only due to student lobbying that increases over the last
two years haven't been greater.
Bradshaw also said, student
representatives will voice disapproval of the fee increase at the
board meeting on February 6. She
said only by protesting increases
this year, can students prevent
higher increases next year.
Prez called big enchilada
SASKATOON (CUP)—The
University of Saskatchewan
Students' Union no longer has a
president.
A motion to change the title of
the office from "President" to
"The Big Enchilada" was passed at
USSU's 1985 General Meeting in
November.
U of S Engineering student Mike
Jackman said he put forward the
motion to remove some of the
mystique from the person bearing
the intimidating title of
"President".
"We now have a very accessible
individual whom students . . . will
be able to come and talk to because
he has a bonehead name,",
Jackman said after the meeting.
Student council president (now
Big Enchilada) Ian Wagner was not
amused.
"I've always considered myself
to be a pretty approachable guy,"
the Big Enchilada said. "How
much more approachable do you
want to get?"
Student Council Arts representative Veronica Dutchek said she
urged people to defeat the motion
because few people in Saskatoon
take students seriously and calling
the student council president "The
Big Enchilada" would only make
matters worse.
Mike Fisher, Canadian Federation of Students Saskatchewan executive rep, said he disagreed with
Dutchek.
"I think I'm in favour of this,"
Fisher said. "Anything that can fill
up this room for the most boring
meeting of the year, I have to vote
"Return the 12 fired"
From page 1
only result from deliberate hostility
on the part of the government and
the faculty association gave up too
easily when negotiating on behalf of
the 12 fired professors.
"The faculty association could
have said it would only negotiate a
financial exigency agreement if it included reinstating these 12 people,"
Rosenbluth said.
"The   new   president   had   the
perfect opportunity to show the
faculty that he believes in tenure
and academic freedom by revoking
the firing of the 12 people including
nine tenured people", Rosenbluth
said.
"We are giving up the principle
of tenure in order to be buddy buddy with the administration," he
said.
Faculty members vote on the
agreement by mail and the ballots
will be counted on January 31.
VOLUNTEER
CONNECTIONS
WANTS YOU
IF YOU
a) need career experience,
b) are people oriented,
c) have good communication skills,
d) can volunteer 4-5 hours per week
THEN WE WANT TO
HEAR FROM YOU
We need on-campus
volunteer interviewers for
the 1986-87 school year
Call VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
at 228-3811 or drop by
Rm 200 Brock Hall
for. Let democracy be served."
The Big Enchilada said the motion was useful because it got a lot
of students to attend the meeting,
but urged it be defeated because it
was "ridiculous".
The motion was amended by
Engineering rep John Melin to give
the president the official title of
"The Big Enchilada, professionally
known as the President" because
council could lose its representation
, on the U of S Board of Governors
unless the word "President" was
included somewhere in the official
title.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Profs uncover new cancer therapy
By EVELYN JACOBS
Three UBC professors have
discovered a new method to treat
cancer.
Professors Neil Towers, botany,
David Dolphin, chemistry and Julia
Levy, microbiology, discovered
photoimmunal therapy, a light-
sensitive combination treatment
which detects and destroys cancer
cells.
Photoimmunal therapy involves
the linking of hematoporphyrin, the
centre of hemaglobin derived from
plants, with a monoclonal antibody, a spliced protein which
defends the body from foreign invaders. The monoclonal antibody
carries hematoporphyrin to a
specific cancer site. Levy says that
"It's like someone walking around
with a key trying to find the right
lock."
mJKtSl^tS
LEVY . . . don't say it's a cure
When hematoporphyrin is exposed to visible light, Levy explains, it
lights up and causes a toxic:
substance, singlet oxygen to be
released.
At this point, Levy explains, the
singlet oxygen will "blow a hole" in
the cancerous cell, and destroy it.
But Levy insists that it is too early
to tell whether this treatment will be
a miracle cure of not. "Don't say
it's a cure, Levy warns, "because it
probably isn't."
Despite Levy's caution, Dr.
Richard Spratley, UBC director of
Research Services says the team's
work was awarded with a "respectable size" grant of $280,000 from
the Canadian Natural Sciences and
Engineering Council. The NSRC
awards grants for national goals
and priorities. Spratley said that the
grant "speaks for the team's good
work and reputation."
Hematoporphyrin, a substance
used in cancer treatment for several
years, causes side effects such as
tissue damage if patients treated are
exposed to sunlight, said Levy. She
explains this is due to the large
doses of hematoporphyrin that
must be administered to find the appropriate cancer cells.
In contrast, Levy and team's
highly specific treatment can allow
hematoporphyrin to be given in
much lower dosages, and patients
will suffer fewer side effects.
Dr. Hulbert Silver of the B.C.
Cancer Control Agency describes
the treatment as a "magic bullet effect." Silver said that Photoimmunal therapy is a promising area
in cancer research, but warns that
"these are still early days as far as
what the application of this treatment to humans will be."
In B.C. alone, statistics from the
Cancer Foundation of B.C. show
there were 6,487 new cancer cases
reported in 1971. In 1983, these
figures rose to 9,901 new cases, an
increase of 52.6 per cent over a
twelve year period.
Mary McBride of the Cancer
Foundation explains the increase is
due solely to age increase. "There is
no increase in the risk of getting
cancer for any age," McBride says.
"People are just not dying of other
things, she said, so the only thing
left is cancer."
A graduate student in
Microbiology warned of the risks
involved with the new treatment.
"If a person is exposed to light too
early after having received the light-
sensitive substances, not all of the
antibodies will find their way to the
tumour site, and singlet oxygen will
be released, causing damage to noncancerous cells."
He added it is important this process be carefully controlled.
Tories threaten
N.S. students
By SAMANTHA BRENNAN
Canadian University Press
HALIFAX ( CUP)—After 33
months of hearings and studies the
Nova Scotia Royal Commission on
Post-Secondary Education has concluded that the solution to the province's 12 post-secondary institutions' problems is to give the
government more control and make
the students pay more.
The commission, chaired by
Truro businessman Rod McLennan, recommends tuition fees double over a five year period, provincial loans replace bursaries, and a
council be established to adminster
Nova Scotia's universities.
In 1984, the Socreds eliminated
the bursary program replacing it
with a loan system, reducing the
total student aid funding by 83%.
At UBC tuition fees have increased
by 90.5% from an average tuition
of $630 in 1981 to $1200 in 1984.
The Nova Scotia commission had
originally planned to submit the
report well before its scheduled
release in February 1985. When it
missed that deadline, the government promised that by October 18,
1985, the university community
would see its contents.
Catherine   Blewett,   Dalhousie
University student council president
said the report's recommendations
threaten accessibility in a province
that already has the highest tuition
fees in the country, and the
autonomy of Nova Scotia's universities and colleges.
Of the commission's 115 recommendations, the most important
calls for a Nova Scotia Council on
Higher education. The council
would control university's
finances, co-ordinate their programs and act as an advisory body
to the ministry of education.
In B.C., the Socreds set up the
universities council of B.C. as an intermediary between the government
and the universities to allocate
funds and guide certain programs.
Blewett said there'll be few
disputes between the government
and the proposed council. She said
with the council composed solely of
government trustees, it will say exactly what the government wants to
hear.
Barney Savage, deputy chair of
the Students Union of Nova Scotia,
said the commission recommended
establishing the Nova Scotia council
in order to "streamline and rationalise, in other words get rid of,
See page 7: NOVA
Currently, photoimmunal
therapy is being used only in
animals. Because the treatment is
highly specific, Levy says that the
animals involved are not harmed.
Levy is presently looking at
leukemia models in animals.  She
says photoimmunal therapy may
one day be able to treat cancers
such as lung, stomach, and bladder,
and any area that is easily accessible
by light.
But respiratory disease expert Dr.
Stephen   Lam   was   reluctant   to
acknowledge the usefulness of
photoimmunal therapy to treat lung
cancer. "Theoretically", Lam said,
"one can use it," but added that it
would have better results in bone
marrow transplants for leukemia
patients.
—tima lass photo
GLOWING BIO-SCIENCE student avidly describes new mutant strain of chicken being developed in genetics
labs. Disbelieving pedestrian risks a sidelong glance, baring his teeth to frighten away the radiation-soaked spec
tre.
Parliamentarian pontificates
By JENNIFER LYALL
Executive levels of government
must be restrained or they may
assume too much power, the New
Zealand deputy prime minister and
minister of justice said Saturday,
"Parliament must adapt to
modern requirements otherwise it
will wither and perish," Geoffrey
Palmer told five hundred people at
the inaugural John V. Clyne lecture
Saturday.
Palmer said there is a "danger of
unbridled power" being assumed
by upper levels of government, particularly in New Zealand where
there is no senate and the only constraint on the government is the
general election held every three
years.
He said "The line between
democracy   and   other   forms  of
government is not so clear as we like
to think."
In New Zealand, Cabinet had
become "totally dominant" and
was becoming alienated from the
public, which had minimal input
into the affairs of government said
Palmer.
"From concentration of power,
dictatorships sprout," he said, and
added the pattern in New Zealand
politics had been toward centralized
and even dictatorial government.
Although he made it clear that he
was speaking of New Zealand,
Palmer said that Commonwealth
countries often have similar problems and can learn much from
each other.
Palmer said his government has
introduced parliamentary reforms
to check the power of the cabinet
and to ensure public input on new
legislation.
The vehicle for reform in New
Zealand is a system of select committees, each made up of three
government and two opposition
MPs, who will scrutinize the
government, review legislation, and
hold public hearings.
Palmer said increased citizen involvement in the parliamentary
system will lead to the fulfilment of
their individual wants.
The efficiency of the New
Zealand parliament has also been
improved by increasing the number
of months parliament is in session,
limiting the length of debates, and
granting the speaker the power to
expel unruly members.
Palmer said parliamentary
reform is essential, despite the difficulties of implementing changes. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 21, 1986
K^ ■; «-"
'Godivacide' misguided
Ah yes, the annual Lady Godiva
ride approacheth and in its wake
the usual doomsdayers and
soothsayers follow crying "rape,
aggression, discrimination and woe
of woes, premeditated violence
against women".
The otherwise solemn, somber
and silent halls of this institution
awake to the coming horrible red
tide and the inevitable naked lady
on a horse — Oh the horror! Oh the
horror!
Few people in the world know
that the central cause of rape
originates with the Lady-G ride.
Oh, if we could only stop this annual journey into the heart of
darkness we might be able to terminate male dominance of the
female of the species. Think of it,
woman would no longer have to
wear make-up to supposedly compete for men — they could just look
as ugly as they are. Women may be
let into the male professorial community on their skills instead of on
the sole qualification of T. and A.
Although lesbianism might have
the same results, we must first start
with a ban on the Lady G Ride.
On the other side of the issue, if
the Engineers stopped this ride and
subsequently female exploitation, it
might have some chilling effects for
the student body and the world at
large. It would mean that the
Engineers would be bowing down
to a very vocal extremist minority.
As Plato said, this is a form of a
tyranny by a minority over the majority. Once this precedent is set any
small group that espouses its own
brand of righteousness can force its
views on the majority by vocal intimidation; is that not how Nazi
Germany began? Secondly, if the
feminist establishment stops the
ride it might promote violent reactions against women in general.
Engineers may withhold sex from
their female and male partners in
protest. Their protest portrays
feminists in stereotypical light as
extremists, female-centric, unswerving, unfunloving with a bad case
of myopia, thus putting back all the
gains they have made in the last ten
years. Thirdly, and most importantly, this university is both lacking in
spirit and tradition and I'm afraid
to say that the Engineers are the only faculty that is really promoting a
sense of pride and camaraderie. If
Godivacide took place it would be
just one more step towards decaying what little tradition and pride
there is at this university. The
university is the last stop on the
road to reality, (getting a job), and
thus not only should it be a forum
to discuss ideas but also an arena
where students can have some fun,
albeit sometimes obnoxious fun,
before social constraints force us
into a sober, mature and less
enlightened world. Lastly, the ride
is in part a symbolic praise of
woman. It sets woman above man
and in effect puts her on a pedestal
to transcend the common male rub
bish. The most critically acclaimed
paintings and photographs from Da
Vinci to Van Gogh have promoted
the beautiful naked female art form
with all its natural curves and
discontinuities. Maybe we should
start burning these paintings and
books. As can be seen, a vote
against the Lady-G ride is a vote
against women, freedom of speech,
democracy, and our university
system. We have progressed too far
to descend back into the dark ages
and if we do, we will probably need
another woman like Lady Godiva
to enlighten us. These facts should
be considered before we get on our
high horse and extinguish a not-so-
terrible ride for the sake of Utopian
and misguided self-righteousness.
Mark Epstein
arts 4
Keith Kirkwood
applied science 3
Michelle Jampolsky
arts 1
Posters protested
I am writing to protest in the
strongest terms possible the posting
of insulting and offensive handbills
on campus walls.
I am referring to those posters
advertising some sort of fraternity
party in which Libyan leader Col.
Moammar Quadaffi (even the name
is misspelled) is quoted as uttering
such inane statements as "Let's
Mambo (sic)".
This is clearly a demeaning and
derogatory slap in the face to the
leader of a sovereign state, a leader
who has endeavoured to steer his
nation on a course separate from
the inimical forces of U.S. Imperialism and Soviet Socio-
imperialism, equally insidious.
Qadaffi's purported statement
"Come while you still can, Western
scum (sic)" is especially degrading
to the many U.B.C. students who
support Col. Qadaffi as a great
leader, a great diplomat, and a true
revolutionary.
The 'frat boys' who dreamt up
this travesty have sunk to new depths of reactionary political arrogance, and deserve to be censured
and condemned for their irresponsible bravado. Certainly, some form
of protest by progressive forces on
this campus is in order.
Down with U.S. Imperialism and
the equally insidious Soviet Socio-
imperialism! Down with the reactionary frat boys! Down with the
demeaning use of the name of a true
revolutionary to advertise a
revolting display of Western
decadence!
Al-Fadel Tafei
political science 4
Fellow engineers are nice guys
We are writing to clear up some misconceptions
about the engineering faculty at UBC as
demonstrated by:
• the January 10, 1986 issue of the Ubyssey
• remarks by Axel Meison, Dean of Engineering
• a letter from Rosemary Brown to the President
of UBC
• various letters in many past Ubyssey issues.
So   called   "sexist   activities"    by   UBC
undergraduate engineers do not prevent women
from entering the faculty. Women now form 12
percent of the engineering undergrads at UBC and
we are not aware of any who considered possible
sexual discrimination as a deterrent to entering the
faculty.
If Dean Meisen and Rosemary Brown want more
women to enter engineering, they should concentrate their efforts at the high school level. Most of
us in high school had a very dry and boring concept
of careers in the sciences, let alone engineering. We
were lucky and discovered a challenging profession,
but others through a lack of career education may
be denied the opportunity to use their math and
science skills in the workplace.
Undergraduate engineers in general do not
discriminate against women in their faculty. Male
student engineers in general do not exhibit an anti-
women attitude. We have never seen pictures of
nude women in our labs. In fact, we have encountered no more sexist discrimination in the
engineering faculty than would be (unfortunately)
expected in any other faculty on the UBC campus,
and probably less. Most of the stupid comments we
get come from non-engineers. (Is that your
boyfriend's jacket? . . . You mean there are
woman engineers?! . . . etc.) Give us a break.
Ignorance like that leads to the kind of comments
we've seen in letters to the Ubyssey lately. Please
check your sources before making exaggerated and
unfounded accusations. Ruining a society's reputa
tion  with  inaccurate public statements is called
libel.
Our fellow engineers are a great bunch of intelligent, humourous, and sensitive men and
women. We're proud to be part of the engineering
faculty at UBC.
Kuniko Ogat
chemical engineering 3
Chris Tippett
mining & mineral process
engineering 3
Maria Wong
civil engineering 3
Ana Sarmiento
civil engineering 3
Mary Boulanger
civil engineering 3
Karen Hakansson
chemical engineering 3
Christine M. Wilson
chemical engineering 2
Karen Tully
chemical engineering 2
Elizabeth Kao
chemical engineering 2
Barbara Thomas
civil engineering 3
Elizabeth Hurst
civil engineering 3
Cathy Chiu
civil engineering 3
Frederica Panon
civil engineering 3
Shanna Knights
chemical engineering 3
Mary Desbrisay
mechanical engineering 2
Kay Omoto
civil engineering 3
THE UBYSSEY
January 21, 1906
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Where's Stephen?" whined the mindless undead hordes as they filed out of SUB 241k. "Probably
dead like the rest of us," grunted Svetozar Kontic, as Corinne Bjorge crept silently up behind him,
bearing a wooden stake. "Nol Don't do it!" cried Debbie Lo, breaking free from the zombie grasps of
Morgan Burke, Edward Mou, and Neil Lucente. "Yes, do itl And let me helpf" said Nancy Campbell,
filling her six-shooter with silver bullets handed to her by Chris Fraser and Camile Dionne. In the
resulting fracas, Colin Stacey and Ian Robertson were blown down the stairs, their bodies being whisked away to the nebulous darkness of B-lot by the ghostly forms of James Young, Evelyn Jacob, and
Chris Wong. On the way, they passed Karen Gram and Sarah Millin bedecked in garlic and silver
crosses to fend off Colin Jerome and Wendy Robertson, who had already finished off Steve, the man
with no last name.
Taken for a ride
Unbeknownst to all youse who actually drive to UBC every day, or even
to the poor (rich?) wretches who patronize BC Transit, there is a forgotten,
abused, and generally mistreated minority on campus, namely the motorcyclist.
Motorcycles (you know, those funny machines parked by SUB) are fast,
cheap, and notoriously easy to park. Anywhere, that is, except at UBC.
Riders at UBC pay twenty dollars a year to park their bikes on campus,
yet there are no definitive regulations, written or otherwise, which
describes what motorcyclists can or cannot do. As such, parking wherever
convenience rears its beckoning head is rampant.
Witness the north end of SUB, and the west end of Buchanan D-block.
While the latter is now considered to be off limits to motorcyclists and is
being appropriately ticketed, only last term it was an accepted and well-
used parking zone. No notice or warning was given to the riders who parked there that motorcycle parking policy had changed, some still don't
know and continue to park there. The tickets which suddenly began
appearing on the bikes were most unexpected and undeserved, considering that the motorcycle owners had paid their parking fees, and had been
informed that only those bikes without parking stickers would be ticketed.
Now, if the Campus Cowboys would put those outlandish fees (SFU
motorcyclists pay one fifth that which UBC riders do) to some use, maybe
local motorcycle riders could park on cmapus confident that they would
not get hit with seemingly random and unpredictable fines.
UBC back on top?
Three UBC profs have discovered what seems to be a new cure for
cancer — photoimmunal therapy, but it's not quite all that it seems to be.
The professors themselves admit it's not perfect. There is hope contained in this new procedure, but it isn't a cure-all type of relief for cancer patients, yet. The therapy is promising, though.
Patients undergoing the procedure after photoimmunal therapy treatment would stay in darkened areas and venture out only at night, as light
striking them would cause skin sores.
The profs have well researched this area and the quality of their work
shows in the sizable grant alloted to them by the NSERC.
They are world leaders in this area and it's gratifying to see this high level
research being carried on in spite of the unaccomodating attitude the provincial government takes when alloting funds to institutions of higher learning.
Looking at the future . . . UBC tuition fees Tuesday, January 21, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
History repeats at UBC
It is 1918. It is a time when blacks
are subject to racial discrimination.
They are oppressed economically,
victims of violence and hatred,
denied jobs and opportunities on
racist grounds. They were often
thought to be more animal than
human being.
When U.S. troops (segregated of
course) were stationed in France
during World War I, many white
soldiers took great delight in telling
the French people to stay away
from the black soldiers because of
their animal nature.
Incidents were reported where
white soldiers would find a willing
black soldier and pay him to cavort
like an ape, naked, wearing a tail, in
a public place such as a tavern.
Surely this could not happen today. This disgusting display, based
on and reinforcing the stereotype of
blacks as being inferior and
animalistic, would cause public outcry. After all, whites supposedly no
longer have the society-sanctioned
power to be able to put on displays
of dominance in which a black can
be bought and displayed. However,
one can almost hear the protests of
those white soldiers responsible: "If
it bothers you, don't watch." "It's
only in fun", "He wasn't hurt",
"After all, we paid him".
It is 1986. It is a time when
women are subject to sex
discrimination. They are oppressed
economically, victims of rape and
other forms of sexual violence and
harrassment, denied jobs and opportunities on sexist grounds. They
are often thought to be inferior, to
be sexual objects, expected to respond to the desires and needs of
men with passivity and acquiesence.
Every year, the engineering
students find a willing woman, and
pay her to be paraded naked
through the university campus.
Many engineering students and
others participate in this, coming to
stare, laugh and jeer. All of them
are participating in an event based
on and reinforcing the stereotype of
women as being sexual objects who
can be bought and displayed, who
are passive and acquiesent to the
desires of men, whose position in
society is so inferior that men can
strip them of all dignity if they so
desire. Again, the protests are the
same: "Don't watch it if you don't
like it", "We don't force her to get
on that horse: we pay her", etc.
In a society which is (slowly)
becoming aware of the damage that
stereotypes inflict on minority
groups, this kind of stereotype reinforcement is intolerable. By making
sexual oppression a joke, the
engineering students are hurting all
the women who are struggling so
hard to throw off the sexist traditions and attitudes of the past;
struggling to redefine what women
are and can be. The "tradition"
which the engineering students are
upholding is far older than the
Godiva ride. It is a tradition of
dominance and oppression. We
cannot allow it to continue.
For those who love to throw the
words "freedom of expression"
around, I suggest that you actually
read the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms. It not only guarantees
equality, especially between men
and women, but limits rights such
as "freedom of expression". Section one reads "1. The Canadian
Charter of Rights and Freedoms
guarantees the rights and freedoms
set out in it subject only to such
reasonable limits prescribed by law
as can be demonstrably justified in
a free and democratic society." In
our "free and democratic" society
the Godiva ride is an abuse of
freedom of expression, because as
long as it and all other forms of oppression exist we cannot be truly
"free" or "democratic".
Jeanne Fitzgerald
law 3
Self-respecting men and women
Well done, Ubyssey! The story
'EUS Peeping Tom Parade panned'
(The Ubyssey, Jan. 17) exemplifies
the misguided and blatantly incorrect media coverage that this year's
Godiva Ride has attracted. The
very first sentence of the Jan. 17
Ubyssey states that "With no
women department heads. . .".
Maybe if, instead of storytelling,
they engaged in some accurate
research they'd discover that our
department head of mechanical
engineering is indeed a woman —
and a well reputed one at that!
Sara Scott's letter, Why can't
engineers think less selfishly, also
gets an A+ for her rendition of
how to blame the engineers for
everything that is wrong with
modern society. Unfortunately, we
fail to see the connection between
Nazi camps, children in diapers,
who pays our tuition and the
Godiva Ride. I think a course on
how to write a cohesive paper is
needed.
Maybe Jim Christian should also
meet   some   of   the   200   female
engineers at UBC. He'd be surprised that we needn't "repress our
female side" or "act like men" to
succeed in our academically demanding field. Perhaps he holds the archaic view that to be intelligent, independent, and career-oriented one
must be of the male sex. That's too
bad: being female has never, for us,
been a hindrance.
The fallacies being printed about
engineers and their faculty have
overshadowed the original cause of
this whole uproar, namely
'Godiva'. We, as engineers, are an
extremely proud, self-respecting
group of men and women who,
with or without Godiva, will not
tolerate such accusations. Why
don't you either stick to the facts or
find another more deserving student body on which to lay your unfounded statements?
Susan Thornthwaite
mech 3
Kathy Tarnai
mech 3
Diane Mar
mech 3
Cathy Strickland
mech 3
AUDITION
®
The Banff Centre
School of
Fine Arts
Date: February 7 & 8, 1986
City:   Vancouver, B.C.
For further information
telephone (403)762-6180
SCIENCE
WEEK
Jan. 20-24
TUESDAY
SUS Sales - SUB
Club Displays - SUB
Bzzr Garden
5:30-7:30 p.m.
Sub Party Room
Bluesday Nite
at The Pit
8:00-00
WEDNESDAY
SUS Sales - SUB
Chemistry Magic Show
12:30 p.m.
Chem 150
Car Rally
7:00 p.m.
THURSDAY
SUS Sales - SUB
Paper Airplane Contest
12:30 p.m.
Hebb Theatre
Speaker: TBA
FRIDAY
SUS Sales - SUB
Home-Brew Contest
12:30 p.m. CPAX 6
Crystal Ball
8:00 p.m.
Armouries
with
POWDER BLUES
&
VERTIGO
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SCUBA DIVE
Join UBC's Scuba Club for
low-cost courses, rentals, gear
purchases, charters and activities.
Next Introductory Course Feb.
Aqua Society
Lower Floor, Student Union Bldg.
228-3329
:
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FOR YOUR
VALENTINE!
Lower Level Hours: Mon.-Fri.
Student Union 8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Building, U.B.C.     Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa & Mastercharge
Accepted Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 21, 1986
%/A
(/itfOti
TODAY
BA STUDENTS MEETING
The curriculum  review committee, faculty of
arts, invites BA students to share their views on
the nature and purpose of the B.A. degree,
noon, Buch penthouse.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Tutorials, 5:30-6:30 p.m.. Brock Hall 351.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon, E.I.S.A. office.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
"Trends  in  education  in  Isreal,"  with  Debbie
Weissman, noon, Hillel House.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel House.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsals, 6:00-8:00 p.m., SUB party room,
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Psychiatry lecture with guest speaker Dr. Miles,
noon, Wood 1.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon Brock Hall 304.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:   "Othello,   starring   Sir   Laurence   Olivier,
Emergency procedures, noon, SUB 58.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB.
CUSO - UBC DEVELOPMENT SERIES
Canada-Zaire connection — Youth perspectives
on African Development (Canada world youth
and Katimavik), 7:30 p.m., International House.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Debate  workshop   —   advanced  styles,   noon,
SUB 125
FINANCE SOCIETY (CLUB) OF UBC
Sweatshirt day, all day, Henry Angus Bldg.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Emergency procedures, noon, SUB 58.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
SUS  bzzr  garden,   5:30-8:30  p.m.,   SUB  party
room.
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Science blues night, PIT, 8 p.m.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter unlimited dance classes,
$45, 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m., SUB 208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB Partyroom.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly meeting, testimonies of healing, all are
welcome, noon, SUB 211.
WEDNESDAY
UBYSSEY PEACE CAUCUS
Pot-luck dinner and meeting, 6 p.m., 3664 West
2nd Ave.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m.. Gallery lounge.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music   night,   featuring   Greg   Gaines,   8:X-11
p.m.,   Graduate student  centre,   Garden  room
lounge.
UBC SAILING CLUB
We want your money, noon, SUB 58.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch B212.
JSA/HILLEL
"The peace movement in Israel," with Debbie
Weissman, noon, Buch A205.
JSA/HILLEL
Dinner, 5:X-7 p.m., Hillel House.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal, 8-10 p.m., SUB party room.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff  meeting  and seminar on  review writing
with Charles Campbell, noon SUB 241K.
THURSDAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Workshop  on  friendship  by  Wilston   Sayson,
noon. Scarf 209.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7 p.m.,  1868 Knox
Road.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Get  together luncheon,   new people  wanted,
noon, St. Marks college.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General   meeting:   regards   bike   clothing   and
tickets to Hawaiian heat party. Jan. 24,  11:30
a.m., SUB 212.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 4:30 p.m., Asian centre
604.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Membership campaign, noon, SUB 58.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediates'    Mandarin   conversation   class,
noon, Buch B317.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 224.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Back in full swing — so smurf on down, noon,
Hebb 12.
EAST INDIAN STUDENT' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
INTER VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Meeting, noon, Chem 250.
GREAT LAW TRIALS
Great Law Trials on the Silver Screen presents
"Inherit the Wind," noon, Law 101. Admission is
$2.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
General meeting featuring speaker Rod Aim on
"How can I be a spiritual revolutionary?" as well
as info on Jan. 24 to 26 retreat, noon, Brock 302.
UBC PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture:   Dr.   Fraser on  "Endodontics," noon,
IRC 5. Also, payment for sweatshirts required.
FRIDAY
SAILING/WINDSURFING/SKI/
DANCE/BIKE
CLUBS
Hawaiian party, 8:X p.m., SUB partyroom.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4-9 p.m., International House (gate
41.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Club  orgy   —   new  members  welcome,   noon,
SUB 58.
UBC WINDSURFING CLUB
Hawaiian  heat  party/dance,  tickets S3,  attire:
your craziest fun in sun gear, 8:30 p.m., SUB
Partyroom.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men  and women  vs University of  Lethbridge
Pronghorns, 6:45 p.m. for women, 8:30 p.m. for
men, War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
UBC women host Thundervolley Tournament,
all day, Osborne centre. Features top club and
intercollegiate teams in western Canada.
STUOENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Speaker: Gary Marchant on "Canada and Peace:
New  Directions for Canada's foreign policy,"
noon, SUB 205.
UBC FILM SOCIETY
SUBfilms: "Rambo," 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin
the two most famous radicals of the
sixties will argue from their
diametrically opposed positions on
life, the universe, financial investment and U.S. intervention in Central America. The Great Debate will
"happen" at the Orpheum,
Feb. 8 at 8 p.m. Call VTC or the
AMS box office for tickets.
Idiots and Neanderthals Supporting A Nuclear Event (INSANE) will
be out on the SUB Plaza at noon on
Tuesday to celebrate the first cruise
missile test of 1986. Be there or go
nuke yourself.
Join the Science Undergraduate
Society tonight as they try their
cure for cancer: bzzr, b**r and
more yeasty cocktails in the SUB
party room at 5:30 p.m. Then join
them as they try to accelerate off
the SUB roof running on their new
fuel: bzzr, more fizzy drinks and
maybe even wyne. Remember
zz = ee times 2. Einstein had fizzy
hair.
•
The Women Students' Office is
holding a day of fabulous
workshops, for women only, on
math anxiety, essay skills, study
skills, sexual harassment and much
much more. Free coffee starts at
8:30 a.m. in Brock 203, workshops
at 9:30 a.m. This is a good chance
for women to find out about the
services offered.
•
Praise the Lord and pass the
nomination forms! Join the
Maranatha bible study (and
nominations for AMS executive) at
noon, in Brock Hall, Room 304, bring your Good Book and your
favorite candidate. Halleluia! Proselytise proper political people pronto. And don't forget to sign your
Ubyssey petition!
Stand Out and Be Counted
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing School is now accepting models for our advanced cutting classes. 16-35,
male or female — if you're interested in creative,
high-fashion haircuts our teachers want you to have
the style of the 80 's which suits you best.
We're open Monday to Friday, 9-5. We'd love to see
you, so give us a call, 738-0519.
$5.00 Cut        $20 Color        $30 Perm
"Remember It's The Cut That Counts"
Suki's Advanced Hairdressing
School Int'l Ltd.
3157 Granville St.
Vancouver,
738-0519
Our Art Director is also interviewing hair models with potential for
photographic and demonstration work.
BURIED CHILD
by Sam Shepard
Directed by Robert Garfat
JAN. 28 — FEB, 1
Curtain: 8 pm
Student Tickets $4
+ Box Office - Room 207*
■^Frederic Wood Theatre*
*••••*•••**
Dorothy Somerset Studio
University of British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
UNTIL JANUARY 31
AT
o/SlliniS
$1.00 Off
ANY MPAL OVER $8JEW
feETJ^VEEN 5PM-7PM
/     >
open^Alris/wanc
REAR
VILLAGE
UBCrr-r (E-X-C-E • L-L-E-N-f) xr
Th e  eat e rY
1 FREE BU
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF &TOFU BURGERS ONLY.
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5296
r
■■**■•"■?■*■w
M -tv-V.-*-
HILLEL HOUSE
* -    ** -
DON'T
FORGET
OUR
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
DINNER (Jan. 22)
from 5:30-7:00 P.M.
Home-cooked food plus a
chance to meet our newly-
appointed Executive Board
Special Guest for this week is
DEBBIE
WEISSMAN
Israeli educator
and peace activist
who will join us for two programs
1. Jan. 21 - "Trends in Education in
Israel"   plus   HOT   LUNCH
-12:30 (at Hillel House)
Mn   n*a
4-Z^Z
2. Jan. 22 - "The Peace Movement In
Israel" 12:30    Buchanan
A-205
*..■■+'■,.  ."   A    ^  ■*      "-
-* ' v-*'
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the_
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
40 - MESSAGES
CUSO-UBC
Development Education Series
Jan. 21—Canada-Zaire Connection:
Youth Perspectives of African
Development. This group has just
returned from Zaire with a lively
presentation from the grass roots.
(Canada World Youth and Katimavik)
Jan. 28—Primary Health Care:
Case Studies from the Third World.
Mary Ann Morris, OXFAM
International House. UBC 7:30-9:30 p.m.
A weekly series exploring international development issues and possibilities for personal involvement.
Every Tuesday night, Jan. 21 - Feb. 25
OPEN TO ALL AT NO CHARGE
CONGRATULATIONS!
to the B.P. Fijis-MF, CO, TO, CH, RK
All that hard work? was worth itl
From "The Lunch Club"
LC, PI, SB, MF, PS and Wayne
80 - TUTORING
SPEAKEASY TUTORIAL CENTRE Find a
tutor or register as a tutor. SUB Concourse.
M-F 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
85 - TYPING
20 - HOUSING
BASEMENT SLEEPING ROOM at 15th Er
Discovery. Priv. ent. Share cooking facil. Er
full bathroom with 1 other student. Laun.
facil. N/S $220/mo. Feb. 1. 224-2153.
NEEDED: Roommate to share quiet hse. with
2 others near Univ. Fireplace,
washer/dryer, microwave, 2 baths. Ph.
261-9498 Avail, immediately $250.
FREE ROOM & BOARD in exchange for
light hsekeeping. Pvte. entrance, pvte.
bathroom. Dunbar area. Close to bus rte.
732-8209.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
FEBRUARY 15, 1986 LSAT
on January 21, 25, 26, 1986
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT PREPARATION COURSES.
1-800-387-1262
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we  type  theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
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processing professionals. Xerox copies,
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perience. Student rates. Photocopier.
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TYPING FOR YOU. $1.00 per page, double-
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SOFT SOLUTIONS word processing:
papers, theses, reports, mscpts., resumes,
mail lists/labels. Days, eves., wknds.
731-1252. Tuesday, January 21, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Sikhs seek seat at UBC
From page 1
is what they are afraid of."
Robert Will, UBC dean of arts,
said his department agreed last
March to accept a chair of Sikh
studies if the money was forthcoming.
"We haven't heard anything
since then", said Will. "But we're
not the principals; we're simply the
facilitators. It's in Ottawa's
hands," Will said.
Will said the Sikhs applied to a
program in the federal multicultural
department for ethnic studies funding. Under that program, the
federal government provides half
the funding and the applicant, in
this case, the Sikhs, pay the remainder.
Will is considering the types of
courses that would be offered.
"It would depend upon the person we brought in (to chair the
department). If he's a historian,
we'll offer history; if he's a religious
expert, we'll offer religious studies
but Punjabi language is indeed one
course we will be teaching," Will
said.
Will said the establishment of the
chair does not require UBC senate
approval. "Senate is just informed
of the chairs," he said. When asked
if the senate would want to debate
this chair because of its controversial nature, Will said their is no controversy.
"It is simply an academic
matter", he said. "If people are
thinking on the right track, there is
nothing controversial about it at all.
Nova Scotia echoes Socreds
From page 3
programmes at Nova Scotia's
universities."
This same council would also
determine criteria for loans under
the proposed Educational Opportunity Fund, which the commission
is recommending replace the provincial bursary programme.
Students can now receive grants of
up to $1700 from the provincial
government after they borrow
$2500 from the federal student aid
programme. With the new system
Nova Scotian students would be
eligible for loans only, to be repaid
after graduation.
Savage said the abolition of bursaries combined with the recommended increase in fees would deter
many young people from going to
university.
"Faced with a $20,000 debt load
on graduation, less students will
want to go to university," he said.
The report also concludes "Attendance at university is not a social
necessity" and says students and
society should strike a partnership
with each paying fifty per cent of
education costs.
This partnership will mean a large
increase in tuition fees for students
in Nova Scotia. The current average
tuition fee is $1464 or 17.5 per cent
of the cost of education. An increase to 50 per cent of the instructional cost would mean doubling
tuition fees, which the commission
recommends be implemented over
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
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five years.
The commission also recommends foreign students pay 100 per
cent of their costs and that out-of-
province students have their share
paid by their provincial government.
The philosophy that students pay
the real cost of their education also
means higher fees for students in
expensive programmes like computer science.
Nova Scotia's student leaders
complained about the commission
from its beginning. The government
appointed an actress and wife of a
prominent Tory, a dairy company
executive, and a losing Tory candidate, but refused to appoint any
or
NEW
RETURN POLICY
On Course Books
• Course books bought for
Second Term courses may
be returned for full refund
any time up to January
31st (the ten-day rule has
been eliminated).
• Books must be unmarked
and in saleable-as-new condition.
• Returns will NOT be accepted without the original
SALES RECEIPT.
After January 31st all sales of
course books will be NON-
RETURNABLE.
REMEMBER
to keep your receipt.
BOOKSTORE
students,   faculty   members
university administrators.
"If they exclude three people
biased in favour of education, they
should exclude three people biased
in favour of business," said Peter
Kavanagh, then SUNS executive
officer.
Blewett said she hopes the
government won't touch any of the
report's recommendations, but
because they paid $500,000 to produce it, she admits that it's unlikely.
"Tom Mclnnes (the education
minister) says his first priority is setting up the council on education in
Nova Scotia. That's the beginning
of the end," said Blewett.
Are Yon
CONFUSED?
• Sifferiig from u
iMity crisis?
• Lost at a crossroad?
•lorei?
Join the Ubyssey today at SUB 241K
How do yon spell relief? • •
THE UBYSSEY
Intramurals
NOON RUNS
Fri., Jan. 24
Sat. and Sun.
Feb. 1-2
Fri., Sat., Sun.
Feb. 7-9
West-East Mall Road Run
SUB Plaza Race Center
12:30 p.m. 3.0 km
RACQUET SPORTS
Buchanan Badminton Grand Prix
Round II Doubles Tournament
Gyms A and B Osborne Center
10 a.m.-7 p.m.
Sutherland Tennis Grand Prix
US Open—Doubles Tournament
Armoury and Tennis Bubble
Fri. — 6:30-11:30 p.m.
Sat., Sun. — 8:a.m.-11:30 p.m.
drop-in
Jan. 20-24
Jan. 27-31
(kwik) adj. 1. rapid; swift; speedy
2. prompt to understand or learn
3. without delay 4. Kinko's
kinko's
Great copies Great people.
5706 University Blvd.      222-1688
M-Th 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
Representatives from Canada's largest GRADUATE
MANAGEMENT SCHOOL will be visiting your campus.
Come and meet us!
MONDAY, FEB. 3
12 noon-1:00 p.m. and 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Rm. 212 Student Union Bldg.
University of British Columbia
FACULTY      OF
ADMINISTRATIVE STUDIES
YDRK
FRIDAY, JANUARY 24th
8:00 p.m.
UBC ARMOURIES
DOOR PRIZES: Dinner for 2 and
Limo service (value $350)
Also numerous hats,
T-shirts
TICKETS: $5.00 ($6.00 at door)
Available AMS Box Office
or SUS Executives - CPAX 2 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 21, 1986
Hoopsters lose thriller to champs
By COLIN JEROME
In spite of a 34 point effort by
Ken Klassen, the 'Birds lost by a
mere basket, 72-70 to the number
one ranked University of Victoria
Vikings.
Victoria's 7' centre, Gord
Clemens, collected two personal
fouls in the first two minutes of the
game and sat on the bench for the
rest of the half. At the end of the
first half, U.Vic, led 38-37. The
teams exchanged the lead
throughout the game. Both sides
had 33 rebounds, with UBC's hustle
making up for their lack of size inside.
"We played disciplined basketball. We hoped to keep the score
around 70 points, and we did just
that," said UBC head coach Bruce
Enns.
6'4" Klassen gave Victoria trouble from the start. Despite usually
being surrounded by two or more
blue jerseys, he managed to sink
79% of his field goals.
Paul  Johansson, a 6'3"  UBC
N.Y. Rangers just
won't leave town
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The New York Rangers beat the
Canucks on Tuesday but one of
their top prospects stayed to haunt
UBC over the weekend.
Behind the stellar netminding of
Derril Trakalo the University of
Manitoba defeated the UBC hockey
club 5-2 on Saturday to even the
weekend series at 1-1. The 'Birds
won the opener at T-Bird arena on
Friday night 5-3 with strong individual performances from Keith
Abbott and Steve Lapointe.
Trakalo who attended Ranger
training camp as a free agent along
with teammate Mike Ridley was invited back next year. Ridley is a
rookie sensation in the NHL and all
indications are that Trakalo will be
in a Ranger uniform next year.
Ridley, a literal unknown has
already scored 14 goals in the NHL
while high priced U.S. collegiate
free agents like Ray Staszak and
Adam Oates toil in the minors.
Trakalo has only to beat out the
anemic Glen Hanlon and another
American free agent, Ron Scott, for
the backup job.
Former Canuck Ron Delorme
scouting the game on behalf of the
organization said, "This kid is a
good goaltender. I'll have to get
Johnny Garrett to come out and
take a look at him. One of the problems   with   Canadian   college
hockey is that the players are older
so that they only have one shot at
training camp. The kid in the U.S.
college who gets drafted at 18 has
four years to develop. The team
doesn't have to pay him a cent during those four years."
Steve Brown and Ken Petrash
each had a goal and two assists to
lead the Bisons in their win. Brown
was an all-star at the recent college
tournament. Another tournament
all-star Mark Trotzuk scored
UBC's first goal while former
Chicago Black Hawk draft Kevin
Griffin scored the other.
"Their goaltender played about a
130 minutes of great hockey
tonight. He was just super. We
played 40 minutes of good hockey
tonight and faded away for the
other 20 minutes. Manitoba has
some very skilled offensive players.
They can get away with not playing
a full 60 minutes of hockey
sometimes. Our team cannot do
that. Though we played five out of
six good periods this weekend we
only got one win. Other teams may
have more wins than we do but not
many better periods of hockey,"
said UBC head coach Fred Masuch.
In the first game Abbot led the
'Birds with two goals coming off
wicked blasts. Lapointe scored the
prettiest goal of the night on a great
individual effort.
Swimmers fare well
By IAN ROBERTSON
The women's swim team was narrowly defeated 59-52 Friday by the
visiting University of Washington
Huskies. Going into the final relay
the two teams were tied, but the
NCAA Huskies finished less than
half a second ahead to take the
women's title.
Head coach Ken Radford said,
"It's disappointing to lose such a
close meet at home, but this is probably closer than any team has
come to the Huskies in the past ten
years."
Fiona Waddell led the birds with
wins in the 400m and 800m
freestyles. Barb McBain won the
200m backstroke and Anne Martin
won the 50m freestyle. Also scoring
for the Birds were Gwen Chambers,
Kim Austin and Nadeane Holley.
The men's competition was not,
as close against the powerhouse
Huskies. The visitors rolled over the
Birds 78-30. The Birds' sole win
came from Geoff Donelly in the
200m butterfly. Second place
finishes came from Ian McMillan in
the 50m freestyle, Rob Traynor in
the 200m breaststroke and Dave
Young in the 800m freestyle. Also
swimming well were Duffy Cutler,
Craig McCord and Mike Ball.
"As a whole the women's team
swam their best meet of the year,"
Radford said. "The men's team
swam well also, with many putting
in lifetime best swims. The results
are encouraging with the CIAU
championships still a month and a
half away."
To date the women have
qualified 13 and the men 6 for the
championships. The University of
Toronto, who will go head to head
with the women's team for top spot
at the CIAU championships, have
qualified only 7.
The swimbirds' next competion
will be Saturday against the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma.
AT A GLANCE .gr
Otv. 1
I. Recreation
2.l>&ysEd
3. Commerce
4. Phrateres
5.. Nursing
6. Japaa Bxetamge
i, Forestry   '■
Dtv. II
1. Delta Gamma
2. Nursing
3. Education
4. Arts
5.. EUS I
6. Alpha Gamma Delta
7. Phrateres
Div. m
I. Phrateres
2. Gamma Phi Beta
3. Forestry 2
4. Delta Gamma
5. EUS 2
6. Kappa Kappa Gamma
guard, assisted on many of
Klassen's baskets and scored 23
valuable points. His two baskets in
the closing seconds of the game still
left the 'Birds two points short of a
draw.
Clemens is the number two scorer
in Canada, averaging 20 points per
game, but was held to nine points
on Saturday. "You have to give full
credit to Jamie Boulding," said
Enns. Although Bouding was at a
six inch height disadvantage, he did
a superb job defending against
Clemens.
The game started at a quick pace
with both teams fast-breaking. The
Vikes used a full-court press which
caused UBC to turn-over the ball at
least four times in the first half. But
the 'Birds worked hard on defence
and held their own on the boards.
They were also successful in
penetrating a tough zone defence.
UBC played aggressively at the
beginning of the second half, forc
ing turnovers and making steals.
The return of Clemens added
strength to Victoria's game, but he
was not overpowering. With four
minutes left, UBC led 53-52.
Former Richmond Colt, Lloyd
Scrub, led a Viking surge that
resulted in a 70-66 score in their
favour.
The loss drops the 'Birds record
to 0 wins and 3 losses in Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union
(CIAU) league play.
—kent kallberg photo
BLOODY BUSHWACKERS screams beleaguered UBC warrior as he clenches his teeth in Rambo fashion. Ken
Klassen played a great game scoring 34 points but still watched the T-Birds drop a two point decision to the
powerhouse Victoria Vikings.
Ski-Birds continue to rule slopes
By WENDY MORRISON
A foot of new snow did not prevent the hosting Birds team from
clinching their second consecutive
alpine combined title at Whistler
Mountain last weekend.
The men's team devasted the
competition in the Giant Slalom,
taking six of the top ten positions.
They also topped the field in the
slalom to win the Alpine Combined
title. The women won their alpine
combined title by a margin of 27
seconds over second place University of Puget Sound. The men's nor-
dic team was 3rd behind SFU and
UW.
A heavy snowfall on Friday night
caused the slalom to be switched to
a dual slalom format. The end
result was an exciting head to head
race between last week's winner Stu
Gairns and first run winner Glenn
Dorey of SFU. Gairns came from
behind to win in a close finish.
Dorey was the top skier in the men's
Giant Slalom, with a time of 77.26
seconds. The 'Birds were close
behind. Ken Stevens posted a time
of 77.59 seconds for second place
while Dave Buckley was third.
In the women's events, Wendy
Morrison clocked a time of 81.14
seconds to win the Giant Slalom
ahead of Yvette Pelletier of UW
with 83.68 seconds. Lynda Cooke
captured fifth place while Andrea
Jaegli was seventh. The Birds liked
the soft snow. Morrison commented that "these are my favorite
conditions. It's really easy to turn in
this kind of snow, so you can ski as
fast as possible."
Elke Socher of SFU chlinched
her second straight slalom victory.
Top UBC finisher was Sally Willis
in fifth.
The cross-country events were
hampered by rain, but not enough
to slow down the tough SFU team.
The 'Birds were third behind SFU
and UW in the 3 x 10 km relay and
in the 15 km individual event.
Jonathan Lineer of SFU was first in
the 15 km in 55:59. Gerry Furseth
placed eight (with 1:03:36) and Stu
Gairns tenth (with 1:04:58) in the
gruelling event.

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