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The Ubyssey Oct 26, 1979

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 20
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October26,1979
228-2301
Medical head
on firing line
Thirty-one doctors who work at
Vancouver General Hospital teaching UBC medical students have asked for the resignation of Dr. John
Dirks as head of the teaching program there.
It is reported they feel Dirks,
head of UBC's medicine department has increased the influence of
full-time university staff at the
hospital at the expense of part-time
clinical instructors.
According to sources, the doctors, who have private practices but
contribute time to the medical
school at VGH, made the request
for resignation in a letter to the
university.
Dr. Dirks said late Thursday he
had "no recollection of such a letter." He had no further comment
but added reports of unrest among
part-time instructors are "inaccurate."
The reports have the doctors
holding Dirks responsible for the
problems non-faculty instructors
are facing.
They charge the number of beds
made available to them has decreased in the two years Dirks has headed the department at VGH. They also accuse Dirks of bringing in staff
from outside Vancouver for posi-
' tions that could be filled by local
doctors.
Sources say this has caused a shift
of influence so that his department
now has greater control at VGH.
The affiliation agreement between VGH and UBC is being renegotiated but cannot be settled until
the provincial government legislates
confirmation of the hospital board
of directors.
The part-time doctors have begun
to receive hourly stipends from the
teaching program for undergraduate instruction only this year. They
now are paid $20 per hour, where
previously they received a nominal
$50 per year.
Protesters plan
Trident invasion
— stuart dee photo
GLADIATORS SEARCH for lost heads and other mind gaps in midst of^st-Tea Cup melee while chariot driver
attempts in embarrassment to hide undergraduate society logo. Odds are still high that scatological non-race was
won by gears or some other small wheels but what's won ain't exactly clear.
B.C. environmentalists are waging a weekend demonstration at the
Trident nuclear submarine base in
Bangor, Wash, to protest the construction of potentially dangerous
weapons.
Some protesters, including members of Vancouver's Pacific Life
Community, will enter high risk
weapons storage areas on the base,
a Pacific Life member said Thursday.
Barbara Neuroth said demonstrators plan to take "non-violent
<
ALCOHOLISM
>
UBC students seek professional help
in dealing with devil John Barleycorn
Alcoholism is reaching epidemic proportions in our society and UBC students are
not exempt.
UBC medical experts and administrators
agree that alcoholism among students is a
serious problem. Although no complete
studies have been done on the problem,
there is evidence that increasing numbers of
UBC students are joining Alcoholics
Anonymous and seeking psychiatric help in
their battle with the bottle.
"It is a significant problem among
students who come to health services. It
seems to be increasing in younger and
younger people. I have seen people on this
campus who are addicted to alcohol," says
UBC health services psychiatrist Francis
Wilt. "It's actually quite surprising."
Erich Vogt, vice-president of faculty and
student affairs said he also is deeply concerned about the problem.
"It's a major concern of ours.
Throughout our society there are more people who use alcohol. We have people on
campus who at 19 years old belong to
Alcoholics Anonymous."
And Wilt says many students on campus
probably won't admit they are alcoholics
because they believe they are too young.
"There's a tremendous amount of denial.
Students say: 'Oh, I'm not an alcoholic,
I'm too young to be an alcoholic' But most
alcoholics are not skid-row bums, they are
middle-class people."
Wilt said too many students believe
alcoholics always cause their own
alcoholism. She said students should not be
personally blamed if they become
alcoholics.
"There are certain biological predispositions to alcoholism. You can't blame
people for it. And a person who has
alcoholism in the family has to be especially
careful." She said students with a family
history of alcoholism should be educated to
develop and create a healthy attitude
towards drinking.
"I think what you have to try and do is
educate people. It is an illness and should
be treated medically," said Wilt.
Vogt said the university is trying to prevent student alcoholism by holding student
seminars on alcohol in UBC's residences.
Wilt said students who believe they may
have a drinking problem can also get help
from AA, which now holds regular
meetings at UBC. The campus group has
about 20 students attending regular weekly
meetings. Most AA members now range
from 18 to 30 years old, but until recently
most members were close to age 50, said an
AA spokesman who declined to be identified.
He says the university environment does
not seem to encourage alcoholism. "The
ones at the university don't seem different
from other areas. The disease of alcoholism
strikes everywhere."
But Ron Cutler, former director of the
Water Street research group on alcoholism,
said beer gardens, drinking boat races, and
other alcohol-related social functions contribute to poor student attitudes.
"There's certainly a problem, particularly in a province such as B.C. where a lot of
students come from small towns and a lot
of activities require drinking. I've dealt with
■<E
GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
>
numerous individuals whose drinking problems started in the first couple of years of
university."
He said the attitudes many students
develop towards alcohol during university
often cause them problems during middle
age.
And Ed Cosgrove, a spokesman for the
B.C. Alcohol and Drug Commission, said
students are now starting to develop poor
attitudes towards alcohol while in high
school, which can lead to alcoholism in
university. "Alcohol use is pretty high
among high school students, so there's a
pretty good chance it's high among university students.
"The effects are cumulative. They go on
to accept it (alcohol) as more and more a
part of a social function. And even though
some students come to the university with
no experience with alcohol, students often
join in the festivities to become part of their
peer group."
UBC awards officer Byron Hender, who
helped wage an alcohol crackdown at the
university in 1976, says the administration
has tried to use peer pressure to reduce
alcohol-related crimes. That crackdown
caused the temporary closure of the Pit, the
revoking of some resident beer garden liquor permits and the shutdown of the Lethe
lounge.
"We were trying to raise the notion that a
little peer pressure would help. We wanted
to lend credence to the idea that it wasn't a
good idea to be rolling drunk all the time."
Hender said he believes the peer pressure
worked and said alcohol-related violence
See page 3: BOOZE
direct action with a theme of peace
conversion."
She said peace conversion is a
strategy to change production from
a military to civilian purposes and
make consumption of world resources more equitable.
"Peace conversion is simply what
can be done with the money now
being used for military purposes,"
she said.
The demonstration will coincide
with similar protests across the
U.S., said Neuroth. The protests
have been scheduled because the
Trident base will become operational this month.
Protesters have never entered
weapons areas before and the move
is designed to emphasize the threat
Trident poses, she said.
"We have organized ourselves into several affinity groups. Each
group will have several members
who will engage in non-violent civil
disobedience."
Rag probes
to get fobs
College Probe, a tabloid newspaper claiming to advertise career
opportunities for students, will appear on Canadian campuses Nov. 1.
Peter Young, managing director
of Probe Publishers Inc. of Paradise, Nfld., said the paper will be
distributed at Canada employment
centres and university placement offices across the country.
But Canadian University Press, a
cooperative organization representing more than 60 student newspapers, is condemning College Probe's plans to distribute on university and college campuses.
CUP president Maureen McEvoy
says that all student newspapers
"run career opportunities ads from
local as well as national sources and
will be adversely affected by any
private publication dumping on
campus."
Advertisers would get better results from the student press because
it has a greater, more regular readership than any dumped publication
could get, McEvoy said.
Maureen Gilchrist, manager of
UBC's Canada employment centre
and student placement office, was
unavailable for comment. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26,1979
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Gay oppression finally 'comes out'
By PETER MENYASZ
The history of homosexuality is a
history of oppression, gay rights activist Stan Persky said Thursday.
Persky told about 90 people in
SUB 212 that until recently no effort had been made to chronicle
homosexual history.
"It's (homosexuality's) recognition as an opppression, an outrage
that is the fundament of homosexual politics," he said.
And he said although the practice
of homosexuality is now accepted
as a normal mode of sexuality, the
struggle is not yet over.
"The circumstances of oppression are not sufficiently changed,"
Persky said. "The condition of isolation, mystification and fear must
be abolished."
He also said socialism and the
struggle for gay rights are related in
many cases. "In each of the frag
mentary histories we have available,
socialists have played an active role.
All of the major contemporary social work on the history of homosexuality has been done by
socialists."
Persky described the year 1869 as
a pivotal time in the "coming out"
of homosexual history. In that year,
he said, the term homosexual was
given meaning and relevance.
"The difference between now
and then," he said, "is that then we
had to create the idea of homosexual. Society has to have created the
idea of the homosexual so you can
be one."
He added that before 1869,
homosexuality was socially unacceptable as a topic of discussion.
"Not only was there silence, there
was unspeakableness. There were
no words for us."
And he said that time period saw
the introduction of anti-homosex-
Renovation idea
upsets residents
Some Gage residents are upset
that plans to renovate their floor
are plagued with uncertainty.
"We don't know when, where or
how long. We don't know much
about it," said second floor south
tower resident Lucky Campbell.
Housing director Michael Davis
told floor representative Scott
Veitch Thursday night that he
doesn't know much about it either.
"I don't know when the renovations will be done. If I can get the
construction company to start
work, we'll start the day after
Christmas," Davis said.
But he admitted he didn't know if
that was possible.
"It should be done by the end of
January," he said. "We'll try to
have the jackhammering finished
over Christmas."
The floor will be a model for renovations planned for the entire residence. Changes include enclosing
the   balcony,   increasing   storage
space and installing a new
refrigerator, Davis said.
Veitch expressed concern about
disruptions if the work is carried on
while students are living in gage.
"We're getting a lot of benefits
but in a lot of ways we're kind of
guinea pigs," he told Davis. "Will
these people start working at 7
a.m.?"
Davis said he would try to arrange to have construction begin no
earlier than 8:30 a.m. but added
students should expect some inconvenience.
"You've got to have flexibility
both ways," he told Veitch.
Davis said he had "no idea" how
long renovations would take, but
Campbell said a good carpenter
could do it in a day and a half.
If the renovations prove successful, they will be implemented
throughout Gage at a cost of $1.2
million.
Students honor pickets
MONTREAL (CUP) — More
than 60,000 Quebec students stayed
home Thursday as teachers at 33
community colleges (CEGEP) went
on a one-day walkout to protest lagging contract talks.
The teachers were among an estimated 50,000 civil servants who
participated in the walkout, designed to put pressure on the Parti Quebecois government in- contract
negotiations.
Students, non-teaching staff and
CEGEP administrators respected
picket lines and no colleges reported
any trouble.
But some teachers at one of Vanier college's campuses in Montreal
say they are upset with the walkout
tactics. They said they think the
move will have no effect and expect
a general strike by civil servants
next spring.
ual legislation in England that made
homosexual acts between men illegal. Women went unnoticed, Persky said, because it was considered
inconceivable by Queen Victoria
that women could indulge in such
activities.
Persky   said   a   young   British
homosexual, Ben Kirk, launched an
unsuccessful protest against the legislation. But the protest had the effect of making homosexuality publicly discussable, he said.
"And the pervert was simultaneously invented," Persky said.
"Homosexuality was considered to
be a hereditary degeneration of the
central nervous system."
That circumstances have changed
since those times is a result of
homosexual political activity and
other social change, Persky said.
"One result of the homosexual
movement has been the development of homosexual history. Having gay history is helpful to surviving as a homosexual."
skwrnamm.
— stuart dee photo
SHARP-EYED NURSE traps escaping patients in T-Cup roundup outside SUB yesterday. Angel of mercy ran
with both players to goal line in vicious contest between nurses and home economic students. Medical savvy won
out and nursing squad walked away with venerated cup in thrilling 6-0 sports spectacular. Game was slowed down
by putrid smelling acid rain which dissolved dignity of gears and aggies in aromatic end-of-game show.
Adult education 'neglected'
The federal government is playing concerned parent to children's
education while undermining adult
education, says UBC's continuing
education director.
The government has left special
adult education programs, offered
by colleges and school boards, seriously underfinanced and should increase funding, Jindra Kulich said
Thursday.
About 350,000 adults with a
Grade 10 education were registered
in B.C.'s continuing education programs last year, he said.
"You cannot provide vocation
training until a person is at a certain
level of literacy."
Five million Canadian adults are
illiterate   because   of   unnecessary
and unjustifiable education barriers, claims a recently released federal government report.
"A campaign against adult illiteracy should be undertaken," the report states.
Kunich said he is glad the report
came out and added that the UBC is
doing its part to help solve adult illiteracy.
But UBC education professor
Gray Dickinson said the university
has no business in actual literacy
training.
It should be involved in training
and research to help adults, he said.
Bureaucrats fight red tape
II off W students fear cancer
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Without any warnings of its
potential danger, University of Winnipeg chemistry
students are using a chemical known to induce
leukemia.
Six students who have taken the first-year organic
chemistry course said they were never alerted to the
chemical's dangers.
"There was no big concern on anybody's part," said
student Erol Genik, referring to incidents when liquid
benzene was spilled during laboratory experiments.
Benzene causes no visible reaction when in contact
with skin or other surface, so most people tend to treat
it like water, he said.
Benzene is used mostly as a solvent and is most
dangerous when its vapors are inhaled.
But Fred Barth, the university's chemistry department chairman, said benzene is used only in limited
quantities and the amount students are exposed to is
not enough to be harmful.
"Usually we try to let students know about the
dangers involved but I can't say we always accomplish
this aim too well," he said.
The laboratory manual for the introductory
chemistry course contains no warning that benzene vapors are toxic. One experiment involves testing an
open-faced container of benzene with a match for
flammability. The physical chemistry manual
specifically warns students not to go near it with a
burner flame.
Dave Hatcher, who teaches 11 sections of the first-
year organic chemistry class, said the department has
been trying to phase out use of benzene because it is
carcinogenic.
The Toronto board of education recently banned
benzene from all use in high schools. Cancer researcher and chemist Michael Archer said: "There
shouldn't be any contact with benzene by students. It
is prudent to eliminate or reduce any exposures.
"It is known to cause leukemia and is therefore
quite dangerous."
Ontario high schools have replaced benzene with a
similar, but far less toxic, product. In Manitoba, a
warning about the chemical has been issued to high
schools but some schools have still not disposed of it.
Tired of the long trails of red tape
and the stodgy bureaucracy that
abounds at this institution? The administration might have found an
answer to the problem.
An information systems task
force has been set up to investigate
how administration information is
compiled and how it can be made
more efficient.
Task force member Robin Russell says they are interested in finding out about bureaucracy-related
complaints from students and are
accepting written submissions.
The task force will also find out if
information gathering can be converted to a central computer
system.
A computer program will make it
easier to get information and provide better security for data than
the present system, says Russell.
But there is some resistance to
change in the system at UBC because the 187 administration offices
each have a degree of independence
and want to keep it, she said.
Booze, a campus habit
From page 1
and property damage has dropped
since the crackdown.
Despite the decrease in damage,
recent statistics of alcohol use
among teenagers indicates that
drunken student sprees are probably just getting tamer. According to
the provincial alcohol and drug
commission, 60 per cent of high
school students recently surveyed in
Vancouver are current users of
alcohol.
But not all, or even most of them,
are necessarily alcoholics. And
UBC's student services director
Dick Shirran says that although
there are more students visiting Wilt
and AA for alcoholism treatment,
there has been no increase in the
number of students seeking help
from the counselling department.
"I don't see a great number of
chronic alcoholics on campus. Most
of the counsellors don't see that
many students with alcohol related
problems."
Health services director Archie
Johnson said he thinks current alcohol problems are no worse than before. "It's the in thing to go out
and get beered up, but it's been that
way for 40 years. It's a problem on
campus, but I think it's a social
one, not a medical one." Page 4
THE' UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1979
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Never go back to Eden again
"Hey folks. Don't throw me any fruits
because my store doesn't deal with that
sort of stuff."
This is the stark, unhealthy attitude
aimed not innocently at oranges or apples but at gays, led by Desmond Morris, manager of the Back to Eden health
food store at 2290 West 4th Ave.
As a public employer, his blanket
refusal to hire gays is no straight
business transaction, merchandise swap
or trading stamp policy.
It's vile and overt sexual discrimination of the worst kind.
He recently told prospective employee
Jonas Goldstein that he didn't hire
"fags" and thcifgays were not among
his "preferences." He saw it as his
natural right as an employer to exercise
discriminatory policies.
As far as we're concerned, he hasn't
got a leg to stand on.
If Morris had refused to hire a
"nigger" or a "coon," as one of our letter writers pointed out, he would have
faced social condemnation, and prosecution if he had persisted. But when
the words change to "queer" and
"fairy," suddenly the condemnation
lessens and in our letter pages support
appears for Morris' actions.
We were shocked and outraged by
the strong anti-gay sentiments expressed in some of those letters.
People should not be condemned for
their sexual orientation, let alone be
denied a job because of it. We respect
the rights of gay men and women to
love freely and openly, without feeling
shame, guilt or alienation. We respect
their right to seek employment, to be accepted and respected on the same
grounds as so-called smug straights.
We received complaints for publishing
a letter Oct. 19 which labelled gays as
"mentally ill." Although The Ubyssey
staff vividly opposes the view expressed
in the letter, our staff policy stands that
anyone on campus has a right to express
his or her views in our paper, regardless
of political or moral stance.
We were certainly glad to see that
gays did gain some strong support from
certain campus groups. The student
representative assembly's women's
committee blasted one of the anti-gays
letters as "bigoted and inappropriate in
an academic community." They expressed the right of gays to live with
dignity.
Morris should take heed.
The least we can all do is give gays fair
and just treatment in society. But we
can go one step further. The original letter describing Morris' hiring refusal advocated a boycott of the Back to Eden
health food store. We second the motion, urging UBC students to not buy
goods from a man who openly
discriminates.
After all, Jonas Goldstein, the gay
who was told by Morris that he didn't
hire gays, appealed to the B.C. human
rights commission, who said they could
do nothing.
We must step in if the government,
which is supposed to protect every individual's rights, can't help.
Support the gays. Boycott Back to
Eden.
Don't let cliff crunch come
We are submitting to The Ubyssey a copy of a proposal for the stabilization of the Wreck beach cliffs.
We hope to increase awareness and
to gain public input for the submission of the following preliminary
plans:
• To provide permanent trails
from the cliff top to the beach
where existing cut paths are located.
These are to be constructed of
wood planks or logs and stepped to
provide easy access;
• To install a five foot high
chain link fence along the cliff edge
except where public access is available;
• To install a plant border along
the trails. These plants would be of
an appropriate nature to encourage
people to stay on the trails;
• A revegetation program to be
implemented on all exposed cliff
areas;
• To slope only vertical cliffs to
an angle which will support a pioneer stage of biotic growth;
• To drain the perched aquifer
away from the cliff face;
• To determine what materials
are required to control wave action
and erosion of the slope at the cliff
base. (Proposed solution: an unconsolidated cobble berm at the
cliff base along with a reef or breakwater, located at such a position as
to dissipate the wave action at the
cliff base.)
We feel that these proposals meet
the objectives sought by the UBC
board of governors' cliff erosion
task force.
According to the criteria for the
submission of briefs, we must provide data, reasoning, conclusions
and recommendations for a scheme
to sustain protection from the elements (i.e. winds, waves and rain)
for the Point Grey cliffs.
Due to the limited time available,
the technical information is being
collected from the existing sources
on campus.
Chris Marchant of the Botanical
Gardens has been involved with re-
vegetation schemes in this area for
four years. He is providing us with a
list of plants that will take hold and
are suitable as a pioneer stage for
erosion control of the cliffs. He is
also providing a cost estimate of
our proposed revegetation program.
Other members of the university
community are being approached to
aid us in gathering data and solutions to our other objectives.
We will also provide a 'ball park'
cost estimate for all of our proposals, as the task force's brief states
"more weight may be given to
briefs that do contain cost estimates."
Our brief will contain illustrations, maps and photographs to
support and clarify our proposals.
We will recommend immediate
implementation of this proposal to
arrest any further cliff erosion. We
will recommend that signs be placed
along paths and at the toe and top
of the cliffs to inform people of the
delicate stability of the cliffs. All
trail entrances should be clearly
marked and maps made available to
the public on the available routes to
the beach.
An education program should be
implemented in the schools, universities, and in the media, to inform
the community of the magnitude of
the erosion problem and to increase
their awareness of the schemes under way to stabilize this problem.
Finally, we feel that the facilities
and resources of UBC are sufficient
to complete the entire proposed
project. We have here an opportunity to apply the knowledge that is
preparing students for injection into the marketplace. Numerous students and faculty of geography, engineering, botany, landscape architecture, soil sciences and geology
have studied this particular problem
over many years.
We feel a task force should be set
up to coordinate the implementation of this proposal using members
of the   university  community.   It
THE UBYSSEY
October 26, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
"Stop the presses." screamed Tom Hawthorn as he rushed into the newsroom, "have I got a scoop for you." Heather Conn jumped up in her excitement,
"we'll make it line on one." Joan Marklund and Will Morphy looked up with shining faces. Kevin Finnegan just grumbled; "Where's my gin you bastards," as
Verne McDonald swang his composing stick wildly at Judi Smith, Christine Wright and Lawrence Panych. Peter Menyasz and Geof Wheelwright chomped on
cigars and sycophants Steve Reilly, Randy Hanson and Kathryn Thurman tidied up the ashes. Julie Wheelwright yelled for more copy and Ingrid Matson and
Wendy Hunt complained about the long hours and pressure of the job. Daniel Moon came in with photogs Glen Sanford, Ross Burnett, Jim Steel, Stuart Dee
and Jim Duggan. "Must of been at the Tea Cup," he sighed. "They smell like shit." Kerry Regier and Shaffin Shariff looked on and yelled, "don't forget the
party this Saturday at the Wheelhouse, and that's a 30."
would provide an excellent opportunity for the students of this university to apply their classroom
learning.
This proposal is being undertaken by students in geography 315
under the guidance of M. North as
an alternative assignment for one
project for the course.
The final date for submission of
this proposal to the cliff erosion
task force is 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2,
1979. The proposal is then to be discussed at a public meeting on Nov.
9, 1979 at the Instructional Resource Centre. We urge all interested parties to attend.
Any information or criticism
about this project which would aid
us in our task would be greatly appreciated. Please contact: Ralph
Fraser (228-8410), Don Golob
(738-2082), Bruce Peel (224-4064),
Greg Smith (733-9065), or Mrs. M.
North, UBC geography department.
A copy of this proposal has been
distributed to Chris Marchant, Botanical Gardens; E. Kucera, geological engineering; Dr. Isaacson, civil
engineering; Mr. Spence, erosion
control task force.
geography 315 students
Get back to Eden,
shrivel and die!
Gay People of UBC should be delighted that the formidable threesome of McDonnell, Vryheid and
Druet have chosen to patronize the
Back to Eden whole wheat emporium. One hopes in fact that all individuals of a similar bent (or
should I say warp), all those suffering from narrowness of the mind
and stoniness of the heart, will
flock to the same establishment and
atrophy together in a suitably sterile
environment.
Perhaps when they and their kind
have shrivelled to something resembling dried garbanzos we will all
be able to get back to Eden.
W. Richardson
librarianship 2
Bile piles on vile
On behalf of the Gay People of
UBC, I wish to thank the many individuals both gay and non-gay
who have written to The Ubyssey in
response to the vile letter from B. J.
McDonnell, A. Vryheid and P.
Druet of Oct. 19, 1979 labelling
gays as mentally ill. The tremendous response has been most gratifying.
I would especially like to thank
the gay/lesbian law association of
UBC and the SRA women's committee for their support.
T. R. Stevenson
Gay People of UBC
president
Please speak up
A very valuable A.K.G. microphone was taken Oct. 12 from the
upstairs area in SUB, after the Ok-
toberfest dance. Will the person
who has the microphone please return it, as soon as possible, to either
the lost and found in Brock Hall or
the civil engineering office in the
civil and mechanical engineering
building at the south end of campus.
If the microphone is not returned
it will have to be replaced with proceeds from the dance that were to
go to charity. Please respond — no
questions asked.
Rod Malkin
civil engineering 4
Keep gator afloat
Do you ever get that feeling of
being cooped up in this university,
as though you were encased in a
glass cage? Do you find that no one
cares about you? Do you find that
the whole world ignores your good
qualities? If you answered yes to
any of the above — you know how 1
feel now that I have been rejected
from the reject club. Help! Before 1
drown.
Barne> A. Gator
S16C2 Gage International Ballet of Caracas
SeePF 6 Queen steps down from throne
By CHRISTINE WRIGHT
Some dub her Queen of CanLit
Land. But the crowd that gathered
at the Literary Storefront on Oct. 20
didn't come to gawk at a
figurehead, they came to hear a
good writer. They weren't disappointed.
The atmosphere was casual.
There were only 100 pre-sold tickets
available for the informal reading.
Early arrivals sat on sofas and chairs
while the rest occupied the floor.
There was a bar open for those willing to clamber over bodies to get to
it. The audience was a diverse mixture of young and old,  men and
women.  And the pre-show buzz
was intelligent.
Atwood began the reading with
several poems-in-process. She
revealed that the works were still in
her own illegible writing. Her voice
was hoarse after two weeks on the
road and the Storefront was not
equipped with an amplifying
microphone. But the power of Atwood's writing surmounted all
technical difficulties.
Atwood's poetry is intense. The
images are strong, often violent.
Concrete details are not shrouded
in    emotion.    The    language    is
economic;  its strength  lies in  its
simplicity.
Atwood's delivery is not
dramatic. Her voice is almost
monotone, the words echo a sense
of detachment. But Atwood is a
writer, not an actress. Somehow
the reading style is appropriate - the
words speak for themselves.
"River Blindness" is a painful
poem. Atwood speaks of "good
news" and a river of "red syrup".
But the imagery becomes progressively sharp. The final line
leaves the audience hushed and
uneasy: "stab it right in the vein
-the good news."
'Atwood on pedestal'
By JUDI SMITH
Things are getting pretty tough
for a queen these days. She works
and works and what does she get?
Nothing but flack and rust on the
throne.
It's bad enough that the pay's so
low, but she can't even go for a
walk in Hyde Park without
somebody asking her for
something, not to mention her
need for five minutes private toiletry
in the morning. Surrounded by mirrors and ladies-in-waiting, there's
barely a minute she has to herself.
Queen Atwood is no exception.
After all that struggle to reach the
throne (albeit with a little elbow-
pushing, toe-stomping and knees in
the groin), it just hasn't turned out
to be the stuff dreams are made of.
It's not easy, telling people what to
do, and there just isn't enough time
to think properly. What with
publishers pounding on your door
wanting important documents sign
ed, and critics breathing down your
neck . . . why, you don't even
have time to look in the mirror!
Nevertheless, Queen Atwood has
found time in her busy schedule to
deliver a Thanksgiving Day address
to her subjects. She has entitled it
Life Before Man. Her platform remains essentially the same as that
which spurred her up to the throne;
however, in this address her
message is clear, uncompromising,
and (relatively) precise.
She addresses her subjects as
"the apathetic, the fatalistic, the
uncommitted, the cynical". We are
incapable of love, she says. We are
unable to deal with simple day-today survival. We hop around from
- bed to bed, wanting, needing,
wishing, hoping, and nobody
knows what to do. In our stupidity,
she tells us, we destroy not only
ourselves and each other, but the
whole world. The world was fine,
she says, before we came along
and mucked it all up.
Her advice to her subjects? The
kindest thing you can do, she says,
is to go out right now and put a
bullet through your head — but
you don't even have the guts to do
that.
The fact is, of course, that these
are not exact words. As everyone
knows, Queen Atwood excells in
the art of eloquent speech, and Life
Before Man has ample evidence of
her ability to translate language into
veritable music. The Speech from
the Throne is worth reading for its
fine eloquence, but the message remains somewhat puzzling.
Did the publishers break down
the door in the middle of her
toiletry? Did the hard seat of the
throne influence her notion of
sound advice? Or is Queen Atwood
pleading with her faithful subjects
to dethrone her? After all, we put
her up there.
Didn't we?
In the silence, Atwood looks up
and smiles. "That's for all the critics
that ask, 'Why are you so
pessimistic?' ".
In another poem, Atwood explores the vulnerability of speech.
Her words encompass an
understanding of human nature:
"it's risk to open your mouth - who
knows what may fly out?"
Atwood's poetic images are firmly rooted in reality. Explaining the
premise of an elegy written for a
poet-friend, she reveals that the
"mushrooms" in the poem are the
mushrooms on a pizza. When she
was editing her friend's first book,
they frequented a pizza parlour in
Toronto.
Atwood's poetic vitality also lives
between the pages of her latest
novel. Life Before Man. The short
scenes read from the end of the
book were rich in imaginative detail
and the characters are relentlessly
realistic. Atwood accomplishes an
unusual feat; she brings laughter to
the subject of death. Her humour is
fresh and morbid simultaneously,
tinged with a pervading sense of
the bizarre.
In one scene, Auntie Muriel is dying of cancer in the hospital. Her
color has changed from a "confident beige to the off-white of a dirty tooth." Her niece, Elizabeth
despises her, yet the sight of Auntie
Muriel crying like a "bleeding
statue" throws Elizabeth's hatred
off balance. The audience alternately laughs and is silent. In Life
Before Man, comedy and tragedy
are intrinsically connected.
"As you can see, this book is all
about sex," Atwood comments
wryly. (She is referring to the
Maclean's review, which asserts
that "love and lust" ... are the entire stuff" of Life Before Man.) Atwood's subject is life.  Often  her
focus is the grim side, but her world
encompasses more than sex.
Margaret Atwood does not like to
be confined.
Atwood responded to questions
following the reading. Asked how
much time she spends writing, she
replied that five hours is the maximum now that she has a 3-year-old
child to attend to. "That's why the
chapters in Life Before Man are so
short" she said.
Regarding the movie being made
from an earlier novel, Surfacing,
Atwood is reserved. Producer Beryl
Fox is a friend, but a movie can't
reproduce a book. "Films aren't
made of words, they're made of images on pieces of celluloid," Atwood said.
The change from book to film is
apparently one that Atwood will
have to accept. Margot Kidder, of
Superman fame, wants to produce
and star in a film version of Lady
Oracle. Lois Lane as Lady Oracle?
"Do you ever take a break from
writing?" Atwood was asked.
"Usually writing takes a break
from you," she replied. Surprising
news from one who has churned
out a collection of short stories, a
children's book, a work of literary
criticism, eight books of poetry and
four novels.
A remarkable list of
achievements; a remarkeable
writer. But Atwood isn't interested
in playing literary figurehead. She is
a serious writer who happened to
become a popular one.
Why must a writer who is female
and Canadian be wrapped with the
banners of feminism and Canadianism? Margaret Atwood doesn't
presume to speak for anyone but
herself. And her personal perspective, as demonstrated at the
Storefront reading, is as bold as
ever. Long live the Queen.
Get a handle
on something great.
Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1979 THEDILS
By DANIEL MOON
The Dils represent the other
side of the coin in punk music.
They have played with big
names like the Clash and been
subjected to lack of sound
checks, limitations on volume and
snob treatment such as D.O.A.
experienced when they opened
the Clash show last week.
Unlike the Clash, the Dils don't
play in large halls and don't have
albums in the racks of major
record stores. But on the basis of
a couple of singles and appearances in smaller clubs in Los
Angeles, San Francisco and New
York they are building a strong
and growing following of fans and
critics.
CHIP . . . record industry sucks
Their recent three night stand at
the Smilin' Buddha treated Vancouverites to the polished vocal
harmonies, uncompromising
musical intensity and revolutionary politics of the group, affectionately nicknamed the Red
Rockers. Between gigs, Tony Kin-
man (bass), his brother Chip Kin-
man Iguitar) and Zippy Pinhead
(drums) spoke with Page Friday
reporter Daniel Moon about their
roots, political commitment and
musical ambitions.
The Dils end their visit here with
a concert tonight at the Viking
Hail,   828 East Hastings,   where
they will be playing with the
Subhumans, the Dishrags and the
Metros.
PF: You're known as a political
band. Do you agree with that
label?
Tony Kinman: Many of the
songs we sing do have a political
content. But like any other label it
tends to create misconceptions.
PF: When you use the term
political, what do you think of?
Tony Kinman: For us it means
singing rebel music that goes
beyond adolescent rebellion. It
goes beyond no girl, zits and
parents into things like cops,
border checks and class wars.
PF: What problems have you
had with the police?
Chip Kinman: We have the
same problems as everyone else.
They're always on the guest list
and show up for free. In Los
Angeles there was a big riot and
they just started bashing heads.
We haven't been singled out.
PF: Have you had problems
with immigration?
Tony Kinman: The last time we
came up they kept us at the
border for eight hours. Half of our
trips up here are usually spent at
the border being scrutinized. The
basic problem is that they don't
like young weird-looking people
coming into Canada, or into the
United States for that matter.
PF: You guys aren't that weird-
looking. Do you think you have
problems because of your political
stance?
Chip Kinman: They don't follow
the punk scene that closely.
Tony Kinman: Of course when
they check the van and see a
paper or a handout, they don't dig
that too much.
PF: You've got a single out called Class War and are advocating a
change in the social structure.
How does that affect your relationship with the recording industry?
Chip Kinman: The recording industry sucks. The people are all
gross, all prostitutes and all mafia.
Being an artist is pretty congruous
with politics because we're trying
to sing about things that mean
something to us.
Tony Kinman: You've had ar-
TONY . . . singing rebel music
tists, writers and poets like
William Blake who expressed their
discontent with the world and it
wasn't considered strange by people. I think it's strange that rock
music isn't a lot more political
because it is a popular music form
and discontent is a widespread
thing.
PF: Why isn't rock music more
political?
Tony Kinman: Early rock music
was an expression of the performers themselves. People like
Elvis were close to the embryonic
recording industry at that time.
They all chose the smaller routes,
Elvis started on Sun Records,
Buddy Holly on Coral Records.
Nowadays the industry controls
what gets out and what's heard.
PF: How did you get the name
the Dils?
Tony Kinman: It doesn't mean
anything. It doesn't refer to
pickles, dildoes, Bob Dylan, John
Dillinger or the Beatles. It's just a
four letter word.
PF: Where is the band originally
from?
Tony Kinman: Chip  and   I  are
DILS . . . other side of the coin in punk music
from Carlsbad, 100 miles south of
Los Angeles. We never lived in
L.A. but since it was close that's
where we played. When we were
ready to move we went to San
Francisco because we liked it.
PF: What's the scene like in
L.A.?
Tony Kinman: It's real good. In
the whole L.A. area there are
eight clubs to play in The L.A.
press is giving the scene ample
coverage.
PF: How do you compare the
Smilin' Buddha with the California
clubs?
Tony Kinman: The Buddha is a
nice building. It's intimate, it's
small and it's got a bar. If it
weren't for all the hassles with the
police it would be a pretty fun
club. I wish they were more relaxed about who they let in and how
many people they let in. It's worse
in the States because the legal
age is 21 and a large portion of
your audience is lopped off.
PF: You've got a new drummer
who is from Vancouver. How did
that happen?
Zippy Pinhead: The Dils were
on their New York tour and their
old drummer, John Silvers, blew
it. He couldn't keep up with the
pace.
PF: How did you meet the Dils?
Zippy Pinhead: I was on my first
trip to San Francisco and phoned
the Avengers' house and Tony
answered the phone. I'd heard the
Dils single up here and didn't
realize that Tony was in the band.
After they came back from New
York they asked me to join the
group.
PF: Had you drummed in any
Vancouver bands?
Zippy Pinhead: Yeah. I'd played
with D.O.A., the Rabid, the Stiffs
and a band called Sergeant Nick
Penis and the Brass Ball Battalion.
PF: That's quite impressive.
How long has the present band
been together?
Zippy Pinhead: Three months.
PF: What do you think of the
local bands?
Chip Kinman: D.O.A. is my
favorite punk band, period. The
bands up here seem to be pretty
hard-working and their songs are
better structured.
PF: Why do you think Vancouver has spawned so many
good bands?
Chip Kinman: It's because it's
kind of innocent up here. It's not
like Los Angeles, which has had a
show biz industry for years or like
San Francisco which is full of
nuts. Out of innocence comes
high quality music.
PF: Would you decribe Dils
music as innocent?
Chip Kinman: I suppose so.
We're from Carlsbad. We never
lived in the city. We grew up in a
military family and moved around
every three years.
PF: Did being brought up in a
military family influence your
music?
Tony Kinman: Only in one way.
Our family is from the South,
Kentucky and North Carolina. The
music we heard on the radio was
country music. We grew up on it
and still like to listen to it. But our
father didn't bring the job home
with him and we didn't live on
military bases.
PF: Did you come to your
political views by reading Karl
Marx?
Tony Kinman: No. I had those
views before I read. I got my
views by working at a shit job as a
gas station attendant. Those feelings come to you naturally if you
don't use one of society's
panaceas like weekend drunks
and movies after work.
PF: Some fans have described
your music as sounding like the
Byrds speeded up 80,000 times.
Tony Kinman: I'm flattered.
PF: Your vocal harmonies are
remarkably lyrical and professionally delivered. How did that
come about?
Chip Kinman: We're brothers,
so our voices tend to vibrate well
together. We're a three piece
band so we might as well use
everything we've got.
Tony Kinman:- We also didn't
expect Zippy to be such a good
singer. He sang on the Vancouver
Complication album.
Zippy Pinhead: Check out Pork
You on a song called Biz.
PF: What punk rock bands do
you like?
Chip Kinman: I still like the Sex
Pistols album, the first Ramones
album and the first Stand album. I
don't like too many bands now. I
think punk rock, like most of rock
music, is 95 per cent bullshit.
PF: Why a punk band? Why
didn't you form a country band?
Chip    Kinman:    Because   we
PINHEAD . . . drummer
don't live in Appalachia. We're
middle class.
Tony Kinman: For most young
white Americans hard rock is the
natural musical outlet. I don't
think too many blacks really dig
punk rock.
PF: You've taken a stand
politically against racism. The
lyrics to your single Class War
say: "I'm talking about a class
war. I'm not talking about a race
war." Why don't blacks dig punk
music?
Tony Kinman: For most black
people there is music they would
rather listen to. They grew up on
different stuff. Take reggae for instance. I've yet to hear a white
person play decent reggae. It's a
matter of what you grew up with.
It's not a question of racism.
PF: The Dils have put out a
single called I Hate the Rich. What
other political songs do you do?
Chip Kinman: Before the Law,
National Guard, Give Me a Break,
and Sound of the Rain. Most of
SeePF 9
Friday, October 26,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
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Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1979 By KATHRYN
THURMAN
The Clash refuse to compromise themselves.
That is why they are the Clash.
And that is why they have survived the indiscriminate onslaught
of self-destruction that seemed to
strike the other seminal British
punk bands (The Sex Pistols, The
Damned) that also emerged from
England in 1976.
The Clash, their debut album
originally released in 1977, is cut
for cut one of the greatest rock
and roll albums ever produced.
And the band's defiant sound
has scored well on the charts.
In 1978, their second album
Give 'Em Enough Rope shot
straight to the number two spot
on the British charts the week of
its re/ease.
The Clash's music desperately
and successfully combats punk
aggression against innocence,
proving that punk is still alive and
well and there for the takers, if
they dare — and care.
Oct. 18: In Geof Wheelwright's wildly driven Datsun
en-route to bus depot.
Huddled in the twilight
shadows thrown along the
backseat of the station wagon,
beside his two precious possessions, a reel to reel recorder and a
stetson packed carefully in a hat
box, his face lit by the glow of the
overhead bridge lights, guitarist
Mick Jones politely apologizes for
not giving me a "proper
interview."
I tell him he's doing fine.
Only a few hours earlier he had
suggested that I "make
something up" instead, as he was
desperately trying to find someone who knew the departure
time of the band's flight to
England. No one knew, and consequently the Clash had been
stranded at the Vancouver International Airport.
Jones had then bid farewell to
his fellow band members,
deciding to re-route his trip with a
short stop-over in Seattle via
Greyhound.
On the_way to the bus depot he
absentmindedly stares out the car
window and muses "we've just
finished eight weeks of chaotic
touring, but this is the first flight
we've missed. Actually we were
at the airport on time but we
weren't allowed to board the
plane as it was about to take off
and we still had all this luggage
with us. Some of our entourage,
including   crew   and   roadies.
deserted us and were on the plane
already.
"The ones who are on the plane
are ex-crew and roadies as of
when they sat on that plane instead of holding it up for us," he
smirks.
"Anyway the tour's done and
the job's over," he sighs as he
slouches further back into his
seat.
"Actually the band itself is quite
self-sufficient" he says quietly,
apparently trying to convince
himself more than anyone else.
"We have to be, considering all
the trouble we've had with tour
managers this tour. Our last one
ran out on us this morning
without paying the hotel bill and
so we had to run out of the hotel
also. I don't know who paid."
Jones suddenly chuckles. "Our
first tour manager on this tour got
the sack 'cause he booked us in
shitty hotels and didn't run things
smoothly. The next one only
lasted for half an hour, then he
had a nervous breakdown. The
William Morris Agency in New
York city picks them for us. At
one point there was two at the
same time, one to watch over
what the other was doing. It was
totally stupid."
I jokingly suggest that just
keeping track of their tour
managers was probably the biggest challenge the band encountered while in America.
"The biggest challenge was the
other night at the gig (PNE
Gardens)," Jones lashes out as
he leans forward and elaborates.
"That one guy in the audience
was throwing something at me. It
was really infuriating. It gets on
my nerves, especially when
they're so far away you can't even
get to them. I told him to come
down and fight but he didn't, so I
' Fuck the establishment and lefs
get on with it. Let us try and build
something better for ourselves'
yelled at him to go home if he
didn't like the show."
Lighting up a spliff he continues: "We'd rather get a good
audience reaction, but sometimes
if we get a bad one we get so pissed off we play much better.
"A gig is supposed to be a
challenge to the audience as well.
The audience must not have any
pre-conceptions about us.
Whatever people expect they will
just have to be disappointed if
they expect anything else than
just regular blokes. But we won't
be an ordinary punk band. The audience will not trap us."
As we turn into the entrance of
the bus depot, Jones heaves a
deep sigh, then slowly smiles.
"I've gone a bit weird now. I've
been just a mad person for the last
two months while we've been
ravaging rampantly through
America.
"Now alt I really want to do is to
sit down," he says as he gets up
and out of the car. "You know
what I mean, perhaps smoke a
spliff, watch the television for a
bit, read a book, and have a cup
of tea."
Oct. 19: At Vancouver International Airport. Sea Island
Lounge and Bar.
Cloistered comfortable in the
dimly lit Sea Island bar, vocalist
Joe Strummer re-arranges his
bright pink stetson. "Yeah, we
have a lot of problems with
managers," he says in his typically
hoarse voice," 'cause we don't
like being told what to do."
I mention the backstage money
hassles they were involved with
just before their gig at the PNE
Gardens two nights ago when
Norman Perry (Perryscope Concert Productions) bailed them out
of a financial jam. I suggest that a
manager could have shielded
them from such problems.
"We didn't have no problems
with him (Perry)," Strummer
stresses. "Our sound and light
crew wouldn't let the show go
ahead without payment of some
$7,000 we owed them and
naturally we didn't have it. And
Norman Perry came up with it."
Several days later in a
telephone conversation. Perry
philosophized. "The Clash in their
way of doing business made a little bit of a financial misjudgement.
And as a result they were very
ashamed that they were in the city
they had liked the most on their
first tour, but now were on the
verge of cancelling because they
didn't have the necessary funds to
pay their crew at their immediate
disposal.
"So I stepped in and advanced
the Clash and their management
enough money to pay the crew so
that the show could go on."
Through the crowd at the bar, I
glance out the window and see
the Air Canada jet Strummer,
drummer Nicky 'Topper' Headon
and their girlfriends will soon
board for England. It's 5'30 p.m.
and the plane leaves at 6:00 p.m.,
f The audience must not have any
pre-conceptions about us.
We won't be an ordinary punk band '
but they aren't in any particular
hurry. Strummer still has $14 left
after buying his girlfriend a hardcover book on the life of Marilyn
Monroe, and that can buy a lot of
gin and lime.
As I turn my thoughts back to
the conversation, I realize Strummer has asked me if I know that
they've just recorded a third
album called London's Calling.
"It's a real smash-a-roony," he
exclaims, "it will sell like hot
cakes. It will be released in
England and America at the end
of November and everyone had
better stand six feet back when
they put the album on the player!"
I'm curious whether they've
made any money from their
previous records.
"Are you kidding?!" ejaculates
Strummer. "Because of our touring losses we are still in debt to
the record company (CBS). And
we try to pay 'em back with our
record sales. But we're never paid
up."
The band had originally received a lot of flack from their more
stalwart fans for signing with a
large corporate record company
(CBS), which was interpreted by
the punk community as "selling
out."
Topper, who earned his
nickname from a character in a
British comic strip, says matter-
of-factly, "When you sign with a
small company you play small. To
get to as many people as possible
you've got to go with the biggest.
"But the bigger the record company the bigger the problems," he
cautiously concedes. "But we can
fight 'em."
Topper then stresses that the
Clash  don't  mind  fighting  with
their record company, but they
don't like fighting with their fans
at a gig. And they care about their
fans.
"We care a lot!" he shouts, tipping over on his bar stool as he
grabs at his drink. "That's what
we're here for. We're only here
(America) to play to the audiences
and please them. If we wanted to
just make money we'd only do
video tapes and films and we'd
release a lot of records. We
wouldn't even bother to leave
London."
The Clash's forceful repertoire
of straight-ahead rock 'n roll occasionally contains an undercurrent
of reggae and rockabilly twists.
"But we're not trying to go back
to the past at all," emphasizes
Topper. "We are just realizing our
(musical) roots. Like Bo Didley,
Sam and Dave, and Jerry Lee
Lewis. They were all great. They
were rock 'n roll!"
"With reggae music it's not the
relgion or the politics I like, it's the
rhythm and the beat," stresses
Strummer.
"Rock 'n roll has got nothing to
do with fuckin' politics. Everyone
says we're a political band, but we
don't sing political songs. We sing
about what's going on," adds
Topper as we leave the bar and
walk along the corridor to Gate
20.
The band's record company,
the press and even the fans have
given the Clash the persona of
politicians, but they only use
music as an effective instrument
of social change.
"We consider ourselves a
socially aware band. I ain't suggesting any party line," states
SeePF 9
I
Friday, October 26, 1979
Page Friday 5 Caracas Ballet blends
modern, Latin dance styles
CARACAS BALLET . . . young company with energy, vitality
By LAWRENCE PANYCH
Vancouver enthusiastically
welcomed the Ballet Internacional
de Caracas following its debut performance at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre Wednesday night. The
South American company of
twenty-two dancers has experienced a meteoric rise on the international dance scene, eliciting ecstatic
praise from audiences and critics
alike.
Director and choreographer
Vincente Nebrada brought it all
together four years ago following
the demise of the New York-based
Harkness Ballet with which he and
several of his dancers were
associated.
Wednesday night's performance
consisted of three ballets. The first
piece, Our Waltzes, was
choreographed by Nebrada and
was a fanciful little number flowing
from beginning to end as one
movement. Beginning with slow,
rather boring ballroom movements
it builds to a series of free-wheeling
pas de deux with some very
dramatic lifts. Movement is swift
and smooth, bordering on violent.
Principal    dancers   Zhandra
Rodriguez and Zane Wilson stole
the show. Rodriguez was firey but
always controlled. Wilson's partnering was faultless. Together they
ascended on air, whirling and
swooping about one another more
skilfully than birds in flight.
Percussion for Six Men, also
choreographed by Nebrada, was an
uninspiring piece. The six male
dancers dazzled the crowd with an
impressive display of acrobatics but
never really rose to the challenge of
the music. Their bravado created
the image of adolescents eagerly
trying to "strut their stuff" rather
than the sense of strength and confidence they were trying to project.
The last piece, Rodin Mis En Vie
by Margo Sappitigton, was a collection of frames attempting to capture in dance what the French
genius Auguste Rodin moulded in
bronze. The display of exquisitely
sculpted bodies, minimally dressed
in skin-hugging body socks, was
sensual to the point of eroticism.
The piece was very pleasing
especially the rare beauty of The
Kiss danced by Rodriguez and
Manuel Molina. But it was not particularly Rodinesque.
Burgers of Calais was especially
disappointing for lovers of Rodin's
work. An attempt was made to
convey the sense of drama of six
brave but defeated men going to
their deaths. It never really succeeds.
No doubt the injudicious choice
of costumes played a role in this
shortcoming. The long, flowing
cloaks may have been superficially
correct but when put into motion
they resemble more the ball gowns
of Ginger Rogers than the heavy,
ponderous robes worn by the
burgers as they prepared to meet
their fate.
The Ballet Internacional de
Caracas is a young company. The
energy and vitality of their dancers
coupled with a unique blend of contemporary dance style and a
distinctively Latin flavor make for
very exciting performances.
Zhandra Rodriguez is indescribable. She dances with a suppleness that is magnetic. She
leaves one with the feeling that if all
that was accomplished in an otherwise fruitless life was to hug her
close and swirl lightlv about ail
would not be lost.
Chicken
out.
More than just classic
. burgers (15 varieties;
we've got super barbecued
chicken (cheap, too!).
R J. Burger & Sons. Lots of
great food. Lots of great fun.
11:30 on-7 days a week. 2966
W. 4th Ave. and Bayswater.
:
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ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
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Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732 9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
CUSO INFORMATION NIGHT
Tuesday, October 30th, 1979
7:30 p.m., Upper Lounge, International House
Slide Show — CUSO in Ghana - prepared by
Returned Volunteers Alice and Joe Howsam
Returned volunteers from West Africa will be on hand to answer
any questions. Job flyers will be available.
EVERYONE WELCOME!!
A Professional Opening to the
World of Business
Discover Deloitte Haskins & Sells. One ot the largest accounting firms..in Canada
and throughout the world...with a diversity of clients and services the equal of any.
A people place. Unsurpassed in technical leadership. A place where professional
development and personal achievement are the ways of our life.
Arrange to talk with us when we visit your campus by submitting UCPA form to the
Canada Manpower Employment Centre or by forwarding your resume directly to J.
F. (Jim) Gordon, Personnel Director, P.O. Box 11114, Royal Centre, 1055 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6E 3P8.
Please feel free to call us at 682-8781.
Deloitte
Haskins Sells
Chartered Accountants
Halifax
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Regina
Edmonton
Calgary
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Langley
Vancouver
"Unequivocally the most terrifying
movie i ve ever seen,   -after dark Magazine
DEP ABc
EVERY BABYSITTER'S NIGHTMARE
BECOMES REAL...
WHEN
A STRANGER
CALLS
COLUMBIA Pit TERES in association with MELVTN SIMON PRODUCTIONS presents
A BARRY KROST PRODUCTION
CHARLES DURNING   CAROL KANE   COLLEEN DEWHURST
WHEN A STRANGER CALLS
Mso s..,rrinS TONY BECKLEY
RACHEL ROBERTS   RON O'NEAL   Executive Producers MELV1N SIMON AND BARRY KROST
Music by DANA KAPROFF    Written b\ STEVE FEKE and FRED WALTON
Produced by DOUG CHAPIN and STEVE II KE    Directed by FRED WALTON
l/MECJNSMONl
I PROOUCtONS NC T
SO AOMHTANCI   T
CORONET 1
(51   GRANVILLE
685-6128
WARNING: Some frightening
scenes. B.C. Dir.
SHOWTIMES: 2:00 4:00 6:00 8:00
10:00 Sunday from 2:00
STARTS
FRIDAY
Page Friday 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26, 1979 *>4p«lMMM<NtHMfcww«>MM>lPMam*a^^
rama
It's a bug's life
for Gregor Samsa
By PETER MENYASZ
Metamorphosis will bug people
who are in the least squeamish.
". . .as Gregor Samsa awoke
one morning from a night of uneasy
dreams, he found he had transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect. . ."
— franz kafka
It's not often that a short story or
novel can be transformed into a live
production without losing its original impact and meaning. But Tamahnous' production of Metamorphosis, adapted by Steven Berkoff
from Franz Kafka's short story,
achieves that transformation.
Metamorphosis
Produced by Tamahnous
At the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre
Until Nov. 10
The plot is simple. A young man,
working to support his entire family, awakes one morning to find he
has been transformed into a giant
dung beetle.
The play chronicles his life from
that point on and shows the reactions his transformation produces
in those around him.
Gregor Samsa (played by Bruce
Ruddell) represents the oppression
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
6882481
A
pLBepra Gas trunk uwe
The Alberta Gas Trunk Line Company
wilt be on campus November 19. 20 &
21 to recruit graduates in the following disciplines for positions within
the Calgary Head Office
Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
(Applied Mathematicsi
Commerce
(Accounting Majors)
Pre-screenmg deadline is November
2. for additional information, please
inquire at the Campus Manpower Office.
Cram
with us*
Not exams -food. Great
food. 15 classic burgers,
inexpensive steaks, fabulous
starters, yummy desserts.
Open your mouth and say
'ahh! 11:30 on- 7 days a
week. 2966 W. 4th Ave. and
Bays water.
of overwork and strained living conditions. His transformation to the
shape of a dung beetle is purely
symbolic — in action and meaning
his real life is similar to the beetle's.
Ruddell's portrayal of the man-
cum-beetle is startlingly real. His
actions and expressions become remarkably beetle-like. And his characterization of Gregor Samsa as a
downtrodden runner on a treadmill
is convincing.
The scene featuring the lodgers
the family takes on to provide some
income is slightly overplayed as
comic relief. But the serious nature
of the play demands some relief,
and Larry Lillo, Wendy Goriing and
Canada Wild are effective as the
finicky, demanding and morally disgusting boarders.
Glen Thompson and Sheelah Me-
gill, as Gregor Samsa's father and
mother, show the strain of a family
dependent on one member for its
sole support. The father is long unaccustomed to work, and blames
his son's transformation for the
family's difficulties. Father and
mother almost come to blows several times and only the mediation of
the daughter (Sue Astley) prevents
violence from erupting.
The set designed for Tamahnous'
production is masterful and con-
METAMORPHOSIS . . . parents kill child by "insecticide"
veys the bug-like focus of the play
with its spidery, disjointed appearance. It also provides enough space
for the play's action to take place.
The overall effect of the play is
stunning. Its length is perfect.
There is no intermission and the ac
tion comes to an end just at the
point where boredom might begin
to set in.
And the point is well made. People put under tremendous pressure
by work or family or both, are generally   unable   to   withstand   the
strain. And their life is worth little
more than the insects we despise
for their lowliness and blind in-
dustriousness.
It's the kind of message that can
bug you for a long time.
Friday, October 26, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 Pacino gives judges
justice in new Jewison film
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
After starring in the Sidney
Pollack-directed Bobby Dearfield
two years ago, Al Pacino is back in
top form as Arthur Kirkland, the
protagonist - lawyer of the new
film, . . . And Justice for All.
. . . And Justice for All
Starring Al Pacino
Playing at the Vogue
The opening of the film finds
Kirkland in jail, in contempt of court
for trying to slug a judge (John For-
sythe) who will not allow evidence
necessary to prove the the innocence of a client Kirkland's
defending to be submitted in court.
That's just the beginning. From
then on, he has to deal with his
senile grandfather (Lee Strasberg),
a suicidal judge (Jack Warden), a
partner (Jeffrey Tambor) who loses
his stability, and an inane ethics
committee.
Adding insult to injury, he has to
defend the very judge who found
him in contempt of court - against a
charge of rape. The shocker is that
the judge is guilty of the crime!
. . . And Justice for All satirizes
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the injustices in the American
judicial system. It's as if screenwriters Valerie Curtin and Barry
Levinson took a magnifying glass
and exemplified corruption in the
judiciary.
What they have ignored in the
process is to give their characters
(with the exception of Kirkland) any
real depth. Pacino's Kirkland is the
most honorable character in the
film. The rest are either uncaring,
sadistic or senile. Forsythe's
character, for example, is completely devoid of compassion and
practises foul acts he purports to
condemn on the bench. Warden's
character, Rayford, is a suicidal
judge who likes to eat his lunch on
the outside ledge - four stories high
- and flies helicopters that run out
of fuel before the ride is over.
Surprisingly, it's the same lack of
dimension in the characters that
makes . . . And Justice for All such
an entertaining film. It's a satirical
farce and is played as such.
Director Norman Jewison does a
fine job of handling the Curtin-
Levinson script. He commands fine
performances from the supporting
cast. Jack Warden is appropriately
loony without seeming contrived.
John Forsythe plays his role with
surprising chilliness and self-
righteousness.
Pacino is Jewison's main asset.
This actor, who should have won
an academy award a long time ago,
either for Godfather Part II or Dog
Day Afternoon, delivers a balanced
and engaging performance. He has
always been good at portraying
men frustrated by "the system"
and Jewison gives him the freedom
of adding range to his character.
The result is the film's strength and
the performance should get an
academy award nomination.
The film, or for that matter
Jewison himself, is unlikely
to capture any award
nominations .... And Justice for
All, though rewarding, is deeply
flawed. At times, it is either dull or
erractic — extremes that loosen the
structure of the film.
But it is worth seeing, if not for
Jewison's return after the critically
blasted F.I.S.T. then for Pacino's
presence.
Switch
blades*
That's right. After the
strenuous job of switching the blades on your ice
skates, you'll probably need
a monstrous, tasty burger.
15 super varieties. Plus other
great stuff. 11:30 on-7 days
a week. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bayswater.
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|              TOURNAMENT |
1   TUES., NOV. 6 AND TUES., NOV. 13 |
|                7:00 p.m. — 11:00 p.m. |
I $100 FIRST PRIZE I
|            Free Foos-Ball, T-Shirts 1
=             For Further Information Contact 1
|          GAMES ROOM IN S.U.B., 228-3692 |
|                LAST DAY FOR ENTRY |
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MACMILLAN BLOEDEL
WOULD LIKE TO
TALK TO YOU
We will be recruiting Engineers for our Pulp £r
Paper Mills and Research & Development
Section during November 13 through 16.
In addition, we will be recruiting Production
Trainees (Forestry, Commerce, Mechanical
Engineering Graduates) and a Control Trainee
(Commerce, Economics or Business Administration Graduates) for our Building Materials
Groups on November 22 & 23.
Watch for details in the Canada Employment
Centre on Campus.
See you in November.
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
AL PACINQ
WARNING: Coarse language and .
swearing. Occasional violence B C •
Dir,
VOGUE
918   GRANVILLE
685   5434
SHOWTIMES: 12:45 3:00
5:10 7:30 9:50. Sunday from
3:00.
WARNING:   Some  frighten
ing and gory scenes. B.C. Dir.
SHOWTIMES:     12:55    2:35    4:25
6:10 8:00 10:00.  Sunday from 2:35.
881   GRANVILLE
6 82-7468
OQEON
Legacy
CORONET 1
851   GRANVILLE
685  6828
WARNING: Some
frightening scenes.
B.C. Dir.
SHOW
TIMES: 2:00
4:00 6:00 8:00
10:00. Sunday
from 2:00.
WHEN A
STRANGER
CALLS
THE ON ON FIELD
WARNING:   Some   violence   and   coarse
language. B.C. Dir.
CORONET 2
851 GRANVILLE      SHOWTIMES: 2:15 4:40 7:05 9:30. Sunday from 2:15.
685-6828
WARNING:   Frank   por-
_     _        trayal   of   incest;   some ]
""""'■ "   scenes   of   drug   taking.
B.C. Dir.
DARK
CAMBIE at  18th
876-2747
SHOWTIMES:
7:00 9:30.
Between
a mother and son...
LUNA
A FILM BY BERNARDO BERTOLUCCI
ALAN ALDA
WARNING:        Some
coarse    language.    B.C.
DROAdwAV 1
70 7   W   BROADWAY
SHOW
TIMES:   7:15
9:15.
THE'
SEDL/CTiOiX
OFJOETY/XAiW
WARNING: Some violent scenes.
B.C. Dir.
DROAdwAy2
Jennifer O'Neill M    EAD^E
OF ONE
SHOWTIMES: 7:30
70 7 W   BROADWAY g-30.
8741927
We are pleased to announce our new line up of films
for the coming months: "Belle De Jour", "Love On
The Run", Federico Fellinis' "Orchestra Rehearsal",
"Picnic At Hanging Rock."
WARNING:
Occasional nudity. B.C. D
SHOWTIMES: 7:30 9:30
VARSITY
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
(Diabolo Menthe)
PEPPERMINT SODA"
mm by DIANE KURYS.
FRENCH WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES.
SUNDAY MATINEES starting November 4 with "Citizen Kane.'
Page Friday 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26,1979 Clash battles
local crowd
From PF 5
Strummer. "I believe in doing
what you want to do and ignoring
what people tell you to do. There
are too many sheep. They read
about 1977 and they want to go
into the past.
"Right now we slag off the
mods in England because they're
trying to re-create some old-
fashioned ideas. I hate it when
everyone wears a uniform style of
dress.
"That's what makes me sick
about posing punks. They think
they gotta wear black leather
jackets and have loads of badges
and zips and sing without a tune
or any soul and just snarl and spit
and gob and just have mindless
thrashing numbers. To me that
ain't punk. To me punk is power
and intelligence."
"If we were just interested in
politics we wouldn't bother to
pick up instruments," adds Topper. "We're a band and rather
than sing about the 'moon in
June' and 'I left my baby' we're
singing about 'couldn't get a
meal' and 'can't get a job.' In
England and America there are a
lot of really rich people and a lot of
really poor people. And we're just
commenting on that. We're trying
to make people think.
"The band's music is more important then the lyrics.  But the
lyrics are still very important too.
We don't write about things totally boring like 'I got given a blow
job' or about groupies, drinking
and drugs. I mean, who wants to
hear about that? We want to keep
that private. It's my own business
what I do.
"We try to sing about things
that are relevant to everybody."
As the rock band most infamously known for its notorious
lashing out against the establishment with its defiantly restless
musical messages, can the Clash
meet the challenge of longevity
and conquer the establishment in
one fell swoop?
"I doubt it" says Strummer
with sad sincerity. "Fuck the
establishment and let's get on
with it. "We don't have to change
them. Let them fuckin' stew in
their own juice and let us try and
build something better for
ourselves. They've had their day,
and every dog has its day. Well
it's our day now."
And Topper defiantly sums it
up as the group enters the security area before boarding the plane.
"We'll never hang ourselves. Just
give us enough rope to play with
and we'll change things."
Halfway down the corridor
Strummer turns around, and calls
out "Don't forget to tell them the
truth!"
The Dils speak out
From PF 3
Our songs are of a political
nature. It's not 1977 anymore and
that is archaic.
PF: Do the Dils sing love songs?
Chip Kinman: Sure. Tell Her I
Love Her is about some guy whose
girfriend dies. He decides to commit suicide so that he can be with
her. You're Not Blank is a love song
sort of.
Tony Kinman: I've got a
girlfriend. It's all part of being a
human being. I mean I don't sit
around and agitate myself into a
frenzy about the rich.
PF: What about the movie Up in
Smoke?
Chip Kinman: That was our first
gig, the first time we'd ever played
in front of microphones. It was at
the Roxy in Los Angeles and we
sang You're Not Blank.
PF: What does the future hold
for the Dils?
Chip Kinman: We're recording an
e.p. (extended play) on Gerry
Records at Little Mountain Sound
here in Vancouver.
PF: What about live concerts?
Chip Kinman: Well, we're playing
tonight at the Viking Hall on East
Hastings. In December we will be
playing at a benefit for the Coalition
Against Uranium Mining which will
be co-sponsored by the American
Indian Movement.
PF: Any tours coming up?
Chip Kinman: Nothing definite.
But we'll be splitting San Francisco
as soon as we get back.
PF: Why?
Chip Kinman: Because San Francisco is imploding. The joint's not
rocking, it's not going around and
around like it used to.
HAIR STYLING
FOR MEN & WOMEN
Quality Hairstyling.    Reasonable prices
ken hippert
hair company ltd.
THURS. OPEN TILL 9 p.m.
Drop In
Or Call
228-1471
  5736 University Blvd.
CHARGEX   (next to the Lucky Dollar
in the village)
The 1979/80 A.M.S. Art Gallery
Purchasing Committee
is now being formed. If you are interested in
purchasing Art for the A.M.S., please contact the
SECRETARY OF SAC - SUB 248
before Friday, Nov. 2/79.
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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 9:00 A.M. 1
MOUNTAIN I
EQUIPMENT 1
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MEET THE GOLD FAMILY:
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The original member of the gold family,
Pacific Gold is a full-bodied brew
especially created for the
golden Pacific Northwest.
Distinctive hearty flavour
sets Pacific Gold apart
from ordinary beers.
It's B.C.'s liquid gold!
Sold at hotels, pubs, and other olhale outlets.
The Draught Gold Beer Ball
At last it's here - genuine unpasteurized
draught beer you can take home!
Just 12" in diameter, the BEER. BALL stores
conveniently in your refrigerator, but holds
an amazing 5 7 draught glasses of beer.
We're proud to be the first in B.C.
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And we're proud of the smooth, refreshing
flavour of Draught Gold.
Take it home and tap it!
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The gold rush is on again!
This light-coloured,
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Discover Gold!
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Friday, October 26, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26,1979
Tween classes
TODAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,   noon,   International   House
lounge.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
CIVIL CLUB
WAVE social, 4 p.m. to8 p.m., SUB party room.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Hallowe'en   party,   costume  required,  8  p.m.,
Cecil Green Park.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Coffee house, 9:30 p.m., Theodora's at 1812
West 4th Ave.
SCIENCE EDUCATION
Conference on Science as a human activity, 9:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Scarfe bldg.
AMS SPEAKERS' FORUM
Speech by Joan Moelart on pros and cons of
uranium mining, noon, SUB auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Hallowe'en    party,    8f30    p.m.,    International
House.
SATURDAY
SCIENCE EDUCATION
Conference on Science as a human activity, 9:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Scarfe bldg.
LAW STUDENTS' ASSSOCIATION
Dance with Ad Hoc, 9 p.m., grad centre.
SUNDAY
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Music for Meian Temple, 3 p.m.. Museum of Anthropology.
MUSSOC
Chorus workshop, 1 to 3 p.m., SUB party room.
MONDAY
HOME ECONOMICS
Pumpkin sales for United Way,  10:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m., in front of bookstore and SUB.
TUESDAY
AMS PROGRAMS COMMITTEE
Vic Rapp gives audio-visual presentation and pep
talk, 8 p.m., SUB auditorium.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cantonese class, noon, Buch. 220.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting   noon   SUB 224
Hot flashes
GaffopifT ghost
If you're into goblin up some
spirits or carving up the faces of
jack-o-lanterns, you've come to the
right time of year. Now is the season of the witch.
More elevated beings begin the
festivities tonight at 8 p.m. when
the Young Alumni Association hold
a Hallowe'en party at Cecil Green.
Seniors and graduates are invited
only if they have a costume.
Cosmopolitans will wait for 8:30
p.m. when similar weird happenings will take place at International
House. And for your own party
next Wednesday don't forget to
pick up your pumpkins from Home
Ec when they have their sale on
Monday and Tuesday. Proceeds to
the United Way.
HOME ECONOMICS
Pumpkin sale for United Way, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m., in front of bookstore and SUB.
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., SUB 126.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Genera!   meeting  and  discussion,   noon,   SUB
113
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
WEDNESDAY
HOME ECONOMICS
Pumpkin carving contest, noon, SUB plaza.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin class (intermediate), noon, Buch. 220-
TM PROGRAM
Group meditation with videotape, noon, Buch.
217.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Fat is a feminist issue discussion group, noon,
SUB 130.
THURSDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
HOME ECONOMICS
Obstacle race, noon, SUB plaza
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., SUB 125.
FRIDAY
HOME ECONOMICS
Boat races, noon, SUB piaza.
HOME ECONOMICS
Dance, 7:30 p m. SUB ballroom
Decorate I Vith Prints
0& imvb^mat
bin
THE Poster & Print
PLACE in B.C.
738-2311
!   Free
I coupon
That's right! This coupon
is absolutely free! Yours
to keep for life. Think about
it-at P J. Burger & Sons.
15 classic burgers and other
great stuff. 11:30 on-7 days
a week, it's yummy. 2966
W. 4th Ave. and Bayswater.
3209 W. Broadway, Van
Decorate With Posters
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
OUR TOWN
by Thornton Wilder
OCTOBER 26 - NOVEMBER 3
(Previews - Oct 24 & 25)
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $3.00
[STUDENT SEASON TICKETS - Four Plays For $8.00]
BOX OFFICE    *    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    -    Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
LEFT BEHIND .. .!
Get  the   new   lightweight
skates from West Point!
SALE PRICED AT:
Bauer Black Panther
Reg. $69.95 NOW $59.95
Lange Elite
Reg. $79.95 NOW $69.95
Lange Laser
Reg. $129.95   NOW $109.95
3771 WEST 10th AVENUE
224-3536"
"The Hockey Specialists"
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 36c.
Commercial — 3 lines. 1 day $3.00; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.75 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B:C. V6T1W5
5 — Coming Events
TOMMY WHO? Find out in SUB Theatre
this weekend.
A FRESH APPROACH to the knowledge
that ends all conflict; A discussion of self-
awareness with Riley White. Please call
278-5680.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
YOUR NEAREST
MC-A-POP
STORE IS
2090 ALMA ST.
WE ACCEPT ALL EMPTIES
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and
racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
GETTING
SICK OF
MIDTERMS?
then come see
Danny Chan
at International
Stereo on Seymour
FOR THE CURE
65 — Scandals
WANTED: Models for figure photography
(females preferred). Fees negotiable.
Phone: 224-5447 5:00-9:00 p m.
ARTS Bear Garden this Friday Oct. 26,
4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Lots of Suds. All Artsies Welcome.
11
For Sale — Private
70 — Services
15 — Found
FOUND one sweater at Shrum Bowl game. If
yours phone 732-8464.
20 — Housing
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander
graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
Member B.C. Registered Music Teacher's
Ass'n. 731-0601.
READING SKILLS. Reading, Comprehension, Retention and Speed. Plus Note Taking/Study Techniques. One Day Course.
Ideal for Students. 266-6119.
80 — Tutoring
25 — Instruction
85 — Typing
30 - Jobs
35 — Lost
LOST, men's glasses at Commerce
Oktoberfest. Silver frames. Needed by
myopic student. 521-8601.
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accu-
ate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual. Clemy 324-9414.
PAPERS and/or theses typed and proofed.
IBM Selectric. Phone 732-9465 evenings.
FAST, efficient typing. Reasonable rates.
266-5053.
40 — Messages
90 - Wanted
50 — Rentals
I'D LIKE to hear from a lonely female
frosh who enjoys bicycling — Box 122
Totem Park, 2525 West Mall.
60 — Rides
99 — Miscellaneous IHMiBPP
The Ballet Internacional de
Caracas has come to Vancouver.
Billed as a young, vital, technically
brilliant and uniquely expressive
company, they will be performing
tonight and tomorrow evening at
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre at 8
p.m. Tickets are available at all Vancouver ticket centres and Eaton's
stores.
Despite the intervention of World
War II, Emil Gilels has made his
mark as an internationally-renowned Soviet pianist. He will perform in
recital at the Orpheum Thursday,
Nov. 1 at 8:30 p.m.
An original and colorful musical-
drama. Highball, is being present
ed by the Touchstone Theatre
Company starting Nov. 2. Previews are Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 at the
Janus Theatre, 2611 West 4th
Avenue at 8:30 p.m. Admission is
$5 at the door or $4.50 in advance.
Matinees are pay what you can.
Metamorphosis has come to
the Tamahnous Theatre. This acclaimed short story by Frank Kafka
is showing from Oct. 12 to Nov. 10
at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, Tuesday through Saturday
at 8:30 p.m-. and Saturday at 3:30
p.m.
"Jaques Brel Is. . ." is back in
town again. The David Y. H. Lui
production    is    showing    at    the
James Cowan Theatre for one
performance only on Saturday,
Oct. 27 at 8 p.m. Ticket prices are
$5.50 for adults and $4.50 for students and seniors.
A musical show about flowers?
Apparently. The Flower Show: A
Musical, Botanical Delight with
Sarabande is showing at The Centre For The Arts Thursday, Nov. 1
at 8 p.m. in the SFU Theatre. For
this evening of fun, wit and charm
admission is $4.50 for the general
public and $2.25 for students and
seniors.
The Literary Storefront and the
Writers' Union of Canada, B.C.
Branch, are having a fund raising
book sale on Saturday, Oct. 27
from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. They
would like anyone who has any kind
of books they can donate to call
688-9737 for pick up.
Also happening in the city are
Doug and The Slugs, and Grown
Men in a Hallowe'en Masque
Ball at the Italian Cultural Centre
on Wednesday, Oct. 31 at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $6. Tuesday, Oct. 30 at
9 p.m., the Western Front Society is premiering a new video by
Randy and Berenicci, and Wednesday, Oct. 31 the Carden Street
Cafe is hosting a Hallowe'en surprise party.
Frunch
lessons.
Frwich - as in Friday
lunch. 15 classic burgers,
tons of other great stuff.
Intriguing starts, fabulous
desserts. 11:30 on-7 davs a
week. Yum. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bavswater.
••••«
n
It
1
GtotaeTwd,
RED LEAF    *
RESTAURANT
^ / Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
FREE DELIVERY
from 4:30 p.m.
10% Discount on all
cash pickup orders
2142 Western Parkway
U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
{pmk^faxC
OpjflASW
VJL/Cft«K KIRIKN
Live Belly Dancing on
Friday & Saturday Nights
LUNCH   11:30 - 3:00 Mon. - Sat.
DINNER   5:00- 1:00 Mon. - Sat.
5:00 - 11:00 Sunday
4Ww.I0th.An*.
22+mY
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
*f UNIVERSITY BLVD.**?
}■%-     Eat In and Take Out    vfc
>&       OPEN EVERY DAY      *6
4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.    **>-
PHONE: 224-6121 /%
Q
Q
a
a
o
i
Jt=Jrdr=.r=Jr=Jr=Jr=Jr=Jndf=JgJn=Jit=Jplf=Jr^i^Jr^ir=ir=Ir^.
1/
Mr
%«
SPECIALIZING IM
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE  FAST DELIVERY
228-9513
4510 VI. 10th Ave.
yrJ^l^rddlir^i^ddr^li^Mriid^rd^riri^Je
CALIFORNIA STYLE
MEXICAN COOKING
Z904 W. «♦»« AVB.    733-37J3
'An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - DUNBAR • PT. GREY
A variety of great dishes including    Moussaka,    Kalamari
Souv/akia, and Greek
salads.
Mon- Thurs 4 pm-2:30 am
Fri & Sat 4 pm-3:30 am A
Sunday    4    pm-12   pm*
738 9520
or 738-1113       | ??WNTOWN
3611 West Broadwa" 1 "9 *itton
PARKING AT REAR 6"-»«l
Dining Lounge - Fu" Facilities -
Take Out or Home Delivery
Late delivery call 'n hour before closing.
Have a FREE LUNCH with us. ! ! !
Bring your lunch to the Old Auditorium on Tuesday, October 30th, at 12:30 and we will play a super one hour concert for you FREE.
The U.B.C. Wind Symphony
"one of the best bands in Canada"
Also at 8:00 p.m., same place
V.
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbrolled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 224-6336
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
/^
for the ultimate \
in fine coffee
and pastries
come to
ems
espresso bar
Daily 8-midnight
Weekends 11-midnight
2134 Western Parkway
"In the Village"
J
Another  Lindy's
SPECIAL
FULL COURSE MEALS
From $3.95
BEEF STROGANOFF
SALMON CASSEROLE
POT ROAST OF BEEF
HALVE OF A ROAST DUCKLING
BREAKFAST SPECIAL
BACON, HAM OR SAUSAGES
AND EGGS
HASH BROWNS, TOAST
COFFEE
$1.95
8:00 AM - 11:00 AM
3211 W. BROADWAY
738-2010
UBG Gaiwpas
Pizza
Steak 8- Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hourb Mon. Thurs. 11:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m ; Fri
11:30 am. 3:00 p.m ; Sat. 4:00 p.m. 3:00 a.m.,
Sun   4:00 p.m   1:00 a.m.
2136 Western Parkway
THE "SUPER"CURRY
IN TOWN
xuiw House
1754 WEST 4TH   732-5313
Open 7 Days A Week
Open 5 P.M. Every Day
CHARGEX MASTtRCHARGE
AMEX DINNERS CLUB
NOW, A NEW
BURGER THAT'S
MORE BURGER
THAN
BUN
Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER store. In a new "six to a pound" size that really
gives you some meat for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
bun." A burger that's tender,
deliciously-cooked. Every time. The
new burger from DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER.
2601 W. Broadway
Dairy
Queen
brazier
Pick-up
Membership Club
Would you like to receive a FREE 15 oz. soft drink when
you buy any size hamburger from Oct, 29-Dec. 1 incl.
Find out how
at WENDY'S
10 S.E. Marine Drive
Page Friday 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October26,1979 Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 26,1979
PLAY IT!
11948 GET THE KNACK"
THE KNACK
RECORDS
.29
TAPES 4.49
11954 first under the wire
LITTLE RIVER BAND
4240 LOW BUDGET
THE   KINKS
RECORDS
TAPES
101
WHITE ALBUM - THE BEATLES (2-LP-SET)
7.29
8.99
525
GREATEST HITS - APRIL WINE
4.49
4.79
958
NIGHT OWL - GERRY RAFFERTY
4.49
4.79
969
WE SHOULD BE TOGETHER - CRYSTAL GAYLE
4.49
4.79
1044
AQUALUNG - JETHRO TULL
4.49
4.79
1192
PARALLEL LINES - BLONDIE
4.49
4.79
2653
SGT. PEPPERS - THE BEATLES
4.49
4.79
3403
1962-1966 - THE BEATLES (2-LP-SET)
7.29
8.99
3404
1967-1970 - THE BEATLES (2-LP-SET)
7.29
8.99
4190
TIME PASSAGES - AL STEWART
3.99
4.79
4221
WAVE - PATTI SMITH
3.99
4.79
6456
LIONHEART - KATE BUSH
4.49
4.79
6459
BALDRY'S OUT - LONG JOHN BALDRY
4.49
4.79
9503
YEAR OF THE CAT - AL STEWART
4.49
4.79
11698
STRANGER IN TOWN - BOB SEGER
4.49
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THE KICK INSIDE - KATE BUSH
4.49
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PLEASURE & PAIN - DR. HOOK
4.49
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THREE HEARTS - BOB WELCH
4.49
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1018
A MILLION VACATIONS - MAX WEBSTER
4.49
4.79
PLUS MANY IN-STORE SPECIALS ON CAPITOL RECORDS
YAMAHA AUDIO
RECEIVER CR-220
The Yamaha CR-220 features 15+15
watts RMS at less than 0.05% TH.D. 5
Year Parts and Warranty.
YAMAHA**    $910 -95
* • twtwtt
MARANTZ 1810
CASSETTE DECK
All the features you demand including
a Dolby Noise Reduction System
Record/playback made from super
hard permalloy material.
We
—«.—« $1QQ.95
sornd better | 9w
QUANTA 500X
Single-play, automatic off, belt-drive
turntable. D.C. motor servo controlled,
electronic speed control, illuminated
strobe complete with ADC cartridge.
.95
Limited Quantity
EPl 100 SPEAKERS
The EPl 100 have become the industry
standard for bookshelf speakers. The
8" woofer produces full tight base; the
1" air spring tweeter reproduces ex-
hilerating highs.
.95
ea.
efg *gg
QUALITY ENGINEERED SYSTEMS
YAMAHA @
Yamaha. The most respected and asked for name in stereo. A&B Sound is proud
to again offer this fantastic yamaha stereo system. It starts with the CR420
Receiver with 25 & 25 Watts RMS at only 0.05% T.H.D. for superb clarity and
accuracy. The Yamaha YP-B2 belt drive turntable is complete with shure cartridge
and features automatic shutoff. The YP-B2 is the only turntable in its class
guaranteed for 5 years parts and labour. To bring you the sound we recommend
the newest rock monitor— the NS240 speaker system features an 8" woofer for
tight bass and an excellent 3" tweeter for smooth, accurate high frequency
response. You can count on getting more for your stereo dollar with Yamaha and

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