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The Ubyssey Oct 22, 1985

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THE UBYSSEY
VjSnco
Vol. LXVIII, No. 13
ncouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 22,1986
228-2301
Health insurance ruling fought
By DEBBIE LO
The Simon Fraser university
teaching support staff union will
appeal a supreme court ruling last
Thursday upholding the provincial
government's decision to exclude
Medical Service Plan coverage for
visa students and workers.
"We think there are grounds for
appeal. This is an important issue
both for our members and for the
province as a whole," said T.S.S.U.
organizer Lisa Price.
The T.S.S.U. filed a petition to
get an injunction against the provincial health ministry's decision to
remove the student and worker
MSP coverage in August.
The ministry's policy change
under the Immigration Act said
Visa students and workers would no
longer be considered "residents"
under two provincial statutes.
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation of Students Pacific chair, said
the judge was not taking the union's
arguments into "full account" in its
ruling.
T.S.S.U. lawyer Leo McGrady
argued the 1976 Immigration Act
definition of "visitors" was not in
effect when the provincial statutes
affecting visa students and workers
were passed, but the judge said that
made "little or no difference".
Hunt said the federation will ask
its local constituencies for monetary
support in the union's appeal at its
next annual meeting Nov. 6.
UBC visa student Carlos
Schrezor said the government has
not been consistent in its definition
CHILD KNOCKS BACK bottle of cold amber brew during wild night of
carousing in Pit. Tuna sandwich in right hand has been certified not
decayed by John Fraser, federal minister of disgracedness. Hair was in
rakish mohawk style until child decided to go back to nature. "But I'll
have to wait a few years to grow a beard," he said.
College library funding cut
By NANCY LEE
Book purchasing cutbacks are
hurting students at Capilano and
Langara colleges say teaching and
library staff there.
Book purchase funding at
Capilano college has fallen to
$20,000 from $100,000 in past
years, said the college's campus
library department head Pat Biggins.
Many assigned reading texts will
be unavailable at the library and
new texts will be virtually nonexistent, she said.
"This is the worst time in history
that this could happen," said Biggins. "Basically it's the students
who are given the runaround —
with the prices of books so high,
they can't afford to buy from the
bookstore — and often the texts
aren't there — yet the library won't
have the texts available."
Capilano chemistry professor
Allen Gilchrist finds this year worse
than before.
"I think it's quite disgusting,"
he said. "I had problems with an
order for an updated chemistry text
and I haven't been able to get it
through; I was quite upset," he
said.
Langara book purchasing cuts
have not been as deep said Linda
Prince, the head librarian there.
Teaching staff can always order
what they need, depending on the
number of teachers, student enrolment size and the "teaching circumstances" involved, she said.
"Langara orders in modest
amounts, but then we've always
ordered in small quantities based
upon the modest, actually pitifully
small, budget we already have,"
said Prince.
Book cuts affect classes where
new, updated information is constantly needed, she said.
"A freeze on books would cut
short new information and departments such as science would really
be hurt."
of a resident. He said he does not
believe it is fair for him to have to
pay income tax and not be eligible
for MSP coverage.
The 4,000 students affected by
the ministry's decision will now
have to seek coverage under private
plans Peter Wearing, a health
ministry spokesperson has said.
Schrezor, who has now purchas
ed private medical insurance, said
it's cost is about $370 more than or
double the provincial MSP cost.
Current MSP premiums are
about $204 per year for singles and
$324 per year for families.
Two Vancouver companies offering medical insurance for foreign
students, Seaboard Life and John
Ingle, charge $330 and $325 for
singles respectively, and $800 and
$650 for families.
Tow Yee, University of Victoria
foreign students association president, said the ministery's decision
discourages foreign students who
will have to pay high differential
fees and now higher priced medical
insurance from coming to B.C.
Transfer payments slashed
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
federal government will use college
and university students to balance
the budget, said Manitoba's finance
minister.
By 1990, provinces will have $6
billion less in federal money to
spend on health, universities and
colleges, according to reports from
a secret session of a meeting between federal and provincial finance
ministers several weeks ago.
In an after-dinner session of the
Sept. 26-27 Halifax meeting that
only finance ministers and not their
aides attended, Michael Wilson,
Federal Minister of Finance said the
government will be cutting back
transfer payments to the provinces
starting in 1986. This new schedule
for cuts is a change from information published in the May budget.
Because aides didn't attend the
meeting and "half the ministers
were probably on the sauce" by the
time Wilson made the announcement, according to an MP who asked his name not be used, the new
plan for cuts got no national press.
But federal opposition critics
found out through the Ontario and
Manitoba finance ministries, and
Liberal secretary of state critic
Roland de Corneille (Eglington-
Lawrence) asked Wilson about the
$6 billion in cuts during Question
Period in the House of Commons
last week.
Wilson said the next meeting with
finance ministers would be to
decide how the cuts would be implemented. He did not deny the $6
billion figure.
Since 1977, Established Programs Financing transfers from Ottawa to the provinces have risen 7.5
per cent a year, to keep pace with
inflation and gross national product
(apart from the six and five years).
Now Wilson wants to cut increases to five per cent per year,
cumulative. Based on Manitoba
ajid Ontario calculations, the
Liberals and New Democrats say
the cuts will be $800 million in 1987,
SI.2 billion in 1988, $1.6 billion in
1989, and $2 billion in 1990.
Currently, according to the terms
of reference of the federal study
team on education, the government
estimates $4.4 billion of its annual
transfer payments go to education
and training.
In the past provinces have always
cut education before cutting health
care, de Corneille said. "This is the
death knoll ringing (for education)
if this goes through," he said.
Manitoba finance minister Vic
Schroeder said Wilson's proposal
means Medicare and accessible
post-secondary education will
become things of the past.
"Right now, in Manitoba, the
federal government gives us 43
cents of every dollar we spend on
health services and education,"
Schroeder said. "Mr. Wilson's objective is to reduce this to 36 cents
on the dollar by 1990."
Manitoba alone could lose $92
million annually by 1990, Schroeder
said.
Schroeder rejected Wilson's
claim that the $6 billion decrease
was needed to reduce the federal
deficit. The same national budget
that proposes the decrease is offering $2.3 billion in tax breaks over
the same five years. He says the
government is trying to balance the
budget on the backs of students.
"There's a clear connection
hear," Schroeder said. "The
federal government is not taxing
retirement savings program investments of up to $15,000 a year
and is also not taxing capital gains
of up to $500,000."
Schroeder said the province will
do what it can to make up any
possible shortfall, but he doesn't
want to be forced to choose between decreasing funding for health
services or decreasing funding to
universities.
Schroeder said he was confident
the provinces could prevent the
federal government from further
reducing transfer payments.
Manitoba, Quebec and the four
Maritime provinces oppose the
idea. Only Saskatchewan's Conservative government finance minister,
Bob Andrew, was in favour.
"Once people understand that
this is about whether they'll be able
to go to the doctor, get a college
education for their kids or retraining for themselves if they're
unemployed, the federal government will be forced to back down,"
Schroeder said.
Campus advertized
By RAJ BASI
National Universities Week, a
self-marketing effort by Canadian
universities is underway until Oct.
27.
"The primary goal of National
Universities Week is to arrange activities designed to draw the universities into the orbit of the public,"
said UBC community relations officer Jim Banham.
Universities and colleges are trying to increase everyone's
awareness of higher education's importance.
"Often enough the students are
as ignorant of campus life and its
growth as are the public at large,"
he said, adding the events this week
have been arranged to benefit both
students and the public.
Both the provincial and federal
fUBC recognizes daycares'
The UBC administration now officially recognizes the need for
campus daycares.
UBC's board of governors approved a policy Thursday to provide
temporary daycare units if and when the current units are demolished to build new units.
A second approval guaranteed daycare will be provided if the demand for daycare increases in the new Acadia housing project.
Student board representative Don Holubitsky said the board's
decision sets a precedent for any further family housing daycare
needs.
"There has never been acknowledgement that the university
should provide daycare facilities," he said.
Holubitsky said the board is now seeking .provincial government
approval for funding to build the new Acadia family housing project;
The board also approved a $9.7 million, 158 unit Acadia family
^ housing project Thursday.        ;  ■ , ,    .   ^
governments have endorsed the
week which has vaired events including:
• an opportunity to meet the
UBC board of governors in the Pit
tonight at 8 p.m.;
• a lecture, Was the World a
Fluke, at the UBC geological
museum where Geophysics professor Paul Thickson will explain
the origins of the universe Wednesday at 8 p.m.;
• a massed band performance of
the 1812 overture Friday at 7:30
p.m. in the Old Auditorium featuring the Pacific Wind Symphony,
UBC Wind Symphony and the 15th
field artiller band.
Off campus events include
Science Frontiers, 9:15 a.m. at the
Robson Square media centre, the
first in a series of five forums on
basic research and applied
technology.
But the Social Credit government
won't be showing up for their planned MLA day Thursday.
New Democrat MLA's are spending most of today on campus but
the Socreds are staying away Oct.
24 to attend an emergency caucus
meeting the same day in Victoria.
The Socreds, who earlier confirmed
their appearance, are starting their
annual convention in Vancouver
later that day.
Banham said the agenda for the
week is so large he hopes everyone
will find something of interest.
"We can't make people come but
we hope the events will be instrumental in attracting as many as
possible," he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 22, 1985
Church stagnates, will die
By BRIAN TRUSCOTT
The Roman Catholic church
should integrate the modern secular
views of today's youth to avoid
alienating them, said a theologian
defrocked from the priesthood for
his liberal and controversial views.
Hans Kung, speaking Thursday
to over 300 people in Buchanan A
104 said he disagrees with the ultra-
conservative stance the Vatican is
taking on everything from birth
control to ordaining women.
"It is a step backwards to those
anti -modernist paradigm oaths that
priests were required to take," he
said.
He said if the church continues its
"back to the gospels attitude," it
will close the doors to any form of
modern enlightenment. This will
create a chasm between the church
and today's youth who will find
"other beliefs and religions to fill
the gap, for example, the Eastern
religions or Rashneesh," he said.
"The framework of Christianity
remains the same with Jesus Christ,
the Holy Ghost, the trinity and so
on but the way in which it is per-
cieved is always changing," said
Kung, adding the Vatican should
learn to compromise and open its
doors to a more modern outlook.
Kung praised the reign of Pope
John XXIII during the 1950*s when
the church took time to expand and
adopt a new attitude towards our
secular society. It was a direct result
of that exchange and "active participation of the the laity, re-
interpretations of the bible,
recognition of many human rights,
the idea of the freedom of conscience, and resumed dialogue with
other churches and religions took
place," he said.
"It was seven years of plenty."
The western world is wavering
between a conservative and liberal
paradigm   and   Kung   hopes   the
Oooooops
Contrary to wild claims in The
Ubyssey, arts faculty enrolment is
not up 22 per cent overall. Rather,
enrolment in first year arts has
jumped 19 per cent this year after
falling last year.
Rest assured the reporter responsible will never walk again.
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UBYSSEY
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Vatican chooses the latter. "As it is,
we are at a fork in the road and it is
anyone's guess what will happen,"
he said.
Kung asked today's youth not to
give up hope in this time of turmoil.
"The future is not as predetermined as it often looks;
something big usually takes place
and the course of events swings into
a new direction," he said. People
must learn to take a stand, be it
against a stagnant church or pro-
nuclear government, retain those
standards, and progress.
"We can again find a focus to
our lives and live amidst order, not
chaos," said King.
Tuition lottery flops
The AMS tuition fee lottery is
floundering due to the lack of ticket
sales. The AMS were hoping to sell
6,000 tickets, but so far said programs committee chair Klaus
Breslauer, "Only 500 tickets have
been sold."
AMS vice-president Jonathon
Mercer said, "I am very upset that
so few tickets have sold. If we don't
sell more tickets we'll only be able
to give away one prize."
Mercer is hoping to extend the
original date of the draw by three
weeks, from Oct. 26. "I feel that
would be welcome by everyone. We
could step up the advertising campaign by putting a booth in SUB
and having more banners."
"If someone approached me and
offered to sell me a ticket, I'd buy
one. Heck, it's a good deal. But I
didn't even know about it," said
Catherine Kennedy, arts 4.
Mercer said he is not sure why so
few tickets have sold.
"Last year we sold over 4,000
tickets. Mind you, about half of
those were from corporate donations. I haven't had time this year to
organize that."
Mercer blamed the activity surrounding Homecoming Week for
his lack of time.
"It seems that students don't
know about the lottery. We've
distributed tickets to the undergrad
societies, but they haven't been
pushing them. The three week extension should compensate for
this."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
I HATE THAT horrible greasy vegetable oil they use in movie theatres says
seasoned popcorn merchant. I only use real creamery butter to make my
popcorn horrible and greasy, she said. Eight chemistry profs were caught
trying to spike the butter with LSD and given humanitarian awards by the
philosophy department.
Alcohol use polled
A survey to determine the level of
alcoholism and student awareness
about alcohol-related problems has
been conducted on campus; for the
last month, a spokesperson for the
housing office said Thursday.
Kirstie Grant said the survey —
which has reached more than 1,000
students — is designed to probe student attitudes and consumption.
Grant said the survey results will
not affect housing policy.
"If anything, we will see how we
can help students and try to set up
some programs," she said, adding
the conclusions will be given to the
student counselling service.
Laura Ensalmo, president of the
Place Vanier Residents Association,
said she was not aware of any
serious alcohol abuse in residence,
but said the results of the survey
will be useful.
"I think it is a good idea to get
student opinion," she said.
Grant, a former residence advisor, said some discipline problems
she experienced when an advisor
were related to alcohol. She said she
is not opposed to drinking, but
doesn't like irresponsible drinking.
Cheap tares unlikely
Students should not expect cheaper student bus passes after a
November 8 transit commission meeting.
Burnaby mayor Bill Lawaine said cheaper student bus passes are
unlikely. "The bus system must get 42.8 per cent of its revenues from
the fare box," said Lstwaine.
He said .$25 student bus passes cannot go on sale next fall because
the transit ;systeof *0tM%ave a deficit. The system had a five per
cent cutback Ais year and it cannot handle anymore cuts said Lawaine; adding student rates would only be possible by raising
;Misjd«itolaxes..: ■■■'■'■.-.'.
'■: /The Canadian federation of students.with other student politicians
has been negotiating since September for cheaper student bus rates.
They want student passes to be valid during non-peak hours in all
zones and a surcharge of 50c levied during peak user times.
"A lot of research has gone into the matter," said Duncan
Stewart, UBC external affairs coordinator.
Stewart said he hopes the transit commission meeting November 8
will favor cheaper student rates.
"I feel the odds are good," said Stewart.
The commission will meet to discuss the student bus pass as well as
other transit issues at the November meeting.
Segarty claims CFS does
not represent youth
By KAREN GRAM
Canadian University Press
Student representatives don't
speak for youth, according to
B.C.'s new youth minister.
Representatives of the Canadian
Federation of Students — Pacific
met with Terry Segarty, provincial
labour minister, in Victoria recently. Segarty's portfolio now includes
the   newly-created   ministry   of
youth.
The students asked Segarty to
allow £in advisory council of elected
representatives of youth groups to
help set the minister's agenda.
Segarty said university students
are not representative of young people and should not attempt to impose their standards on the
ministiy.
"A lot of the difficulties are that
Saywell's modern
university teaches
liberal, vocational
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
If governments cut higher education to deal with budget deficits,
they face more problems including
even larger deficits in the future,
said Simon Fraser university's administration president Saturday.
Willaim Saywell spoke to over
500 people at a Vancouver Institute
talk on Relevance and Our Universities: Responsibility or Red Herring in Woodward IRC 2 which was
the first event of National Universities Week, Oct. 18-27.
He said universities had to teach
the arts, not just vocational subjects, to be educationally relevant.
And we should look at the effect,
not just the use of a liberal education he added.
"Above all else, the capacity to
make informed judgement must be
cultivated if we are to accommodate
the diversity of opinion that is the
test of a democracy's health," he
said. "If we are to remain vigilant
in promoting social justice, we must
impart more than vocational skills
in our universities."
He said under "vocationalism",
the traditional values of liberal
educators have come to be seen as
something which can be cut from
universities because we can no
longer afford them.
"This is an aggressive challenge.
In areas of the industrialized world
where unemployment rates are
unacceptably high, many people
believe the growing concentration
on vocational security seems more
than justified," he said.
He said we have to prepare to
deal with rapid change in the
modern world where jobs can appear and become obsolete within a
decade.
"A committment to vocationalism that doesn't produce a
very realistic capacity for adjustment against the shifting backdrop
of technological and organizational
complexity yields few benefits," he
said.
He said Canada must develop at
all costs, seizing a competitive edge
to avoidl>eing left behind.
"I agree that the modern university has an obvious responsibility
for the professional education of
those expected to exercise specialized knowlege," he said. "I disagree
passionately that specialization
alone will give us the competitive
edge."
He said Japan was an example of
a country which has a good, general
educational curriculum.
"A general yet thorough groun
ding in the liberal arts and sciences
receives priority over all other
educational options for those who
would become leaders in Japan's
economic life," he said.
He said universities would have
to breeik down the barriers that exist. "Our dependency on public
funds necessarily pressures us to
pursue new and untested forms of
partnership with government and
industry."
"Close association between
universities and the private sector,
if properly constructed, can produce stimulating relationships that
benefit the surrounding community
and the economy at large," he said,
citing Silicon Valley and Stanford
university in California as an example.
He said the training in a liberal
arts education is vital.
"Is not the capacity to reason,
along with the process of reasoning,
the underlying factor that allows us
to keep freedom alive?" he said.
"Can we say that freedom exists
when the reasons for our individual
actions;, for our social and institutional arrangements, are
unknown?"
there are areas like single parents,
ethnic minorities, cultural groups,
etc, etc., who can't afford to attend
university," he said.
Segarty said an advisory council
should not be made up of young
people elected by other people.
CFS told the minister that
students need more jobs. According
to Statistics Canada, 22,000 B.C.
returning students did not find
work this summer. Student
unemployment in B.C. was 18.5 per
cent in July.
"We hope your ministry will not
concentrate entirely on Expo '86 in
terms of job creation. We want to
make sure students from the interior will be able to find jobs during the summer," said Barry Link,
a University of Victoria student
coucillor.
"Yup, yup. Sure. I agree with
you 100 per cent. We're making
plans," said Segarty.
Though B.C.'s minimum wage,
at $3.65 an hour, is the lowest in
Canada, Segarty refused to consider raising the limit.
"I'm not in favour of raising
minimum wage because an increase
would lead directly to higher
unemployment," Segarty said.
"Young people are often hurt the
most by increases in minimum
wage."
CFS representatives questioned
Segarty's logic, asking him to account for the fact Ontario has a
minimum wage of $4.60 an hour
but its unemployment rate for
returning students is only 12 per
cent.
Segarty had no explanation.
CFS asked if he intended to implement affirmative action for
women and other minorities.
"No. I believe in equal opportunity for all, not special privileges
for some."
"Is there equal opportunity
now?" asked CFS.
"There are some things I would
like to change." Segarty refused to
discuss the matter further.
Peace activists assist
Star Wars contest scam
By AL BANNER
A U.S. Strategic Defence Initiative Organization request to
universities for innovative ideas on
getting Star Wars off the ground
has campus disarmament groups
jumping at the chance to fill it.
Students from UBC, Simon
Fraser university and Langara college have joined forces in the
Students' Committee to Assist
Military Madness (SCAMM) to
sponsor a contest aimed at parodying the SDIO request.
Mark Fettes, a UBC SCAMM
organizer said the contest is a way
of getting scientists thinking about
Star Wars and its implications.
"Star Wars won't be able to gain
momentum if most scientists independently come to the conclusion
that the program is scientifically
worthless," he said.
The official SDIO contest is an
attempt to get the Innovative
Science and Technology Office
(1ST) a branch of SDIO to get
universities and small business involved in the Star Wars program.
According to an SDIO brochure,
the purpose is to "mount a mission-
oriented, basic research program
that drives the cutting edge of the
nation's science and engineering effort in a direction that supports existing SDI technological development thrusts and points the way for
future new initiatives."
The   SDIO   is   soliciting   pre-
proposals called "white papers" to
make it easy to start doing
"mission-oriented basic
research".    "Researchers are initially spared the laborious task of
preparing a formal proposal document requiring corporate or university approval," says the brochure.
The SCAMM contest on the
other hand originates from a
November meeting by a chapter of
the united campuses to prevent
nuclear war at Cornell university in
New York.
Lizbeth Gronlunc, a physics
graduate student and one of the
contest organizers at Cornell, said
the SDI request is part of its advertising budget.
"As well as trying to get the best
researchers to work on their problem they are also trying to sell the
program to the public and congress
by getting universities involved,"
she said. "They are trying to turn
universities into lobbyists and its
backfiring," she said.
Grolund said the purpose of the
SCAMM contest is to "point out
the absurdity of the whole thing —
both to the public as well as people
working within the SDIO."
Grolund said the contest could
have a big effect in reducing the
legitimacy of the official program.
Details of SCAMM's White
Paper abstract writing contest will
be given this Friday at a talk by
University of Victoria professor
David Parnas in IRC 2 at noon. Page 4
THE    U BYS
Buy universities
National Universities Week should be able to
sell universities on their accomplishments
merits and most importantly their people. The
government ironically has announced transfer
payment cuts amounting to six billion dollars in
the midst of universities week.
Another major blow is the recent 30 percent
reduction to campus student employment centres. The goverment is making it harder for
students to find jobs to pay for their education. The government should consider the
consequences of limiting universities size
before the damage becomes irreparable.
One  of  the   most   ridiculous  and   absurd
events occurring during the week is "Home
Coming Week". Just the name reminds one of
the lunacy of the American collegiate sports
scene. Imagine thousands of roaring fans
gloating in some type of Dyonisian frenzy,
where women are cheerleaders put on display
as trophies of the mighty conquerors — objects to be enjoyed in the orgy of victory.
Students need not flock like sheep and
chant meaningless slogans trying to capture
some mystical spirit that doesn't exist, instead
they should face reality and fight for what they
have through continuous and effectual support of university functions.
Privileged Del Mundo mixes Filipino issue
The Philippine consul general's
response (Ubyssey, 11 Oct. 1985)
to an earlier article by Muriel
Draaisma on the current Philippine
situation deserves careful scrutiny.
Rather than simply dismissing Ms.
del Mundo's claims that the Marcos
government has "made some progress" as being half-assed lies, let us
consider each of these supposed
achievements.
(1) Land reform: True. For every
hectare given to a farmer, many
more hectares went to multinational
agri-corporations and big corporate
farms, thus transforming self-
sufficient farmers into plantation
workers. The Agrarian Institute
reports that less than 0.5% of eligible farmers have obtained full land
ownership. In short, land reform
was the theory; land grabbing was
the practice.
(2) Diversification of exports:
True.   When   export-oriented   in
dustrialization failed to produce
employment, the government turned to exporting labor itself. Skilled
labor is being exported under contracts "supervised" (i.e. skimmed)
by the Ministry of Labor to
Hongkong, Middle East, etc.
(3) Development of indigenous
energy sources: True. Marcos' solution to the energy crisis was an overpriced ($2B) nuclear power plant
situated near a volcano very similar
in design to the one at Three Mile
Island. A sizeable portion of the
cost was paid to a well-known Marcos crony as "commission".
Rather than dwelling on Marcos'
"successes" let us consider "some
errors" which, unfortunately, Ms.
del Mundo fails to enumerate.
(1) Enormous foreign debt. In
1984, the Philippine total external
debt amounted to $25.6B, 42 times
more than that was owed when
Marcos took power in 1965. Much
of these loans went to capricious
projects such as beauty contests,
luxury hotels and the financing of
Mr. and Mrs. Marcos' jet-setting
lifestyle. Much is also invested in
North American business and real
estate.
(2) Poverty and Malnutrition.
The rapid decline of the quality of
life during the 20 years of Marcos
rule is well documented. The National Census and Statistics Office
reports:
Chapman 's morals hypocritical
It was disturbing to read Mr.
Chapman's hypocritical letter in
last Wednesday's Ubyssey (Oct.
16, 1985). In his flight of propaganda, Mr. Chapman seems to have
lost touch with the real issues at
stake in the Arab-Israeli conflict.
He twists current events to accommodate his personal bias with
regard to the conflict. Mr. Chapman's double standards allow him
to condemn the raid on the P.L.O.
headquarters in Tunis, while applauding P.L.O. acts of aggression
against Israel.
How can Mr. Chapman talk
about human ethics and dictums of
international law while at the same
time condoning P.L.O. terrorism?
He feels that it is "only proper" for
the P.L.O. to continue with its
"valiant efforts", the result of
which has been the slaughter of
hundreds of innocent civilians
worldwide. Does this not violate
every code of human ethics?
The P.L.O. has never abandoned
its commitment to the elimination
of Israel by means of terrorism. The
P.L.O.'s aim remains unchanged:
the elimination of Israel as an independent Jewish state. This
strategic goal is written into the
Palestinian National Covenant
(P.N.C.), the P.L.O.'s basic
charter, and has repeatedly been
reaffirmed in its official resolutions. The P.L.O. "rejects every
solution that is a substitute for a
complete liberation of Palestine,
and rejects all plans that aim at the
settlement of the Palestine issue"
(Article 21, P.N.C.).
With regard to Mr. Chapman's
concern over the "innocents"
caught in the Israeli raid, we remind
him that the target of the raid was
the headquarters of the P.L.O., the
same P.L.O. which has been
responsible for the deaths of
countless individuals, the most recent of whom was Leon Klinghof-
fer, the 69-year-old wheelchair-
bound passenger aboard the hijacked Achille Lauro. Really, Mr.
Chapman, how innocent could
those people have been?
Ben Singer, political science 3
Shane Chetner, science 4
ly TramtA STUln\+i)    :/tmer
— Real wages have fallen by 60%
— Cost of living has increased tenfold
— 71 % of the population live below
the poverty line
— Pneumonia and tuberculosis remain the top killer diseases
(3) Human rights violations. The
cold blooded murders of Benigno
Aquino and minority tribal chief
Macliing Dulag by the military illustrate the callousness of the
regime. Countless other human
rights violations are documented by
Amnesty International. The Philippines is a country where basic
freedoms of speech, press and
assembly   are   curtailed.   Strikes
against "vital industries" are prohibited, but Marcos considers even
soy sauce factories as being vital.
One need not be a consul general
to realize the despicable state that
the Marcos government, with the
support of its American allies, have
relegated the Filipino people. It is
for the above reasons that Filipinos
from all walks of life, and of all
ages are rising together in protest —
NOT because of any foreign or
"communist" ideology as Ms. del
Mundo asserts.
Her deliberate attempt to confuse
and scare the Canadian public by
labelling the democratic and nationalistic aspirations of the
Filipino people as being "communist ideology" should be
deplored.
The National Service Law is just
one of the many tools Marcos hopes
to use against the enlightened student movement. For how does Ms.
del Mundo explain the training of
students (10-21 years old) in "mob
and riot control" as a method of
defence against external aggression?
Indeed, how can one, living luxuriously in one of Vancouver's penthouses "so blest with food", complete with maids and driver and the
other privileges accorded only to
the defenders of Marcos ideology,
sympathize with the millions of
Filipinos who daily prostitute
themselves for less than the daily
legal "minimum wage" of 57 pesos
(Cdn $4/day)?
Name withheld by request as this
letter can be interpreted as an act of
subversion and the writers' family
still resides in The Phillipines.
Middle-East too complex for emotions
Transition House needs support
After having attended an information meeting of the Women's
House Saving Action (Vancouver
Transition House) it became clear
to me that the government funding
for Salvation Army and Act II is its
attempt at union-busting. Neither
Sallyann or Act II have adequate
experience with battered women
and both lack an appropriate
analysis of domestic violence. The
Vancouver Transition House on the
other hand was a public, unionized,
feminist service proven successful
over time. This essential service was
cut — it must be reinstated,
reinstated.
The occupied Transition House
continues to provide safety, confidentiality, shelter, and basic support to battered women and their
children. Volunteers operate a 24
hour crisis line and community
agencies (including social workers
from the ministry that would have
closed its doors) refer women there.
Battered women themselves still
choose this shelter as the best
response to their needs. These facts
testify to the validity of Transition
House as well as its strong community support.
A report on the "feasability" of
a publicly funded transition house
is expected within the next few
weeks. Demonstrate your support
by writing to community
newspapers and council members
before the report is tabled. Only a
demonstration of strong community support will bring back the Transition House.
For further information, there
will be a video Of Transition House
shown next week (details of place,
time, etc will be posted soon).
Everyone is welcome.
Jacqueline Larson
arts 4
In response to Bruce Kadonoff's
emotionally-charged and rather
slanderous, but especially incoherent and ridiculous letter, inappropriately entitled, "Israel and
U.S. Uphold Liberty and
Democracy", Oct. 18, which attempted to justify Israel's
calculated killing of innocent
civilians, I must say that I have
never before read anything so utterly worthless, so lacking in historical
analysis, so permeated with
doublethink and doublespeak in
this poor excuse for a student voice.
Not only was Kadonoff's demeaning rambling full of
misleading parallels, incorrect
assumptions, and convenient omissions, he naively attempted to
legitimize Israeli military actions in
the face of totally unrelated events
elsewhere in the world. Out of this
twisted logic arises a simplistic view
of good and evil forces operating
the world. Such a close-minded
and emotional position repels all rationality to the point where truth is
contorted and reality gives way to
fantasy: "yes, civilians are hurt",
but implied necessary to "end the
one-sided   killing".   The   former
assertion greatly understates reality
whereas the latter misrepresents it
entirely.
Well, you may be young, Bruce,
(and obviously very sheltered), but
welcome to the real world! A world
in which "terrorism" is manifested
in various forms under different
guises. Why, if as you say Israel is
"no less democratic than the countries of our western world", does
Israel persist in supplying up-to-
date military weaponry to what may
be the most brutal and repressive
totalitarian    regime    in    our
hemisphere with one of the worst
records of human rights violations
and disappearances — Guatamala?
Why does Israel train mercenaries
to sabotage and kill? Why does she
bomb population centers fully
aware that women and children will
die? Is this your concept of "very
liberal" democratic values in action?
The political situation in the
Middle-East is far too complex to
reduce to such simplistic and uninformed  emotionalism.
John Bodtker
arts 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 22, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
The six little bears came home to dinner: Debbie Lo was disappointed because there was no
more winter melon soup whilst James Young had a hard time finding the tofu . . . Camile was
considerate in not choosing the special because Stephen Wisenthal prefers dishes without pork.
Meanwhile Raj Basi and Steve Kontic passed up on the chopsticks; we had to save Laurie and
Nancy from the wicked but funny witch, who (Pardon the pun) will join Brian Truscott. Al Banner, Michael Groberman and Nic in the UBYSSEY. So Karen Gramm, Ed Man and Gordanna
Rasic, I bet you're asking who's been eating their porridge? I'll give you one clue; Erika Simpson
was the last one on the scene ... .
^* Tuesday, October 22,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Smoking should be definitely stamped out
By GORDANA RASIC
The Saturday, Oct. 19 Vancouver
Sun reports that cigarettes will not
be permitted in most public
buildings if Vancouver's chief
medical health officer, Dr. John
Blatherwick, has his way." I can't
help but cynically wonder how they
plan on enforcing such a law if indeed it is passed.
In the past few weeks I have
observed smoking on a Vancouver
bus I was on; — he refused to put
out the cigarette despite the fact
smoking is not permitted on public
buses; another man smoking a
nauseating pipe in a downtown
department store even though such
a practice is restricted by a fire
bylaw; and the manager of the local
Super-Valu smoking in the aisles of
food — smoking in food stores is
prohibited by a Vancouver health
bylaw and one would presume the
manager of a food store would
know this.
I was never aware of smokers
smoking in prohibited zones until
recently. Are the smoker's
retaliating against all the nonsmoking areas spreading ever increasingly? Perhaps the true question is are they fighting back or are
they simply being defensive as they
usually are when they are confronted with their smoking.
I am aware that not all smokers
smoke where they are not supposed
to. There are indeed very considerate smokers to be found.
However, the seemingly increasing
bad lot of them are turning me
against smokers in general and this
is unfortunate.
There   is   no   doubt,   however,
about the fact most smoker's are
(freestyle J
defensive. They understand what
they are doing is damaging to their
health and shortening their lives.
When we non-smokers remind them
of the fact they resent it. This is
perfectly understandable: I don't
imagine anyone would enjoy being
reminded of the fact that they're
shortening their own lives which is
after all their own business. I have
no personal hatred towards
smokers but I do resent them harming my health and shortening my
life with their bad habit.
Non-smokers have rights as individuals and should not be taken
advantage of. Smokers tell me they
have rights of their own and it's
their air as well. I certainly do not
dispute that the air belongs to all of
us but I would like to point out that
it is the smokers who are polluting
it.
I compare their illogical
arguments to saying "This is my
house and I therefore have the right
to burn it down and collect the insurance that I paid for." The problem however, is that this illogical
argument is also an illegal practice.
Do the smokers sense they are
losing the battle and are putting up
a last defiant war? Or do they
believe there will always be cigarettes as long as the government can
tax   them   heavily   and   tobacco
Cackle. Cackle. Hallow'eens Just a short
broomride away. Once again It's time for all
you ghoulish lovers of the witching hour to dust
off your typewriters, dig out your pens and
shake the cobwebs from your brains. Yes, it's
time for the big event of the year. Its the
UBYSSEY GHOST STORY CONTEST!
To enter just type your scariest story (which
must be under 2,000 words) triple spaced on
a 70 character line) or a super graphic (cartoon) and levitate, teleport, or just bring it Into
The Ubyssey office, SUB 241K by October 25
(that's this Friday).
Your story must Include a T-Bird, a goldfish in
Nitobe Gardens. SUB expansion. Dr. Pat
PTIcGeer, the president's mansion, and Wreck
Beach.
The winning story will appear in the
hallow'een Issue of The Ubyssey. Great prizes too;
STORY
1st - Dinner for two'at Las fTlar-
garltas valued ot J20.
2nd   -   Dinner   ot   Candia   Taverna valued at #12.
GRPFIX
1st - $15 take out food at  Red
Leaf Restaurant.
2nd - Dinner at Candia Taverna valued at $12.
This contest Is open to all the
university population except
Ubyssey gremlins. Enter or I may
put a hex on your midterms!
Special Offer
20% Off
Any Hair Service
With Student AMS
Card
1071 Denman St.
688-7808
2178 W. Broadway
731-4138
*f&
THUNDERBIRD
ATHLETICS
UBC ALUMNI
HOMECOMING THIS WEEK
BLUE AND GOLD NIGHT
this Friday, October 25
Thunderbird Homecoming
Football Game vs.
Calgary Dinosaurs
5:00 p.m. Thunderbird Stadium
Wear the UBC colours of blue and gold and win prizes
of $100, $50 and $25. Show your support of The University by wearing your school colours.
Thunderbird Hockey
vs. Calgary
Fri., Oct. 25
Sat., Oct. 26
7:30 p.m. Thunderbird Arena
Friday night is Blue and Gold night at the rink. Wear
something blue and gold at the game to win prizes of
$100, $50 and $25.
POST-GAME HOMECOMING DANCE Friday night
SUB BALLROOM featuring the B-Sides
Game Tickets:
-Adults $3.50
— Seniors and Students $2.00
— UBC Students free
For Information Call 228-3917
farmers will grow crops for a profit.
Money talks even in this disease-
causing practice.
At the moment it seems the non-
smokers are winning the battles of
the cigarette bannings but losing the
war of enforcing the bannings. But
it doesn't have to be war. I have lived with a smoker my entire life in
perfect harmony. Compromises can
be achieved if people are willing to
bend.  I see the smokers as the
unbending defensive ones. If those
smokers who haven't yet done so
compromise a little or lose some of
their defensiveness we could all be
better friends.
Can there be a future smoke-free
world? The majority rules in a
democracy: The majority of people
do not smoke.
Gordana Rasic is a Ubyssey staffer who feels strongly about pure,
natural air.
#■'
-A.
~W
JrfSL
A
3:
^A
Vi ?'»V
HILLEL HOUSE
Rs'n'«f,.nrb
r;1t»,i.a.BTht
u, „ v    " /w s r
#
■■&
£
Tues., Oct. 22
Hot Lunch—12:30 p.m.
Read the News in Hebrew with
Ami Ruzanski 11:30 a.m.
Israel Information Table—SUB
Wed., Oct. 23
Dinner 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 24
Network Seminar
"Decision-making: From Conflict
to Cooperation — Israeli Foreign
Policy".   Speaker:   Commander
Dov Effron Jewish National Fund
Representative 12:30 Buch. B214
Fri., Oct. 25
Oneg Shabbat at 1053 Douglas
Crescent 8:30 p.m. Phone
224-4748 for more info.
_j&_
**■-
TT
Applications
are now
being accepted for
five (5) positions with the
STUDENT
ADMINISTRATION
COMMISSION
(SAC)
SAC is the 10 member body of the AMS
responsible for implementing policy set
forth by AMS Students' Council.
Applications open until Thursday, Oct. 29, 4 p.m.
Application forms available/returned at SUB 238
VI
CPry4if"c7Wusically Speaking
mtj
THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Rudolf Barshai, Music Director and Principal Conductor
presents
KAZUYOSHIAKIYAMA
Conductor Laureate
ROBERT AITKEN ^
Flutist & Host
R. MURRAY SCHAFER
Co-host
Saturday, Oct. 26   8:30 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 28    7:30 p.m.
THE ORPHEUM *T ,
Programme: wm' ■ f '
Brandenburg Concerto No. 3
Bach
Concerto for Double String
Orchestra Tippett
Flute Concerto  Schafer
Pines of Rome Respighi »  ^-^AVj^J^yi-    £
Sponsored by       CPAirli (    ■' %
TICKETS NOW! at all VTC and CBO Outlets, Eaton's, Woodward's
(VTC and Orpheum service charges applicable)
$8 to $27.50-113 off for students and seniors
TO CHARGE BY PHONE: 280-4444 Eaton's, MasterCard, Visa
NEXT CONCERT BY THE VSO-THE JUBILEE SERIES
Sunday, Nov. 3, 2:30 p.m. — Monday, Nov. 4, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 5, 7:30 p.m.
Rudolf Barshai, Conductor    Ivan Moravec, Pianist
Music by Mozart and Mahler
Tickets at all VTC Outlets — $8 to $27.50
(VTC and Orpheum service charges applicable) Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 22, 1985
%tf#ti
TODAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
Write against Expo, noon, SUB 224.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in game, everybody welcome, 7 p.m., UBC
aquatic centre.
JSA/HILLEL
Israel Information table, noon, SUB. Read the
news in Hebrew, 11:30 a.m.. Hillel House. Hot
lunch, noon, Hillel House.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Special lecture with Med students — come and
find out what it's like in Med school, noon.
Wood. 1.
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 212.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon to 1:30
o.m., SUB 208.
THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE
EXCHANGE OF STUDENTS FOR TECHNICAL
EXPERIENCE
Information meeting, noon to 1:30 p.m., CEME
1202.
SIGMA XI SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
SOCIETY
Dr. Robert Henklin, speech on taste and smell in
health and disease, all welcome, 4 p.m., WOOD
3.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly   Testimont   Meeting,   all   are   invited,
noon, SUB 215. »
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
In-house debating and coaching, noon,  BUCH
B223.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Fellowship and discussion, noon. Brock 304.
WEDNESDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon, SUB
208.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
"Women   at   UBC   —   trends   and   issues",
women's discussion, noon. Brock 223, Women's
lounge.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Stranger than Paradise, S2, 7:30 p.m. and
9:X p.m., SUB auditorium.
JSA/HILLEL
Dinner, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Hillel House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB party room.
UBC STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN
AFRICA
Strategy planning meeting, plan B?, noon, T.A.
Union office, armouries room 202.
THURSDAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting, special guest speaker, David
Walker, noon. Brock Hall, room 302.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall term of classes, noon, SUB
206.
FILM SOCIETY
Film:   Beverly Hills Cop,  $2, 7 p.m.  and 9:30
p.m., SUB auditorium.
AMS WOMEN'S CENTRE FILM FESTIVAL
Three films: All Our Lives, Augusta, Not Your
Imagination, noon. Woodward IRC 4.
NFB Film: Behind the Veil, history of nuns in the
Catholic church, free, 7 p.m., IRC 1 (Woodward!.
TEACHING ASSISTANTS' UNION
Teaching workshops: Counselling Students —
culture shock at the university and the problems
students face, with Rod Haynes, TAU staff, and
June Lythgoe, Director Women's Students Centre, 1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., Grad Centre, 2nd floor
lounge.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
AIDS speech, noon, SUB.
CHRISTIANS ON CAMPUS
Jubilee, noon, Angus 328.
POETRY READING
Poet,   Erin  Moure,  author of Wanted Alive,
Domestic Fuel, York Street and more, noon,
Buchanan Penthouse.
UBC MARXIST-LENNINIST STUDY GROUP
Conference: The situation in India today, noon,
Buch A203.
JEWISH STUDENTS' NETWORK
Israeli foreign policy seminar with Commander
Dov Efron from Jewish National Fund, noon,
Buch B 214.
JSA/HILLEL
Torah study, 11:30 a.m., Hillel House.
GREAT LAW TRIALS ON THE SILVER SCREEN
The Verdict, starring Paul Newman, $2, noon.
Law Faculty Building, room 101-102.
STAMP CLUB
Trading   stamps,   noon,   International   House,
room 400.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Bronze class, noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB ball room.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Noon hour meeting, International House lounge.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Seminar — Duncan Mackenzie of Harry Rosen,
noon, Angus 226.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Weekly meeting, noon. Geography 212.
MAIN LIBRARY
Tour and personal help, secrets of the library
divulged, noon. Main Library entrance.
FRIDAY
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Samosa Night, 6 p.m., SUB 211.
FILM SOCIETY
Beverly   Hills  Cop,   7  p.m.   Et 9  p.m.,   SUB
auditorium.
JSA/HILLEL
Oneg Shabbat, 8:30 p.m., 1063 Douglas Crt.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Rock 6f Roll, noon, SUB party room.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Software Constraints, noon. Woodward IRC 2.
DO WE HAVE A JOB FOR YOU!
The Keg Boathouse Restaurant is looking for
energetic, hardworking, caring people who
would enjoy working with the public. All jobs are
part-time — two-three evenings per week.
Please apply in person at the Canada Employment Centre (Brock Hall, Rm. 106, on campus)
this Wednesday, October 23, 12:00-2:30 p.m. or
at the Boathouse Restaurant on Cardero St.,
between 2:00-3:00 p.m. on Wednesdays.
ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
Introductory Specials—(Expires October 31st, 1986)
—Xmas Gift Certicates Available
SUNTANNING    10 Sessions 20 Sessions 30 Sessions
Wo,fSv8temoSNLY    $49        $79      $109
5784 University Blvd.
(in UBC Village)
Vi Blk. Away
224-1922
224-9116
3 Months—$149 (unlimited)
OR
Yearly Membership $65 plus
$3 drop-in
V
i<
•*•* A GRAND EXPERIENCE.
Klaus Maria Brandauer gives a fantastic performance...A richly-textured, smashing
historical drama that is as gorgeous to look at as it's engrossing to
experience...an exciting, mature piece of filmmaking that^
makes for one of the year's top dramas!'
-Williia M. UfHTTIttW SERVICE
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VARSITY VARIETY
**£*<
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C/X^S
FIREWORKS & HALLOWEEN' SUPPLIES
^^      4515 West 10th Ave. -224-4922
visa Mon.-Sat. 9:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
a^m Fri. 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m.
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HALLO^EN
For zany wigs, masks,
costumes and the best
masquerade make-up,
come and see . . .
(
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Dance Shop1
& The Red Caboose
1023 W. BROADWAY
Broadway & Oak
733-6116
The Red Caboose
Kids Only Market
Granville Island
682-1544
554 W. GEORGIA
(Georgia & Seymour)
681-8757
ImTHE classifieds
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1983 HONDA MASCOT 80 scooter, 6200
km, exc. cond., inc. windscreen, rear
basket. $750 obo. Call 732-5021.
ONE  DRAFTING TABLE,  $100;  one 21"
color portable TV,  $75;  one gold colour
shag rug, 12'x12', $20. 879-7674.
'73 MUSTANG, V-8, P.S., P.B., new battery, paint & tune-up. No rust, $1500 obo.
Call 876-4610 or 434-0694.
1969 ALFA COUPE 17S0. Beautiful, stereo,
Abarth, $5200 obo. 984-6744.
'80 FIAT X-19. Ex. cond. Metallic black,
gold stripes, Targa roof, fog lights, CIBIE
headlights, new Pirellis, $5800 obo.
921-7388 anytime, 738-7188 days, 734-7188
evs.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
38th & Cambie. 321-4809.
35 - LOST
LOST—In B lot. Brown leather change
purse containing 3-silver rings & bracelets.
Great sentimental value. Reward. Phone
266-7968.
85 - TYPING
40 - MESSAGES
DESPERATELY SEEKING BAHA'IS.
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FOR FAST RESULTS
USE UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIEDS Tuesday, October 22, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Birds fumble their way to sloppy victory
By MONTE STEWART
Football games are often won or
lost in a single quarter of play. Last
Friday's Western Intercollegiate
Football League game between the
Thunderbirds and the Manitoba
Bisons was such a game.
After cruising to a 14 point first
quarter lead, the 'Birds hung on to
defeat the Bisons 17-14 before approximately 800 fans at Thunderbird Stadium.
Quarterback Jordan Gagner
opened scoring connecting with
first year receiver Craig Keller on a
51 yard scoring strike at 9:17 of the
first quarter. Less than two minutes
later, running back Terry Cochrane
scampered 65 yards for a major,
thanks primarily to a gaping hole
created by the right side of the offensive line. Unfortunately
Cochrane was lost for the remainder of the game.
Bad weather caused havoc as
UBC gave up the ball 11 times,
eight on fumbles and three on interceptions. The Bisons, who
bumbled the advantages they gained on the recovered fumbles and in
terceptions, gave up four fumbles
and two interceptions.
Manitoba's lone touchdown
came on a 59 yard pass from Kevin
Eikerman to Larry Santin at 12:17
of the second quarter. Darrel Batt
provided the remaining Manitoba
points, booting two field goals, one
convert, and a punt single.
The UBC defence saved the victory in the second half. Trailing
17-14 in the fourth quarter,
Manitoba tried to go for a first
down on a third and one situation
from the UBC 13 yard line but the
Arts '20 relay race largest ever in history
As the Arts '20 Relay Race draws
closer, Intramurals has had a
chance to analyze this year's competition and reflect on the old. With
190 teams registered, this year's
race will be the largest ever Arts '20
since its beginning in 1920.
The students of UBC should
acknowledge the Class of 1920. Led
by Dr. Hugh Keenleyside, this class
put forth the proposal of holding a
relay race to alert the public to the
need for a new university site at
Point Grey. Hence the beginning of
the Arts '20 Relay Race.
Associated with the relay was the
Great Trek of 1922. To increase
political pressure a committee was
organized to gain publicity. The
Great Trek was a means by which
this was accomplished. Each student was encouraged to get at least
25 signatures from the community
at large. In the end, a 56,000
signature petition was presented to
the government. Students marched
from Fairview to Point Grey protesting the current state of affairs.
The original committee members
went on to become prominent B.C.
citizens. Jack Clyne, past
Chancellor of UBC and past president of MacMillan Bloedel, was one
of them.
The Arts '20 Relay continued on
after the move to Point Grey. Dr.
Harry Warren, an honorary pro-
IM standings
UNIT POINT STANDINGS
A« Of October 16, 1986
Woman's Units
Points
1. Physical Education
972
2. E.U.S.
857
3. Arts
615
4. Forestry
311
5. Rowing
310
6. V.S.T.
264
7.  F.N.S.
149
8. Ballet/UBC Jazz
133
3. Nursing
110
10. Science
87
11. Education
80
12. Rehab. Medicine
65
13.  Phrateres
40
14. Gamma Phi Beta
38
15. Medicine
24
16. Grad. Studies
21
17. Commerce
18
18. Regent College
17
19. Alpha Delta Pi
16
20. Ski Team
11
22. Agriculture
5
23. Recreation
2
24. Kappa Kappa Gamma
1
Men's Units
1.  E.U.S.
1774
2. Beta Theta Pi
1194
3. Science
988
4. Forestry
606
5.  Fiji
566
6. V.S.T.
544
7. Arts
492
8. Physical Education
488
9. Cycling Club
474
10. Kappa Sigma
467
11. Dekes
351
12. Fire Department
315
13. Medicine
272
14. Phi Delta Theta
266
15. Psi Upsilon
234
16. Commerce
225
17.  Rowing
220
18. ZetaBetaTau
199
19. Law
199
20. Grad. Studies
156
21.  Rehap. Medicine
156
22. Gage
134
23.  St. Andrews
110
24. Totem
110
25. Zeta Psi
108
26. Agriculture
51
27. Pharmacy
50
28. Regent College
31
29. Roma
23
30. Sigma Chi
23
31. Alpha Delta Phi
19
32. 3rd Salish Alumni
17
33. Vanier
15
34.  Education
5
35. Ski Club
5
36.  I.V.C.F.
2
37. Ski Team
2
38. Dentistry
1
39. R.C.M.P.
1
fessor at UBC, remembers running
in the relay in 1925 and 1926. He
reflected that "in those days it was
difficult to find eight students who
could actually run a mile". For Dr.
Warren, a track athlete in his time,
the gruelling 3rd leg of the race was
exhausting and the ditch provided a
convenient place in which to collapse.
Since Arts '20 was revived in
1969, participation has increased
significantly. Some units even hold
time trials in order to select a top
notch team. Captained by Jim
Richardson, the EUS Ringer Team
held time trials this year and
selected strong middle distance runners. This team placed 4th overall
last year and with the addition of
Seamus Parker (1st year Engineering), they should be strong contenders this year. According to
Richardson, "it will be tough to
beat this team".
Another contending team will be
the Beta Quicks. Team members
Chris Brown, Paul Quinn and Steve
Gustavson are all strong runners
and hope to provide tough competition for Rowing, EUS and the
Track Team. This year a physically
handicapped team has registered.
On the team are five blind athletes,
two wheelchair athletes, and one
runner on crutches.
Several alumni will also be present at the race, some of who actually ran in Arts '20 many years
ago.
SPORTS EVENTS THIS WEEK
Upcoming Events
Nov. 2-3
Buchanan Badminton Grand Prix
Round 1 — Osbone Centre
Rehabilitation Mecicine
Wheelchair Challenge
SUB Plaza - 12:30 p.m.
Registration Deadline
Oct. 21-26
Oct. 28-Nov. 1
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BLUEPRINT for the
FUTURE?
A   PUBLIC   FORUM   on   the   MacDONALD
COMMISSION with special guest speaker The
Hon. Donald Johnston, Opposition Finance
Critic.
Resource Speakers:
• Mr. James Matkin, Pres. & C.E.O. Business
Council of B.C.
• Dr. Keith Banting, Dept. of Political Sc. UBC
• Dt. Timothy J. Hazledine, Dept. of Agriculture
Economics UBC
October 26—9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
Rm 200, UBC
Coffee Served
Tickets $5 at door or call 224-4001, 732-5474
Co-Sponsored by Vancouver Quadra Liberal Riding
& UBC Student Liberals
'Birds held them back. Manitoba
did get one last chance to tie the
score. However, with 1:43 remaining Eikerman bobbled the snap on a
field goal attempt and UBC managed   to   stave   off   defeat.
If the 'Birds continue the WIFL
trend winning at home and losing
on the road, they will take second
place, and more importantly, the
final play-off spot. Aside from
Calgary, no team has won on the
road. If the 'Birds continue this
trend, they will finish with a 4-4
mark because they have one home
game and one away game remaining
in the regular season.
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men and women
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offer EXPIRES NOVEMBER 30th, 1985
552 SEYMOUR STREET.  VANCOUVER,  BC   V68 3J5 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 22, 1985
Field hockey women west's no. 1
By STEVE NEUFELD
With three shutout victories this
weekend in Victoria, the UBC
Thunderbird women's field hockey
team clinched first place in the
Canada West conference standings
and automatically assured
themselves of a birth in the CIAU
national championships to be held
on November 1 to 3 in Toronto.
UBC began its tournament matches on Saturday afternoon with a
1-0 win over the Alberta Pandas. In
a close contest Alberta was
outplayed and beaten when Jody
Blaxland slammed home the winner
for UBC. Blaxland also scored
anothe goal in the team's Saturday
afternoon shutout 3-0 win over the
Victoria Vikettes which automatically clinched first place for the
'Birds. Joni Franks and Heather
Benson also scored in the victory.
In Sunday's action, the Thunderbirds beat the University of Calgary
2-0 with Joni Franks notching
another goal. Goalkeeper Alison
Hoens recorded all three shutouts in
the weekend's action.
The Canada West all-star team
included some familiar faces including: Jody Blaxland, Joni
Franks, Debbie Rotz and Heather
Benson as well as UBC head coach
Gail Wilson who is once again the
Canada West Coach of the Year.
Wilson was also last year's Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union
coach of the year.
Looking ahead, the national
championship tournament will once
again feature always tough Toronto
and York University, which is
coached by national team coach
Marina van der Merwe. York
returns nearly its entire lineup from
last year's second place finisher at
the nationals but based on past performance UBC should have a good
SPORTS
Soccer men alone in first
By STEVE NEUFELD
The UBC Thunderbird soccer
team gained sole possession of first
place with a 3-0 victory over the
Victoria Vikings in Victoria Saturday. The win gives UBC 13 points
in the Canada West standings, one
more than the Vikings.
After missing an earlier chip shot
over an out of position Vikings net-
minder, Ken Mulleny redeemed
himself with UBC's first goal oh an
uncontested header off a corner
kick ten minutes before the half
time break. The crucial match was
very physical and resulted in a second half ejection. Victoria's Greg
Kern stranded his teammates with a
ten person effort when he was sent
off for a second yellow card infraction after pulling down a UBC
player.
The Vikings rallied for some
spirited play but a Brian Petersen
goal late in the game salted away
the win with a picturesque series of
moves that left a trail of Vikings in
his wake.
Other sparkling performances
were turned in by Mike Malana,
Sean McLaughlin and goalkeeper
Brian Kennedy who after some fine
saves on crosses collected his sixth
shutout of the season.
Coach Joe Johnson was very
pleased with the team's effort, saying "there wasn't a single passenger
among our players this game."
This weekend the team travels to
the wild rose province to face
Calgary on Friday and Lethbridge
on Saturday. The Thunderbirds remain the only undefeated team in
Swimmers win
The UBC Thunderbird swim
team won the first meet championship of the season and a meet record
in the 1500 metre relay at a weekend
swim meet with the Victoria Vikings
in Victoria Saturday.
The men's team, led by Kevin
Stapleton edged the dogged Vikings
by the close score of 75-73 while the
defending Canadian university
champion women showed the
Vikettes how "to play by trouncing
them 73-43. Led by captain Sandra
Mason and Anne Martin, the
Thunderbirds displayed their form
of last year and promised good
things to come this season.
"This meet was a good warmup
for the season. We swam well
against Victoria and achieved victory, something we didn't do
against them last year," said UBC
coach Ken Radford.
The Thunderbirds rest up for a
few weeks (if you can call swimming
four hours a day in practice resting
up) before their next meet against
the Pac 10 University of
Washington Huskies in Seattle
Nov. 1. Their home opener is slated
for Nov. 15 when they host Central
Washington in the tropical UBC
Aquatic Centre.
pionship they will host the Ontario
winner in a national semi-final
game on Saturday, November 2nd.
The CIAU national championship
game will be held at the home field
of the most westerly finalist
(possibly UBC) on November 9th.
Team           GP
W
L
T   F A Pts
UBC               8
5
0
3 25    3  13
Victoria         8
5
1
2 21  10 12
Calgary          7
4
2
1  17    9   9
Alberta          7
3
2
2 10   9   8
Lethbridge     7
1
6
0   8 24   2
Saskatchewan 9
1
8
0   6 32   2
the Canada West Universities
Athletic Association but will face a
serious threat to the streak when
they play the Dinosaurs on Friday
afternoon.
"Playing a strong Calgary team
in adverse weather conditions on
their home turf can have an impact
on the skill level of better players,"
said Johnson. "We have to be
sharp if we are to beat both the
Dinosaurs and the Pronghorns."
If the team captures their second
consecutive  Canada  West   cham-
UBC gets experience
The UBC cross-country team competed in a dual meet against UVic in
Victoria on Saturday in preparation for the Canada West meet to be held
there on Nov. 2.
The 4km women's race was won by UVic's Brenda Shakelton. Top UBC
finisher was Sue Kainulainen in 14:23, placing fourth overall. She was
followed by Fredrique Schmidt 15:03 (ninth place), Cara Haffenden 15:41
(twelfth place), and Sharon Koeeh 16:49 (thirteenth place).
UVic's perennial powerhouse, Carey Nelson, handily won the men's
8km race in 24:05. Ed Booth, consistant as a top five finisher in any Conference meet, was UBC's first finisher in 25:15, third place overall. In support was Joel Silverman 26:29 (tenth place), Larry Nightengale 26:58 (thirteenth place), Len Goodman 27:07 (Fifteenth place) and Dave Binner 29:50
(twenty-third place).
"It was a tough, bloody course," said Ed Booth, referring to the hilly
terrain. ' 'The experience gained running here will definitely give us an edge
going into Canada West."
shot at the title. The Thunderbirds
have won four of the last seven
titles and during Wilson's nine
years at UBC have made the national finals eight times.
The second place Vikettes will
now play off with the University of
Manitoba in a best of three series in
Victoria this weekend to determine
the wild card entry from western
Canada.
Team GP W  L   T   F A Pts
UBC 9   7    1    1  18   4 26
Victoria 9   5    3    1  14   8 19
Calgary 9   4   3   2 10   9 16
Alberta 9   0   9   0   4 25   0
im:
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PRESENTS
an
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EDUCATION FORUM
with
Lome Nicholson —NDP Education Critic
Dr. Dennison — B.C. Liberal Party
Dr. Archibald —B.C. Economic Policy Institute
SUB CONVERSATION PIT
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