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The Ubyssey Jan 12, 1967

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Array Reds bomb out
It was just a little
fizzle, instead of
the expected explosion when the
red horde dropped
a 'bomb' in a
library fish pond
Wednesday. Inventor of the fiasco, (far left) was
duly punished for
Jubar by the anti-
Cong agents, r-
THE UBYSSEY
- powell hargrav. photo       Vo1- XLV,H' No- 34     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 12,  1967<-JC^<8  224-3916
Council squashes revisions
Charlie Boylan's constitution
revisions were shot down Monday night by students' council.
Boylan's concept of a 60 student assembly was considered
by most councillors to be too
cumbersome or else completely
unnecessary.
His plan was defeated 11-6.
(In an editorial, Dec. 2,
Ubyssey editor-in-chief John
Kelsey predicted the defeat. He
said, "No doubt the far seeing
councillors will shoot the whole
bag down next term, and UBC
student government can remain
in the dark ages where it is now
and where it belongs.")
Boylan expressed disappointment in the council's action.
. "Any constitutional revisionist must recognize we are dealing with elites. Student council
effectively involves a very
small handful of students.
"The polices of this council to
fight to reduce fees, improve
conditions in residences, and
advocate student participation
in university government are
fine as they stand.
"However, we have yet to
evolve a movement of students
consciously working to fulfill
these policies," he said.
He added: "You cannot
create such a movement toy
legislating a new constitution,
but a new constitution could
facilitate the process of breaking the rut student council is
in."
The undergraduate societies
were the major cause of the
motion's   defeat.   They   united
with other council members to
form the 11 to 6 decision.
A 20-student council as well
as the 60-student representative
assembly was envisioned in
Boylan's proposal. This executive would have included six
vice-presidents — in charge of
government liaison, external
student affairs, academic affairs, internal student affairs,
administration liaison, and
housing affairs. AMS council
now includes two vice-presidents.
The Boylan proposal also in
cluded salaries of $300 a month
or less for the president, treasurer and Ubyssey editor.
Each of the vice-presidents
would have had committees
working under him, to remove
some of the load which Boylan
feels is now placed directly on
the two vice-presidents.
However, the undergraduate
society presidents felt that this
addition of bodies would only
serve to slow down the already
slow workings of the AMS, as
was the feeling on the larger
assembly issue.
School trustee
faces libel suit
AMS president Peter Braund said
Wednesday the B.C. Assembly of Students is considering libel action
against a Burnaby school trustee.
The action arises from statements
made by trustee Bill Daly that the
B.C. Assembly of Students is a "questionable organization using communist
tactics."
Assembly literature mailed to some
Burnaby high school students prompted Daly to question the uses of such
literature.
"This could very readily ibe a tool
to use student newspapers for propaganda of any description," Daly
said.
Chairman of BCAS, UBC science
student Frank Fylnn, and Braund
said they will consult with the AMS
lawyer on the matter.
Braund refused to name the lawyer
before the consultation takes place.
In a telephone interview Wednesday, Daly said he would "refrain from
comment until I have been notified by
the lawyer involved."
AMS vice-president Charlie Boylan
Wednesday called Daly "an ass and a
fool."
"An   organization   should   not  be
criticized for the jargon it uses," he
said.
He was referring to Daly's objection
to the use of the term "secretariat"
which is the name for the BCAS ruling body in each institution.
"It is a term used in communist
countries and foreign to our way of
life," Daly claimed.
Daly had not contacted the assembly
before making any of his statements
and says he does not intend to get in
touch with any representative of
BCAS.
Braund said Daly's statements are
"irresponsible, utter rot, and possibly
libelous."
"We feel a public apology is in
order," he said.
The BCAS was formed last fall to
develop a united front before the governments and administrations on the
question of improving the educational
system.
One part of their program includes
a review of high school newspapers
and student papers.
Purpose of the review is to make
student governments more efficient
and more effective in defining and
protecting students' rights.
NEVER APPROACHED'
Presidency candidate
opts out of the race
No matter what Vancouver papers say about presidential candidates,
The Ubyssey has refuted at least one possibility.
Chairman of the Economic Council
of Canada Dr. James Deutsch claims
he has never been approached on the
subject by anyone.
"No one has approached me or
suggested that I put my name in for
the job," Deutsch said.
A downtown morning paper named
him as a "leading possibility" and the
afternoon paper included his name
with the "long shots" of their list.
Contacted in Ottawa, Deutsch was
asked if he would consider the job if
was offered to him.
"I don't know. The whole thing is
hypothetical at this time," he said.
Informed UBC sources claimed two
more candidates were "high on the
list" but unlikely to take the job.
They are John McCreary, dean of
medicine and John Galbraith, Canadian-born economist.
The sources said McCreary "won't
touch  it"   and   Galbraith   "probably JAMES DEUTCH
won't come here." . . . ne long shot Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 12,   1967
— kurt hilger photo
"Ml SEE your deuce and raise you another," says pensive coed, worried by winner's
face on friendly bank teller. Second term fees having reduced most students' bankrolls
to low-tide   mark, the food  bill  must  be met somehow.
PSYCHEDELIC AFFAIR'
Rev. McKibbon drops out
By VAL THOM
UBC Anglican minister Jim
McKibbon suddenly cancelled
a speech on "The Psychedelic
Affair" scheduled for Wednesday noon in the Angus building.
McKibbon telegrammed his
decision to the Ubyssey Wednesday morning.
"Out of deference to the advice of my church wardens
and because of the importance
of what I desire to say, I am
convinced that the atmosphere
is too controversial to speak
on these significant matters at
this time."
No other reasons were given
for his change of mind.
McKibbon could not be
reached for comment.
His speech could have caused    a    clash   with    Anglican
Mardi Gras
calls wits
Mardi Gras needs some cartoons.
Mardi Gras is holding a contest for the best comic cartoon
depicting any facet of university life or Mardi Gras.
First prize is $25 to be
awarded by professional cartoonist Len Norris Jan. 25 at
the Mardi Gras bazaar in the
PNE Showmart building.
All entries will be on display at the Showmart from
Jan.   26-28.
Entries should be submitted
to the Mardi Gras office in
Brock Extension not later than
Jan. 20.
Size should not exceed
22" x 28".
THE*
IW.I_I.SS
♦FILE*
Today — Auditorium
Bishop Godfrey Gower. Gower
has banned public statements
by Anglican ministers for
broadcast or publication made
without his permission.
Gower refused to speak to
The Ubyssey about McKib-
bon's decision.
He had planned to speak on
his controversial psychedelic
church service held in December and televised on the CBC
program Sunday.
The psychedelic service, organized by McKibbon and
United Church minister Harold MacKay, unsettled some
observers and brought condem
nation   on   the   two  ministers
from church officials.
Gower's edict was a direct
result of the furor created by
the service.
Students hoping to hear McKibbon expressed disappointment at the cancellation.
"This must be a tough situation for him," said a fourth
year arts student after hearing
of the telegram.
"He must be walking a tightrope."
Noble said the Lutherans
would contact McKibbon to
invite him again to speak on
campus.
VOLUNTARY RECREATION PROGRAMME
There is a mixed volleyball group every Thursday at
11:30 a.m. in the Memorial Gym. Bring a friend and
join. Free instruction.
Free Badminton     —     MW 130     —     Memorial Gym
School of PE tfr REC,
Voluntary Rec Program
Phone 228>-2401
1058 ALBERNI
685 - 0536
NEED A CAR?
FOR AN  EVENING
OR A WEEKEND
ONLY $5.00 plus 5c a mile on ANY of our cars over night.
5:00 p.m. - 9:00 a.m.
24 Hour. Weekend
RAMBLERS
$5.00
5c/mile
$12.00
5c/mile
VALIANTS
$6.00
5c/mile
$14.00
5c/mlle
GALAXIE 500's, H.T.
FURY Ml'., H.T.
$8.00
5c/mi!e
$18.00
5e/mile
MUSTANG'S, H.T.
SPORT FURY
$8.00
5c/mile
$18.00
5c/mlle
ALL RATES PLUS GAS
(Ages 21-25 Collision Insurance Extra)
SPECIAL RATES FOR  TEAM,  CLUB  AND  OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
Education show
to bare wares
TORONTO (UNS) — Education is going big business
these days and teachers are getting their own trade show.
It's the Canadian Education
Frat's home
not a house,
say police
TORONTO (CUP) — Morality charges laid against two
girls and 24 men after a police
raid on a University of Toronto fraternity have been
dropped.
The charges against the 26
involved in the Nov. 17 raid
on Phi Kappa Pi fraternity
house were dropped because
of "insufficient evidence", one
of the young men said.
Five of the men' were
charged with keeping a common bawdy house, the other
19 were charged as found-ins.
Two girls were charged as
"inmates of a bawdy house".
"To prove we were running
a common bawdy house the
police would have had to
catch us in the act — they
didn't," one of the men said.
Showplace and it will run
from Jan. 26 to 28 here at Exhibition park.
On display will be the products of 281 manufacturers,
distributors and suppliers of
school equipment and services.
New developments in teaching techniques, mostly at the
pre-university level, will be
demonstrated.
Among them is an audiovisual centre which will be
operated during the exhibition
and which will invite the participation of visitors in its
operation.
The problem of the increasing need for fast construction
of school buildings and facilities will be tackled by experts
from the School Construction
Systems development project
from New York.
School architecture will be
prominently represented by a
display showing 75 of the best
examples of school and uni-
verstiy buildings in Canada.
GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME
ADDRESS
MR. ROY YACHT, Consultant
™* CARD SHOP
L
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
MEMBERS FOR HOST COMMITTEE,
TENTH ANNUAL C.U.S. SEMINAR
Members will make arrangements for the Tenth
Seminar, to be held in late August or early September in the Lower Mainland area. The position would
involve work on one of the following sub-committees:
Finance, Facilities, Public Relations, Transportation,
Entertainment, or Clerical. Some tasks will require
more participation during the school term than in the
summer; others will require little activity until the
summertime. Experience in related work is helpful,
but not essential. Members will attend the Seminar
as part of their duties. Further inquiries and/or
applications should be directed to Box 153, Brock
Hall, or phone 224-6965.
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
The election of the Executive of the Students' Council 1967-68 will be held as follows:
First Slate: for President, Secretary, Second Vice-
President. Nominations open January 25 and
continue to February 2, 1967. Election will ibe
held on February 8, 1967.
Second Slate: for First Vice-President, Treasurer, Coordinator. Nominations open February 1 and
continue to February 9, 1967. Election will be
held on February 15, 1967.
HOMECOMING CHAIRMAN:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Homecoming Chairman. Eligibility forms are avail-
aible from the A.M.S. Office (S. Brock). Applications
and eligibility forms must be submitted to the Secretary of the Alma Mater Society, Box 52, Brock Hall
before Thursday, January 19th, 1967. Thursday,  January  12,   1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— al harvey photo
FIVE YEARS OF SPACE are on display in the basement of UBC's library. The photographic array is part of a three exhibit presentation, now being shown in the Fine
Arts gallery. Also included are  Andre Keretz and the George Eastman House collection.
Ortho-novum for UWO girls
inconceivable' says medic
LONDON (CUP) — The head
of the University of Ontario's   ers   from   the   student   news
health services department has
denied his department is distributing birth control pills to
Western co-eds.
When told two female report-
paper, The Gazette, had obtained prescriptions for the pill, Dr.
R. J. Bowen said, "If any pills
have   been   given,   they have
Health chiefs fail
to make pill rule
PALO ALTO, Calif., (CUPI) — College health authorities, discussing whether birth control pills should be
prescribed to unmarried female students, wound up in a
dilemma here last week.
Bureaucrat
named to
senate
The UBC Senate has a new
member — and he comes from
the ranks of the provincial
government.
A cabinet order named
John Meredith, assistant superintendent of education (instructional services) of the provincial department of education, to senate for a three-
year term.
Meredith fills the vacancy
left by the expiration of Dr.
J. F. English's term last fall.
English was formerly deputy education minister and is
now chairman of the Public
Utilities Commission and recently elected senator at the
University  of Victoria.
Meredith is a native of Ontario but was educated in the
west. He taught high school
in B.C. before joining the education department as a research assistant in 1947.
In 1958 he was promoted to
director of curriculum and became assistant superintendent
in 1965.
The experts are unable to
decide whether attempts to prevent unwanted pregancies,
which occur if colleges take no
action, justify the moral and
psychological damage which
may result.
However, Dr. Beatrix A.
Han-burg, a psychiatric research associate at Stanford
University, says universities are
really being asked to take a
stand on an issue much broader
than contraception.
"The students who want contraceptives are really asking
that universities express an
opinion on the new morality,"
she said.
If the student health centre
decides to dispense birth control pills, students will inter-
pert it as an administrative
sanction to sexual freedom, she
said.
'been on the advice of specialists."
But both girls said they had
not consulted another physician
before going to the health service.
The first reporter, who claimed to be suffering from menstrual cramps, said she was
given a one-month supply of
Ovulen, a type of birth control
pill. The second girl, who requested the pill for birth control purposes, said she received
a three-month's supply renewable for nine months.
The article also stated that
birth control pills were available on the black market in
London, Ontario, where UWO
is located. _
The black market pills were
also available without the advice of a physician.
HEALY ASKS PROBE
Faculty reviews
arts marking
By RON  SIMMER
Tradition-bound marking policies in the faculty of arts
must be changed, says arts Dean Dennis Healy.
"Arts instructors tend to
mark in a narrow 'band from 50
to 80 percent, with the result
that good students do not get
high enough marks," Healy said
in an interview Wednesday.
The present marking system
is a hold-over from traditional
letter-grading, in which the
only people who got A's were
freaks, he said.
"Some instructors are very
severe in their marking," Healy
said, "and I have asked faculty
members to sit and look at
what they are doing and see
that it is right."
The Ubyssey reported the
marking review Tuesday.
Healy, who initiated the probe,
was unavailable for comment
at that time.
Healy emphasized that grading was a matter for only faculty to deal with.
"I am not trying to debase
standards," he said. "I want
to make sure students get exactly what they deserve, especially the outstanding ones."
Healy circulated a report on
percentages of students with
first-class standing in 1965-66,
to arts faculty members.
It showed that the percentage
of firsts was small compared
to other faculties.
In the report Healy wrote: "I
do not intend to regulate grading, but I invite departments
and   individual   heads   of   the
DEAN  HEALY
.  .  .  hold-over system
faculty to review current practices and standards of marking."
The following tabic compares
percentages of first class marks
from first to fourth years in the
faculties of arts and sciences for
65-66.
Arts
First: 2.9
Second: 2.0
Third: 5.8
Fourth: 8.6
Sciences
First: 6.8
Second: 7.4
Third: 8.8
Fourth:  12.9
Ban on brew adverts
dropped by NS board
HALIFAX (CUP) — The
Dalhousie Gazette, student
newspaper at Dalhousie University, has won the right
to carry advertising sponsored by breweries.
Nova    Scotia's   liquor   li-
Word wielders, gift ideas
sought by grad class brass
The '67 grad class is looking for help.
It's executive is asking for suggestions to fill the
positions of valedictorian, historian, will writer, prophet,
and poet.
Nominees must be members of the grad class and
their names may be submitted to Florence Kepper, Box
44 in th AMS office by January 18.
Suggestions for the grad gift may also be sent to
this address.
cencing board rescinded its
1965 decision banning the
advertising after receiving
application from the Dalhousie student union.
The licencing board in its
ruling restricted breweries
to use of their name. No
slogan or brand names are
permitted.
The student brief to the
government stressed the economic factors involved in
carrying the advertising,
pointing out the ban had resulted in the loss of several
thousand dollars in advertising revenue.
It is not known whether
other campus newspapers in
Nova Scotia will be permitted to carry similar advertising. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout tho university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinion* arm
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorieed
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Pago
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press Trophies for general
excellence and editorial cartoons.
JANUARY 12, 1967
Making faces
When newspapers change their appearance, they
either do it all at once, and warn the reader well, or
they sneak up on him with a new little change every
week.
The reasoning, an old managing editor once told us,
is to keep the poor reader buying a paper he recognizes,
so he can't decide he doesn't like the new look.
We don't have that problem because you can't fight
or switch to the next best-selling brand.
But we're still weary of the prize-winning format
The Ubyssey's had for the past six years. ,
Our staff will turn all its creative energies to a
different looking product — which just might read
differently too.
So don't blow your collective cools if you don't
recognize us some days — we're playing games in the
search for a new look.
But let us know what you think.
What's my line?
Last month we facetiously suggested students mail
in their choices for UBC president — but since then
everyone's leaping onto the cart and the name game
is being played for keeps.
Then, board of governors chairman Nathan Nemetz
suggested anybody who had an idea send it in.
Now, faculty selection chairman Benjamin MoyleS
especially wants the faculty to mail their choices in.
Between fits of pique over the lack of a student
committee seeking names, we have a vision of Nemetz
and Moyles and their committees going mad cataloguing
all the nominees with the library's new computer, and
never getting around to choosing.
And between the resultant fits of mirth over that
dream, we think how ridiculous the whole game is
getting.
Obviously, the idea is to avoid the criticism surrounding John B. Macdonald's appointment—previous
president Norman MacKenzie announced his resignation
on the same day the board announced its Harvard
winner. All the people who weren't consulted didn't
like that. ,
So now everybody has a chance to get in on the
democratic nominating process, but for what?
For nothing. Macdonald was a highly qualified man
in a dirty job. He couldn't possibly satisfy everyone, so
he chose not to satisfy students.
The next man will have the same problem of not
being able to make everybody happy, doubled in spades.
Besides having to choose a part of the university community to be usually unpopular with, he'll be unsatisfactory to all the people who nominated someone else
before he ever alights on main mall.
When he does do something, and all the people who
aren't happy with his decision cry out, their shrill
complaints will be doubled in volume by the basso we-
told-you-so chorus from the second   guesser's gallery.
Besides all that, democracy makes another problem
—there will undoubtedly be a gaggle of unhappy losers
who gripped both feet between their teeth by accepting
nominations too early — like Simon Fraser's Patrick
McTaggart-Cowan.
The frivolities really start when someone nominates
selection committee chairman Nemetz himself. We
seriously do name him because he is a highly qualified
man who could operate well within the strictures of the
presidency role.
Hee hee, we can hardly wait.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing      Richard Blair
News  .      Carol Wilson
City       ._   _   Danny Stoffman
Photo       Powell Hargrave
Page Friday ..    -       Claudia Gwinn
Focus        Rosemary Hyman
Sports    ..    Sue Gransby
AiM't New* Al Birnie
Ass't City ,_.. Tom Morris
CUP  __—. Bert Hill
Kelsey, our editor, came. Val
Thom took a trip for a story, reverently. Cartoonists drank. Kris
Emmott, chuckling, eyed Petey's
pants from a distance. Ron Simmer
returned. Val Zuker paraded purple
peace buttons. Dave Cursons, Murray McMillan, Mary Ussner, Kathi
Harkness, Norman Gidney, Jill
Green, and Relling, a flabby guest,
wrote. Als, Birnie and Trulst, headlined.
Kurt Hilger, Al Harvey, and
Derrek Webb and Dennis Gans,
Chris Blake, and Don Kydd pictured.
THE CLOSET
BY GABOR MATE
Clothes make the etc.
"Again this year Glamour
wants to know:  Who is the
best-dressed girl on your campus? We hope  that you can .
provide us with the answer."
Thus begins a letter to the
Ubyssey from Mrs. Garda
Foch, college editor of Glamour   magazine. The   letter
goes on to explain that this is
a n annual
contest with
photographs,
girls, judges,
free trips to
5*ew York,
etc. "In addition," writes
the kindly
Mrs. Foch,
"the winners
and their colleges will receive
national recognition in Glamour and in newspapers
across the country."
Our first reaction was one
of overwhelming enthusiasm.
"Oh boy," we said to our editor, "imagine being able to
boast to your grand-children
that you used to attend a college which received national
recognition in Glamor magazine!"
"But I don't have any
grandchildren," said our editor somewhat icily, "and
neither do you as far as I
know."
That cooled our ardor somewhat. We finally wrote the
following reply to the college
editor of Glamour magazine:
"Dear Mrs. Foch," we
wrote. "It is with deep humility and shame that we are
forced to confess our ignorance of who the best dressed
girl on this campus is. For
one thing, we have never
thought that clothes make
the man, nor the woman.
(The man may make the woman, but that is not probably
where your main interest
lies.)
"Secondly, we in The Ubyssey office tend to look upon
the fully clothed girl as an
obscenity, or at best a temporary phenomenon to be eliminated. Clothes, therefore,
are not of primary interest to
us. In fact, the better the
clothes,   the   more   reluctant
the girl might be to part with
them.
"Thirdly, dear Mrs. Foch,
we must admit that other,
more trivial matters have engaged our attention for the
past little while. Nothing serious, mind you, and nothing
alarming, and assuredly nothing that should hinder your
dedicated search for the best-
dressed college girls. But we
have been following with certain anxiety a little war that
your country is prosecuting
in Asia.
"Certainly there is no connection, Mrs. Foch between
the fact that children are dying of starvation and napalm
in Asia and the fact that your
country is rich and idle enough to run contests such as
yours at its institutions of
higher learning. No connection at all, Mrs. Foch, please
do not misunderstand us.
"It's just that, and we beg
you to pardon us for saying
so, dear Mrs. Foch,—it's just
that if we didn't have a sense
of humor we would vomit on
your letter and send it back
to you in an envelope."
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
'Greeks  sincere
Editor, The Ubyssey:
As usual some of the content in The Ubyssey has succeeded in irritating me. However, some of the articles in
Tuesday's issue succeeded in
rousing me out of my usual
apathetic-student state into the
irate-reader category.
I object to Gabor Mate's
claims that Mardi Gras is nothing more than an excuse for
a drunk.
When working on the preparations for Mardi Gras I
never came across the cynical
hyprocritical attitude that
Mate claims motivates the
Greeks.
I found everyone involved
sincere on giving to charity
through their efforts.
Certainly Mardi Gras is a
good time, we need it once a
year. But it is not a drunken
orgy  disguised  as   a  charity
affair.
I was also amused toy Bill
Daly's comments on the communist BCAS. From Daly's
comments, I realize the United
Nations  must  also  be   com
munist and foreign to our way
of life. After all, the secretariat is the most important
body of the organization.
Taking Daly's observations
to the extreme, what can be
To Page 5
»
Maple Leaves Thursday, January   12,   1967
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
mmmmQ-mmmR
read into elementary school
readers.
Don't the  children  in  the
stories play with a red wagon?"
Subversive literature in our
schools, what's next Mr. Daly?
IRATE READER
Why on  earth?'
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Thank goodness for the new
arts revision. UBC's antiquated curriculum is a source of
intense irritation.
Take Geog. 101 — Why on
earth should any human individual have to memorize
and regurgitate such useless
knowledge as climate classification?
This set of permutations and
combinations should be relegated to the ones interested
in meteorology or other specialized sciences. In these days
of numerous charts and tables
any person interested in this
type of information surely
knows where to go.
ANON
White bikes'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Here's one man's solution
to the problem of commuting
on our enormous campus. The
AMS could invest in a number of community bicycles,
painted white to identify
them. They would be for use
anywhere on campus.
Anyone wanting to use one
to get out to B-lot, for example, could ride it out and
leave it where he stops, to be
used next day by, say, someone who wants to get from
the lot to the Brock, a 3/4
mile walk.
The possibilities are infinite. Possibly some stands
could be built at convenient
places. A bicycle committee
could be allocated some
money every year and be responsible for maintaining
them. It would cost less that
seven cents per student to
buy 200 bikes at $25 each.
Not only would students
have this handy transportation, but they would also
have a chance to show that
they are as mature as they
think they are by showing
some respect for this common
property. How about it?
Leo Toscanelli
Grad Studies
According to the Underground Press Syndicate, the
provotariai movement in the
Netherlands already tried it
The police confiscated the
white bikes because they
were not properly locked.
The provos put combination
locks with common numbers
on all bikes, and wrote the
combinations all over walls.
Nobody knows what happened next. —Editor
'Clerk or ...'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I must correct some false
impressions that Mr. N. J.
Davidson gave in his Jan. 6
letter about unification of the
armed forces.
First Mr. Davidson is under
the wrong impression that the
serviceman, under unification, will (become a jack of all
military trades and master of
none. This is not the case.
The various trades and duties
of present day servicemen are
becoming more complex and
there will still toe a great need
for specialists. Under unification a serviceman will still
choose his speciality, be it
pilot, infantryman, navigator,
cook, gunner, clerk, or bottle-
washer.
The degree of specialization
needed today would preclude
any attempt to force any serviceman to become versed in
all fields. Unfication is an attempt to organize the military
along modern, efficient, functional lines rather than the
system of enviromental services (land, sea, air) which
has little revelance today.
Second, Mr. iDavidson left a
wrong impression in regard to
uniforms. It may cost $60 million for the new uniform but
it is Mr. Hellyer's intention to
introduce it over a period of
years as present uniforms
wear out. Hence what would
be spent to replace old uniforms will now be spent to
purchase new uniforms.
According to all reports,
except for some disgruntled
admirals and others the vast
majority of servicemen show
every inclination to stay on
and help make this great step
forward in military development a great success.
BRIAN FOGARTY
1st vice-president
UBC Liberal club
$400 raised'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The aggies would like to
thank all the students on campus who supported our apple
day. Over $400 was raised in
aid of the Crippled Children's
Fund. So, you see, aggies do
raise funds for charity.
Aggie undergrad society
'Mud and slander'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I'm sure Gabor Mate is
chuckling. He writes poorly
but effectively and doubtlessly is aware of both facets.
He, in his columns, (and
especially in his dwindling
number of serious ones which
are replaced toy anecdotes as
he seeks to become the poor
man's Jabez) leaves himself
wide open to criticism in his
strange jumps in logic, irrele-
vancies, distortions, and sins
of ommission; but no one attacks him for this.
Instead pens of vitriol ruled by minds far- narrower
than his and much more set
in their beliefs than he churn
out invectives which easily
betray their prejudices and
the sociological prisons called brains which rule them.
Instead of adjectives and
descriptive nouns with frown-
ed-at connotations in our
middle-class heaven, such as
*red', 'pot - head', 'animal',
'scuffy', and 'traitor' being
used to discredit said great
one, why doesn't someone offer intelligent criticism and
an honest, well thought-out
rebuttal of even one of Mate's
e a r t h-shaking pronouncements?
One could expect such garbage as I have exemplified
on the letter pages of the
local evening edition, but in
a newspaper catering to a
budding    intellegensia     and
leaders of tomorrow's community (pardon my tongue)
it is, to say the least, disappointing.
Perhaps it is not because
his opposition has no articulate champions to contribute
to their cause, but simply
that they have no credible or
coherent argument to proffer
and must resort to mud and
slander.
JOHN   PLOMMER
Arts IV
'Unification natch'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am for unification of the
armed services.
The role of the Canadian
Armed Forces has been changing from the clearly impossible task of national defense,
to one of "keeping the peace"
in the widest international
sense. Canada is one of the
few nations to which this task
may toe put, given its political
development and position in
interational affairs today.
In my view, both as a student and a regular member of
the CAF, unification of the
services is a natural and logical step in the organization of
the best possible military team
to fulfill this peace-keeping
role, considering the job to be
done against the budget available to do it.
Mr. Davidson, in his letter
of Jan. 6^ makes some completely inane remarks. Particularly, no man will do a job
in the services he is untrained
for. This goes without saying
and I am surprised he should
mention it.
Regardless of Mr. Davidson,
I watch the services evolve
into one service which is truly
functional in the world today
— not stay as some kind of
tradition-bound anachronism a
few conservative former admirals and others would have
it remain.
Mr. Davidson, it is with professional pride I will serve in
such a unified service when I
leave this university.
A. W. BURTON
Eng. 4
SPECIAL
EVENTS
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
TUES., JAN. 17
Donald Duncan
Ex Green Beret on
Vietnam
"The Whole Thing
Was A Lie"
Auditorium
THURS.. JAN. 19
Acid Rock in
Brock
with
Uncle Al's Fantastic
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MON.. JAN. 23
Sidney Cohen
from Los Angeles
on L.S.D.
"A Reply To
Timothy Leory"
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"BUT WHY SHOULD a broken leg make any difference,"
questions Calvin Skeebom, describing his equipment to
appreciative ski bunny. From the first view of the glistening slopes to the final breathtaking descent, skiing is
a   fun   thing.
THE      UBYSSEY
MOVE MADE
Thursday, January  12,   1967
Bookstore staff
apply for union
Full-time  staffers of UBC
join the university union local.-
The decisions of the staff
to join the union was announced to John Hunter, bookstore
manager, on Dec. 21.
"I have no objections at all,"
said Hunter. "There has been
no dispute between the staff
and administration."
The same view was expressed
by J. F. McLean, director of
personnel.
"If this is what the majority
of staff wants, then the administration will not oppose
them. This is university
policy." he said.
Hunter did not know how
this would affect the students
who work part time in the
bookstore.
"This matter will have to be
settled by the board of labor
relations," said McLean.
No reason has been given by
the staff for their move.
'^Salaries and hours will not
bookstore have applied to
Grant given graduates
for community studies
UBC is the first Canadian
university to receive a major
grant from the Richard King
Mellon Charitable Trusts to expand training of graduate students in urban and regional
planning.
The grant of $150,000 will
be used over three years by
the division of community and
regional planning in the faculty of graduate studies.
It will provide Mellon fellowships in city planning,
faculty salaries and a flexible
sum of $10,000 to be used for
either purpose.
Dr. Peter Oberlander, director of UBC's planning division, said the grant was made
in recognition of UBC's leadership in professional education
for city planning in Canada.
"The Mellon award comes at
a very strategic moment when
there is a great shortage of
qualified planners, and when
the problems of urban development multiply daily," said
Oberlander.
Talks center
on pot, acid
Marijuana and LSD will
be discussed at UBC Monday and all users and non-
users are invited to participate.
The meeting is sponsored
by the November 11 Committee and will be hosted by
the Quadra Institute.
The committee was formed last fall to change present marijuana legislation
and institute a program of
general education on the
psychedelic drugs, marijuana
and LSD.
The meeting will be held
in Ed. 201 at 8 p.m.
change as far as I know but the
staff might want higher wages
once they are members of the
union," Hunter added.
"The matter wasn't presented to the board meeting this
week," said J. B. Harvey, registrar of the labour relations
board in Victoria. "I do not
know when it will be before
the board."
The bookstore staff is the last
group of university workers to
join the union. The staff of
housing administration and
food services are already members.
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Eugene O'Neill's Autobiographical Masterpiece
LONG DAYS JOURNEY INTO NIGHT
with Alma Thery, Barney O'Sullivan, Lee Taylor, and Eric Schneiler
Directed by Stanley Weese
JANUARY 13-21
STUDENT TICKETS AT 75 CENTS AVAILABLE ALL PERFORMANCES
This production is presented by the Department of Theatre especially for the
students of English 100. You are advised to get your tickets early. Hundreds
were unable to see Marat/Sade. Don't be left out of Vancouver's Leading
Theatre this time by leaving it to the last minute.
EARLY  CURTAIN  7:30  p.m.  nightly
BOX OFFICE   —   ROOM 207   —
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE FOCUS
Report asks 14-campus union
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
TORONTO (Staff) — A
revolutionary proposal that
would amalgamate Ontario's
14 universities into one super
institution is meeting strong
opposition.
The proposal, contained in
the Spinks commission report
released last month, would see
the University of Toronto as
head campus, with satellite
campuses at the 13 other public university sites.
The commission was constituted to find ways to reduce
duplication of facilities, especially in graduate work. Its
report deplores lack of a coordinating agency to plan the
development of such graduate
work in Ontario.
Five years ago, the province
had only eight public universities in Toronto, Hamilton, London, Kingston, Kitchener-
Waterloo, and Ottawa.
Now it has 14, with an
undergraduate enrolment of
more than 50,000 and a corresponding graduate enrolment.
NO REGARD
"Here are 14 fully chartered, nominally autonomous universities which function with
the freedom of independent
private institutions," the
Spinks report states. "They
are free to declare their own
objectives and to develop their
own programs, without regard
or reference to their neighbors, or the needs in this regard of the province.
"Yet their major support is
derived from public funds and
in this regard, they are actually state universities in the
same sense as those in the
United Kingdom or the United
States.
"They compete with each
other for their share of the
annual appropriations, and the
direction and rate of their development   is  determined  not
by rational and unified planning, but by their individual
ingenuity in securing funds."
It's a drastic situation, the
report contends, and it needs
a drastic solution.
The report suggests a University of Ontario, directed
from the head campus in Toronto, with side developments
such as an Ontario provincial
universities library, also headquartered in Toronto.
First headwinds against the
suggestions blew from the
universities themselves.
TOO COMPLICATED
Dr. J. A. Corry, principal
of Queen's University in Kingston, termed the report "An
unnecessarily complicated solution to the problem of coordination of our effort."
A poll of university heads
conducted by the Toronto
Globe and Mail turned up no
votes for the plan.
Comments ranged from, "I
cannot believe the government
can consider the University of
Ontario concept," (from the
new president of the University of Guelph) to a charge that
the concept was irrelevant
(from retiring president of the
University of Western Ontario,
Dr. G. Edward Hall).
Dr. H. G. Thode, president
of McMaster University in
Hamilton, termed the plan
neither necessary nor desirable. Present administrative
systems could implement the
needed reforms and end duplication of effort, he contended.
Even Ontario's young, aggressive minister of university
affairs, William Davis, had
reservations about the plan,
although he did not make
clear what his reservations
were.
The Spinks commission is
part of an attempt by the Ontario government to revamp
university affairs. The province was the first in Canada
to set up a separate  depart-
Ottawa
ment of university affairs,
which has pushed through a
number of controversial plans.
They met with protests too;
strong student opposition to
the Student Awards Program
introduced last fall brought a
few minor revisions but nothing near the major changes
demanded by the students who
marched on the provincial legislature, wielding scrap - SAP
signs.
The Spinks Commission was
sponsored by the Committee
on University Affairs, and the
Committee of Presidents of the
Provincially Assisted Universities in Ontario.
Committee members were
University    of    Saskatchewan
ONTARIO
14 campus university?
DR. J. A.  CORRY
.  . . opposes report
president Dr. John Spinks;
Dr. Gustave Arlt, president of
the Council of Graduate
Schools in the United States;
and Dr. F. Kenneth Hare,
Master of Birkbeck College,
University of London.
All three have experience
with large universities with
main and satellite campuses.
Model for the University of
Ontario concept seems to be
the University of California,
Artl's former homeground.
But, say the plan's critics,
concepts used by universities
in California just aren't relevant to Ontario's universities,
developed over many years to
be completely independent of
each other.
CORRY MOST SEVERE
Corry, speaking for the
university presidents of Ontario, was the plan's severest
critic.
He allows that the commission is right about many
things: Ontario does need more
people with higher degrees;
postgraduate work must be of
a high standard; it would be
impossible to provide top rate
facilities for all graduate disciplines at all Ontario universities.
Corry concedes, too, that
planning has been lacking in
past development of graduate
facilities. "It is right in thinking that improvements in these
devices and procedures are
urgently needed," he commented in a recent newspaper
article.
But, stresses Corry, "it
is wrong when it prescribes
a University of Ontario as a
kind   of   holding  company   to
integrate and harmonize the
work of 14 separate universities widely scattered over the
province, a massive and inevitably cumbrous organization for achieving a few very
specific jobs of co-ordinating,
an organization likely to create
in the Ontario environment
more problems than it would
solve."
As an alternative Corry,
past president of the Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada, suggests increased co-operation among
presidents of Ontario universities to develop facilities for
Ontario's 8,000 graduate students and the thousands that
will follow them.
He also recommends a
strengthened Committee of University of Affairs, working
with the university presidents
to achieve a greater degree of
co-operation and planning.
RESULT UNCERTAIN
What will become of the
Spinks Report is uncertain. If
Ontario premier John Robarts
and university affairs minister
Davis decide to adopt the plan,
the university presidents will
foe forced to go along.
Robarts and Davis are both
university and law school
graduates. Both are young,
aggressive and, to some point,
autocratic.
Robarts' Progressive Conservative majority in Ontario
faces only weak opposition in
the legislature, with the Liberals badly disorganized, and
the NDP little better.
Robarts and Davis are far
from politically inept. They
would not force an integration
upon the men whose co-operation they must secure — the
university presidents.
It seems more likely that the
major recommendation of the
Spinks report will be toned
down, with an attempt to coordinate activities in the universities without an actual
amalgamation.
SOME FULFILLED
No one seems seriously opposed to the idea of a provincial universities library, for
example, or to an upgrading
of undergraduate libraries.
Other recommendations
likely to be fulfilled call for
a provincial accreditation procedure for all doctoral programs, and creation of an On-
t a r i o Universities Research
Council, to co-ordinate research in universities.
But the main result of the
Spinks report will probably be
an acknowledgement by both
government and public that
some attempt at co-ordination
is necessary if Ontario universities are to provide the best
research facilities, without duplication.
"The Spinks Commission has
confirmed Ontario's need for
expanded facilities for graduate study and research," comments Corry.
"It has demonstrated how
expensive graduate work is.
It has stressed the obvious
consequence: there must be
orderly and efficient allocation
of responsibility for the task."
Thursday,  January  12,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 12,   1967
COUNCIL JOLLIES
BY  KRIS  EMMOTT
Semi-clad councillors uninhibited
There isn't much traffic along the
centre island that runs from Brock to
Wesbrook, but the walk is sometimes
very interesting.
From the island you get a clear view
of the inside of Petey Braund's office.
The other day happening to look that
way, my startled eyes beheld Petey
Bear in the act of tucking in his shirt.
He waved gaily and grinned, then
shyly turned his back in order to do up
his pants.
This is confirmation for my theory
that Petey is best capable of constructive work when partly undressed.
I'll never forget the evening he received the library committee in his
bathrobe. Then there was the Halloween council meeting.
It was at that meeting, if you recall,
that Petey sat in for the Great Pump
kin, dressed in a tin helmet with horns,
blue ribbons and long blond braids, and
his bathrobe.
So it is that there was an atmosphere
of tension for the first few minutes of
Monday night's meeting.
The councillors were there, the gavel
was there, Allison Rice was knitting,
but something wasn't quite as it should
be.
Then it happened. Petey Bear unbuttoned his cuffs. Everyone relaxed
as he rolled up his sleeves. The meeting
had begun.
It wasn't much of a meeting—Charlie
Boylan came late, Lome Hudson said
"uh" only 73 times during his SUB report, and six or seven councillors were
absent, although Jack Redenback was
present. Debate was neither furious nor
ludicrously trivial.
Obviously,   the   councillors  feel  re
strained.    They    lack    self-expression.
There's only one thing to do.
First of all, a bathrobe sashed with a
heavy woolen necktie is a very comfortable garment. From now on all the
councillors should wear ibathrobes to
the meetings, except Lome Hudson,
who may wear a toga, and Peter
Braund, who should wear only a pair of
surfer's baggies.
Girls may don chiffon nighties. Naturally, while we're all getting comfortable, we might as well recline on
long couches, a la ancient Rome.
Next, instead of uninteresting coffee
breaks, why not pass around bowls of
wine? That should stimulate debate, at
the same time deaden the mind to
trivia.
And that, I'm sure we all agree,
would be a very good thing.
Student observer status
'a token' to UWO council
LONDON (CUP) — The University of Western Ontario's
senate broke tradition here recently when it decided to allow a student observer to sit
in on its next meeting.
The decision, termed "a
token thing" by students' council president John Patrick,
failed to satisfy council members who have been agitating
for increased student participation in decision making.
"It's a very, very dishearten
ing situation," said Patrick,
referring to the apparent rejection by the board of governors of a council proposal for
representation of interested
groups, including students, on
the senate-board liaison committee which will recommend
changes in Western's constitution.
Patrick says he feels the
board hasn't realized the council's main contention — that
all university members should
participate in its governing.
Meanwhile, council says it is
planning to appeal directly to
students in a pamphlet to be
mailed out next week.
STUDENTS!
FULL  RANGE  OF.  STUDY  MASTER
NOTES NOW AVAILABLE
OPEN DAILY
From 10 a.m.
to MIDNIGHT
(Noon-to Midnight Sunday)
Out-of-towners:
Send for
catalogue.
891 Granville St.    Tel. MU 5-5814
TALK SERIES STARTED
UBC has established an annual lectureship honouring the late professor George J. Spencer, who died in
July, 1966 at the age of 78.
Spencer,, an internationally-known entomologist,
joined the UBC faculty in 1924 and was named professor
emeritus of zoology following his retirement in 1954.
The inaugural Spencer Memorial Lecture will be
given March 30, 1967 by Professor Sir V. B. Wiggles-
worth, professor of biology at Cambridge University and
a leading expert in the field of insect physiology.
The Huberman Educational Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL   COLLEGE
UNIVERSITY SUBJECT TUTORING IN
ENGLISH, MATHS, CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS,
SOCIAL SCIENCES, BIOLOGY, ZOOLOGY,
LAW, ACCOUNTING, FRENCH, SPANISH,
and GERMAN.
Please phone for information about other courses.
MORRIS HUBERMAN, Educational Consultant
"KNOWLEDGE & SUCCESS THROUGH LEARNING POWER"
"
WE HAVE MOVED TO LARGER PREMISES
AT 2158 W. 12th AVE. - NEAR ARBUTUS.
Formerly at 3601 W. 16th Ave.
Phone 732-5535 or 263-4808
STUDENTS IN ALL FACULTIES
There's a rewarding future for you
as a Chartered Accountant
Learn how and why, January 23 to February 3
During this period, members of the Institute of Chartered
Accountants of B.C. will be at UBC to interview students
who  expect to  graduate   in   1967.     Arrangements  for
interviews may be made through Mr. J. C. Craik at the
University Placement Office.    Earlier interviews may be
arranged by telephoning the Institute office at MUtual
1-3264.
YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN A CHALLENGING AND
FAST-GROWING PROFESSION.
Chartered Accountants play a decisive role in Canadian
business, industry and government.    Many have attain
ed executive positions of considerable stature and influence; their training and experience enables them, as
one writer has put it, "to disentangle the threads of
profitability that holds a company together".
By rapidly broadening the scope of its activity, the
profession offers you unlimited opportunities to specialize
and to attain a well rewarded position at an early age.
Your "on location" work with practising Chartered
Accountants will introduce you to a wide range of industrial, commercial, service and governmental operations.
THE   INSTITUTE   OF   CHARTERED   ACCOUNTANTS
SHEEP GROIN, Sask. (UNS)
—City fathers today expressed shock over the rising birth
rate in this country. Mayor
Herman Schweinfelder stated
"Something has to be done, or
these gophers will over-run
us."
530 BURRARD ST., VANCOUVER 1
MU 1-3264
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
IN GERMANY
Fanatic image removed
Br BILL GRAF
(Ubyssey reporter Graf is
in Germany this year on a
World University Service
scholarship.)
MARBURG, Germany — If
you've ever travelled abroad,
you have been confronted by
the language barrier.
All of a sudden the language of the text-book is the
language of the streets, the
newspapers and magazines,
officialdom, the shopkeepers,
merchants and universities.
NATIONAL PROTOTYPE
And despite your loud protestations to the contrary you
harbored a mental concept of
a national prototype for each
country.
You thought of a degenerate, love - making, urinating
Frenchman or a wurst-eating,
militaristic German fanatic,
or a tempermental, oily Italian with arms perpetually
raised in a gesture of surrender.
The realization of the existence of other cultures, and
more important, the recognition of individuals within
these cultures, is what travel
is essentially all about.
But if you are prepared to
accept this premise, then you
must also be prepared to
share the guilt for the excesses of modern Europe, particularly those of the Nazi
era.
OUR FAILURE TOO
Because, if Germans, like
Canadians and indeed, like
all Western nations, are not
to be regarded as stereotypes
but as individuals conditioned by environment and culture, then the German failure
is the failure of Western Man;
the problem of Germany is
the problem of our civilization, and the guilt, the responsibility for the past are
not Germany's alone.
This is not an attempt to
exculpate the Germans in
any way. It was the Germans
alone who installed and sup-
BILL GRAF
... in Germany
ported a regime whose activities have been fully described
elsewhere. Hitler's legacy to
the German people is truly
not a thousand-year Reich
but "a guilt that will last a
thousand years."
But these same Germans
who speak a "text - book"
language in fact say the same
things as we do. Many of
their words are identical or
similar to our own.
Essentially their culture is
our culture: both derive from
the Greek and Latin, both experienced rationalism, roman
ticism, realism, existentialism
and so on, and both are mutually indebted.
Facism then is not a German invention or monopoly,
as the existence of fascist regimes in Spain and formerly
Italy, as well as the movements in Britain, France and
the USA demonstrate.
Fascism is rather something
possessed in greater or lesser
degree by everyone. It is the
suspicion of things one cannot understand, the fear of
what is new or different, the
bewilderment at and fear of
the incomprehensible.
It is the search for a god-
substitute among the trappings of ceremony and superstition and it is the yearning
for a new absolute in an unreasoning and unqualified adherence to something tangible, visible and simple.
INSTINCTIVE DISLIKE
More particularly, it is the
instinctive dislike of someone
you vaguely feel may be superior to you; it is the suppression of civil rights and
the exclusion of non-WASP's
from your favorite club; it is
an alternative to the Pearson-
Diefenbaker fiasco; it is the
assertion of the superiority
you're sure you possess; and
it is what remains when reason has run its course.
OPEN MEETING
WITH DEAN OF GRAD. STUDIES
IAN McTAGGART-COWAN
Graduate students are invited to attend the G.S.A. council meeting on
Monday, January 16 to discuss subjects of concern with the Dean and
members of the council. The meeting will be held in the committee
room at the Centre at 6:15 p.m. This will be a good opportunity to
meet the Dean and to have graduate student opinions heard beyond
the coffee session.
• Erbacher and
Gresvig Skis
• E.C.L, Tyrol and La
Dolomite Boots
• E.C.L, Tyrelia and
Solomon Aliais
harness
4W
- .   • Junior ski sets
• Sweaters and Sox • After Ski Boots and Slippers
• Toques, Parkas, Hoods and Hats • Goggles and Glasses
COMPLETE SKI SETS AT $29.95     -     REPAIRS AND INSTALLATIONS
North Western Sporting Goods ltd.
10th AVE. at ALMA ROAD
224-5040
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear  Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts  & Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'  Coats 10%   UBC  Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608  Granville   (at 10th)  4691   Kingsway  (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 83 - January 9, 1967
Accounting Book I. Hull (Putman)      :__ 2.50
Act of Creation. Koestler (Pan)       _  2.75
Ancient Iraq. Roux (Pelican)          .         2.95
Armament or Disarmament: The Continuing Dispute.
Fisher & Burns (Wadsworth)                       ._     4.25
Basic Facts of Human Heredity. Scheinfeld (Washington Square Press) .60
Behaviorism. Watson (Phoenix)                          1.75
Bias of Communication. Innis (Univ. of Toronto Press)   2.50
Birds of Canada. Godfrey (Queen's Printer Ottawa) hardcover      - 12.50
Canada in World Affairs 1953-1955. Masters (Oxford Univ. Press) 1.95
Canada Year Book 1966 (Queen's Printer Ottawa) paperbound  3.00
Hardbound                                            _ _-      5.00
Change & Continuity in Twentieth-Century America. Braeman
(Harper Colophon)                                                  2.25
Christian  Future. Rosenstock-Huessy (Harper Torch)         2.60
Christian Social Teachings. Forell (Anchor)        2.25
Circle Game. Atwood (Contact Press)           -   ...  2.00
Contemporary China. Adams (Vintage)                                              .  2.45
Education 8> The New America. Kinball & McClellan (Vintage)  2.45
Essays 1958-1962 On Atomic Physics & Human Knowledge.
Bohr (Vintage)                                                    1.90
Existentialism Versus Marism. Novack (Delta Dell)        3.20
Faculty Retirement Systems in Canadian Universities.
Ingraham (Univ. of Toronto)           _   .         2.00
Flying Saucers — Serious Business. Edwards (Bantam)   .75
Freedom Not License. Niell (Hart Pub.)          .   ...  2.25
French Revolution. Thompson (Oxford Univ. Press)               -   3.25
Future of Canadian Federalism. Crepeau & MacPherson
(Univ.  of Toronto)                                                .   „   .               1.95
Gerard Manley Hopkins Priest & Poet. Pick (Oxford Univ. Press) ___ 1.45
Ghosts & Poltergeists. Thurston (Gateway)                                    1.85
Grass Beyond the Mountain. Hobson & Richmond (Bantam)    .75
Greek Ideal & Its Survival. Hadas (Harper Colophon)  1.45
Hitler & Nazism. Snyder (Bantam)                         .     .60
How to Get your Year at College. Carter (A H. Carter)  1.00
Ideas of the Great Philosophers. Sahakian & Sahakian.
(Barnes & Noble)                  _. 1.65
Ideologies. Corbett (Hutchinson)        2.75
In Search of Greatness. Karsh (Univ. of Toronto)  1.95
Invasion from Mars. Cantrill (Harper Torch)                _  _       2.25
ft Doesn't Matter Where You Sit. (McClement (McClelland 8. Stewart) 2.50
John Keats. Bate (Oxford Univ. Press)             4.15
King of the Cats. Dupee (Noonday Press)  2.10
LSD On Campus. Young & Hixson (Dell) _.  .60
Last 100 Days. Toland (Bantam)1     . _.   _               ,    1.25
Last Tresilians. Stewart (Penguin)         .. . _.       1.35
Life & Voyages of Captain George Vancouver.
Anderson (Univ. of Washington)                                  3.20
Mela-Meditations. Sesonski & Fleming (Wadsworth Pub.)      .     2.10
Metropolis: Values in Conflict. Eliasjr. (Wadsworth Pub.) 3.75
Morality and Beyond. Tillich (Harper Torch)                             _     1.10
Muslim World on the Eve of Europe's Expansion. Saunders (Spectrum) 2.25
Maritimes & Canada Before Confederation. Whitelaw
(Oxford Univ. Press)       .       .     1.95
On Authority & Revelation. Kierkegaard (Harper Torch)    2.60
Our Depleted Society. Melman (Delta Dell)                              2.35
Pan Book of Mathematical Tables. Montague-Beart (Pan)  1.50
Parasites of Heaven. Cohen (McClelland & Sewart)  .  2.50
Penkovskiy Papers. Penkovskiy (Avon)                            .95
Philosophical Understanding & Religious Truth. Frank (Oxford Univ.) 1.65
Premarital Sex in a Changing Society. Bell (Spectrum)        2.25
Procedure in the Canadian House of Commons. Dawson
(Univ. of Toronto) ._.     2.50
Psyche. Rohde (Harper Torch)   2.25
Putnam Collegiate Guide to Economics Book 1. Dawson (Putnam)  2.50
Putnam Collegiate Guide to Economics Book 2. Dawson (Putnam) _- 2.50
Radical Papers. Howe (Anchor)      _.       1.65
Random House Dictionary of the English Language.
(Random House) hardcover  29.50
Recent History Atlas. Gilbert (Weidenfeld 81 Nicolson)  3.50
Restoration Dramatists. Miner (Spectrum)  2.25
Retrial: Murder & Dr. Sam Sheppard. Holmes (Bantam)  .75
Rideau Waterway. Legget (Univ. of Toronto)  I.95
Sheepskin Psychosis. Keats (Delta Dell)  2.00
Sociology Book 1. Donnelly (Putnam)  2.50
Structure of Matter. Abbot (Pan)    1.25
Systematic Theology of Paul Tillich. McKelway (Delta Dell)   2.10
Tension Areas in Word Affairs. Turner 81 Freedman (Wadsworth Pub.) 4.25
Thailand Burma, Laos 8> Cambodia. Cacfy (Spectrum)  2.25
Thespis. Gaster (Harper Torch)    ...                     3.40
Toronto During the French Regime 1615-1793. Robinson
(Univ. of Toronto)      2.25
Traditional Near East. Stewart-Robinson (Spectrum)  2.25
Training In Industry. Bass 8. Vaughan (Wadsworth)  1.90
Understanding Evolution. Ross (Spectrum)      .     3.00
Uninhibited History of Canada. Nieol & Whalley (Musson)  2.25
Unsafe at Any Speed. Nader (Pocket Book)     1.00
Vietnam No. 1 in the Read-In Series. (Metheum Pub.)     1.25
Vietnam Inside Story of the Guerilla War. Burchett
(INTERNATIONAL PUB.)   2.35
Virgil. Commager (Spectrum)              .        _ ._       2.25
What They Are Doing to Your Children. Rafferty (Signet)    .75
Whirlpool. Giguere (McClelland 81 Stewart)        2.50
Will the Real Gordon Sinclair Please Stand Up.
Sinclair (McClelland & Stewart)                     2.50
A World of Nuclear Powers. Buchan (Spectrum)        2.25
Writing in Canada. Whalley (MacMillan of Canada)  .95
You English Words. Moore (Delta)      2.10
UBC BOOKSTORE Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
(Advertisement)
Thursday, January 12,  1967
,f -mm
CHARISMA
SUBJECT OF
FINAL  TALK
THE ECUMENICAL MAKE-UP OF THE AUDIENCE that has heard Rev. Tommy Tyson (second from
left) is demonstrated here. From left to right they are Ken Gaglardi (Pentacostal), T. Tyson
(Methodist), Jerry Schindler (Catholic) and Berk Maddaford (Anglican). Jerry Schindler is
on leave for a year from his responsibilities in the Catholic Church.
/  HAVE  THE
HOLY  SPIRIT
by Bev Norby
I speak with other tongues.
This is a most precious gift of
God. I pray with the understanding, and when my need
or my grief is desperate, I pray
in another tongue those words
that reach beyond anything I
can express in my own language.
Speaking with another tongue is a beautiful experience.
It adds a great and powerful
dimension to prayer. I can pray
by myself or I can allow the
Holy Spirit to pray through
me. He is my strongest link
with God.
I realize that speaking in
tongues is not convincing evidence of God to those who have
not received the baptism of the
Holy Spirit. To them the tongues I speak may be of God
or it may be gibberish which I
have formed to the sound of
language. The truth of the evidence is apparent only to those
who have also received the
baptism — and to me.
I prayed for this gift for a
year. When I finally received
it I knew beyond doubt, that
here was the evidence of one
more promise Jesus had made
and kept.
Christian unity
topic of week
The collapse of denominational barriers has been a
prominent feature at the series
of meetings sponsored by the
interdenominational Full Gospel  Students.
Rev. Tommy Tyson (a southern Methodist) has shared the
dias with a Roman Catholic
Jerry Schindler, and both
have told how they "met
God".
The cross denominational
audience heard accounts of
God's Holy Spirit being received by Anglicans, Catholics, United Church members,
Baptists, Presbyterians, Pente-
costals and others.
Tyson, who has received the
baptism of the Holy Spirit,
said that before he received
it himself, he dismissed those
who advocated it as the "froth
on the casket of a dying
church". In his meetings Tommy, who is now very much
apart of this Charismatic
movement, acclaims the Holy
Spirit as a source of God's
power, and talks of the spirit
of God as being the real cohesive factor in Christianity.
Gospel club open
Interested in joining the Full
Gospel Students?
To do this or to get further
information about the activities
of the Associated Full Gospel
Students, please call:
Rick Bowering .. 224-9065
Ken Gaglardi 228-8615
Bernice Gerard     266-9275
Paperbacks available
Want to be up-to-date on
church history? Raise your
Christian education literacy
level?
Copies of the books listed
below may be obtained without
charge at the Tyson lecture
series this week (except Friday)
in Bu 202 at noon.
They Speak with Tongues
By John Sherril
The  Cross  and the Switchblade, David Wilkerson.
They Speak with Tongues is
an account of Sherrils attempt
to see what the tongues movement is all about.
The Cross and the Switch
blade deals with the miraculous
cure to drug addiction.
Tongues terrified
John SherriPs academic approach to speaking in tongues
led to a noteworthy incident.
Sherril recorded six people
as they spoke in another language and also recorded two
people that hadn't received the
baptism of the Holy Spirit, as
they tried to speak a language
they hadn't learned.
These tapes were then played
before David Scott, religious
editor and three linguists from
Columbia University, two from
Union Theological Seminary
and one from General Theological Seminary.
Together they were specialists in modern and ancient
languages; one was a language
structure expert.
While none of the languages
was identified, the linguists
were able to pick out the two
that were as they said 'just
noise'.
Sherril's book can be obtained free at Rev. T. Tyson's meetings every day this week except Friday.
The Rev. Tommy Tyson
speaks today at noon in Buchanan 202 in the last of a
series of lectures on 'The Charismatic Renewal". Today, also,
is the last of the specially
scheduled informal prayer services (St. Andrew's Chapel at
1:45) which the Full Gospel
Students are sponsoring in conjunction with the Tyson lecture
series and the internationally
regarded week of prayer for
Christian unity.
The Rev. Mr. Tyson comes
to U.B.C. from O.R. where
he has been appointed to serve
as chief chaplain by Bishop
Paul Ganber of the Raleigh
Area of the Methodist Church.
Mr. Tyson was educated at the
Guilford College, Greensboro,
and Duke University, IXirham,
N.C.
Schedule
expanded
The attendance at the meetings of Tommy Tyson has increased in the past three days.
Starting from 40 on Monday
to 55 on Tuesday, the audience
numbered about 65 yesterday.
Today's meeting is the last
meeting Tyson will have on
campus.
Thursday evening he will
speak to an interdenominational group in Hotel Vancouver
in Salon A at 8:00 p.m. This
is an extra meeting planned
since Tyson arrived. The Full
Gospel Students who are also
sponsoring this event expect
about 100 students, laymen
pastors and priests to listen
to the testimony of Tommy
Tyson and Jerry Schindler.
Recently Chaplain Tyson led
a team of ten students from
O.R.U. in an area wide evangelism crusade with Oral Roberts in Rio de Janeiro. The
university students .volunteers
from several faculties, participated in a literature saturation
programme aimed at getting the
good news of the Christian gospel to every resident. '
The students report that one
Rio businessman who for three
years was confined to a wheel
chair as a result of brain damage which robbed him of his
sense of balance was instantly
made well. After prayer, he
ran back to the speaker's platform and demonstrated to the
18,000 people in the auditorium
that his sense of balance had
been restored.
Oral Roberts says concerning
Tommy Tyson's part in the Rio
pre-crusade minister's meeting,
"I don't know if it was because
so many Methodist ministers
and missionaries were present,
but the group really responded
to Tommy ... He told that God
has baptized him with the Holy
Spirit and that he had left
resident ministry to enter evangelism."
In the lecture series this
week Mr. Tyson is directing attention to the possibilities of
renewal of power, love and
unity in the church through re-
emphasis on the work of the
Holy Spirit.
Rev. Tommy Tyson
of
Oral Roberts
University
speaks on
the
CHARISMATIC
RENEWAL
Monday to Thursday
Bu. 202    All Welcome
ADVT. Thursday, January  12,   1967
THE      UBYSSE1
Page 11
MORAL FORCE NEEDED
Scholarship to 'Lett
ROBERT KERR
. . . first one
Med head
appointed
to chair
A founding member of
UBC's faculty of medicine, Dr.
Robert Bews Kerr, is the university's first Eric W. Hamber
professor of medicine.
Approved by UBC board of
governors, the appointment
will toe effective July 1, 1967.
Kerr will continue to head
the faculty of medicine and
the Vancouver General Hospital department of medicine.
The professorship is the first
perpetually endowed and
fully-supported chair or professorship at UBC.
Mrs. Eric W. Hamber endowed the university with a
$500,000 trust fund as a memorial to her husband. A total
of $25,000 a year will be
available in perpetuity to support the professorship.
UBC president John Macdonald said: "It is fitting that
Dr. Robert Kerr, the first professor and head of the department of medicine at UBC,
should be the holder of UBC's
. first fully-endowed chair."
Do you have physical vigor,
moral force of character and
ability to serve, work with
and lead others?
Then a $1,500 scholarship,
provided by the Sherwood
Lett Memorial Fund, could be
yours.
Chief Justice Lett, who died
in July 1964, at the age of
68, was described in the memorial minutes of the UBC Senate as UBC's "most distinguished student."
Lett was three times AMS
president, and later a member
of the Senate and of the Board
of Governors.
He was chancellor from 1951
to 1957.
The scholarship was set up
after his death. First winner
was former Ubyssey editor
Mike Hunter, who had physical vigor, moral force of character and ability to serve,
work with, and lead others.
Dean Walter Gage, chairman
of UBC's awards committee,
has called for nominations for
the 1967-68 award to be sub-
THE
Today — Auditorium
Aggie apple day sales
make $500 for children
Aggies collected more than $400 in their annual
Apple Day Tuesday.
The proceeds from the sale of 24 boxes of apples
will go to the crippled children's hospital.
Apple Day is an annual event during Aggie Week
which ends Saturday.
There will be a cow milking and beer drinking
contest in front of the library today with the aggies,
foresters,  engineers, phys.  ed.,  and Pubsters.
VILLAGE   CAFE
"Where good friends and fine food meet"
5778 University Blvd.
(In the Village)
224-0640
mitted not later than Feb. 28.
The winner will be selected
from candidates nominated by
the UBC students' council, the
executive of the official undergraduate society of the various
faculties and schools, and
faculty.
Details of the eligibility and
qualifications of candidates are
available at Gage's office.
A $1,000 bequest from the
late Frederic Hampton Clenn-
denning has raised the fund
to more than $42,000 since it
was established in late 1964.
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
SEASON.
10% Student Discount on
Presentation of Student
Card.
336 West Pender St.
681-2004
^   ^
gf       U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12. 1966 to April 15. 1967
TUESDAYS   —
WEDNESDAYS —
FRIDAYS   —
SATURDAYS   —
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.*
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m."
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.**
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   — 12:45 - 2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
♦Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
Students .35
Students .50
Adults .60
Adults .75
ADMISSION: Afternoons -
Evenings
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
Some things
You DESIRE . . .
Some You Need!
And one of these is education. Imperatively! Once it
was a prerequisite of success. Now you need it just
to get by! YOU know this.
Consult us. Vancouver's
first tutoring college. {Still
here because we get results). To third year University — Our staff is fully
qualified. Success rate?
Above 90 per cent pass in
subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
(Vancouver) Ltd.
571 Howe Street
683-8464
___yv ^Diamond with L^onndt
ence
"Floir"
$100
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
IIRBWKS
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK  ROYAL
"UTTERLY FANTASTIC!" Says Robby McLennan
Robby is a student al the University of British Columbia — HE CAN READ
1400 WORDS PER MINUTE!
Before taking the course in Effective Reading offered by Reading Dynamics.
Robby read at the rate of 250 words per minute with a comprehension of 70%.
He now reads 1400 W.P.M. and his comprehension has risen to 85%.
We're not fond of superlatives, but we can't resist noting Robby's own comment on the course — "Utterly Fantastic!"
Over 250,000 people have enriched their lives by taking this course. Let us
show you, at one of our FREE DEMONSTRATIONS, how YOU can benefit from it.
The course offers a money-back guarantee if we should fail to enable you to
at least triple your present reading speed.
FREE DEMONSTRATIONS IN READING  DYNAMICS
Friday, Jan. 13
Tonight-Jan. 12
BAYSHORE HOTEL
McKenzie  Room
5:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY HILL SECONDARY
SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
5:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
BAYSHORE HOTEL
McKenzie  Room
5:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY HILL SECONDARY
SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
5:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m.
READING DYNAMICS OF BC LTD
MAIN OFFICE. 549 HOWE STREET   VANCOUVER 1 BC
SUITE 210 685-2374 Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 12,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Filmsoc raises Caine
FILMSOC
Four showings of The Ip-
cress File in the auditorium
today at 12:30, 3:30, 6 p.m. and
8:30. Admission 50 cents.
CIASP
Application forms for summer work in Mexico now
available at St. Mark's and
Brock Ext. 350. Deadline Jan.
19.
CYCLING TEAM
Organizational   meeting   today at noon in gym 211.
WAA
Eighth   annual   Thunderette
basketball tournament will 'be
held Friday evening and all
day Saturday in the women's
gym.
SAILING CLUB
Important meeting today at
noon in Bu. 106.
UBC  ORCHESTRA
Practice  tonight  at   7  p.m.
in   music    104.    Violins   and
violas needed.
EUS
Girls in nursing, home-ec
and re-hab medicine are invited to a skating party Friday at 8:30 in the arena. Sock-
McMaster
to ponder
senate
revamp
By  PETER   CALAMAI
The Hamilton Spectator
HAMILTON <CUP) — McMaster University will consider a complete revamping of
its internal structure to im-
prove communications and
eliminate duplication of effort
and conflict of authority.
The recommendations in a
170-page report made by a
senate committee headed by
Dr. J. S. Kirkaldy, are expected to be considered by the
senate later this month.
In addition to faculty and
alumni representatives, the
committee had two student
representatives.
Major recommendations of
the Kirkaldy report include:
• Division of the arts and
science faculty into four separate faculties — science, humanities, social sciences and
business.
• Replacement of the old
college system by three "divisions" — science, arts and
health sciences; creation of a
faculty majority on the senate;
student representation on some
faculty  committees.
• Replacement of the
graduate studies faculty with a
CUS seminar
needs UBC
organizers
Volunteers are needed to
help organize the tenth annual seminar of The Canadian
Union of Students to be held
in Vancouver next fall.
"UBC was honoured by being chosen as host for the centennial year seminar. We
must now show the CUS delegates what Vancouver hospitality really is," said AMS
President Peter Braund.
The committee must raise
funds, complete facility arrangements, and plan entertainment, transportation, and
registration procedures for
the  150 delegates.
Applications are being received at Box 153, Brock Hall.
graduate board;   and  revamping of the senate.
The report also recommends
a special public relations administrative assistant to the
president be appointed to improve relations with the
people of Hamilton.
hop, skating and hockey game
included in 50 cent admission.
MUSSOC
Meeting today at noon in
clubroom for ticket committee.
COTC
UBC pipeband practices
Thursday at 7:30 in the armory. All welcome.
VIET NAM COMMITTEE
Meeting today in Bu. 220A.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting today at noon in
Bu. 223.
MUSSOC
Prop men, carpenters, strong
"fly" men, and back stage help
needed. Sign up in clubroom
above auditorium stage.
SPORTS  CAR  CLUB
Meeting today at noon in
chem. 250. Slides of 1986
Thunderbird rally will be
shown.
INTERNATIONALISTS
Alex Bandy will speak on
The Problems of Two Revolutions Friday at 7:30 at 2979
West 29th Avenue.
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
j   • Full Dining
Facilities
1   • Take
Home
Service
/'»THE
(ilPCRESS
Today — Auditorium
CAN
OCTOGENERIANS
MAKE WITH  THE SIXTIES?
You bet your sweet young life they can. Take
Grassies downtown on Seymour. Right now in
swinging sixty-six Grassies are celebrating their
eightieth birthday. And they're as young as
ever. They have to be. Catering for youth demands a youthful approach. Grassies have it.
All the way — from jewellery to time-pieces,
cufflinks to earrings, bracelets to brooches to
necklaces and  all  things   rare  and   beautiful.
Because Grassies emphasise 'style.' Prefer the
"way out" to whafs "in." They approve and
applaude today's young set. Like what they see.
So will you. When you step into Grassies —
jewellers extraordinairel
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR .. . 685-2271
■
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST, PAIR OP BLACIC GLASSES
between Sasamat and UBC. Phone
224-4856.
VIOLIN WITH BLACK CASE IN
main library shelves. Would "finder" please return. Has sentimental value.
PEARL NECKLACE, DOUBLE
strand, east mall, last Thursday,
phone Heather at  897-6606.
WHOEVER MISTAKENLY? TOOK
a light brown attache case from
SedgevlHck please return the contents to the same spot or phone
261-2503.
LOST MIDDLE OF DEC. LADIES'
silver wrist watch and circular
gold and pearl pin phone 736-9462.
I WOULD SURE LIKE MY BROWN
leather driving gloves back,
(sniff). Lost Wed. 4th, Cathie,
526-5455'.
FOUND: CAMERA, LEFT IN CAR
between Ashcroft and Kamloops.
Apply Dean's office, room 410
Engineering Building. '_	
LOST AND REQ'D. URGENTLY—
2 French pronunciation manuals
by Leon. Lost Dec. 7. .Phone
Audrey   at  261-0804.
Coming Dances
12A
LIGHT SHOW & DANCE TO THE
West Coast Sound of the Unfor-
seen and the Seeds of Time. The
Afterthought 2114 W. 4th. Fri. at
8:30.
NEWMAN BALL, REGAL BALL-
room, Georgia Hotel, Friday, Jan.
28, 8:30 p.m. $6.00/couple ($5.00 for
members). Tickets at A.M.S. or
Newman   Centre.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
Scandals
39A
PIED    PIPER    WANTED.    APPLY
St.   Mark's  College.	
THE   HIPPIES   &   THEIR   MATES
are  invited  tt^JMardi JJras_*67.
SEE     YOU     IN     THE    FUNNIES.
Mardi   Gras,   January   27-28.
SEWING - ALTERATIONS    40
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
TYPING — ELECTRIC — 224-6129.
STUDENTS!
Am once again free to accept your
typing  requirements.   Elec.   Typewriter.   Inger   872-7380.
PROFESSORS
Fully   exp.   in   the   typing   of  your
theses.  Reas. rates. Ref. Inger 872-
7380.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED: BABYSITTER FOR 3
yr. old girl. 4:30 to midnight approx. Live-in. Call Mrs. Lu Hal-
lick 738-1203.
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND History lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
COW MILKING CONTEST THURS-
DAY noon in front of the Library.
SCIENCE FORMAL CRYSTAL
Ball this Saturday at the Coach
House Inn, 9:00 to 1:00. Tickets
$3.75 from A.M.S. office or S.U.S.
Exec.
E.U.S. SKATING PARTY! N.U.S.—
Home-ec — Rehab med. Girls Invited. Fri. 8:30 T-Blrd Arena.
Transportation
14
RIDERS AND driver wanted vie. of
45th Ave. and Blvd., phone Ralph,
AM   1-1281.	
DISTRESS! NEED A RIDE M-F
for 9:30 classes. Oak and 49th
Phone Lynn: JS63-6602.
TWO DRIVERS WANTED FOR
carpool, 8:30 classes. Vicinity
Capilano Highlands. Phone 987-
6380.
CARPOOL NEEDED FROM MAR-
pole for 8:30's Mon.-Fri. Will
drive one or two days a week.
FA.   1-9461.
Wanted
15
WANTED LOTS OF PEOPLE AT
cross-cultural workshop in Inter-
natlonal House Sat., Jan. 14, 9 a.m.
WANTED TO BUY. OLD ELEC-
tric toy trains, the older the better. American Flyer, Lionel Horn-
by,  etc.  Phone 261-1838 eves.
TEXT WANTED: BUFFA'S "MOD-
els For Production & Operations
Management".   Phone   985-3945.
16
Travel Opportunities
WANTED RIDE FOR TWO, TO
Kimberley, mid-term break, ex-
penses shared,   ph.   Mike  277-3659.
TAKE  A  TRIP AT   THE   AFTER
thought.   A Light Show & Dance
with the Unforseen and the Seeds
of   Time.   The   Afterthought,   2114
W.   4th.  Friday at 8:30.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
EXPO     ANYONE?    LARGE     CON-
verted   bus-camper   complete.
Sleeps 6 plus. 434-1677.
ELECTRIC BASS GUITAR MUST
sell! Worth $170.00. Sell for $100.08
Phone CA 4-5584. Gord.
FARMERS' FROLIC TICKETS FOR
sale from any Aggie or from
A.M.S. office. $3.00 couple. Jan.
14, Armouries 8:30 - 1 a.m.	
FOR SALE: OXFORD UNIVER-
sal Dictionary $10.00, Complete
Yale Shakespeare 40 volumes
$25.00.  Both  as  new.  Phone  681-
1944 eves.	
FOR SALE GRESVIG G-88 METAL
skis 180 CM. Like new with har-
ness,   $60.   987-5434.	
FOR SALE: ONE SET WOMAN'S
golf clubs and bag; Smith's tachometer; 30-30 Winchester rifle. Call
Janice or Craig, 433-0292.
RENTALS  8c  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
QUIET, COMFORTABLE room in
apartment, kit. privileges. Close
to  express  trans.,  phone  266-7663.
PRIVATE ROOM; BATHROOM,
kitchen, private entrance, near
gates, dbl. bed. etc., warm, Phone
224-6857.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND board on campus at
ZBT Fraternity House, phone 224-
9660, after 5 p.m.	
1958 PONTIAC 6-cyl. auto., excellent
cond., w.w.'s, radio (rear spk.),
$450,  Mike,  731-6295.
TRANSPORTATION     CHEAP
$150.00.   AL.   5-8061.
1961     CORVAIR     MONZA,      VERY
good   Bhape.   Ph.   Carlos,   266-9298.
1947 DESOTO CONVERT, RADIO,
heater, near new top, $175 or off-
er,   Bruce,   733-8724   after   6:00.
1954 STUDABAKER COMMANDER
V-8, excellent condition, new tires.
$225 or best offer, phone 278-2377
after 6   p.m.	
1957 PONTIAC SW V-8 NEW
shocks, tires, battery, recond.
motor, clean throughout, $595,
phone 228-8144.	
'55 VAUXHALL VELOX, 4-DOOR,
Six cylinder, excellent running
condition,   $135.   433-7844.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
PAPA BULLS, MAMA BULLS,
and Baby Bulls Are All Coming
to the Farmers' Frolic on Jan. 14
in the Armouries.
THE
12:30,
IPCRESS
3:30,   6:00,
FILE   —   THURS.
8:30  Auditorium.
IF YOU'RE OVER THE AGE OF
consent you're old enough to have
fun at the Afterthought. 2114 W.
4th.   Fri.   at  8:30.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR STU-
dent plus salary, In return for
babysitting, household duties—own
room AM 6-9784.	
ROOM AND BOARD. ON CAMPUS.
Good food and comfortable accommodation. Phone 224-9662 .after
5:00  p.m.	
ROOM AND BOARD CHEAPEST
on campus. Five minutes from
classes.   Call   224-9660.	
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD.
Phi   Delta   House;   convenient   lo- ■
cation; congenial atmosphere. Jim
Gaudin,  CA 4-9073,  5:30-7:00.
ROOM AND BOARD. $40 MONTH
plus light babysitting. One block
from   gates.   224-0146.   Girl   only.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
WANTED, MALE senior student to
snare West End apartment, immediate occupancy, phone "Ed"
681-8751.  after 5 p.m.	
3 MEN WANT A FOURTH TO
share house at 15th and Burrard.
Must be over 21. Phone 738-3033
after 5 p.m.      	
WANTED: MALE STUDENT TO
share 2 bedrm. apartment, Kits.
Immediate occupancy. $47 per
month.  Ph. 738-0685.	
STUDENT WANTED TO SHARE
Cornish, HE 4-0122 or 681-8730
after 6:06 p.m.
BUY  -  SELL  -
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
RENT

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