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The Ubyssey Mar 19, 1985

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 University funding still mystery
No one knows much about the
new $14.9 million 'program adjustment' funds included in the new
provincial universities budget.
George Morfitt, Universities
Council of B.C. chair, said Monday
he's not even sure if UCBC will be
responsible   for   dividing   up   the
money, part of the zero per cent increase allotted to universities March
14.
"We're at the disposition of the
(universities) minister to tell us how
he wants it divided up," he said.
Morfitt said the fund will be used
to help fund early retirements and
severance pay, salary increases for
selected faculty, and to facilitate
enrolment shifts within and among
the universities.
UCBC secretary Lee Southern
said the council is still waiting for a
letter from the university ministry
telling the council of the exact funds
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 45
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 19, 1985
228 2301
available before the council proceeds with exact budgets for each
university. "We can only go as fast
as the government gives us information," he said.
UBC vice president finance Bruce
Gellatly said UBC will be in "deep
trouble" if it does not get its share
of the special funds. Excluding the
fund, UBC's budget is five per cent
less than last year.
Former UBC president George
Pedersen said in his resignation
speech March 7: "If we get hit with
a five per cent cut when that budget
speech comes down, I do not
honestly believe this university can
respond to that."
Gellatly said a zero per cent increase leaves a $7.5 million deficit
fo- 1985-86 while a five per cent cut
makes the deficit $16 million. The
university has no idea what it has to
do to get money from the fund, he
said.
Jack Finnbogason, College-
Institute Educators Association of
B.C. president, said he doesn't
think the fund will make up the
missing five per cent. The fund will
be used for severance pay and early
retirement funds set up for dismissed faculty when programs are cut,
he said.
UBC has already paid out more
than $4 million for about 50 early
retirements over the last two years.
NOTORIOUS CUTE KID enjoys hearty meal before heading off to anthropology class. Digital digester knows
that thumbs come complete with 19 special herbs and spices and provide 93 per cent of recommended daily nutritional allowance. Also, cute kids on cover always increase pickup rate.
Colleges lose more in NDP ridings
VANCOUVER (CUP) — The
B.C. Social Credit government is
calling for an average six per cent
cut in college funding but at least
one professor fears that colleges in
NDP ridings will receive even less
money.
Jim Howard, faculty association
president at Selkirk College in the
B.C. interior, said schools in ridings
that snub the Social Credit party
will have to absorb a disproportionate amount of the cutbacks in
funding.
Selkirk, the interior's oldest college, is a good example.
Howard said the school is being
"diluted to pieces" and is bracing
for a whopping 10.4 per cent funding cut. The cut will force the college to fire 15 per cent of its faculty
and eliminate its second year
university transfer program.
The college program allows
financially-strapped students in the
interior to study for two years at a
local institution, before moving on
to a university on the B.C. coast.
Three other institutions are in the
same position as Selkirk. They are:
Capilano College, the Pacific Vocational  Institute and the B.C.  In-
McGeer mad over letter
By ROBERT BEYNON
Universities minister Pat McGeer
may sue the Confederation of
Faculty Associations of B.C. president and a Victoria magazine over a
letter the magazine published.
Universities ministry spokesperson
Jane Burnes said Monday McGeer
is seeking a legal opinion. "He
hasn't yet decided" whether to sue,
Burnes said.
She added McGeer could confirm
"neither the substance or spirit" of
the letter, adding that although
Monday magazine — the letter's
publisher — contacted him regarding the letter McGeer had not yet
officially received a copy.
Monday Magazine editor Peter
Ladner said he carefully studied
the letter before publishing it and
"my impression is it's a pretty accurate reflection" of McGeer's
thoughts.
Ladner said he grilled both
academics who were present for the
conversation the letter refers to,
and their statements corroborated
each other's.
The letter, written by Simon
Fraser University professor Ehor
Boyanowsky, says McGeer told
him in a meeting that:
• it's dreaming to think that
Established Programs Financing
given by the federal government for
post-secondary education must be
spent on education;
• there are too many students,
faculty and universities in this province;
See page 5: COLLEAGUES
stitute of Technology. All of B.C.'s
colleges, however, including
Okanagan, Kwantlen, Douglas,
Langara, and Malaspina are suffering from prolonged underfunding.
Howard said the Kootenays
region, where Selkirk is located,
was dealt a "crushing blow" last
year with the closure of the David
Thompson University Centre in
Nelson. He said the move was
politically motivated.
A coalition of educators has
begun to protest the government's
policies and staged a demonstration
at the opening of the B.C.
legislature recently.
"What we'd like to hear from
(education minister Jack) Heinrich
is why the government wants fewer
See page 2: THERE'S
Finnbogason said the fund makes
the public mistakenly think government money will be used for new in-
novative programs. "It's
deliberately part of a device to
mislead the public," he said.
Acting UBC president Robert
Smith said everyone is very anxious
about the fund and its implications
for university autonomy.
"University autonomy is
something we prize very highly and
we must recognize and protect it.
We must see to it that we do not
compromise it," he said.
Programs will still be cut because
of the deficit, Smith added. But
UBC does not have to prepare a
budget by April 1 when its next
fiscal year starts, he said.
"It's not as if we all turn into
pumpkins if we don't have a
budget," he said.
Even university ministry
spokesperson Jane Burnes said she
did not know what the fund will be
used for. But she said she didn't
think the $14.9 million will only be
for severance pay and retirement
funds.
Burnes denied the fund threatens
university autonomy, saying the
program changes will be left up to
the universities. "It's all up to the
universities, they're autonomous
and we won't be telling them what
to do," she said.
Faculty criticize UBC
board's McLean
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
UBC's board of governors chair withdrew his offending comments concerning UBC faculty in a letter to the faculty association in UBC Reports
recently, but some faculty are still angry.
David McLean's letter said he had "been totally misquoted" in an article
in the March 9 issue of The Sun which reads: "The resignation (of UBC
president George Pedersen) could be 'the thing the university needed,'
McLean said because faculty may 'take their responsibilities more seriously.'"
Law professor Dennis Pavlich said he does not see the connection between Pedersen's resignation and the faculty's responsibilities. "Did
Pedersen encourage people not to work? If McLean said so it is a foolish
comment," said Pavlich.
McLean added his remarks about the need for a "different type of president" in The Sun article were also taken out of context.
Pavlich said he is running for election as faculty representative for the
committee to select a new UBC president because he wants to prevent the
selection of a president who will be a rubber stamp for the provincial
government.
UBC needs a president sensitive to every segment of the university, as
well as the community and government, said Pavlich, "not someone who
will toe the line of the government-appointed board of governors".
Committee of Concerned Academics member Philip Resnick said
McLean's comments imply the faculty has done little more than "sit on
their fannies tweedling their thumbs for the last five years". Resnick, a
political science professor, said more faculty will quit, adding those leaving
will not be slouchers.
' 'It would be a very good thing if McLean resigned and took universities
minister Pat McGeer with him," said Resnick. He said the provincially appointed board members, who make up the majority of the board, are not
sufficiently independent of the government which has appointed them.
"We should be doubly careful the choice is not a rubber stamp for people like McLean and McGeer" he added.
Associate civil engineering professor Richard Spencer, also vying for a
faculty position on the presidential committee, said he does not want a
president who is a rubber stamp for the government.
McLean said his comments about UBC's faculty were quoted out of context. "My view is that the faculty are working their butts off, they do take
their responsibilities seriously," said McLean.
He said his remarks about the new kind of president were also quoted
out of context. "I meant I am amazed at some of the people who are expressing an interest" in the position of president, he said.
I.S. right wing women now force
By SUE McILROY
The right wing movement in the U.S. is having increasing success organizing women into a strong
political force, a leading U.S. feminist, writer and activist said Friday.
Andrea Dworkin told 600 people in Woodward IRC
the right seems to be offering women many benefits
such as economic security, a certain amount of respect,
and a place inside society.
She said in a society "permeated with sadism and an
incredible increase in random violence" the right offers women a limited security and the promise of law
and order.
"Right now there's this war and it's a war against
women and if we're going to fight back there must be a
certain ruthlessness in women that doesn't exist now."
Dworkin's speech on "Right Wing Women", the title
of her newest book, was organized by the Alma Mater
Society women's centre, and co-sponsored by the UBC
law faculty and the Simon Fraser University women's
studies department;
Right wing women are consistent, said Dworkin,
citing the fact their stand on abortion never changes,
and Dworkin sees this as strength.
"The right is about power and force and fear",
See page 2: FEMINISTS
gassagwSSH*^ Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 19,1985
Feminists must confront
From page 1
Dworkin said. "And the right is
prepared to use police and military
strength against anyone who upsets
their power, she said.
Feminists must be prepared to confront this power with the knowledge
that "if you take power from people, you must be ready to watch
them be hurt at losing it". She said
right wing women want power "and
they don't say thank you".
Dworkin was critical of feminists
and the women's movement for
having created social and political
conflict and not following it up.
"We said that we wanted economic,
racial and sexual equality and they
(the right) thought we meant it",
Dworkin    said.    Consequently
feminists must take some responsibility, she said, for the rise of the
right.
Dworkin said it is very difficult
being a woman in a society that
hates women.
"The stigma of being a woman is
used to humiliate you all the time",
Dworkin said.
'There's no reason"
From page 1
B.C. citizens to have an opportunity for an education. Since Ottawa
pays 75 per cent of all post-
secondary funding, surely there's
no sound financial reason for cutting back," said Jack Finnbogasan,
president of the College-Institute
educators association.
Eagle Spirit
Fly with You
N.I.S.U.
Native Indian
Student Union
University of British Columbia
CULTURAL AWARENESS DAYS
You are invited to join the Native Students on campus in the following
events:
Cultural Awareness Days Opening
—March 20, Noon, Scarfe Lounge
Speaker Series
—March 20, 21, 22 (12:30) Scarfe Bldg.
Indian Organizations Information Booths
—March 20 & 21 (10:30-4:00) Scarfe Lounge &
SUB Lounge
J  Food Tasting—Sample B.C. Native Foods
—March 21 (12:00-2:00) Scarfe Lounge
~  Film Presentation
—March 20 & 22 (2:30-4:30) Scarfe Lounge
U Drama and Dancers
—March 20, 21, 22 (12:00-2:30) Scarfe and
SUB Lounge
SPEAKER SERIES
March 20—Scarfe 100 (12:30) Linden Pi nay. Counsellor, Native Education
Center. Native Education: New Solutions for Old Problems.
March 21—Scarfe 100 (12:30): Don Moses, Edonomist, Chairman, Native
Economic Development Fund. An Update on Economic Development.
March 22—Scarfe 100 (12:30): Susan Tatoosh, President, Aboriginal
Women's Business Development Corporation; Director, Native Economic
Development Fund. The Changing Roles of Native Women.
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ALL LECTURES ARE FREE—PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented
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STORE-WIDE SPECTACULAR APRIL 13
CELEBRATING OUR 8TH ANNIVERSARY
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- 20
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Federal report critiques Socreds
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
The B.C. government is making a
profit on post-secondary education
funding, according to a newly
released federal study.
B.C.'s grant from the federal
government for universities and colleges will be $20 million more than
the $462 million B.C. will spend on
them this year, according to a
federal study on post-secondary
funding in all provinces released
Thursday by federal secretary of
state Walter McLean.
The report by former CBC president Al Johnson calls for pressure
on provincial governments to increase their spending on colleges
and universities. It suggests tying
funding  increases  to  increases  in
provinical spending.
The 1977 agreement which
removed any ties between federal
and provincial increases has "gone
wrong," the report states. The
report suggests either abandoning
any pretense of federal control or
moving to exert more control.
Four provinces — B.C.,
Manitoba, Newfoundland, and Ontario — have shown especially
steep falls in the provincial share of
funding since 1977, the report
states. Federal post-secondary
transfers, totalling $4.2 billion this
year, will represent 80 per cent of
funding this year, compared with 69
per cent in 1977.
B.C.'s share has been cut 25 per
cent over the period according to
the report.
Acting UBC president Robert
Smith said he approves of the
report's demand for a new federal-
provincial agreement.
"1 agree its time that the federal
and provincial governments harmonized their attitude," he said.
"Somehow there's got to be a
meeting of the minds."
Universities ministry spokesperson Jane Burnes said the transfer
payments for health, which got a
$200 million increase in last Thursday's provincial budget, and
universities and colleges, come in
one sum and the province has no
obligation to pass a set amount to
post-secondary education.
Universities and colleges received
between a zero and a five per cent
funding cut.
"All of the money sent to us is
passed on in the appropriate manner to British Columbians," she
said, adding that "Johnson and the
federal government have their own
way of adding up figures."
UBC    vice-president    finance
Bruce Gellatly said he hopes the
report will have some influence in
getting federal increases passed on
to universities and colleges.
"1 think there's got to be some
way of earmarking those (federal)
funds so they find a way to post-
secondary education," he said.
New SUB open at last
By DAVE FERMAN
Despite going over budget the
Alma Mater Society SUB expansion
project enjoyed a successful opening Monday, as managing to meet
its third completion deadline.
The project was $800,000 over
the initial announced cost but
$100,000 of that was spent on
repairs that AMS finance director
Jamie Collins said "would have had
to be done anyway." The project
was funded through student fees
passed in a 1982 referendum which
created the Capital Projects Aquisi-
tions Committee.
Students who viewed the project,
and the 30 students hired to work in
the expansion, had positive reactions to the project.
Like all new malls the SUB expansion is light, bright and clean. A
second year theatre student said:
"Wow, it's just like being in a huge
plastic fridge."
The first addition that catches
one's eye is the checkerboard design
of the orange julius-type counter
serving a variety of orange drinks
and red hotdogs. At 1 p.m. business
was brisk. A new salesperson said
business was better than expected.
The other room now in operation
is the pasta restaurant. The centrepiece of the expansion is a stylish
room with 25 small tables and a
plush couch seat running along the
walls.
The restaurant sells a host of
pastas, salads and soups. The prices
are modest, with regular linguini
and white clam sauce listed at
$2.95. The restaurant was busy.
Outside there are outdoor tables
equipped with Perrier parasols.
There is also office space in the
expansion available for five clubs
and the new intramurals office. A
word processing centre will be
available to all students for a price.
There are also two bookable
rooms featuring windowed fronts
and wooden floors that can be used
for dance and exercise classes.
ENGINEERING   WEEK   HAS   come   and   gone   but  this
photograph remains. It shows model of flood control mechan
Thames River, England.
eggertson photo
stimulating
ism used in
Referendum misunderstood
UVic defeats free press
University of Victoria students
voted against a $2 per term fee increase that would have given financial independence to their student
paper.
Students also rejected a proposal
that steps be taken to stock cyanide
pills on campus to be taken in the
event of nuclear war. A similar idea
at UBC never made it to the voting
stage.
Mike O'Brien, co-editor of the
Martlet student newspaper, said 882
students supported a directly
student-funded Martlet while 1,064
voted against the idea. A 1979
referendum failed by 179 votes.
The proposal's defeat means the
Martlet must print 16 pages per
week instead of 24, and cannot pay
for two full-time editors. A no campaign surfaced among residence
students who wanted more on-
campus coverage said O'Brien.
But he said all types of coverage
had to be reduced this year when
the student society reduced the
paper's budget, adding the
residence campaign was misinformed.
The referendum also proposed a
newspaper board with several stu
dent representatives instead of having student, council controlling
purse strings.
"Students had a chance of administering their own paper. They
blew it." O'Brien said funding is
now subject to the whims of student
council.
In the last three years student
newspaper autonomy referendums
have been consistently losing across
Canada. The Ubyssey lost a bid for
financial autonomy from the Alma
Mater Society in 1981.
"I think because of the hard
times students are deciding freedom
of the press is not worth two or
three dollars," said O'Brien, adding the official comment of the
Martlet staff is "Life sucks."
Some students are confused
about the nature of the Alma Mater
Society's referendum March 27, 28
and 29, according to the AMS
director of administration.
"Some people have the perception that it is a fee referendum,"
said Simon Seshadri Monday.
"It's a referendum to create an
athletic council to spend athletic-
fees," he said. The AMS wants the
administration to organize a council
with 50 per cent student representation to allocate athletic funds to
varsity teams, intramurals and
recreation.
Seshadri blamed the misconception on letters such as one in the
Mar. 15 Ubyssey headlined "Vote
against athletic fees." "I think a lot
of students are unclear about that.
They think that by voting no they're
going to actually prevent it (the fee)
from occurring," said Seshadri.
The board of governors imposed
a $32 athletic fee to make the total
athletic fee $43.50 Mar. 7 despite an
agreement in 1968 that athletic fees
would not be imposed without student referenda.
Seshadri said the AMS would only go to court against the board if
the referendum did not pass. "We
would rather try to reach a solution
by working together with the administration than by taking a confrontational approach that may
cost students a lot of money," he
said.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 19,1985
Resign
It is increasingly clear that universities, science and technology
minister Patrick Lucey McGeer must resign.
He never has done much good for anyone, but his recent conduct makes his continued control over universities — and representation of the riding including UBC — a complete travesty.
One might think universities, especially UBC, would benefit from
having a UBC faculty member as minister. But McGeer resorts to
cooing about the wonders of Princeton while saying B.C. can't
have any good universities.
If Dr. McGeer had worked for, instead of against, our universities then perhaps UBC would be one of the top universities in
Canada. Not long ago people said UBC might become the best
university in Canada, but look at the shambles it is in now.
A man who should be defending the interests of B.C.'s universities is their worst enemy.
Why does this man, who is a professor, stay in Canada when he
feels our universities are "Mickey Mouse?"
At a time when morale is down at all our universities, a few
reassuring words and some concrete action by the minister responsible might do some good. But does our Dr. McGeer offer anything
but jeers?
He doesn't even have influence in his own cabinet where he is
mistrusted as an educated person.
He doesn't have any influence at UBC, except what he gets solely by virtue of his position, and is more than mistrusted as a man
who has done worse than nothing for universities.
McGeer serves no useful function as minister or MLA and
should, if he has any decency at all, resign.
'Thank you all'
I am writing this letter to publicly
express my thanks and appreciation
to two UBC students and the
RCMP at the university detachment.
On the night of 13 March, 1985 I
was assaulted by a man who was
hiding in the bushes on sixteenth
Avenue, close to Westbrook mall.
This was a premeditated attack (he
Man commits series of assaults in UBC area
No longer am 1 willing to live in
fear and paranoia of the next time 1
might be attacked. Nor am I willing
to remain silent on a series of incidents which threaten to continue
and affect a large portion of the
university community: in particular
women.
Rape and assault are going on
before our very eyes and yet most of
us remain ignorant or distanced
from this fact. I did not become ful-
Science holds
evaluation
Even if your courses are all as
easy as Dr. McGeer says they are,
the Science Undergraduate Society
needs its members' opinions on
their courses and professors.
The SUS is resurrecting the
(in)famous Black and Blue Review.
This week all science students
should receive in the mail, an
evaluation form for their professors
and courses.
Careful, honest and prompt completion of this evaluation will permit the SUS to provide, in July, a
booklet to each Science student
which will assist you in prfessors
and course selection for next year
(assuming any courses and professors still remain next year).
Evaluations may be dropped in
boxes provided at the following
locations:
1) Sedgewick
2) Wesbrook 100
3) Chemistry 250
4) Hennings 200
5) Hebb theatre
6) SUS office (CPAX 2)
Greg O'Neill
SUS representative.
ly aware of this until I was assaulted
in January while in the residential
area near the tenth avenue gates.
Until now I have refrained from
publicizing this story so as not to
jeopardize Vancouver police investigations.
However, the recent rape of an
eleven year old girl at eleventh and
Sasamat, by a man using the same
methods, and of a women at eighth
and Trimble prohibit me from remaining silent any longer.
This man, who is terrorizing
women in the West Point Grey area
and other parts of the city, must be
caught. At the same time, women
must be made aware.
To quote a letter which appeared
in the Western News and corresponds with my experience: "The .
attacker would hide behind a tree or
bush until the victim was at the
right distance, then he would spring
and cover the girl (woman) with a
blanket or something similar to
that."
In my case he sprang from the
lane behind me, threw a sheet over
my head and me to the ground. He
unquestionably knew what he was
doing.
Somehow 1 managed to escape:
others haven't been so lucky. Since
this incident I have been terrified,
constantly watching over my
shoulder at the slightest noise or
sign of motion.
More than once I have jumped,
startled by what proved to be an innocent jogger coming from behind.
1 and others who have fallen victim to this man's activities, will not
feel secure until he is caught. Even
then, we will be continually plagued
by the fear of being victimized by
others like him.
Those   who   have   remained   ig
norant, all but the close circles of
those directly affected, continue to
walk about unsuspectingly. These
people must be told: until now, they
have not been — not by the police
and not by the press.
Until this man and others like
him are stopped, we must act as the
hunted. Only if we ourselves exercise vigilance can we protect
ourselves. If you are victimized or if
you see or hear anything suspicious,
don't hesitate to call the police.
In my case they were more than
helpful and obviously concerned.
It's not worth risking silence; his
next victim may be close by and
unaware. And, she may not be so
lucky as to escape his degrading,
hostile and painful intentions.
name withheld
by request
was wearing a mask) and I think I
am lucky to be alive.
I don't know what made this very
sick person stop hitting me, but he
did stop. When I ran to the road for
help, Mark and Kathleen (you
know who you are; I didn't know if
I should print your last names)
stopped to take me to the RCMP
office close-by.
Thank you both — I am forever
grateful for your concern and quick
response. My thanks also to the
RCMP, in particular officer Desjar-
dins for his support.
Finally, 1 guess I would just like
to say that as long as this letter
helps to inform others about where
these crimes are occuring, and how
often, ultimately serving to prevent
other violent attacks from happening to women, then it has been
worth sharing the most terrifying
night of my life with the readers of
The Ubyssey.
name withheld
by request
Athletic referendum on council, not fees
The Alma Mater Society is asking
the student body to vote yes to an
Athletic Fee Referendum that
would see the athletic fee charged to
all full time students raised from
$11.50 to $43.50.
This fee increase has already been
approved by the board of governors
and will come into being one way or
another.
The board of governors has encroached on the AMS's authority to
levy athletic fees as was previously
agreed to between AMS and UBC.
Because of this action, the AMS has
been basically placed in a no-win
situation.
THE UBYSSEY
March 19. 1985
The'Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Well, begum and begorrah, it's March 19 alraady and we're glad the blarney's a-passing us by — at
least the gala-blarney, the hyper-blarney and the mega-blarney we've been a-having lately. Tis fair
enough to turn the likes of wee Dave O'Ferman, wee Stephen O'Wisenthal and wee Jamie O'Yuung
green to the gills, ready to toss thair Irish biscuits all over the bloomin' flarr. How is it that-thair
Regressive-Conservativ guvermint cuts the bleedin' CBC by two hundrid millyun dollars and the next
thing you know Mr. Brian nd the Gipper be-getting a reel speshul television show, all mutheriiuid and
apple pie, mark you. That doesn't pass by our crew of investigative journalists out hair at the
Youbeesee dus it my friend? I be-talking about the keen eyes of Sarah O'Millin, the sniff-it-out nose of
Monte O'Stewart, the ears to the ground methods of Robert O'Beynon. And who'd be those two,
a-lookin like feminist agents of social change: none other than Sue O'Mcllroy and Renate O'Boerner.
And another point, raised by the yet to-be-fooled Victor O'Wong: why does Maurren Forrester sing
such pretty airs when the Canada Council be-getting cut a-this way and a-that. Oh, the yoosual feelin
of edgicatin the pooblic were enough to make Patti O'Flather break into tap-tap dancin
The AMS will be forced to sue
the university for breach of an
agreement which will be very costly
to the AMS and therefore the
students themselves.
In addition, the fee increase will
go ahead with or without the consent of the AMS, thus leaving the
student council with no control over
the distribution of funds obtained
by the fee increase.
The only alternative is to return
to the university the power to levy
athletic fees under the condition
that a university athletic council be
created with 50 per cent student
representation by the AMS.
This council would enable
students to have an influence over
how their money is spent.
We ask you to support the
referendum with a yes vote to
enable students to determine the
budget of all athletic programs —
intramurals, recreation and inter-'
college.
Without the yes vote, students
will be completely excluded from all
decisions regarding athletics at
UBC.
Barbara Gobis
pharmacy 3 Tuesday, March 19,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Colleagues more appropriate
From page 1
• universities need to raise entrance requirements to weed out
people in universities for "social
reasons";
• Maritimes universities are
"Mickey Mouse";
• it is cheaper and more efficient
to import "management and
research" people than to train them
in B.C.
Boyankowsky, the Confederation of Faculty Association of B.C.
president, told the Vancouver Sun
the statements in the letter were en-
Students for UBC
plan shining light
Students for UBC will be a shining light in the darkness Wednesday.
They plan to line the key entrance
ways to the Law building, holding
lights in a flashlight vigil starting at
7 p.m.
The UBC senate convenes at 8:00
p.m. in the building reached by east
mall or Crescent road near gate 3.
In the meeting Students for UBC
will present the senate with a petition signed by more than 9,000 people protesting the cutting of one-of-
a-kind programs at UBC and calling for "an open and equitable
discussion by the university community as to how cutbacks are to be
implemented."
Programs that have been asked to
justify their existence include architecture, rehabilitation medicine,
landscape architecture, community
and regional planning, speech
science, audiology, religious studies
and oceanography.
Acting UBC president Robert
Smith sent letters in February to all
12 faculties pinpointing 35 programs to justify why they should
not be trimmed or eliminated.
Smith denies any final decisions
have been made but some members
of the university community feel
there is a lack of open discussion on
how cuts will be made.
tirely true and he was shocked
McGeer made them.
When told McGeer might sue him
Boyankowsky said: "That's interesting. It would be interesting to
know on what basis, since all I did
was quote him."
He said McGeer made the comments at a meeting between him and
University of Victoria professor
Gordon Shrimpton. Shrimpton told
The Sun the letter was "absolutely
fair and accurate."
At the letter's end Boyanowksy
writes: "Perhaps a number of your
(cabinet) colleagues would be more
appropriate for the universities
position," and adds, "I would
argue that your attributes can be
best used exclusively in the sciences
and technology area" of your portfolio.
PIITISI
NOMINATIONS NOW
OPEN
FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES ON THE
FOLLOWING PRESIDENTIAL
ADVISORY COMMITTEES
Concerns of the Handicapped
Food Services
International House Board
of Directors
Land Use Committee
Men's Athletics
Sherwood Lett Memorial
Student Union Building
Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre
Traffic & Parking
War Memorial Gym Fund
Women's Athletics
Youth Employment Program
Nominations Close
4 p.m., Wednesday
March 20
1 position
4 positions
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
Community Rep
4 positions
3 positions
1 position
1 position
Forms Available
SUB 238
Awaka at 3 «jn. *e unKMna MtoatftgiMMi #***, »pmtni&fai#imMmiwmrw<*iitol&i*
the tttfitt pJwet. Qtmusam<m4#qml «*•» *» *«w» <# pwi»,»e(*W<>o*»«wt»»««««»«*^
d<m, retoaM. F«Mntjaiieeft*^ywiry»enM»i^
faintly, then putting. • tttr. fiw point*, a pentagon, etatfc and ahock. braafcins away m pam-and
war*. Ti»p**i»ofc»a(W.l^opan,ttaifae»out«id»o^^
aaain. Another aay to do the wo* you have to So.
SAY"SISI"TOTCU'S
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on all car loan applications.
Plus. You can enter TCl's Trip to Mexico" contest.**
You could win the grand prize of return airfare and
^ nights accommodation for 2 to Mazatlan
(valued at approx. $1500).
The contest is open to B.C. residents 19 years and over.
No purchase necessary. A skill testing question must be
correctly answered to win.
Drop into any TCI' branch for an entry form and complete
contest rules and ask us about other PRIME + 1% loans.
> [in mill a'UL-w.ibk- K-
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TEACHERS CREDIT I NION
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
WHEREAS the students of the University of British Columbia (UBC) voted by referenda to have
levied against them a $7.00 Student Athletic Fee and a $4.50 Intramural Fee, and
WHEREAS it is desirable to create a broader management structure to run Athletic programs, including Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics, and Recreation U.B.C:
BE IT RESOL VED THA T
"The Alma Mater Society of UBC (AMS) return to the University the power to levy Athletic fees subject to an agreement between the AMS and UBC which will include the following provisions:
(a) creation of a University Athletic Council possessing the following characteristics:
1. 50% of the representatives to be appointed by the AMS,
2. control over Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics and Recreation U.B.C. program budgets,
3. power to recommend the use and development of present and future athletic and recreation facilities,
and
4. power to recommend to the UBC Board of Governors changes in athletic fees.
(b) a commitment from the University to fund the indirect cost of running athletic and recreational
facilities and a portion of the University Athletic Council Budget."
YES    □
NO    □
Day Polls: Wednesday, March 27 to Friday, March 29 as follows:
10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Angus Scarfe
Buchanan Sedgewick Library
CEME SUB
Computer Science Woodward Library
Law Hebb
MacMillan War Memorial Gym
(Poll time and location subject to availability of Poll Clerks)
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 19,1985
"%/A
W60?i
TODAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting and bible readings,
noon, SUB 211.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture: Cardiovascular and thoracic surgery,
with Dr. Jamieson, noon. Wood 1.
BASKETBALL FINAL HOUR
Division one men's semi-finals 8:30 p.m.. Arts vs
Grads Studies, 9:30 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Selling grad dinner and dance tickets, taking
orders for sweatshirts, 11:30a.m., Buchanan by
the Arts advisor's office.
MUSSOC
Banquet tickets on sale, noon, club office.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture: "Origins of the Cold War in Comparative Perspective: Canada, U.S., U.K. Relations," noon, Buch B221.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night,  newcomers meet in 237A,  4:30
p.m., Gallery lounge.
THE UBYSSEY SCHOOL or JOURNALISM
Screenings for  sub-editors and  staff  meeting,
noon, SUB 241K.
INTRAMURALS
Basketball finals, div. 2 6-7 p.m., div. 1 7-8:30
p.m., super league 8:30-10 p.m,, awards to be
given out. War Memorial gym.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE AND
HISTORY DEPARTMENT
Lecture: Historians on the Holocaust, prof. L. E.
Hill and J. S. Conway, noon, Angus 110.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Selling tickets for grad dinner and dance as well
as taking orders for sweatshirts, 11:30 a.m.-1:30
p.m., Buchanan near the arts advisors office.
NDP CLUB
Annual general meeting, noon, SUB 119.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS
Important meeting and elections, noon, Angus
226,
MUSSOC
Banquet tickets on sale, noon, club office,
UBC DEBATING CLUB
Dr.  Allen  Beasly discusses AIDS  in the third
world, noon, debating club office.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Chaplains   lunch,   hot   lunch   available,   guest
speaker:   Robert   Smith,   noon,   Hillel   House
(behind Brock Hall),
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND
TRAVEL CLUB UBC
Slide presentation on cycling, noon, SUB 213.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Lecture   on   Asian   painting   by   Letta   Shea,
honorary research association, 3:30 p.m., Asian
Centre seminar room 604.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
General meeting, people and plans for '857'86,
noon, SUB 211.
THURSDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Voting for second slate, noon, SUB 216A.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB
Speakers and film - Dreams of a Free Country:
A Message from Nicaragua, noon, Buch A100.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Selling grad dinner and dance tickets and taking
orders for  sweatshirts,   11:30 a.m.,   Buchanan
near the arts advisor's office.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Lecture:   Managing Foreign Trade by Marwyn
Samuels,   associate   prof   in   Geography,   3:30
p.m., Asian Centre, Music studio 105.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Election of new executive, 1:30 p.m., 7th floor
lounge Buchanan Tower.
MUSSOC
Banquet tickets on sale, noon, club office.
LAW STUDENTS
Lecture on wife battery, noon, Law 169.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Video on "Rock and Roll Music," noon, Scarfe
206.
ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP
Two   speakers   on   international   environmental
issues, noon, Geography room 212.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Deadline for submissions for nomination forms
for 85-86 CSA executives, 1 p.m., SUB 235.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Guest   speaker   rabbi   Baruch   Kaplan,   lunch
available, noon, Hillel House.
AIESEC
General meeting, noon, Angus 223.
FRIDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Lecture:   Economic   Costs  of  an   Independent
Defence    Policy    for    Canada,    by    Gideon
Rosenbluth, noon, SUB 206.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Video: Business Plans, noon, Angus 226.
Special
Offer
20°/c
O Off
Any Hair Service
With Student
AMS Card
1071 Denman St.
688-7808
2178 W. Broadway
731-4138
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Voting for second slate, noon, SUB 216A.
DEPARTMENT OF HISPANIC AND
ITALIAN STUDIES
Free public lecture,  noon,  Buch A102, Symposium, $5 for faculty, $4 for students, 3 p.m.,
Buch B314.
PSYCHOLOGY STUOENTS' ASSOCIATION
Last chance for ordering sweatshirts, also sale of
tickets for grad. Dinner and dance, 11:30 a.m.,
Buchanan near the arts advisors' office.
NOP CLUB
Ian   Waddell,   M.P.   for   Vancouver   Kingsway
speaks   on   "Mulroney:   Reagan's   Yes-man?",
noon, Buch D121.
MUSSOC
Banquet tickets on sale, noon, club office.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Election   of   new   executive,   noon,   7th   floor
lounge Buchanan Tower.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Election for second slate, noon, SUB 216A.
>>
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NEW RELEASES
Crimes of Passion
All of Me
Adventures of
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Rent a VCR & 2 movies
for Only $9.50 (Mon. Thurs. 24 hrs.)
Weekends slightly higher
"Club membership  Privileges
»••••••••<
GAMES AND TV RENTALS
AVAILABLE
Rent A Compact Disc Machine and *4 Discs
for only $15.00
(Mon.-Thurs 24 hrs.—Weekends Slightly Higher)
*3 Disks only $5.00
COMPACT DISK SALES & RENTALS 41st AVE. STORE ONLY
*•••••—••••—
3560 W. 41st Ave. and Dunbar
(across from Safeway)
266-6276
i Arbutus St.
(across from Greek church)
266-3306
ATTENTION
AMS CLUBS
The following is a list of AMS Clubs which will be
deconstituted and have their club accounts frozen
EFFECTIVE MARCH 29, 1985, for failing to adhere to
AMS Clubs regulations. The Clubs listed below have
not submitted either a 1985/86 budget and/or a
membership list and/or a constitution. Please see the
Administrative Assistant in SUB Room 238 for more
details.
Aikido Karate Club
Amateur Radio Society
Amnesty International
Apathy Club
Aqua Society
Astronomy & Aerospace Club
Ballet UBC Jazz
Baltic Association
Bio-resource Engineering Club
Brotherhood of Benevolent
Scientists
Campus Cavaliers
Campus Pro-Life
Charismatic Christian
Fellowship
Christian Publications
Curling Club
Debating Society
Eight O'Clock Swim Club
Geophysics Society
Slavonic Circle
Social Credit Party Club
Speech Hearing Club
Student Christian Movement
Student Council for
Exceptional Children
Student Pugwash Association
Students for Peace &
Mutual Disarmament
Theatre Students Association
Ukranian Student Club
Informed Students
Association
International Cooking Club
Karate Club
Law Soccer Club
Licentiate In Accounting Club
Metallurgical Engineering
Mineral Engineering Club
Model Parliament Club
Music Students Association
My Jong Kung Fu Club
Navigators
Newman Catholic Club
Palestine Education
Committee
Phra teres
Physics Students Society
Political Science Students
Society
Psuedo-lntellectuai Students
Society
Public Interest Research
Group
Recreation Undergraduate
Society
Rockers co-op
Sky Diving Club
Underwater Hockey Club
Vancouver Adventure & Travel
Club
Varsity Christian Fellowship
Visually Impaired Students
Association
Wildlife Club
Windsurfing Club
Wing Chun Kung Fu Club
Women's Engineering Club
Wu Shu Club
'S      "^ "■
■ / o-v.'/"
-THE CLASSIFIEDS-*
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, ,70c. Additional days, $4.00 and ,65c.
Cl.issifu-tl ,iils art- payabl ■ in advani r   Deadliiw is 10:30 a. m.  Ihe
(lav baton- puhln at/on
Publications Room 26%  SUB.,  UBC,  Van.,  B.C.   V6T 2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
CANOE FOR SALE:  16 ft. fibreglass, incl.
2 paddles, $135 OBO, 688-4842.
15 — Found
FOUND: Tennis racquet in front of Regent
College. Phone Lori, 224-7295.
25 - INSTRUCTION
30 - JOBS
WORK ABROAD. Permanent or working
holidays. Unique newsletter listing openings overseas, $3.00. Bulletin & Jobsearch
Kit, $1.00. Work Abroad, 1755 Robson,
Box205-UB, Vancouver, B.C. V6G 1C9.
NORTH SHORE INTERIOR
College Pro Painters. Applications available at
CEC in Brock Hall (Rm 214)
FREE HAIRCUTS for models. Call Gordon
at 263-4719, Sachi's.
MODELS-MODELS-MODELS
Female photographers models required for
part-time work. No exp. necessary. For audition send photo & write to: SPECTRUM, P.O.
Box 311, 1215 Davie St.. Van., B.C. V6E1N4.
CREATE YOUR OWN CAREER
INVESTOR SEEKING
BUSINESS TALENTS
Investor provides capital to students with
business ideas for creation of long-term
businesses. We take the risk. Submit proposal and resume to P.O. Box 46, Thor-
nhill, Ontario, L3T3N1.
35 — Lost
$100 REWARD for information leading to the
return of yellow &■ white tent last seen near
SUB Plaza Mar. 4. Contact 228-3818 or
922-4026.
EARRING, SILVER HOOP, lost Feb. 19,
A-block Buch. Immense sentimental value.
Phone Pat 224-4514.
40
Messages
WITNESSES to an accident at 4th & Alma
on Fri., Mar. 1 at 9 a.m. between a white
Rabbit & red Datsun, please call
668-4284/224 0902.
WANTED: MCAT course prep, kit, will pay
a reasonable price. Call 224-4762 or
594-1359. Ask for Amir. Leave mess.
SPROUT   thanks    everyone    for    a    great
deadlock on the flipside.
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
70 - SERVICES
THE WRITER ... the typist. Term papers.
Assignments. Research. Reports. Prof.
Resumes. Ghost Writing. Memoirs.
Speeches. Business Proposals. 733-1383.
YOUR DEADLINE approaches but draft
No. 47 is still not quite right? Don't despair)
Experienced editor will polish term papers,
theses, etc. Other services also available.
Contact Footnotes Information & Research
Service, 430-5751.
ARE YOU TIRED of dieting with no success?
Would you like to lose 10-30 lbs. in a
month? Then phone 736-1904.
80 - TUTORING
EXP. TUTOR - Math., physics, call Alexis,
734-2116 before 10 a.m. or after 10 p.m.
85 - TYPING
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
OCTOBER 5, 1985 LSAT
on September 13, 14. 15/1985.
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT Preparation Courses,
112 800-387 3742.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U & del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (MICOIVI). Student
rates $14'hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
WORDPOWER - Editing & word processing professionals. Thesis, term paper,
resume &■ form letter specialists. Student
rates. 3737 W. 10th (at Alma). 222-2661.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Oays, evgs/wkends. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
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90 - WANTED
IDENTICAL
TWINS
Required for Innovative
Research in
Bio-Psychological
Research
For information contact
Dr. H. Klonoff
No. 7-2255 Wesbrook Mall
Psych Unit
228-7301 Tuesday, March 19,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Differential fees up in Scotia
HALIFAX (CUP) — Foreign
students may have to drop out of
Nova Scotia universities next year
because of the latest provincial
government hike in differential
fees, according to a student politician.
Alex Gigeroff, Dalhousie university student council president, said
foreign students in the province
already pay more than double the
tuition fees paid by Canadian
students and cannot bear the strain
of a 29 per cent increase.
"This increase will make it more
difficult for these students to attend
Nova Scotian universities," said
Gigeroff.
Foreign students will pay a differential fee of $1,700 in addition to
regular tuition fees next year, which
are in the $1,400 range.
Gigeroff said the province ignored a provincial education board
recommendation to limit the increase to $60.
"I don't think the provincial
government realizes the harm the
increase will cause international
students," said Gigeroff. "There is
»
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228  i"i 1 PageS
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 19,1985
Neale has doubts about Canadian pucksters
By MONTE STEWART the   Vancouver   Canucks   coach
If there was ever a case for col- made it last Sunday night.
legiate hockey players going to the "In the Canadian colleges many
United States to play, Harry Neale, of the players are a lot older," said
Neale, who will almost certainly be
retained by the Vancouver Canucks
in some capacity nexfseason.
"Most of the kids that go into the
Canadian colleges — that are good
— have already gone through
junior and we've had a real good
look at them," said the coach and
general manager.
The Canucks, beyond the point
of no return as far as this season is
concerned, have never had a Canadian collegian on their roster. Doug
Lidster, a Canadian who played at
Colorado College, is the only
Canuck to be recruited from the
university ranks.
All others have either been
drafted from the junior ranks or
else    they    have    been    acquired
through the free agent market.
"American kids (primarily Canadians playing at universities in the
U.S.), at 18, come out of tier two
(junior) and you haven't had a look
at them," said Neale about the
players that he feels will be able to
help the Canucks immediately.
Neale's statements virtually
quash the hopes of several UBC
Thunderbirds as far as the Canucks
are concerned. Bill Holowaty and
Rick Amann, both selected to the
Canada West and Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union and
first all-star teams, are the two most
likely T-Birds ever to see action in
the NHL.
However, Holowaty, 25, might
be  considered   too  old   to  take  a
chance   with.    Amann,    24,    was
drafted by Detroit in 1978.
The Canucks mentor's attitude is
somewhat ironic, considering that
he once hired Tom Watt out of the
University of Toronto as his assistant coach. Watt, who later became
head coach of Winnipeg Jets before
receiving the proverbial axe last
season, is rumored to be a strong
candidate for the soon to be vacant
Canuck head coaching job.
Evidentally, Neale's respect for
the people who run Canadian
university hockey program does not
coincide with his lack of respect for
Canadian university players.
"I don't know whether there are
five guys that came out of Canadian
colleges. Are there?"
Cockroft goes on; El might win
RICK HANSEN EYES long road ahead of him.
Wheelchair athlete leaves
UBC will bid farewell to Rick
Hansen Wednesday.
The UBC student embarks on
what could be the most fortuitous
endeavour of any athlete. Thursday
he  will leave  for  an  around  the
world tour.
Not the kind that you enjoy via
sea or air. The type whereby you
wheelchair your way through a
course of 25,000 miles, roughly the
equivalent of the circumference of
the globe.
Hansen was paralyzed in an auto
accident at the age of 15. Since then
he has brought much prestige to the
university by means of his many
athletic accomplishments. He
recently won a gold medal at the
Seventh Annual World Wheelchair
Games in Stoke-Manville, England.
Hansen also became the first ever
wheelchair athlete to compete in the
annual Vancouver Marathon. The
purpose of his journey, which, if
everything goes according to plan,
should take 17 months, is to raise
money for spinal injury victims.
He calls the event the "Man in
Motion World Tour" to emphasize
Expo 86's theme of transportation
and communication.
Hansen will travel down the West
Coast to Mexico and east to the
Atlantic before flying to the British
Isles. The tour will cover places as
diverse as North Africa and the Far
East.
International volleyball here
being billed as a revenge
It  is
match.
Canada versus the United States
in a rematch of the Olympic semifinals in which the U.S. defeated
Canada 3-0.
Yet the exhibition volleyball
match to be played at War
Memorial gym this Saturday is a far
cry from its Olympic predecessor.
Neither team has its original
coach. Canadian Olympic boss Ken
Maeda has returned to Japan. Paul
Brasson, a Romanian, is Canada's
new coach.
American Olympic coach Doug
Beal has moved up to the position
of national team director while
Tony Crabb has taken over as head
coach. And both teams feature
several new players.
The British Columbia Volleyball
Association is sponsoring the event
which is being heavily marketed by
an American firm. Ticket prices for
the supposed grudge match are not
what you would normally expect to
pay.
All UBC students are admitted
free to varsity events. However,
this contest, not affiliated with the
university in any way (aside from
promotional assistance), will cost
up to $10 to attend. Students must
pay $8.
B\ MONTE STEWART
"I'm going to be competing
forever."
While being selected as a co-
winner of the UBC women's athlete
of the year was "a great honor" for
high jumper Jeannie Cockroft, she
says she has much greater rewards
in sight — the Olympics.
"1 wanted to make the team last
year but I fell three centimetres
short", said Cockroft, who has
since eclipsed the standard.
The Delta native set a Canadian
Interuniversity Athletic Union
record this season, jumping 1.84
metres. She jumped even higher
that that at a Canada-U.S. exhibition meet. That jump of 1.88m was
the third best in Canadin history —
only Brigitte Reid and Debbie Brill
have surpassed the mark.
Cockroft also won the Canadian
indoor championship in February.
"The season was right up where 1
expected it to be," said Cockroft,
adding that she has now set her
sights on the upcoming outdoor
season.
The other co-winner, diver Nancy
Bonham, has looked ahead to some
future goals of her own — like finding a job.
After finishing second in the
Canada West finals, Bonham won
the CIAU title for both the lm and
3m diving events. But the 22 year
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Tuesday, March 19th
12:30 News from Israel (lunch is available)
Wed., March 20th
12:30—Chaplains lunch with a special guest — New UBC
President Robert Smith (a hot lunch is available)
Thursday, March 21
12:30—Guest Rabbi Baruch Kaplan will speak on Yeshivot in
Israel (lunch available)
Hillel House
(Behind Brock Hall) 224-4748
CENTRE
Full Service
Duplicating Available
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Copiers still only
5c
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Student Union Building
228-4288
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1
old engineering student has put her
diving aspirations on hold as she
completes her final year of studies
and then tries to find permanent
employment.
To nobody's surprise, the
women's swimming and diving
team was selected as UBC's
women's team of the year for 1985.
The club had a perfect 9-0 record
this season, winning both the
Canada West and CIAU competitions.
The national championship was
the first ever for UBC.
Olympic rower Tricia Smith was
presented with an honorary Big
Block award for her participation in
the Games. However, the university
failed to acknowledge the efforts of
Diane Rakiecki. who won two
medals at the World Wheelchair
Games in Stoke-Manville, England
last summer.
With the men's Big Block dinner
looming, El Ladha has emerged as a
strong candidate to win the Bobby
Gaul Trophy.
The fifth year defender was instrumental in the Thunderbirds'
Canadian Interuniversity Athletic
Union soccer championship. He
was selected as player of the game
when the 'Birds edged Carleton
Ravens 2-1 in the title match.
The award will be presented this
Thursday   at   the   Facultv   Club.
AMS concerts
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