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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 28, 1973

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Array Students ignored
AUS
By RYON GUEDES
Arts dean Doug Kenny's
0 proposed re-evaluation of the arts
faculty deliberately avoids
mention of student participation in
the project, Bill Moen, arts undergraduate society president said
Thursday.
Moen spoke regarding a
memorandum sent by Kenny last
week to faculty heads asking for a
complete review of structure,
staffing, programs, and objectives
in all arts departments.
* In the letter Kenny cited possible
financial cutbacks in the arts
faculty from the UBC administration and provincial
government as the reason for the
study.
"As far as they're concerned,
students are not involved," Moen
told The Ubyssey, referring to the
arts faculty committee members.
"The main point of their evaluation
is the justification of more funds
for the faculty of arts and the
security of the professors."
Moen said Kenny's failure to
invite student participation in the
review was an intentional oversight. "He declined to ask the
students because he is afraid they
might say something critical of the
faculty," he said.
Moen said the memo, originally
sent only to department heads, was
mimeographed by acting
philosophy head Robert Rowan
and placed at philosophy students'
disposal.
Rowan was not available for
comment.
The Kenny memorandum
requested of each department in
the faculty "detailed and convincing arguments for the continued support of their programs,"
to be submitted in a report by Nov.
1.
The areas the memo required
information on were:
* "The present goals and objectives of your department or
schools indicating the relationship
between those connected with
research and with teaching;
* "A clear indication of your
department or school's academic
priorities   in   terms   of   existing,
THS UBYSSEY
developing       and       projected
programs;
* "The relationship between
these objectives and programs and
the number of students and of
society at this point in time;
* "As clear as possible an indication of the activities and
achievements of your graduates
over the last five years;
* "Plans for development in the
next five years (a) if necessary
additional funds should be
available, and (b) if resources
remain at the present level."
Kenny was not also available for
comment.
Moen said several departmental
student unions were being formed,
including the philosophy, anthropology-sociology, political
science, and psychology departments.
"Basically they will be formed
for situations like this, where a
directive issued by Kenny that will
Yiave a great influence over the
students education is made without
consulting them," he said.
"The AUS' role in this will be to
initiate and organize unions in the
departments and try to direct some
students' interests toward having a
voice in their respective departments."
'vKenny is trying to accomplish
in one month a thorough
examination of one of the most
complex issues," he said. "On
what basis the taxpayer should pay
taxes, and what determines a
student's education, are things that
cannot be considered in that time."
In a joint statement in the AUS
student newsletter Students and
Politics the undergraduate society
executive condemned Kenny's
plan as "bullshit".
Says the statement: "It is clear
that his (Kenny's) main concern is
with convincing the public administration and government that
the faculty is using our resources
effectively.
The statement scorns Kenny's
call to department heads to invite
students to participate.
Instead the statement suggests
"Students in each department
must organize themselves and
demand that open meetings be held
at which both students and faculty
can discuss the content of such a
report.
"Immediate action is necessary
if students are going to have any
say in the developments of the
faculty of arts."
Hydro boss
in tiger's den
By KEN DODD
Upon taking the lectern B.C. Hydro chairman David Cass-Beggs
looked out at the crowd in the MacMillan planetarium auditorium
packed with academics, environmentalists and businessmen and
smiled.
"I feel rather like the nineteenth century British prime minister
Lord Derby," Cass-Beggs said. "He said he had once dreamt that he
was addressing the House of Lords and then woke up to find he was.
"It is definitely a case of David
BLADDERS BURSTING Ubyssey shutz-staffel swilled gallons of likker in annual tree faculty boat race
booze-up. As always rang-a-tang rag riters bombed opposition by downing cases of vile fluid in mere seconds.
From left to right co-editor Michael Sasges, Marc Hamilton, Jake van der Kamp and the incredible invisible
* Ryon Guedes. Pathetic forestry faculty sewing circle finished distant second when they finally downed their
communal bottle of beer several hours later.
Senate
posts won
ByDRUSPENCER
Three university senate student
seats have been acclaimed but
three other posts are.still up for
grabs.
Graham Burns, arts 4; Ellen
Paul, education 3, and Phillip
Park, applied science 4, have
claimed senatorship.
Candidates for the three
senators-at-large are Jeanette
Auger, arts 3; Nancy Ann Dower,
science 3; Arthur Hilliker, grad
studies 9; Linda Kingston, science
2; Fred Metcalfe, science 4;
Sandra Smaill, law 1; Art
Smolensky, law 1; Susan
Waechtler, grad 9 and Katy Young,
law 1.
Two candidates for Alma Mater
Society secretary are George
Mapson, physical education 6 and
Stuart Russell, arts 2.
Internal affairs candidates are
Doug Brock, arts 4; Gerald De
Montigny, arts 3 and Coreen
Douglas, arts 3.
Advance polls will be held between 11:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. on
Oct. 2 in SUB and Angus.
Polls will also be located in
Gage, Totem and Vanier
residences' common blocks between 5-7 p.m. Oct. 2.
Election day polls will be located
at stations thrdUghout the campus
between 10 a.m? and 4 p.m.
Three referendums will also be
decided. Students will be asked
how often The Ubyssey should
publish, whether graduate
students should be required to pay
the $15 SUB building fee and
whether the AMS constitution
should be amended to allow candidates in AMS elections to be
affiliated with political clubs.
in the lions den," he said.
Cass-Beggs' analogy turned
out to be very true in the question
period following his one-and-a-half-
hour address on "Power
Development and the Environment
in B.C." when people from the
audience repeatedly questioned
and challenged Cass-Beggs on his
generally favourable opinion of
nuclear power as an energy
source.
Irving Stowe of the Greenpeace
foundation attacked Cass-Beggs,
charging the hydro chairman with
trying to convince the public of the
supposed need for nuclear power
without properly advising them of
the dangers involved.
Stowe said Cass-Beggs had been:
"propagandizing the public on
what you apparently feel to be the
necessity of using nuclear power
without also taking the responsibility of telling that public the
dangers involved in the use of it."
Case-Beggs said in reply to
Stowe's charge he felt the types of
nuclear power plwnt systems
suggested for Canadian use really
would have little of the dangerous
side-effects commonly associated
with nuclear development.
"Uranium is no more dangerous
than a hunk of steel. You could
sleep with it in your bed and it
See page 2: NUCLEAR
Protest!
A demonstration to protest plans
to bring supertankers through
Juan de Fuca straight will be held
Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Peace
Arch.
Buses will leave 2007 West
Fourth at 11 a.m. The demonstration is sponsored by the
Scientific Pollution and Environmental Control society and
Greenpeace. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973
Nuclear foes flay Beggs
From page 1
would do no harm to you whatsoever," he said.
"The use of uranium will be very
safe in the types of nuclear reactors we would be producing in
Canada."
Cass-Beggs said there was not
necessarily such comparative
safety reactors currently
operating in the United Kingdom,
France and especially the U.S.
He explained he felt the difference was that the high toxic
mineral plutonium was directly
used in the processes in those
countries but was not planned in
the Canadian nuclear models thus
minimizing such risks.
Cass-Beggs said that the only
danger in the types of reactors he
thinks B.C. Hydro will be using
before the end of the 1980's would
be the intense radiation of the
spent uranium that would be stored
"in ponds similar to swimming
pools" after energy use. However,
he said this danger could be
eliminated by the careful refining
of such waste.
At this point Cass-Beggs was
challenged by one man from the
audience of about 200.
"You're either misinformed on
the dangers of nuclear power or
choose to be misinformed," the
man shouted.
"You say there is really no
danger in uranium when uranium
has caused more deaths by cancer
ti.an any other type of mining
program."
He then agreed with Stowe's
earlier charge that the hydro
chairman had "clouded" the issue
of nuclear power.
Cass-Beggs then went on to say
he didn't think nuclear power was
"in any way the final energy phase
of mankind."
"Mankind's use of nuclear
energy may well not last even a 100
years," he said.
An earlier questioner asked the
hydro chairman why the utility
was still  advertising  for  people
increase their energy demands
with slogans like natural gas is
cheaper now than in 1956". Instead
Cass-Beggs was asked if it
wouldn't be wiser to promote
secondary and tertiary industry in
the province to save energy.
Cass-Beggs answered saying,
"All you say has much validity but
you would have to have a tightly
controlled socialist economy for
such regulation to have any real
effect."
His questioner then interrupted
saying it had been his understanding that (premier) Dave
Barrett had been elected with a
mandate to do just that.
Seeming overwhelmed Cass-
Beggs said, "I'm all in favour. But
if you leave our energy development in the hands of private
capitalists, especially those outside of Canada, then there is no
chance of this ever being
established."
Catching the accidental irony df
Cass-Beggs' comment many of the
audience laughed at the tragedy
implied by the phrase.
Sensing his mistake Cass-Beggs
smiled and said, "then the
technology of mankind will reach
better ways of converting energy
to our use."
During his address, the first of
environmentally-oriented lectures
sponsored by the UBC Westwater
research centre Cass-Beggs had
outlined the energy possibilities,
nuclear and otherwise being in-'
vestigated for use toy B.C. Hydro.
Cass-Beggs had criticized what
he termed traditiofial attitudes
toward utility management in
Canada for being primarily concerned with the most profitable
way of providing energy.
Cass-Beggs, who has also held
similar posts under NDP governments in Saskatchewan and
Manitoba, said "social democratic
governments must be concerned
with profit and the gross' national
profit but increasingly in government-selected areas.
He said such "people-oriented"
facets of the economy as housing,
urban development, public services such as hospitals and
recreation facilities should be
stressed as energy uses rather
than the emphasis being largely on
private industry.
However, he said "such use will
still result in increased demands
for energy in the coming years so
we must be prepared to meet this
challenge."
He said energy future was in the
"systematic mobilization of the
energy of the sun."
Hydro-electric power fell under
this category.
Cass-Beggs said various energy-
producing methods were being
investigated by Hydro at this time
including the burning of wood,
wind power — especially in
isolated areas; tidal power, though
he felt this source very limited by
the lack of potential sites;
geothermal energy in the form of
steam from underground areas;
and the correct utilization of fossil
fuels such as natural gas, oil,
uranium and coal.
He said he anticipated a
development of a process called
magneto hydro-dynamics (MHD)
that would partly revolutionize
energy use. He said one plant in the
Soviet Union was already using
this method.
He explained the MHD method
would result in greater efficiency
in the amount of energy use of
fossil fuels such as coal and
uranium as the amount of surface
heat would be greatly reduced.
This has been acknowledged as
one of the drawbacks of
widespread use of coal and
especially uranium in the form of
nuclear reactors.
However, troubles with coal
would still be encountered he said
due to the amount of phosporous
Eatons vs. the U of T-
an old lady revenged
TORONTO (CUP) — The Eaton
family has a wrinkle in their plans
to turn downtown Toronto into an
Eatonsland and the University of
Toronto is doing its best to smooth
it out.
The problem can be traced to a
lady named Naomi Bilton, who
carried a grudge against Eatons to
her deathbed when she willed some
very important property to the
university.
The university has little or no
need for this small property which
is far away from the campus.
However, the Eatons are chomping
at the bit to use the land in phase
two of the mammoth Eaton Centre.
The wrinkle is contained in the
wording of the Bilton will.
The university received the land
under the stipulation "that the
same never be sold or leased to
John C. Eaton or the T. Eaton Co.
or any person or firm in any way
representing them, or to any
person or corporation carrying on
the business of a departmental
store surrounding the property."
The clause was aimed as a thorn
into the side of the company which,
during the twenties, swallowed
small business in the area and
which today owns all the land in the
immediate area.
This little problem has kept
lawyers for both the university and
the Fairview Corporation (a group
looking after development of the
Eaton centre) busy for the last few
years looking for a loophole.
The university went to the Ontario Supreme Court about two
years ago to contest the wording of
the will, but it was upheld. One
would assume that the university's
hands were tied.
Not true.
According to Jack Brook,
executive assistant to business
affairs vice-president Alex Rankin,
Fairview is revising an offer for
the property to be presented to the
university board of governors, Oct.
12.
Even after the refusal by the
Supreme Court to change the will,
university officials have been
informed by their solicitors,
Cassells Brock, that the sale is
legal, and it appears that the
university will accept the offer.
As to how this is possible,
business affairs refuses to tip their
hand. Brook declined to give The
Varsity, the university's student
paper, a copy of the letter containing the legal opinion of the
prestigious law firm, nor would he
disclose the price Fairview was
offering.
Keeping in mind that the firm of
Cassells Brock didn't get to be one
of the best in Toronto by offering
rash opinions, it must be assumed
that the sale does not break the
wording of the will.
Fairview, as a developing
company building for the Eaton
centre, does not necessarily have
to represent the Eaton family or
department store. The land
collected and developed will belong
to Fairview, not the the Eatons.
Fairview is an independent
company with no Eatons on the
board of directors.
Fairview's money and influence
comes from the Bronfmans family,
of distillers corp. — Seagrams and
Cemp Investments Ltd. which has
been involved in the same sort of
downtown eating in Vancouver.
This, however, does not mean
that the Bronfmans and Eatons
aren't behind the conference table
working out the deal.
Gus Abols, vice chairman of the
executive committee of the
governors council at the university
theorized that it is possible for
Fairview to buy the land without
breaking the wording of the will
provided they don't actually build
any part of a department store on
the property. This means they
might build a small park to lure
shoppers in from the streets or a
parking lot to accommodate
shoppers from the suburbs without
contravening the stipulations of the
will.
The sale to Fairview of the
former Bilton property does away
with the last holdout in the area
and will certainly take a load off
the minds of both university and
Fairview lawyers.
Even when there's a will, there's
a way.
and   other   gases   and   dust   it
releases into the atmosphere.
So he said since uranium was the
cleaner fuel it was there and in the
mineral's conversion to nuclear
energy that B.C.'s energy hopes of
the next century lay.
And, as he was to find out not too
long after, that was where his
problems with a segment of the
audience was to begin.
Students
offered
cJLindu A
"King of
Corned Beef"
DELICATESSEN   -   RESTAURANT
Phone 738-2010
321 1  W. Broadway
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
bait
TORONTO (CUP) — Several
Ontario universities/including
York and Western, are offering
scholarships to first year students
in an effort to counteract the drop
in university enrolment.
York University offered Grade
13 students who had an 80 per cent
average or more $660 scholarships
to cover tuition.
However the Council of Ontario
Universities, a committee of
Ontario university administrators,
is concerned that such practices
will lead to competition among
universities and students.
The council special committee
on undergraduate scholarship
policy *was created out of concern
that some universities were increasing their entrance admission
scholarships in order to attract
first class students away from
other institutions.
at
4560 W 10th.
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
duthie
BOOKS
The RIGHT PLACE for the RIGHT SERVICE
(VOEVO)
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Reasonable Prices Quality Workmanship
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8914 Oak St.
at S.W. Marine Dr.
263-8121
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PEUGEOT
SALE
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YClfS
Est. 1930
3771 W. 10th Ave.
224-3536
j Friday, September 28, 1973
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 3
Residence list still in effect
ACTIVITY IN 0VEB   2 0   SPORTS
1   #*-<2s>me   OtitmjeAted ROOM ;•'Opvv***ME*o»»*L &W
UNIVERSITY LIFE MIRRORED in this horribly symbolic photo by Peter Cummings (or hadn't you noticed?) The Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Kazuyoshi Akiyama played noon Wednesday in the War Memorial gym while 2,000
UBC students listened on. The concert, sponsored by the Dean of Women's office, featured music by Mendelssohn,
Tchaikovsky, Somers and Strauss as the VSO played to publicize their upcoming Queen-E concerts. In the background, an
intramurals banner waves, representing the unification of campus dichotomies (that sounds nice.)
By JEAN CLARKE
A new list of people wishing residence
accommodation at UBC is being compiled.
Students can sign the list, or if they are
already on the original list compiled Sept.
10, have their names revalidated Friday and
Monday at the housing office. The list
becomes effective Oct. 1.
There are currently about 260 people on
the waiting list for rooms at Gage, Totem
Park and Place Vanier. Only one or two
rooms become vacant every day.
A committee of 15 students is responsible
for administering the vacancies. The
student committee was formed as a result of
discontent with the original method of
allocating rooms.
The several hundred students who lined
up in front of the housing office labor day
weekend were given numbers by the staff.
Each day the available rooms were given
to those present with the lowest numbers.
Students were not happy with this
arrangement and accepted the offer by
housing director Les Rohringer to take over
the administration of the available rooms.
Everyday at 12:30 the vacant rooms (if
any) are given to the first people on the Sept.
10 list. You must be at the office then,
otherwise your name is skipped over.
However, if you are not there when your
name comes up you are automatically put at
the top of the list for the next day.
Those people on the existing list who have
their names revalidated will be given first
priority on the new list. In addition to
students waiting for the first available
rooms, there are five or six people who
applied before Sept. 4 for rooms for the
spring term only. They will receive the first
rooms available for Dec. 1.'
Since Sept. 10, 45 men and 30 women have
been taken off the list. How many were
assigned rooms in the residences is not
known — the remainder no doubt settled for
$120/month flea-ridden closets.
Baskets and books in basement co-op
By MARK BUCKSON
Where can you buy Grandma's
Countrj' Cooking, used copies of
Skindiver Magazine, a homemade
straw basket or four months use of
the 197:5 Liberation Calendar?
The Alma Mater Society co-op
bookstore sells these and otherr
intriguing    ittems,    in    SUB's
basement.
In October, after the early rush
of students looking for still-usable
texts ends, the store becomes a
craft centre and convenient source
of reference books and magazines.
They have processed almost
40,000 books in the last two months.
The store sells over one hundred
books and craft items on slow days.
Yet they make no profit.
"The mark-up on books sold is
used for salaries, maintenance,
and little things like the papers for
book price records," store
manager Diane Kirshner said
Thursday.
Most items in the store are sold
on consignment. Students bring in
used books which are priced at 75
per cent or less of the new prices.
After a book is sold the store
returns to the seller the retail price
less twenty per cent commission.
For example, a book in good
condition that cost $10.00 new is
sold for $7.50 by the store. The
vendor keeps $6.00 while the store
retains $1.50. Crafts are sold the
same way.
Kirshner said anything left after
expenses goes into the building
fund.
"The building fund subsidises
other SUB services such as the
games area if they are unable to
pay operating expenses."
Kirshner is currently looking for
all kinds of craft items.
"On crafts, our consignment
rates and conditions are the best in
the city," said-Kirshner.
Shoplifting is a minor problem.
"People realize we aren't out to rip
them off so they don't rip us off." If
an item is stolen the store pays the
seller half the consigned price, she
said.
The store was organized in
September 1971 as an alternative to
the University Bookstore.
Administration bookstore
manager Bob Smith said Thursday
the Co-op store has little effect on
his business. "I'd like to offer a
similar kind of service if we had
the space and money to support
it," he said.
(The administration store buys
some used books in April which can
be resold for courses next September. It pays 33 per cent less
than its retail price but buys the
books outright rather than on
consignment.)
Barbers to pastries
The SUB barbershop may be
converted to either a pastry shop,
an optometrists office or a knick-
knack shop in October.
The barbershop has no option on
its five year lease which expires
this month.
The  Alma  Mater  Society  has
advertised for a new tenant
receiving replies from the barbershop and the three new
businesses.
Building Manager Graeme
Vance said Thursday the lease will
be given to the business which will
be most useful to students.
Eight face problem
By JAKE van der KAMP
Eight buildings under renovation at UBC have the same ventilation
installation problems which are threatening to postpone the opening of
the new Pit for one year.
y       A physical plant worker said Thursday the buildings don't have an
automatic ventilation system because of a strike by the Vancouver local
of the Pipefitters Union against four international ventilation and air
conditioning equipment companies.
He did not specify which buildings were affected, saying only that
they were older buildings recently renovated.
"The situation for none of them is as serious as the Pit's," he said.
"They re all above ground and if necessary can be ventilated by
opening a window. These buildings never had ventilation before, so
there js no loss, just a delay.
*"        "The Pit is a different case since it has no windows and there would
not be sufficient ventilation to clear the air," he said.
NEW ANGUS WING goes either up or down beside the bookstore. Don Peterson captured this picture of
workers on the site of another potential eyesore on this already glaucomic campus. Sometimes we wonder,
you know why they inflict these things upon us. Is the architect a nephew of Wally Gage? Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973
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THIWSSCY
SEPTEMBER 28,1973
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges.
"We are, we are, we are The Ubyssey.
"We can't, we can't, libel he or she . .."
"Hi, I'm Ricky Sasges. Remember those great asshole-rock songs of the
seventies? Song like Piss on the Trees by Don Hubbert, Ryon Guedes, Gary
Coull, Lesley Krueger and Marc Hamilton; Wally Sucks by the Hacks (Rick
Lymer Tom Barnes, and Allan Doree); Gears are Queers by Laura Crockett
and the Hernia Sisters (Brenda Ashworth and Sandy Camont); Alkies Are
Nice People by Jo-Ann Hinchcliff; Eat Shit — It's Good For You by Vaughn
Palmer, Jean Clarke and Peter Leibeck, my own Suck Me Dry — Oowah, and
Please Erase Me by the Cartoonists (if they ever show up). And announcing
our special offier: by just showing up at The Ubyssey office noon Monday,
you can also get, at no extra charge, your very own press card and Rag style
' guide! Get it now, now, oowah suck me dry . .."
Order now, and get with no additional charge, Golden Boring College
Songs of the Sixties, featuring such popular and cherished lullabies as Oh
What Shall We Do With The UEL by Ken Dodd; Hot Off The Press by Jim
Banham; Little Brown Shack by Leslie Rohringer; Just An Old-Fashioned
Boy by Malcolm McGregor; Kiss Me, I'm An Asshole, by Doug Kenny; I
Have Other Plans For Lunch by Wally Gage; Don't Step On My Blue Serge
Suit by J. Parnall; Eat A Rat For Breakfast by Brian Loome; I'm Sleeping
With Chaucer Tonight by Gordon Blankstein; Sit On My Face by Art Philips,
v*»
Our snazzy new $250,000 pub in the
SUB basement is going to be closed for a
whole year awaiting installation of air
conditioning.
Without the equipment, crowded with
350 plus persons it would be like a steam
bath.
And the air conditioning won't be
installed because the system the AMS
purchased has been declared "hot" by 34
striking pipefitters and no one will touch it.
And the local strike, just a tiny part of a
North America-spanning jurisdictional
dispute probably won't be settled until
April.
Which means no Pit until September.
Now being the strong silent type we
don't rile easily, but just the mention that
we might find it more difficult to pursue one
of our favorite past times (getting drunk)
causes even those among us who are sober to
pause.
Quite simply: We want the Pit, we want
the Pit, we want the Pit. . .
Now, who do we blame?
Unfortunately finding a scapegoat for
this little mess isn't easy.
We can't (much as we'd like to) blame
the administration — they had nothing
whatsoever to do with the Pit construction.
We can't even blame the Alma Mater
Society and nothing hurts us more than not
being able to do that. But there's no way the
AMS could have anticipated this union
holdup.
Nor can draw a line and blame either
union or management.
Usually we have sympathy with the
workers but this time they aren't striking for
higher wages — it's a jurisdictional dispute.
And besides, they are working for
another company during the strike — a
company owned by those they are on strike
against.
Management isn't interested in settling
the strike until the whole industry-wide
contract expires in April
You see Vancouver is just a tiny part of
their international operation.
But then neither is the union interested
in settling the strike before April.
You see Vancouver is just a tiny part of
their international operation.
That's it!
We'll blame big bloody international
companies and unions which aren't
interested in anything but globe-spanning
meglomaniac policies.
Little people, like 34 pipefitters, a local
air conditioning installer and the relatively
insignificant students at UBC get caught in
the machinery.
There: now we feel better.
But what are we going to do about it?
You'll find us in the temporary Pit in
the SUB ballroom.
Crying in our beer.
Letters
mS
Bookstore
I would like to respond to comments in Tuesday's Ubyssey made
by Nancy McLean concerning
bookstore policy.
First pricing policy — normally
educational materials are supplied
to the bookstore at a 20 per cent
discount — equivalent to a 25 per
cent markup: Sometimes books
are supplied at trade discounts of
33 per cent or 40 per cent. Rarely
are they supplied at net price or at
discounts of less than 20 per cent.
When they are our selling price is
equivalent to a 25 per cent markup.
This is the only exception to our
policy of selling books at the
manufacturer's suggested selling
price.
Approximately 70 per cent of the
bookstore inventory is characterized by the short 20 per cent
educational discount.
Commercial bookstores in town
operate with different types of
books — tradebooks and their
inventories are characterized by
the long 40 per cent trade discount.
Textbook returns — a very expensive operation for the
bookstore: When we are in receipt
of a bona fide book request form
signed by the faculty member
concerned, the merchandise
naturally is not returned. Verbal
assurance is not enough.
If books are held beyond the time
limit set by the publisher for
returns, the bookstore, not the
professor, absorbs all the loss.
At our last fiscal year end,
March 31st, 1973 more than $50,000
in inventory was in storage for use
this September.
Finally a note to McLean: Your
continuing battle to lower prices of
books for your students is commendable but you have never
discussed it with me.
I would also like to clarify one
more issue. There exists some
concern that the subsidy requested
in the report prepared by the
bookstore committee would be
used to finance needle and thread
type of merchandise.
In fact the committee's request
is directed to the financing of
personnel and inventories to
maintain a reference and research
section in sufficient depth deemed
necessary to meet the needs of the
academic community.
R.J.Smith
bookstore manager
Committee
I am writing to ask you to correct
a mis-statement attributed to me
in the Sept. 25 issue of The
Ubyssey.
Ryon Guedes had discussed with
me by phone the work of the
president's committee on the
status of women as this affects
students and faculty members. I
had told him that our committee's
first study concerned the
possibility of discrimination
against women students who have
applied for admission to the faculty
of graduate studies.
The point of misunderstanding
between us was that he has written
— such a study "will be launched
early this fall". In fact, the study
began at the beginning of April. We
hope to have it completed and
made public before Christmas.
Robert M. Clark
chairman
committee on the status of women
We welcome your correction but
according to our reporter's notes
you did say the study will be
launched early this fall—Eds.
Mildred B.
Thank you for your assistance in
making women on campus aware
of the existence of the Mildred
Brock room. Each year we try to
reach the incoming women
students but invariably find some
are unaware that women have a
"quiet lounge" on campus in which
they can meet friends, relax, read,
or rest. In addition, women's
groups can reserve the room for
their meetings by booking it with
the dean of women's office.
Forgive me for correcting you, •
but the furniture in the room is,
with the exception of the carpet,
the original furniture recovered.
The funds came from the
university, not the Koerner
Foundation.
For your information, its correct
name is the Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation (was it
sexism that omitted Thea's name,
Robin?).
Last but not least, the day your •
story about an "exclusive" room
appeared on campus there were
both men and women students
attending a discussion in the
Mildred Brock room at 12:30 p.m.
Jeanne Elliot
commerce 4
We're not sure you read our
story. It made quite clear that men
aren't banned from the room — but
they are made uncomfortable. And*
a spokesman for the dean of
women's office told us the room
has been traditionally for the use of
women.
The reason we didn't use the full
title of the Koerner Foundation is
the same as the reason we call the
Walter Gage memorial washroom
the Gage washroom: we don't like
long formal titles—Eds.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is included for
our information in the letter, or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Unsigned letters will under n*
circumstances be printed.
Although an effort is made to
print all letters as received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters can be mailed free to The
Ubyssey via campus mail or be
dropped off at the office on th%
second floor of SUB, room 241K. i Art
Graffics
As part of the Vancouver Art Gallery's show
Pacific Vibrations, Tom Graff presented a
theatre piece entitled: "The Canada Family
Album or We Should Take the Mona Lisa at Face
Value or When Jesus Wept".
Graff combines all forms of art in his
production. He describes his piece as a room in
which the audience is part of the sculptured
space. His central stage is a luscious red carnival tent. On each side are two sets: on one a
small table complete with two 'tea grannies',
and on the other a grand piano covered with old
photographs.
Despite the lavishness, the whole piece is
mechanical. One has the feeling that Graff
thinks of people as remnants of technology.
The theme represented by the song "Sally of
My Dreams" is sung and played by harlequins
and accompanied by stills and a film. She is only
represented by a photograph and by a grotesque
metal rose. The room becomes a "magic box" —
a gleaning from the throwaways.
The two Victorian ladies become junk or
mannequins as well, disposable yet reaching into
the present. In the film they become museum
pieces in a Broadway junkshop. Their mode of
speaking is absurd mechanical lingo such as:
"Columbia, this is Houston."
"Altitude 3 to 4 miles, looking good."
There is no communication between parts.
Each  is  a  single  image  or   "choreographed
sculpture".
It is to me a personal statement as in a painting. The mouthpiece for this personal view is
one actor who is also the stage manager, singer
and projectionist. He ends as a child in a grocery
store, riding a mechanical pony wrapped in a
plastic bag. The whole thing is thrown away.
It seems to fit the general view of the show.
Each artist is working on his own thing — his
personal statement. The audience or gallery-
goer has to decide the outcome of the vibrations.
The show continues with more workshops,
sculpture, music and theatre till Oct. 20.
Kathy Ball
Drinking the wine
is only half the fun.
You can make it for 25-50c per bottle. Complete equipment will
cost $23. Quick maturing fruit wines to imported grape
concentrates. Drop into
Wine-Art.
VICTORIA
1548 Fairfield Rd.
384-1741
SAANICH
1678 Poplar Ave.
477-9121
VANCOUVER
3417 W. Broadway
731-4726
NORTH VAN
1125 Lonsdale
987-8713
WEST VAN
Park Royal - North Mall
926-1610
BURNABY
4525 E. Hastings
299-9737
NEW WEST
815-12th Street
524-9066
SURREY
13575 King George Hwy.
588-5810
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
4450 West 10th Ave.
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I Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336 I
HOURS - MON. to THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
_FRI. &SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.M
A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATION
Thurs.       ^**   "" "^s^   Fri. 7:00
s& 9:30
monty  python
NOW FOR
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COMPLETELY
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Sat.     N. y    Sun.
7:00 & 9:30Vn**^_^-^'^ 7:00
SUB Auditorium        50*
SHOWTIMES:
12:20, 2:00
3:55 5:50
7:45 9:40
Odeon
881   GRANVILLE
682-7468
JOANNE
WOODWARD
in
"THE EFFECT OF GAMMA RAYS
ON MAN-IN-THE-MOON
MARiG
SHOW TIMES:  12:15
2:00 4:00 6:00 8:00
10:00
MATURE: Contains several
brutal murders
R. W. McDonald
Coronet
(51   GRANVILLE
685  6828
STARRING
MARGOT
KJDDER
FRIGHTENING FILM SINCE
HITCHCOCK'S "PSYCHO"
SIAMESE TWINS
AT BIRTH —
...Now,cut asunder!
CWVOnMATftOM
Vogue
91S  GKANVILLC
619-9434
STARRING: SIDNEY JAMES
KENNETH WILLIAMS
GENERAL
SHOW TIMES: 12:10 2:20 4:35 6:45 9:00
JESUS CHRIST
SUPERSTAR
Park
GENERAL
SHOW TIMES:
7:30 9:30
SUNDAY MAT. 2 p.m.
Varsitu
224-3730«»
4375 W. 10th
this year's winner of the coveted Grand Prize
at the Cannes Film Festival,    rrrf A
Inc
STARRING:
SARAH MILES
ROBERT SHAW
GENERAL
SHOW TIMES: 7:30 9:30
Hireling
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973 Film
Discreetly bourgeois
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie Directed
by Louis Bunuel, Script by Bunuel and Jean-
Claude Carriere, Photography by Edmond
Richard.
Bunuel's latest film, while somewhat
astonishing to those who have never seen a
Bunuel, is an amplification and elaboration of
what he has been saying in his films for the last
forty years. Dealing with one of his favorite
subjects, the upper-middle class, and utilizing
one his favorite art forms, surrealism, The
Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a clever,
w^tty and entertaining picture.
The plot, such as it is, is centered around the
ambassador of Miranda and his small group of
friends who seem to be constantly involved in the
ritual of dining out. It is just that, the empty and
vacuous ritual, that so fascinates Bunuel, for
something bizarre always prevents this group of
people from actually getting any food. Cocktails
they always get, however, and the explication of
the fine art of mixing is one of the minor leitmotifs in this film.
One level of this film is social satire. For
example, a guest in the ambassador's office, who
has come to pick up the cocaine smuggled in the
ambassador's diplomatic pouch, is startled to
see the distinguished gentleman suddenly walk
over to a closet and grab what appears to be a
high-powered rifle. Heading towards the window
below which on the sidewalk a blue-jeaned
revolutionary from Miranda pretends to sell
toys, the ambassador is stopped by his guest who
is brushed aside with the ominous sounding
words, "I do what I must do." But instead of
some grisly result (of which there are many in
this film) Bunuel merely has the ambassador
pick off one of the young lady's stuffed toys with
a pellet from the pellet gun.
The humor of The Discreet Charm of the
Bourgeoisie is subtle, irrational and surrealistic.
It is bizarre rather than laughable but it is
nonetheless one of the major aspects of the film.
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is full
of dreams, dreams of a surrealistic and often
violent nature. Bunuel never tells us, or even
hints at, when the dreams begin and we only find
out when a character wakes up that he has been
dreaming. Hard line surrealists, in which school
Bunuel can easily claim membership, see the
dividing line between a dream, reality and a
waking reality as non-existent. The film
therefore is invested with numerous ghosts;
worst fears are realized and greatest desires are
acted out.
Just once we get the sense that the reality may
be tampered with. At the beginning of one of the
endless series of dinner parties a host of
revolutionaries storm the dining room with
machine guns at the ready. In a marvellous
scene, they shoot everybody up except for the
ambassador who has taken refuge beneath the
table. He would have escaped unnoticed except
that during a particularly pregnant pause his
hand is seen stealing up from under the table and
reaching for a succulent leg of lamb. In what is
probably the only scene in which anybody actually gets to eat anything, he is seen under the
table with his mouth full of meat even as they
pour bullets into him. At this point he wakes up in
bed and goes downstairs to the fridge for a snack
of cold meats.
Interspersed throughout the film are shots of
the group of six marching purposefully down a
long, level road in a flat uninteresting landscape.
As a symbol of innocence, of unawareness, of the
bourgeoisie, it is a striking image and exceedingly well handled.
On another level, everything about The
Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie can be said to
be whimsy. But whimsy is not necessarily bad,
rather here it is used with punning effect. A
basically structureless plot and a unity that
seems merely to be a collection of episodes
linked by various motifs is connected with the
theme in a devastating totality.
The only real criticism of the film, which is
actually a criticism of Bunuel, is that he has been
saying the same thing for many years. But this
does not render Bunuel dated or unimportant,
rather his films take on a subtlety and a unity in
which the hand of a master artist can be seen.
Ed Cepka
'Look! The flaming giraffe!" exclaims Bunuel.
Kind of imminent decay
"The Hireling" — directed by Alan Bridges, adapted
from a novel byL. P. Hartley. Starring Robert Shaw
and Sarah Miles.
It's the early 1920's, England in the rain. A chauffeur-
driven Rolls pulls slowly away from a private hospital.
Lady Franklin (Sarah Miles), having partially convalesced after a nervous breakdown, sits timidly in the
back seat. As the car starts to move the camera lingers
on the clean white-washed walls of the hospital where
they end abruptly at a grimy rain-soaked street.
The countryside slides by, lush and green and
potentially pastoral, but the camera picks out dark
ragged figures in fields, and ill-kempt characters on the
roadside, dirty children.
In this scene from the beginning minutes of the film,
and throughout the whole movie, the camera is constantly emphasizing .an atmosphere that is almost
sordid, but not quite; a kind of imminent decay. It is
rendered even more powerful in the light of other recent
films made in England, (for example, Losey's The Go-
Between, from another Hartley novel, and for several
reasons a better film) in which Hardyesque vistas and
elaborate country homes have almost become cinematic
cliches. Here too are marvellous houses: one has
become an asylum for mentally^ disturbed ladies, the
other retains a medieval chill. The landscape is never
quite picturesque but is always vaguely disturbing. This
kind of delicate undercutting, combined with Robert
Shaw's portrayal of Leadbitter the chauffeur, is what
makes The Hireling a fairly successful film.
Leadbitter is an ex-sergeant major who has risen
slightly above his lower-class background by way of
World War I. He has his own one-car chauffeur service,
and a few pretentions, but is basically a servant, more
conservative than his masters. Shaw is almost always
good, and at times magnificent. The few times in which
he doesn't come across are probably not his fault. (This
is director Alan Bridges' first film).
Lady Franklin is Leadbitter's best client, a recently
widowed and fairly neurotic young lady. Fortunately,
Miss Miles for the most part confines her interpretation
to a competent quivering of lip and widening of eyes, all
to good effect. Lady Franklin is a somewhat vapid
creature, but she somehow stirs the blood of her temporary chauffeur. Ultimately, of course, class tells, and
Leadbitter gives vent to his rage by committing minor
anarchy on his own Rolls Royce.
The notion of a class structure is essential to the film,
and equally important is the general decay that affects
every level;  the  middleclass  isn't rising  so much
as the aristocracy is sinking. Between the barrenness of
the neurotic women of the upper class and the sleazy
fecundity of a rejected waitress who shrugs (post-
coitally) back into her knickers there is little to choose,
except in Leadbitter's story-book mind. He defends Lady
Franklin's slighted virtue, but doesn't understand their
relative positions; he can't decide if he's a chivalrous
knight or a dutiful servant.
Two things give the political aspects special power on
film. One is the camera work, with its eye for the sordid
detail, and the other is the initial pace of the movie. It is
for the most part little slower than a genteel crawl,
which makes for at least one unintentionally comic
scene. It takes place in a darkened basement, and is
charged with long brooding looks, slowly rolled up
sleeves and muscular forearms; the intensity is
hilarious. But without the snail's pace of the first part of
the film, the last twenty minutes wouldn't have the
power that they do. The ending of "The Hireling is explosive and vulgar and cruel, and extraordinarily effective.
It's at the Varsity. Arrive late in order to miss a
terrible short, and take the coffee rather than the orange
drink.
Gordon Montador
Cinematheque: refreshing escape
It is not true that there are no good films to be seen in
Vancouver. Pacific Cinematheque, which operates from
the National Film Board's mini-theatre at 1155 West
Georgia offers a refreshing escape from the cotton
candy that clogs Granville Street.
Going into its third year of operation from an embryonic start in the Vancouver Art Gallery, Pacific
Cinematheque will show over 150 films in the coming
months. The programs vary from the beginnings of
cinema to the present day and include silent classics as
well as the independent or experimental film-maker.
But a standard of quality is always maintained.
Pacific Cinematheque's October program begins
Wednesday Oct. 3 at 8 p.m. with NFB Archives, a series
of films made between 1939 and 1944. These include early
Norman McLaren, Joris Ivens Action Stations, 1943, and
Gordon Sparling's Peoples of Canada, 1941.
Other films in this series, on Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
include animated films to aid the War Effort, and films
of Canada's role during the war years. Highlights include the first feature length Eastman colour film,
Royal Journey, 1951, and Churchill's Island, 1941,
showing England preparing for the German invasion.
The Thursday series is West Coast Independents,
with two shows at 7 and 9p.m. Featured are the films of
Dave Rimmer on October 18 and Tom Braidwood on
October 25. Others include Sandy Wilson, Zale Dalen,
Peter Bryant and Bryan R. Small.
On Friday October 5, the International Series-begins
with Pierre Etaix's Yo-Yo, described as "that rare
phenomenon, a film simple to enjoy." The following
Friday is Satyajit Ray's Days and Nights in the Forest.
The October 19 presentation is Peter Brook's Tell Me
Lies with Glenda Jackson and the Royal Shakespeare
Company. The Series concludes on October 26 with Louis
Malle's Zazie Dans Le Metro. All films are at 7 and 9
p.m.
Saturday evenings in October are given oyer to the
films of John Cassevetes. Faces, Shadows, Husbands,
and Minnie and Moskowitz gives the audience a chance
to see the work of a developing talent and in a complete
body of work see a direction and attitude emerging.
Upcoming features are Japanese films, notably The
Burmese Harp and Harakiri, French films such as Le
Guerre est Finie and Quebecois films like Dreamed
Love, highlight of the recent Women in Film series
which travelled throughout Canada. There will also be
experimental shorts and guest lecturers such as Jon Jpst
and Freuda Bartlett.
Admission is only $1 at the door and there are usually
two shows at 7 and 9 p.m. Or a $5 membership entitles
you to receive monthly mailings of new programs in
addition to two complimentary passes, each valid for the
single admission of a guest accompanying a member.
Geoff Hancock
Friday, September 28, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 Art Galleries
Provocative and sun
La Mascara ... a lithograph from "Homage to Quevedo"
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973 ealistic
The Fine Arts Gallery is currently showing a bright and
provocative exhibition of Mexican surrealism which succeeds in
inviting and involving audience response.
The exhibition has been put together by Rothmans and
presents a well-balanced offering of works by three contemporary
Mexican artists — Jose Luis Cuevas, Xavier Esqueda, and Pedro
Friedeberg. All three display vigorous originality and mastery of
different materials and techniques.
Cuevas' suite of lithographs depicting Mexico's social milieu
are at once delicate and arresting. Of his subjects Cuevas has said,
"It is not my intention either to condemn or to justify. I seek merely
t to describe, in terms of my own sensibility." What he describes,
then, is highly individualized, or expressionistic.
There is in Cuevas' drawings a fascinating tension between the
pleasing effects of his use of line, texture, and color and the oddly
horrifying effect of his obsession with the grotesque and the fantastic. This tension between attraction and repulsion generates
part of surrealism's irresistible appeal. In art, Robert Browning
has said, "Our interest's on the dangerous edge of things."
Cuevas, however, perhaps because of his chosen medium and
subject, seems at times uncomfortably close to caricature.
Esqueda's paintings and Friedeberg's wooden sculptures and
painted  wood  assemblages   more  fully  realize   the  surrealist
* manner.
The French poet Andre Breton has stated that the goal of
surrealism is "the resolution of those two seemingly contradictory
states, dream and reality, in a kind of absolute reality". Both
Esqueda and Friedeberg explore the unlimited possibilities for
beauty, humor and terror which exist in this magical world of a
transcendent reality.
Friedeberg blends the spontaneity of 'objets trouves' with the
charm of inspired invention. The brittle humor and inventive
improbability of his creations beguiles the eye and tantalizes the
imagination.
Esqueda's paintings, like Friedeberg's sculptures, inhabit a
# surreal world in which fantasy has intercourse with reality. His
colors are warm and sensuous, his use of outline and compositional
elements striking. Combining simplicity of form with richness of
meaning, Esqueda, more than Cuevas or Friedeberg, communicates a fluid and accessible stream of ideas and emotions.
Esqueda's "Lesson in Survival" crystallizes my impression of
the exhibition as a whole: a spattered paintbrush, wafted by an
unseen hand, trails a dappled sky above a grey landscape. The
lesson is as valid and enduring as it is obvious. Although art may
amuse and entertain us, it also may quite literally open a new
window on the world of our perceptions.
3 ARTISTAS MEXICANOS continues until October 7. Rothmans has made available an illustrated catalogue of the exhibition
t   which includes several of Friedeberg's sculptures not exhibited.
Rob Harvey
Table designed for an obsequious ventriloquist.
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^   j Ingmar Bergman's first English language motion picture starring
M   I Elliott Qould, Bibi Andmson, Max von Sydoui
The Perfect
Reference Booh
BIRD CALLS
1973-74
STUDENT
TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
On Sole Soon
F.U.S. Presents
UNDERCUT '73
with
HANK and the HOBOS
Saturday, September 29
8:30 P.M.
S.U.B. CAFETERIA
Full Facilities $3.50 COUPLE
TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM FORESTERS OR F.U.S. OFFICE
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4S--t
Friday, September 28, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Drama
Road Show
A week ago Thursday, The Playhouse Theatre
Centre of B.C. previewed its production of
Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie".
That play and three others are scheduled to tour
18 spots in the province over the next 10 months.
The tour's four productions are going to be
performed for specific age groups. "Reflections" is performing for the primary grades,
"Reynard" for the junior grades, "The Amorous
Hypocrite" for the senior grades, and "The
Glass Menagerie" for more adult audiences.
If the audience's reaction to the Playhouse's
preview at Centennial Theatre last week was any
indication, the play should be well received by
the rest of the province.
Menagerie is a play set in the Depression era
of 40 years ago. It shows the despair of a family
in that era who have had the misfortune of being
deserted by their father. "He worked for the
telephone company and fell in love with long
distance." There are a myriad of frictions and
conflicts amongst the rest of the family;
Amanda, the mother. Tom, her son. Laura, her
crippled daughter.
Amanda Wingfield (Rita Howell) is tender at
heart, yet, cruel in her manner. She comes
across as a super-possessive mother who is
afraid of losing her son — he is the family
provider — but, she is eager to marry off her
daughter to any promising young man.
Laura (Janis Nickleson), the daughter, is a
quiet sort of girl and, because of her crippled
condition, lives in her own world, a world of
blown-glass animal figures.
The son, Tom (Tom Wood), is constantly going
out at night to lose himself in the fantastic world
of the movies. This is his only escape from the
-trap he is caught in by providing for the family
and, also, an escape from the boredom of his job
in a shoe factory. Some of the times he, understandably, goes drinking. However, it is
always on the pretense of, "... going to the
movies."
When "a gentleman caller" arrives for dinner
(Peter Kunder) a semblance of rationality
prevails in the Wingfield household. His brief
visit does not sort out everyone's problems, but it
does serve to get Laura to realize some of her
potential and to face reality and not hide in her
glass menagerie.
In the Playhouse's production, the opening two
scenes of Menagerie lack some drive, but, after
that initial hesitancy, the actors become more
spontaneous and alive in their roles. Tom Wood
performed exceptionally well and was the core
around which the play seemed to be built. (He
also served as the narrator of the play.)
Peter Kunder got a lot of laughs from the
audience in his role as "a gentleman caller"-. He
was funny in his attempts to get Laura to realize
her potential through a sort of amateur
psychoanalysis. Also, the costume he wears —
an old fedora, conservative, thin lapelled sports
jacket, and baggy pants makes him look like
Clark Kent, even though it fitted in to the time
frame of the play.
John Wood, the director of Menagerie seems to
have done a fine job of getting everything
together, except for the rather lacklustre first
two scenes.
Williams' script is innovative in set design and
props. As he himself says: "It (the set) omitst
some details and exaggerates others." This
tends to make the set appear rather utilitarian
and may move people to think that the company
ran over their budget on the actors and had to
skimp on set material.
Another device that is novel in a dramatic
play, is the use of "incidental music" to set the
mood for each of the scenes. This seemed to work
well and added a pleasant touch to the production.
The last time the playhouse went on tour was
back in 1965 with "ryomeo and Juliet".Menagerie
will give its audiences a different exposure to
theatre. And, besides that, it is admirable that a
company is doing something to spread the
theatre, and the arts in general, throughout B.C.
— something that should be done more often than
once every eight years.
Boyd McConnell
Art
Celestial Light
Lynn Vardeman's continuous lumia composition "The Celestial Suite, Opus 47" at the
Simon Fraser Gallery is an exciting concept
which suffers from a modest presentation.
Lumia is the art of light. The artist uses form,
color and motion to create an aesthetic language
which some claim is the most spiritual and
radiant art of all. An art as capable of varied
emotional beauty as music.
The idea is not a new one. At least twenty-five
centuries ago Pythagoras contemplated the
music of the spheres — the heavenly bodies in
their orbits. The world's first color organ was
built in 1734 in Paris. And throughout the early
twentieth century various performances took
place in London and New York combining
symphony orchestras and electric color organs.
None of these performances was successful.
In 1919 Thomas Wilfred in New York designed
and built the first large instrument for the
performance of silent visual compositions. He
named this instrument the 'Clavilux' and the
new art form lumia. Ten years later lumia
recitals were well received in Europe and North
America.
More recently Ken Kesey and the Merry
Pranksters hoped to re-capture the original
religious experience with the Acid Tests. Liquid
projectors, slides, movies and strobes, combined
with The Grateful Dead, turned airplane
hangars into total experience.
This is where Lynn Vardeman's lumia composition suffers. The show is supposed to be
integrated with the music of R. Murray
Schaefer's "Epitaph for Moonlight", but in fact
the mechanics of the presentation mar what
should be a pure art form. The tape slips each
time it restarts. There is no soundproof box for
the slide projector. One is aware of the revolving
polarized filter which makes each of the
162 slides appear to change shape and color. The
slides are prepared with glue, scotch tape and
saran wrap, which seen through polarized light
looks like a photomicrograph of a rock slice
except the shapes and colors are constantly
changing and fusing.
There are some moments every now and again
of arresting shapes and combinations of colors
which point to the true potential of lumia
presentation. Schaefer's music, though interesting in itself, creates a phony celestial atmosphere, easily shattered in the darkness when
you step on someone.
Instead of being an intimate experience using
light, the show is never totally integrated
because it never overcomes its artifice. A lack of
funds could explain a modest performance but
not excuse it since art does mean taking a risk,
even financial.
Thomas Wilfred states "Lumia is still on the
level-of pre-Bach music. The Rembrandt of this
medium has yet to come along." Lynn Vardeman's composition seems a promising sketch
but only hints at something bigger to come.
Compared with the total environments of light
and rock shows, lumia seems meagre in comparison.
The recital ends today at the SFU art gallery.
Doors open 10 a.m., close 4 p.m.
Geoff Hancock
Fine Arts in the Forum
Local artists will have the opportunity to
create a total artistic environment in the Pacific
National Exhibition Oct. 3 to Oct. 7.
The Community Arts Council of Vancouver is
sponsoring the event, which opens next Wednesday at 1 p.m.
The council requests one piece of work, in any
medium, from every artist who is currently a
resident of British Columbia. If you have any
artistic creation you wish to display, bring it to
the north end of the PNE forum before Oct. 1 for
the first day, or before the next day of any
exhibition.
The object of Fine Arts in the Forum is to
provide exposure for local creators and their
creations in the visual and performing arts. It
will give the public an opportunity to update
itself to current trends of resident artists.
Creations can be paintings, drawings, prints,
etchings, sculpture, crafts — really, almost
anything.
For the non artists among you, drop in at the
forum and take a look. Student admission is 50c.
'DECORATE WITH PRINTS'
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
^(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)^
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
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Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes- Gifts,etc.
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Tomorrow Night
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also
TIM WILLIAMS
Next Week
Sonny & Brownie
Fine Arts in the Forum
Five days and nights
of creative art displays
from local artists
PNE Forum Oct 3-7
2 Shows Nightly
9:30 and 11:30
THE EGRESS
739 Beatty St.        687-4613
A David Y. H. Lui
DANCE SPECTACULAR
Event
INPrU DANCE
THEATRE
of URflEL
Explosive exuberance, haunting
melodies, ancient ritual and modern
theatre — Inbal "ranks among the
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TUES., OCT. 9
Q.E.T.-8:30
Tickets now on sale! $6, 5.25, 4.50
& 3.75. Vancouver Ticket Centre
(683-3255), Eaton's, and other
V.T.C. Outlets.
Jayson Hoover 'N Stuff
TONIGHT &
TOMORROW
NIGHT
IMAGE
661 Hornby St. 687-1547
1
A NEW WAITING LIST
will be started October 1 for students wishing Residence
accommodation for the spring term (beginning December 1).
The current waiting list expires November 30. All
students on this list who are still interested must also
put their names on the new waiting list. Available rooms
are assigned each day at 12:30 to the first persons on
the list present.
OFFICE OF DIRECTOR
OF RESIDENCES
FOR THE ABSOLUTE LATEST
IN EYEWEAR
LOOK TO. . .
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STUDENT DISCOUNTS
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EYEWEAR FASHIONS WITH A FLAIR
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973 Death of a poet
Pablo Neruda, 69, the Chilean poet who won the
Nobel Prize for Literature in 1971, died of cancer
Sunday.
His funeral Tuesday was attended by nearly 2,000
mourners and apparently many more were in
hiding. Those attending the funeral cortage were
kept in check by armed soldiers. There were no
demonstrations on the rain slick streets even though
Neruda's followers gave the Communist salute and
sang "The Internationale". A spokesman said, "A
black wind has blown amongst us," referring to
both Neruda's death and the military junta.
Neruda died in his home on Isla Negra, an island
off the coast of Chile, near Santiago. His death was
suspiciously convenient for the new military junta
which deposed Marxist president Salvadore
Allende; Neruda himself was a personal friend of
Allende's and a self-proclaimed Communist. It is
not known whether the military was involved in
Neruda's death.
Neruda, the son of a railway worker, published
his first book Crepuscalinos (Twilight) in 1923 and
quickly earned a reputation as one of the premier
poets in the Spanish language. Neruda was a former
senator in the Chilean congress and an ambassador
to France. He was also an active member of the
Chilean Communist party for a quarter of a century.
Some critics have called Neruda the finest poet of
the twentieth century. Seldon Rodman, writing in
The Saturday Review said: "To my knowledge, the
only living poet who is admired wherever poetry is
read — is Pablo Neruda." American poet and
translator Robert Bly said: "At the moment,
Neruda entirely dominates South American
poetry." Bly claims Neruda writes the greatest
surrealistic poems in a western language. "French
surrealist poems appear drab and squeaky beside
them."
As a poet, Neruda has confidence in what is
hidden. His imagination moves from spot to spot
with utter assurance. He sees the hidden connections between conscious and unconscious substances with such clarity that he hardly bothers
with metaphors. Neruda's poems are deeply
surrealist and yet in them, ordinary objects of the
outer world attain as great a force as anything
magical and fantastic.
His poetry embodies curious and cunning ideas.
Neruda refuses to confine himself to a specific
subject matter or a kind of poem. He began his
career publishing love poems "which sprouted all
over his body". But by 1936 he was writing
Residencia I and II where "death also goes through
the world dressed as a broom lapping the floor,
looking for dead bodies". He saw the outer world
with such a clear sense of its suffering that the later
development of political poetry does not come as a
surDrise. He was shocked by the loss of Spain to the
Fascists
His poetry underwent a considerable change in
style over his long career and it is a mistake to
quote him out of context. Neruda is wildly romantic
and simultaneously bitterly cynical. In the middle
1950's he wrote a number of odes to the simplest of
things (Odas Elementales) to a wristwatch, to air,
to salt, to a watermelon. On receiving a new pair of
socks, he writes
I resisted
the mad impulse
to put them
into a golden
cage
and each day give them
birdseed
and pieces of pink melon.
Like explorers
in the jungle who hand
over the very rare
green deer
to the spit
and eat it
with remorse,
I stretched out
my feet
and pulled on
the magnificent
socks
and then my shoes.
Neruda tried to capture the universal in the
elemental. In the minutely concrete he saw the
world. Neruda encompassed many things; he began
as a surrealist aesthete; he became a revolutionary
and a people's poet.
Bernard Bischoff/Geoff Hancock
In Concert
Pablo Neruda (1904-1973)
Mortifee and Bibb
The advertisement read "On Stage, In Concert, Ann
Mortifee and Leon Bibb". And Bibb wrote in Playboard: "Ann
and I have wanted to sing together, in concert, for a long time,
and are pleased that tonight we are." One expected that these
two Vancouver talents would be, no less, singing together. But
after their opening song together, Ann left the stage to Bibb for
one full hour. She returned after intermission for her own hour
I>erformance, then closed the show singing with Bibb the song
from Jacques Brel: "If We Only Have Love".
This arrangement was unexpected but ideal. Both artists
gave superior performances according to their individual
style.
The flip of a coin decided whether Ann or Bibb should take
the first half. The entire show carried this informal attitude
which contributed to the performers' close rapport with a
highly appreciative and responsive audience.
In his solo concert Bibb was superb. He sang a variety of
popular songs by numerous Canadian and American artists
that presented a wide range of ideas and feelings. Beginning
with a simple, traditional blues song which he performed
without musical accompaniment, using only his body, voice,
and face to convey rhythm and feeling, each song was
testimony to a versatile and well-developed talent.
Bibb's lean and limber body was an important part of
every song, used to transmit energy, set rhythm, and
dramatize situations. In Otis Redding's "Dock of a Bay",
Lightfoot's "In the Early Morning Rain", and the ironically
optimistic "My Last Blues Song", the pronounced, infectious
rhythms surged out from Bibb to the audience. Throughout his
show he used the'stage liberally and effectively. In his last
number — prior to his encore — he left the microphone and
toured the stage, trodding out the rhythm of a chain gang song,
conveniently trodding offstage at the end of the song.
The most impressive presentation, if one can distinguish
the best from the best, was Bibb's sensitive rendition of
Leonard Cohen's "Suzanne". His mellow voice effected a
continuity of sound and feeling which is conspicuously absent
in Cohen's own presentation of the song but which gives depth
and body to this rich poem. With simple and subtle variations,
such as a change of key, the use of the flute, and dimmed
lights, Bibb highlighted the exotic qualities of this song. The
audience acknowledged his success most enthusiastically.
Bibb's choice of songs and vocal capabilities, of course,
contributed largely to our enjoyment. But even more impressive, and perhaps more important, was his individual
style. Conspicuously absent was the conventional stance of
regular showmen who practise their humor and cultivate
casualness. Certainly Bibb practised and performed. But his
confidence was devoid of arrogance. He seemed peculiarly
sincere, radiating a genuine love of his work, a spontaneity, a
naturalness that were fundamental to his success.
Ann   Mortifee's    performance   was    much   different.
A bit lower . .. lower . : . ahhhhh that's the spot.
Although she was as forthright, steady and strong as
Bibb, her manner was bouncy and bubbly; she
radiated nervous excitement. Her selections were less
varied and less familiar, though "The Old Folks" from
Jacques Brel elicited an enthusiastic audience
response.
For two of the songs she played guitar, and twice
she sang her own creations. "My Man and I", which
she composed during a day at Long Beach, she performed capably without instrumental accompaniment.
Her most successful numbers were those at the end: a
powerful song based on William Blake's "Tyger" and
"Prelude for Love", an extraordinary piece without
words which illustrated the power and magnitude of
her talent. Her voice was generally clear and strong,
though sometimes uncomfortably airy on the higher
notes.
The band, consisting of three guitars, a piano and
organ, drums, a cello, a flute, and a bass viola was not
only capable, but highly appropriate to such a performance. It provided a subtle accompaniment, never
over-riding and never failing the performing artist; it
set mood and tempo, and provided depth and breadth
for each number.
Sunday night's was the only performance. Sunday
night's performance was a singular success.
Linda Reed
Friday, September 28, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Comment
Arse Poetica
0 most mysterious, querulous, sissified Muse,
why do you enforce such a chili-bean appetite? Is
it farts you fancy, the ambrosial clouds they send
forth? Is it the pox or a beshit face makes you
hide so, stare out like two pissholes in snow? Ahh
Hosemonster, your tastes disgust me & I proffer
a hint or two about dining at the Arse Poetica
Canadiana.
Firstly & lastly, there are better places to eat.
So why go back for the same old crap? Well (a)
its Canadian crap (b) you don't know its crap. &
this is interesting.
Its like food. If there's no food to be got, our
guts leap & croak & we jump on the closest
morsel. Applied to those who were starving for a
Canadian Poetry its: no poem/ poem/ gulp!
Chewed, swallowed, digested without question.
We all know what food is but not many know
what poetry is, without which info we're all
gullible & susceptible to the crap some call
poetry.
This isn't to say Canadians are the only ones
ignorant of what crap is or isn't, or that its indigenous to this soil; but why smear it on a flag &
wave it around? Good poetry is good whether an
American, Englishman, Italian, Chinese, or
Canadian writes it. It will stand alone as poetry.
But O Dung-Eater! Hangdog Frump! your
heart beats in an ironlung, stung to atrophic bliss
by the Swamis who keep you. Their heads are
plunged in the toilets of despair, the airy clouds
of here & there; so its no fault of yours you waste
away, its theirs, the 'Poets', the ones who dish up
such crap.
& some may have a notion of your needs but
don't see what's keptyou til now elsewhere or
that you suffer in ICU. These guys are the ones to
keep you alive, without them you're nothing. But
they don't know what you are, so fail to keep you;
hence you are what you are: nothing. & some
have vague suspicions but they only produce
vague nothings.
Unsatisfactory? You're damn right! Time to
clean the Stygian Stables of your yap! Unmat the
crap in your hair, the cowflops in your ears! Kick
up a fuss! Get on with it, your ABC's, a palatable
diet!
& these 'Poets' not only keep you in an uncertain state of health, they're also keepers of
countless intellects, both private & professional
(or public). I cant speak for the individual intellect per se, but the professional, & in this case
the professorial intellect, has much to do with
your condition. Its an odd circumstance, but in
this realm, the poet is both keeper & kept & so too
is the Academic (professorial). Academics like
to identify & label. They have identified Poetry &
labelled it Canadian. Well granted its written in
Canada & by Canadians, but is it Poetry? They
believe it, the Poets believe it, & those beliefs
from such lofty & dizzy heights the public accepts. Its a perpetual circle of misunderstanding, a pot of Cavendish stew spiced with
Seagrams & Blue.
& the Publisher/Editor has his toe in there too;
& it aint there to get cleaned either. He's no mind
of his own, another keeper & kept — shitflicker.
Yeah! incest to boot!
'Way-O! Bully boys blow!
The Gadarene swihine have got us in tow.'
Ahh Poetry! your boys are lost, they kiss
another's ass, swim like big frogs in a puddle.
Brent Ma*ckay
Concerts
Purely divine
A breathless, amplified purr: "My friends call
me the Divine Miss 'M'."
Brazenly flapping a garish feather boa;
thrusting herself across the stage in a mincing,
breakneck shuffle; flailing her arms as a song
absorbed her being; Bette Midler, "the last of
the greatj tacky women," zapped 'em, Saturday
night, at'the Queen E.
"Po-zishuns, girls," she directed her
"Harlettes" the female vocal trio that backs her,
"we've got to keep these Vancouverites freaked
out." The Vancouverites were transported from
their seats, giving the Divine and her entourage
three (count 'em, three!) standing ovations for
Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy, perhaps the best-
known cut on her first album (a second is soon to
be released) and refusing to let the show end
until Miss 'M' pleaded exhaustion.
Before her tour of the "tackiest cities in North
America" which brought her to Vancouver, and
before a recent series of television talk-show
appearances (Johnny Carson) and magazine
articles (Time, Ms. Magazine), knowledge of the
self-anointed superstar belonged to a slightly
esoteric cult.
But "trash with a flash" is catching on, and
her act, which has evolved largely from a stint
done a couple of years ago at New York's Continental Steam Baths, has developed the parody
and wistful emulation of homosexual camp and
drag into a near art form. Bette is a woman in
female drag, playing with the images that have
oppressed women into approximating some
conventional standard of the attractive (sexy,
passive) woman.
"I was real scared to come up to this part of
the country. I was in Seattle once for six weeks
and never got laid once. Not once in six weeks.
Yes, I was REAL scared to come back this way."
She deals with pain, loneliness, frankly, infusing schmaltzy songs of teenage love, like
"Leader of the Pack", with a depth of feeling, a
frenetic energy, and an unapologetic sentimentality that creates a human meeting-
ground far beyond the barriers of good taste.
In between songs, she snipes at the drag of
dignity of American power figures. "Now, if
Dick (Nixonnnn) would only do to Pat what he's
been doing to the country ...".
As she opened her second act, Bette talked of
her apprehensions about a Canadian audience.
"I was afraid I was gonna gross you out. But I
was peeking through the curtains, watching you
come in. And I saw that you CAME to BE
GROSSED-OUT."
Audience participation in the Bette Midler
Event went far beyond hand-clapping and sing-
along. A sizeable contingent of ephemeral drag
(beards and gowns of black chiffon) was on
hand, eliciting ripples of polite (?) applause as
the elegantly-attired took their seats. "Entrances for days and days..." commented the
Divine.
Performing emotional acrobatics, recalling
loneliness, savoring love, and celebrating the
tenacity that keeps us all going, Bette Midler
became the focus of a rapport the audience was
unwilling to allow to be dissolved by the
houselights.
Coming back on stage once more, this time to
tell the stamping, cheering audience that had
made no sign of breaking up, that she is just too
tired to go on, the Divine Miss "M" announced,
"I thought I was going crazy, but I didn't know
for sure till I came here."
Ian Spence
efc
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Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973 Friday, September 28, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
1973-74 AMS budget
Notes
This budget is based on 18,000 full fee paying members and
1,400 part-time fee paying members taking an average of 3 units.
These   notes   contain   an    explanation    for   each   item   in   the
expenditures column of the budget.
Student Union Building Debt
This is the $15.00 portion of the A.M.S. fee to be used to
repay the capital cost of the building.
Undergraduate Society Fees
This    is   the   amount    collected   on   the   behalf   of   the
Undergraduate Societies  by the A.M.S. as shown in the
revenue section.
Graduation Class Fee
This  is  the  $7.00   fee  levy  collected  on   behalf of the
Graduating Class.
0      S.U.B. Management Fund
Constitution allocation  of  50c  per  member to  purchase
equipment   at  the discretion of the S.U.B. Management
Committee.
Accident Benefit Fund
Constitutional allocation  of  10c per member to a  fund
from  which  Council   may cover  injuries to studetns not
covered by medical insurance.
S.U.B. Art Fund
Constitution allocation of $1,500 for the purchase of'
Canadian Contemporary Art.
National Union of Students
This represents the 30c per member fee levy of the N.U.S.
approved at last year's General Meeting.
Registration Photographs
The cost of placing photographs on membership cards.
,        Athletic Fee
This is the $5 extramural athletic fee established by
referendum.
Covered Pool Trust
This the $5 Covered Pool fee established by referendum.
Constitutional Margin
The  Constitution  calls for a  5%  operating margin to be
included in the budget as a safeguard. The 5% is based on
the operating portion of the A.M.S., which includes:
Building Operations 350,000
Discretionary Funds
including margin 178,450
528,450
528,450 @ .05 = 26,925
Undergraduate Society Grants
Since all Undergraduate Societies submitted their budgets
after the April 30 deadline for Palmer Proposal consideration, I have set aside $10,000 for Council to allocate to any
of the Undergraduate Societies in any way that Council
r thinks is appropriate.
Ubyssey (Schedule C)
The allocation will allow The Ubyssey to publish 2 times
per week with a total of 668 pages. This amount includes
80% of the Publications Administration expense (Schedule
B) which supplies the supports service, such as accounts
receivable and advertising sales, that are necessary for the
operation of the campus newspaper.
Intramurals (Schedule F)
This allocation allows all students to participate in many
organized sports, through teams formed in clubs and
Undergraduate Societies.
Students' Council (Schedule E)
This is the budget on which the Students' Council operates
itself. Included in this amount is a portion of general
administration expense (Schedule A) which supports the
Council and its direct programmes and activities. Some
services which the Council uses are auditors, solicitors,
4 printing and general bookkeeping.
Conference Grant
This is a special fund administered by the Finance
Committee to aid subsidiary organizations in sending a
maximum of two representatives to conferences, which will
be beneficial to their membership and/or the A.M.S. as a
whole. Written reports are to be submitted by the delegates
for future reference of the Society's members.
Speakers Committee
This allocation is to cover publicity, travel and honoraria of
speakers to be invited to speak on topics which are interest
to students.
Education Committee
I have made this allocation to cover costs in having a
committee, of Council and interested students, hold
hearings with members of all Undergraduate Societies
about special topics In education today such as:—
(1) John Bremer Commission
(2) Student Financing
0 i,3) Task Force on University Education which will re-write
the Universities Act.
I support this allocation of funds, only if the Committee
will actively solicit the opinions of all students and publish
a   summary   report  to   be  criticized   by   students   before
forwarding the report to the Provincial Government.
Special Projects Clubs
This allocation is administered by the Finance Committee
to aid clubs with the cost of special projects. This fund was
established in the Code when clubs were no longer given
direct operational grants by Council. This fund is non-
accumulative.
Student Directory (Schedule D — Bird Calls)
This allocation allows us to publish a Student Telephone
Directory. The allocation includes 20% of Publications
Administration Expense (Schedule B).
Elections
# This is the amount necessary to print ballots and publish
the necessary notices as well as maintain elections equipment.
External Affairs
This allocation is to cover the operating costs of the
External Affairs Office, which includes long distance
telephone calls, stationery and supplies, and the cost of
sending delegates to B.C.A.S.U. and N.U.S. conferences.
Treasurer Operating
This allocation covers the operating costs of the Finance
Committee, the Treasurer's office, and the search for the
General Manager.
Undergraduate Society Support
This allocation represents that portion of general administration which is used to support Undergraduate Societies
(Schedule A).
Clubs Support
This allocation represents that portion of general adminis-
+% tration which is used to support clubs. (Schedule A).
Co-Recreation
This is a new programme to supplement intramurals. It will
allow members of both sexes to participate in a limited
number of sports together.
Special Events
This allocation is to defray any possible losses that may be
incurred in the running of the Special Events programme.
Any surplus or deficit from this programme will be
accumulated to defray or be defrayed from future programmes.
Constitutional Revisions
This is a standing committee established by the Code to
suggest revisions in the Constitution. The allocation is for
M stationery and supplies, and publicity.
Endowment Lands Committee
This allocation will establish a temporary committee to
prepare a report about the proposed provincial government
actions on the University Endowment Lands. Money is
included to send delegates to present this and other reports
to the provincial government. Some funds are also included
so that the committee can publicize what is to happen to
the University Endowment Lands.
S.U.B. Development
This committee is to investigate the possible expansion of
S.U.B. services using present areas, and possible future
areas to be built as part of the pool complex.
Amateur Radio Society Support
W This  is a special allocation to a society which supplies a
unique service to the students. The service is a ham radio to
make telephone patches for students to places overseas.
Since 1970 the society has made about 270 such patches.
At a gl
anee
REVENUE:
A.M.S. Fees — Regular
612,000
Extension
9,800
Non-Credit
30
Undergraduate Society Fees
13,000
Graduation Class Fee
20,000
Investment Income
30,000
Total
684,830
EXPENDITURES:
Non-Discretionary:
Student Union Building Debl
270,000
Undergraduate Society Fees
13,000
Graduation Class Fees
20,000
S.U.B. Management Fund
9,000
Accident Benefit Fund
1,800
S.U.B. Art Fund
1,500
National Union of Students
5,400
Registration Photographs
4,000
Athletic Fee
91,680
Covered Pool Trust
90,000
Constitutional Margin
26,925
533,305
Available For Discretionary Uses:
Discretionary:
Undergraduate Societies Grants 10,000
Ubyssey 32,160
Intramurals 11,000
Students' Council 44,000
Conference Grants 3,000
Speakers Committee 1,500
Education Committee 1,000
Special Projects Clubs 2,000
Student Directory 1,640
Elections 2,000
External Affairs 1,600
Treasurer Operating 4,500
Undergraduate Society Support 11,700
Clubs Support 15,600
Co-Recreat ion 1,000
Special Events 2,000
Constitutional Revisions 210
Endowrnent Lands Committee 500
S.U.B. Development 200
Amateur Radio Society Support 250
CYVR Support 2,000
Food Services Committee 365
S.U.B. Operations 1,000
Mamooks 800
S.U.B. Art Gallery Committee 1,000
S.U.B. Art Gallery Programme 500
151,525
151,525
The allocation is to defray operating costs in the form of
electronic equipment which wears out on a regular basis.
CYVR Support
This allocation is to be administered by the building
manager for the maintenance of the $50,000 worth of
equipment which was installed in the radio station when
the building was built. It is not feasible for the Radio
Society to maintain this equipment. Their inability in the
past few years to maintain this equipment has resulted in
continued deterioration of the equipment.
Food Service Committee
This allocation, to allow for the detailed investigation of
purchasing the Food Services operation in SUB, includes a
small amount to allow the committee to publicize its
results if Council wants.
S.U.B. Operations
This   allocation   is   the   amount   needed  to   balance the
operating budget of the Student Union Building. The totals
for the S.U.B. budget are:
Gross Expenditures . 350,000
Gross Revenue 349,000
Total (1,000)
Mamooks
This allocation is to subsidize a poster and sign making
operation in the S.U.B., which would be supervised by a
part-time employee.
S.U.B. Art Gallery Committee
This grant is to repair damaged pieces of the Brock Hall Art
Collection as recommended by the auditors.
S.U.B. Art Gallery Programme Committee
This allocation is to allow for the showing of the Brock
Hall Art Collection in the S.U.B. Art Gallery. The
allocation will also allow the presentation of other art
exhibits throughout the academic year. The main expenses
of the programme are supervision and publicity.
This budget is printed in The Ubyssey as per the Constitution and
is respectfully submitted.
John Wilson,
A.M.S. Treasurer
Schedules
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Salaries & Benefits
Transportation & Communication
S & S (General & Print Shop)
Professional Services
Equipment Rentals
Sundry
Christmas Party for Staff
Revenue from Selling S & S
(A)
Budget
1973-4
63,700
2,500
8,600
9,000
5,000
500
500
89,800
11,800
Total Admin. Charge
To be Allocated 78,000*
* This is a suspense account to isolate administration expenses to
be charged to the following areas on the following basis. These
percentages are based on the amount of work processed by this
department on behalf of the other departments or programmes.
Students' Council
Publications
Student Union Building**
Undergraduate Societies
Clubs
35%
27,300
10%
7,800
20%
15,600
15%
11,700
20%
15,600
78,000
** Increased 5% because of extra Pit duties.
PUBLICATIONS BUDGET
EXPENSE:
Salaries
Stationery & Supplies
Postage
Telephone & Telex
Car Allowance & Sundry
General Admin. Charge
(B)
Actual
Budget
1972-3
1973-4
16,000
17,000*
375
400
245
250
430
450
600
1,300
6,990
7,800
24,640
27,200**
Total Expense
* includes local  commission  for Ubyssey advertising sales  for
first time.
** This    is   a    suspense   account   used   to isolate   Publications
Administration expenses. These expenses are-charged to the two
main operating areas on the following basis:
Ubyssey —80% 21,760
Bird Calls — 20% 5,440
27,200
UBYSSEY BUDGET (C)
REVENUE:
Advertising Display
Classified
Subscriptions
Total Revenue
EXPENSE:
Printing
Photography
Mailing
Honoraria
Telephone & Telex
Stationery & Supplied
Staff Meals
Banquet
C.U.P.
Misc. Salaries
Distribution
Sundry
Total Operating Expense
Administration
Youthstream Commissions
Local Commissions
Promotion
Total Publication Expense
Total Subsidy
STUDENT DIRECTORY
BUDGET        (D)
REVENUE:
Advertising
Sales
Total
EXPENSE:
Commissions
Printing
Administration & Miscellaneous
Total
Net
STUDENTS' COUNCIL BUDGET
STUDENTS' COUNCIL EXPENSES:
Executive Salaries
Stationery & Supplies
Transportation & Communication
Information
Honorariums
General Administration
Miscellaneous
2 Issue
Actual
Budget
1972-3
1973-4
54,900
50,000
2,240
2,000
515
400
57,655
52,400
54,610
51,000
285
500
760
800
1,115
1,000
1,480
1,550
900
550
275
275
305
—
1,765
1,950
—
375
—
1,100
305
250
61,800
59,350
17,100
21,760
3,040
3,350
4,715
—
15
100
86,670
84,560
29,015
32,160
Actual
Budget
1972-3
1973-4
9,800
9,800
2,200
2,500
12,000
12,300
2,500
2,500
6,260
6,000
2,490
5,440
11,250
13,940
750
(1,640)
E)
Actual
Budget
1972-3
1973-4
5,912
5,500
2,728
3,000
2,555
3,000
1,798
3,000
550
1,200
27,944
27,300
3,088
1,000
44,575
44,000
INTRAMURALS'BUDGET        (F)
MEN'S
Referees
Rentals
Operating
Equipment
Banquet
Less Revenue
Total
1972-3
1973-4
WOMEN'S
Actual
Projected
Referees
Rentals
$4,512.75
$4,875.00
Operating
3,019.10
3,355.00
Equipment
862.25
955.00
Banquet
197.53
229.00
Total
1,715.00
286.00
CO-RECREATION
10,306.63
$9,700.00
Referees
1,221.10
1,400.00
Rentals
$9,085.53
$8,300.00
$    658.00
$1,210.00
576.26
775.00
	
150.00
131.37
250.00
469.34
165.00
$1,994.25
$2,700.00
$    370.00
630.00
$1,000.00 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973
sy;
- •HfrUyiZ* 'if/aii!, 'A.,
Hot flashes
Travel
opportunity
World University Service of
Canada invites applications from
UBC students interested in
travelling in the Caribbean this
summer as part of a Canadian
university study seminar.
Applicants should understand
either French or Spanish and
should be concerned about
Canada's relationship with
develop countries.
Information and application
forms are available from Patricia
Howe in the Institute for Asian
and Slavonic Research behind
Brock Hall.
Commies
The Communist Party of
Canada (Marxist-Leninist) will
hold a public meeting Sunday, 7
p.m. in the Fisherman's Hall, 138
E. Cordova.
Volunteers
Volunteers are needed at North
Shore Neighborhood House, a
non-profit organization providing
recreational, educational and
social opportunities for North
Vancouver citizens.
The house provides leadership
training for the volunteers who
are needed two hours each week
from October to May.
For further information
contact R. Demby at 987-8138.
Protest
The Ubyssey would like to
remind you again of the protest
against all sorts of oil spills and
such that might be the result of
the oil tanker route down the
coast.
Meet at 2007 West Fourth at
11 a.m. Sunday for buses for the
Peace Arch.
Bremer again
Education commissioner John
Bremer's task forces will be the
subject of a convention Saturday
at the graduate student centre.
Representatives from the four
provincial universities have been
invited to form a common
submission to the task force
representing opinions of all B.C.
university students.
Bremer, in a letter to GSA
assembly co-ordinator Lid Kellas,
declined to attend the convention,
saying it should not be held until
the task force has completed its
initial work phase.
GSA vice-president BT P Paul
Knox said he has sent letters to 15
organizations and expects about
30 delegates to attend.
Red Cross
qualified hams (sic) they can pay
$5 for an associate membership.
They are entitled to free
instruction in code and radio
theory in preparation for
becoming hams (sic).
Members can enjoy the thrill
on free telephone calls to almost
anywhere in the western
hemisphere.
For further information on
how you can be a ham (sic) call
Bill at 228-5353 or 224-2835.
The Red Cross will be continuing  to   make   the  trade  of  the     TeftflIS
century    with   students   through
next week.
You give them blood, they give
you coke. (Did you ever feel
you're getting the short end of the
stick?)
Seriously folks, apparently
there's a blood shortage
throughout B.C. And you don't
want to be the one to die because
of lack of blood for transfusions
do you? (sob, sob).
Monday to Thursday next
week, in SUB 207-209.
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
The women's athletic
association will hold tennis
tryouts today on the m.g. tennis
courts at 4:30 p.m.
Parking
Radsoc
The UBC Amateur Radio
Society reminds students their fall
membership drive is now
underway.
And for those students who are
The parking problem for
students in the car lots scattered
around UBC is perennial.
However, Mike Tenenbaum,
science 2, has the answer to the
problem.
"If the physical plant would
put parking lines in their lots they
could increase the capacity by one
third, "Tenenbaum said in an
interview with The Ubyssey
Thursday. "The present situation
is ridiculous."
He said many cars currently
take up "far too much room."
,     '*"^$( >X$o      "
'Tween classes
TODAY
YOUNG SOCIALIST CLUB
Panel discussion on Union of B.C.
High School Students 8 p.m. 1208
Granville.
SUNDAY
GERMAN CLUB
Free hike. Meet at Mount Seymour
chairlift parking lot at 10:30 arm.
UBC WOMEN'S TENNIS TEAM
Team tryouts on Thunderbird
tennis court from 10:30 a.m. to 1
o.m.
MONDAY
UBC WEIGHTLIFTING TEAM
Training sessions — open to
beginners — every Monday from 7
to 10 p.m. at the John Owen
Pavilion, room 101.
UBC KUNG-FU CLUB
Every Monday and Wednesday 4-6
p.m. in SUB ballroom. New
members welcome.
MEN'S BADMINTON TEAM
Team practices from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
in P.E. gym B.
Come for lunch or supper
We're new & we're nearby
UBC
We specialize in
Charcoal broiled
steaks, BBQ
ribsC&n'SPa7 CAMPUS
Italian f PIZZA & SPAGHETTI HOUSE
dishes. |       2136 Western Pkwy (in Village)
FREE DELIVERY
224-4218 or
224-0529
OPEN
7 DAYS
A WEEK
ELECTIONS
OCT. 3, 1973
Polling stations open
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
at the following locations:
Civil Engineering
Woodward Library
Sedgewick Library
Buchanan
SUB
War Memorial Gym
McMillan
Education
Ponderosa Cafeteria
ADVANCE POLLS —OCT. 2, 1973
Gage Towers 5-7
Totem Park 5-7
Place Vanier 5-7
Angus 11:30-3:30
SUB 11:30-3:30
A NEW WAITING LIST
will   be   started   October   1   for  students  wishing
Residence   accommodation   for   the   spring   term
(beginning December 1).
The current waiting list expires November 30. All
students on this list who are still  interested must
re-validate their names for the new waiting list in
person  11:30-2:30 Thursday,  Friday and Monday.
(Please bring AMS card.)
Available rooms are assigned each day at 12:30 to
the first persons on the list present.
OFFICE OF DIRECTOR
OF RESIDENCES
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 SMB., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
COPE DANCE, SATURDAY. SEPT.
29th, 8:00 p.m. Ukranian People's
Hall. Bar. Rock 'n Roll. Admission, Students unemployed $1.00,
others $2.00. Buy a membership
and get in free.
Lost 8c Found
13
LOST: SILVER WIRE FRAMED
glasses in red case. Sept. 19th.
Phone Patsy Cho-Sik immediately.    521-3402.
Special Notices
15
FREE!
Roll   of   50'   or   56'
Kodak   or   llford
B 4 W Bulk Film
with    the    purchase   of   a
WATSON BULK LOADER
At $17.50
limit: 1 Per Customer on
presentation of Student I.D.
tfje TLtn& anfc gutter
Cameras
3010   W.   Broadway
736-7833
DISCOUNT STEREO EXAMPLE:
AM-FM Stereo receiver. 2 speakers, turntable, base, cover and
cartridge, list $200. Your cost
$125. 2-year parts guarantee.
Call   325-0366   for   savings.
U.B.C. BEAUTY SALON NEAR
Campus. No appointment necessary.   5736   University  Blvd.
WANTED — JEWISH PKOPLE 20-
30 from out of town and "Vancouver for non-structured, non-
organizational functions. For information Ph. Days 731-4161,
Eves.   738-4062.
MEMBERS' OP THE GRADUATE
Student Centre can obtain pamphlets describing the centre and
its functions from the office of
the   centre.
Special Events
15A
C.U.S. SPONSORS "OKTOBER-
fest" Oct. 5. Tickets available
from  A.M.S.   office.
UNDERCUT '73 SUB CAFETERIA
Saturday, September 29. at 8:30.
$3.50/cpI. Guaranteed good times
with  Hank and the Hobos.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
'65 AUSTIN 1S00 F.W.D.. NEW
trans, and motor parts. $650. ph.
263-5392  eves.
1952 CHEV. PICKUP, REBUILT
engine, new brakes, new tires,
etc.   $350.   Phone   Mike,   438-1981.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
DAYTIME BABYSITTER FOR 18-
month-old, 3 days/week (your
place); phone 733-9849  (eves.).
Scandals
37
BUTT: CANNOT GO TO UNDER-
cut '73 since Harvey Kirk stole
mv virginitv at Church picnic —
Bertha.
NEED ENTRGETIC, COMMITTED
volunteers living in Kitsilano to
do staff operations for West
Broadway Citizens' Committee.
Help fight land developers. 736-
3431.  2741 W.   4th Ave.
EMPLOYMENT
Typing
40
EFFICIENT, ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   263-5317.
Help Wanted
51
WAITRESSES, DANCERS. CASH-
iers, hostesses; up to 13.50 per
hour. Contact Mike Hamilton,
684-3426 or 524-8581. (Call No.
1125) answering service.
COMPANION (M,F) FOR BOY 11,
girl 6, in Mt. Pleas. M.T.W.
dinner, eves. app. 15 hrs. per
week. Trans. 50c per hour. 874-
7178.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of Music. All
grade   levels   welcome.   731-0601.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring
64
Speakeasy SUB Anytimel
228-4557 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Nowl 12:30-2:30
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
GUARANTEED GOOD TIMES,
only $3.50 cpl. Meet SUB Cafeteria, 8:30 p.m., Saturday for
Undercut '73.
Rooms
SI
MATURE WOMAN WANTED TO
Share house on W. Van. waterfront with two others. % hr.
from UBC, $125. 926-6119 or 733-
578». __
WANTED: SUITE FOR MATURE
grad. woman, 2 well behaved
children (6, 11). Near UBC or
will do cleaning, cooking in partial exchange for rooms in house
874-7173.
Room & Board
82
JAPANESE MAN INTERESTED
in learning English, like to board
with Canadian family, willing to
pay $130 per month. Please telephone Mr. Mori. Mr. Hoshi, 437-
3210 after 6.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Friday, September 28, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
Birds
catch
Olympics
The UBC Thunderettes came
from behind to win 6-3 over the
Greek Olympics Wednesday.
The first division soccer league
game was played at Capilano
Stadium before about 350
onlookers.
Nick Condilinios opened the
scoring for the Olympics during
the opening minutes. Tim Hunter
replied for the Birds at the five-
minute mark. A minute later Greg
Harrop scored for the Olympics.
Ed Solysik of UBC finished the
scoring for the half with a goal at
the 17 minute mark.
The Birds went into a 4-2 lead
during the second half on goals by
Phil Stanford and Mike Armstrong. Greg Harop then scored
again for the Olympics. This was
countered by goals by Hunter, his
second of the night, and by Alan
Chell. Both goals came in the last
five minutes of the game.
This win, their first, is particularly satisfying to the Birds.
Olympic players, Vince Golabeck,
Rick Gunn, Greg Harrop, Joe
Iacobellis, and Len Lendvoy are all
former UBC players. Also, the
Olympics new coach, who has been
sidelined by a collapsed lung, in
Joe Molnar. Molnar is the ex-coach
of the Birds and works at UBC in
the physical plant department.
UBC's record now stands at one
win, two draws and a loss.
Welcome Tom,
sorry for theft
By DON HUBBERT
Tom Irohsi of Barbados arrived on campus Tuesday.
Being a keen rugby fan he turned out to play for UBC in the game
against the Scribes. During the game someone broke into the locker
room and ripped off him and the other players. To say the least, it's a
hell of welcome to Canada.
I hope that the mindless bastard who did this enjoys spending the
bread.
Just bear in mind that the sports staff has need of a male eunuch
and if we ever catch you, we'll ensure that the position is filled.
On behalf of the staff, Tom, we welcome you to Canada and
apologize for what happened.
Sport comments
1) Looks like we'll have to make it a policy to give men's sports
equal coverage. We now need more reporters to cover men's sports.
1) NicetryA. J.Lowe, but you blew it.
3) How about some cheerleaders at home football games?
4) We pick the Golden Bears to beat the Birds by at least a touchdown.
Football lineup
STROKE  AND  STROKE   AGAIN
intramurals race.
—don peterson photo
swimmers fight for  lead   in
The football situation in the
western collegiate league is
completely out of hand.
The University, of Manitoba
Bisons are sharing the lead with
the Saskatchewan Huskies. The
Birds are sharing last place with
Alberta, last year's western
conference winner. The problem
is, any team in the league can beat
any other.
The   Birds   are   playing   the
Women's basketball flying
By ANGELA DRIBBLE
The women's basketball -season
got off to a flying start last week
with 45 girls coming out to the team
tryouts.
The Thunderettes were the top
Canadian women's team last year
winning the championship in
Montreal in March. This year with
new coach Ron Thorsen the team is
hoping to go all the way again.
Thorsen played basketball for
the  Thunderettes  and   was   con
sidered one of Canada's top men
players. Last year he coached the
men's junior varsity team.
Returning to the varsity squad
this year are Kathy Burdett, Liz
Silcott, Laurie Watson and Vicki
Williams all in their sophomore
seasons. Peggy Robinson is
returning for her fourth year as are
Bev Barnes and Debbie Phelan.
Barnes and Phelan played for the
Canadian National team this
summer   touring   Europe   and
playing at world student games in
Moscow.
This year's junior varsity team
is coached by Joanne Sargent.
Sargent played Thunderette ball
and holds a position on the National
team. She has a great deal of
basketball experience and the
team should do well under . her
direction.
It looks certain that all three
teams will be as successful as they
were last year.
Alberta Golden Bears Saturday at
the University of Alberta. Both
teams are passing clubs and the
game should be a high scoring
affair. The defensive secondary of
the Birds should be in for a busy
day. Their hustle will Jlopefully
overcome their lack of height.
UBC head coach Norm- Sjhemas
said he was more concerbfefl jover
Alberta's running game than their
passing. He said he expects "a high
scoring game with the "Birds
coming out on top."
Thomas said that much of this
week's practice has been devoted
to picking up secondary receivers
as he expects heavy coverage on
Bill Baker.
UBC has been plagued with
offensive troubles this season. This
game would be a good time for it to
come untracked. The defence has
played well this season but the
running game of opposing teams
seems to gain momentum as the
game ends. This is due more to a
lose of poise than lack of ability. It
can only be hoped that as the team
gains in experience they can
correct this tendency.
Trivia answer
First batter triples on first pitched ball. Pitcher takes position in.
box to pitch to second batter, runner on third decides to steal home,
pitcher steps from box and throws home. Batter interferes with throw.
Batter is out and runner goes back to third. *
Next two batters go out the same way. This goes on for nine innings
and only one ball is pitched each inning.
Of course it is highly improbable that this could happen but it can
and our trivia award is safe as nobody guessed our answer.
• . . more trivia
1) "Jackie" Mitchell, first woman to sign a professional baseball
contract, struck out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig in succession in an
exhibition game: April 1931.
2( M. Pauliquen, Paris 1912, remained under water 6:29-4/5
minutes. Memorial services took place two days later.
3) What is "Eagle" Keys real name. Trivia award of the week; the
chance to coach the Lions for the rest of the season, or until they make
the playoffs, whichever comes first.
Mt. Baker Ski School
Accepting Applications For
Ski Instructors
No previous teaching experience necessary.
Must be good skier.
Call (206) 592-2350 or
write:     George Savage
5695 Mt. Baker Hwy.
Deming, Wa. 98244
WHERE IT ALL BEGAN
MGB
BGT
MIDGET
AVAILABLE
RIGHT NOW
GOOD COLOR
CHOICE
GORDON IMPORT
AUTOS. LTD.
3695 W. 10th Ave.
733-8105
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SALES      SERVICE      PARTS
LEARN HOW
to deal with frustration, lethargy
and dissatisfaction
Get back on top again!
understanding yourself and others with
the Activator Philosophy of Human Behavior
INTRODUCTORY SERIES
given by Dawn Pellin starts
MONDAY, OCTOBER 1st - 8 p.m.
5 week series costs only $15
ACTIVATOR CENTRE
2150 W. 4th Ave. 731-9266
UNIVERSITY
DISCOUNT PRICES
ON
HEWLETT-PACKARD
CALCULATORS
HP-35 and HP-45 (Scientific)
HP-80 (Business)
Orders taken   Civil  Engineering  Rm.  206 every noon
until Oct. 3.
Information  available  in   Main   Hall Civil  Engineering
Bldg. Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 28, 1973
Intramural deadline near
By RON KONKIN
The deadline is Friday for men's
basketball, hockey, and the cycle
drag.
This year more than 100 teams
should be entered in the basketball
league. Once again the 16 team
tournament will be held on March
4-8.
The hockey league will be a little
bigger and probably a lot better
than last year. An inter-college
intramural hockey league has been
proposed and organizers say it
should prove quite interesting.
The cycle drag, which will be
held Oct. 14 at the JOP track, is a
50-lap relay race. Grease your
wheels as you can bet the competition will be good.
The great annual turkey trot
takes place noon Monday.
Both men and women will be
taking part.
The men's run is 3-1/2 miles long
while the women's is 2 miles.
If you are not participating,
come out and watch as the
engineers are trying something a
little different this year. Super
Gobblers in this year's turkey trot
are John Dennison, education
faculty and Eddy Gautchi from
phys ed.
Badminton starts Monday, Oct.
The ladder has been posted by
room 308, Memorial gym. Make
sure you go over and take a look at
it. Play begins at 7 p.m. in
Memorial gym.
The touch football-league play
kicks off on Tuesday. Education
and commerce look like the teams
to beat. Betas, always a dark
horse, could be a surprise.
—don peterson photo
WINNING TEAM in Wednesday afternoon intermural swim meet pictured right to left: Ivali Hopkins, Gary
MacDonald, Ron McCracken, Mike Stramhuis, and Mike Conn. Missing are Duncan Flett and Brent Hughes.
Bowling begins on Tuesday with
matches taking place between 7:30
- 9 p.m. and 9 - 10:30 p.m.
Remember, all you have to pay is
10 cents for your shoes.
Unit managers must not forget to
pick  up   their   teams'   playing
schedules at room 308, Memorial
gym-
If your team defaults, they ace
out of the league and it certainly is
not their fault if they do not know
when or where the game is being
played.
Due to the poor weather, the golf
deadline for your two rounds has
been extended for one more week.
Post entries are being accepted.
Rumor has it that the residences
are dead when it comes to sports!
Has anyone heard differently?
Prognostications
Prognostications for the upcoming pro hockey season:
The NHL will expand its schedule to 300 games per team.
The Canucks will be unhappy with their new coach (or old coach,
manager, usherettes in the Coliseum, etc.).
The NHL will expand to 38 teams, competing fiercely for only 32
playoff berths.
Clarence Campbell will defect to the WHA.
Montreal will quit the NHL for lack of competition.
Bobby Hull will get 127 goals and finish fifth among WHA scorers.
The Canucks will defect to the WHA and be rejected.
The Blazers will finish last and Vancouver sports fans will flock to
the hospital or church of their choice in record numbers.
Al Eagleson will cancel Stanley Cup until further notice because his
athletes are underpaid.
Volleyball champs
By LAURA CROCKETT
The UBC Thunderettes, 1973 intercollegiate Canadian volleyball
champions, are once again heading towards the opening of their season.
Forty women have been practising two to three hours a day for the
last two weeks. Their goal was to make one of the three UBC women's
volleyball teams.
The Thunderettes have some top, proven, women volleyball players
on this year's squad. Team leader, Betty Baxter, who travelled to
Moscow as a member of the World Student Games team, is currently
practising four hours a day with the Canadian National Team. A former
National team member, Sandy Vosberg, is also playing with the
Thunderettes again. Two other members of the team, Karen Johnston
and Sharon Williams, were participants at the World Student Games
training camp. Norma MacDonald and Barb Wollner, both on last
year's team, with Lynn Mays, a former Chimo player, are also with the
squad.
Marilyn Mose is coaching the young, talented, junior varsity. Diane
Coleman has returned from last year and is coaching the Totems, who
did well in their Senior B and tournament play last year.
Scribes bow to Totems
UBC Totems defeated the Scribes Rugby Club 8-3 in a 3rd division
play Wednesdaq night.
Dave Waterman and Bill Wyndrum scored tries for the Totems
while Fred Potton scored on a place kick for the Scribes side. UBC led 4-
0 at the half.
Other standouts for the makeshift UBC team were Tom Ironsi, Rob
Google and Peter Cahoon. The team was hastily put together that afternoon and many of the players had never practiced in their game
positions.
PONDEROSA CAFETERIA
on the West Mall
ANNOUNCES
EXTENDED SERVICE
Commencing Mon., Oct. 1, 1973
Mon.-Thurs.
Fri.
Spaghetti suppers
Our specialty
8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
refreshments
Tues. & Thurs.
Chevron
NOW
YOU CAN SAVE ON
• GAS AT THE SELF SERVICE ISLAND
IT COSTS LESS
• ALSO FULL SERVICE
At your nearest service station on campus
VILLAGE CHEVRON SERVICE
(CHARLTON & CHARLTON LTD.)
2190 Western Parkway
(Behind the Village)
Ph. 224-1226     224-1713

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