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The Ubyssey Sep 11, 1987

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 the Ubyssey
Door slams on 2000 B.C. students
By CAROL ANN McKENNA
and MIKE GORDON
Canadian University Press
Lack of overall funding has
forced B.C. community colleges to
turn away roughly 2,000 first year
and students competing for limited space.
Critics say the crisis in post-
secondary education funding
stems from several years of Social
Credit education policies.
"The government has planned
for this and it's happening," said
Stephen Scott, executive officer
for the Canadian Federation of
Students-Pacific Region.
Scott traces the lack of accesibil-
ity and space in the province's
universities and colleges back to
1982-83, when former premier Bill
Bennett's restraint program drastically cut social services to compensate for its own recession.
"The ministry is really out of
sync with itself," said Scott "On
the one hand they have made hei p-
ful changes to student aid, but on
the other (they) haven't provided
resources or space at colleges and
universities".
Scott said the provincial government is only worsening the situation by targeting its funding to
specialized training, such as computer science, through programs
like the Fund for Excellence.
Instead of the Fund for Excellence, which subsidizes training
programs selected by the Social
Credit cabinet, Scott says the government should increase the general operating grants to colleges
and universities.
"Students have to continue to
press the government for accessibility," said Scott.
"Otherwise its unfair to have a
reasonably expensive post-secondary education system which everybody pays for, but only a few can
attend."
The Social Credit government
continues staunchly asserting its
philosophy of economic opportunism in its post-secondary education policy.
Ministry of Advanced Educa
tion and Job Training spokesperson, Dick Melville said that minister Stan Hagen has strongly recommended post-secondary institutions re-examine their curricula
to see if they are offering students
adequate job training.
"Is (the curriculum) what students require to get into the
workforce, is it what commerce
and industry require?" said Melville.
Melville said the government's
revisions to provincial student
have created opportunities for
more students to attend school.
But the $61 million for student
aid, and $81 million job creation
program, Jobtrac, can't solve the
problem alone, he said.
But Langara principal Denholm
says the government has put post-
secondary institutions in a funding trap.
"We can only offer as many
courses as the government is willing to subsidize," said Denholm,
adding that priority is given to
basic, first-year courses because of
demand, while more specialized
courses are not taught due to lack
of demand and funds.
About 600 people were turned
away at Douglas College in New
Westminister, 200 more than last
year, said acting president Gordon
Gilgan.
At the Langara Campus of Vancouver Community College
roughly 800 people were not able
to register, up from between 400
and 500 from last year, said Campus principal J.J Denholm.
"The college was built for 3,500
students and today there are 6,186
enrolled here," said Denholm.
"This means 92 per cent of our
seats are filled and we still have
late registration next week."
Douglas College Student Society president, Anena Johnston,
said many new mature students
couldn't get the courses they
wanted.
"They immediately got frustrated and wanted to give up," said
Johnston. "People made arrangements for day-care and others
didn't qualify for a student loan
because they couldn't get into nine
credit courses."
UBC acting registrar, Alan
McMillan, said that 200 students,
twice that of last year, were turned
down after the first year Arts
quota of 1500 was reached.
"We don't make any more offers
than we can handle," said McMillan, "unlike community colleges
who were turning people away at
the registration desks."
Fraser Valley College registrar
Bill Cooke said the
college turned down 400 students and 1200 requests for additional courses.
The registrars at Capilano College in North Vancouver, and
Kwantlen in Surrey both reported
getting students at late registration last week who couldn't get
registered at other community
campuses.
Kwantlen registrar John Patterson said the college has added
21 new sections to meet the increased demand for courses.
B.C. students
petition gov't
By CAROL ANN McKENNA
More than 1,000 Langara students have signed a petition protesting provincial underfunding of
post-secondary education.
The Langara students are
amongst the roughly 2,000 across
B.C. who couldn't get some or any
of the courses they need while
registering this fall.
The petition charges that the
B.C. government and College
Board are shirking their responsibility in upholding the basic right
to education by not providing
enough courses.
It calls for a meeting between
students, government and College
Board officials to discuss ways of
solving the problem.
Chair of Langara's student
union, Paul Keet, said the idea of a
petition was discussed at a fall
meeting of the Canadian Federation of Students-Pacific Region.
"We anticipated a problem (at
registration this fall), but did not
realize how serious it would be,"
said Keet.
Keet said that of the 1,029 Langara students who signed the petition, 66 did not get any courses.
"But 66 represents an extreme
minority," said Keet, adding that
hundreds of students left registration without even seeing the petition.
Keet said LSU representatives
are meeting with students next
week to plan a course of action over
the next few weeks.
He also said CFS plans to hold a
forum on the issue at Simon
Fraser University in the near future.
As well, the LSU will send a
delegate to the national conference on post-secondary education \
in Saskatoon this October.
Saskatchewan
students denied access
Rick Hansen gets honorary Doctor of Law degree (see story p.3)
Vol. 70. No. 2
Steve Chan; photo
By CONNIE NAKONECHNY
SASKATCHEWAN— An unprecedented number of qualified
applicants are being turned away
from Saskatchewan post-secondary educational institutes this
fall.
"A minimum of 1,500 qualified
students are being denied entry to
the technical institutes this year,
and 1,000 are being denied access
to the most technical faculty on
campus: Arts and Sciences," wrote
Lyndon Surjik, president of the
Canadian Federation of Students
Western Region, in an open letter
to the premier of Saskatchewan.
"All of this because our provincial government is not providing
the funding that makes it possible
to accomodate these students," the
letter reads.
As a part of its "deficit reduction" program, the government
has eliminated numerous programs at the four technical schools
in the province and amalgamated
these institutes into the Saskatchewan Institute for Applied
Sciences and Technology, centrally administered from Regina.
Because funding has not kept
pace with the cost nor the demand
for university education, the University of Saskatchewan's faculty
of Arts and Sciences has been
forced to impose an enrollment
quota of 1,700 on first year, and
4,300 on upper year students, both
full and part-time.
University of Saskatchewan
Tum to page 6: Bee Problem
Vancouver, B.C. Fridav. September 11.198, WANT TO HELP?
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SUB 100B (MAIN CONCOURSE) ph: 228-3777
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CCI
2724 S.E. Marine C
Jr.
Vancouver, B.C.
432-9687
wowed 100 cheering fans
in the Ubyssey office.
This year, No Fun is
returning, palm trees in
hand, to present the Rich
Folk Festival. Come to
the Ubyssey office, SUB
241K in the Northeast
corner (second floor), and
see No Fun, Friday September 18, 3:30-7:30 p.m.
David M., Paul Leahy and
the gang will not disappoint. New staff and
other interested people
especially welcome.
Local Bands Rock Campus. Three untamed local
rock bands will shatter
the pastoral quiet of the
UBC campus at 3 p.m.
today. Experience the
wild sounds of Oversoul
Seven, Roots Roundup,
and Screaming Sirenss at
the CITR Cider Oasis
(and Beer Guard Den) in
SUB room 207/209 until 6
p.m. this afternoon. Be
there and enjoy the lush
surroundings, or stay
away and die of thirst.
BETWEEN
CLASSES
TUESDAY
1
1
1
LTNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
WINISTRY
nformal worship. All welcome re-
gardless ol denomination. Noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
CITR-UBC Radio
Cider Oasis and Beer Guard Den.
Experience the wild sounds of local
rock bands Oversoul Seven, Roots
Roundup, and Screaming Sirens.
Become a member and be mislead,
3 to 6 p.m., Sub rooms 207/209.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Co-op Supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre 5885 University
Blvd.
HOT
FLASHES
TODAY
UBC UBRARY
Tour of Main and Sedgewick libraries, all welcome. 10:30 a.m.
and 12:30 p.m. Meet in Main
ibrary, entrance hall. Tours last
45 minutes.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN
RESEARCH
Exhibition of contemporary
Chinese paintings by Professor
Lui-Sang Wong, 11:30 a.m.- 5:30
p.m. daily 'til Sept. 20,
Asian Centre Auditorium.
SATURDAY
CITR RADIO FM 102
Shrum Bowl '87, Football Action:
UBC vs SFU, 7:30 p.m., Swangard
Stadium.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Communion Service, 10 a.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Experience the return of a
jreat thing. Last year the
Kippest folk-rock duo
Surrey ever produced
CLASSIFIEDS
Rates: AMS Card Holders-3
lines, $3.00, additional lines,
600. Comercial - 3 lines, $5.00,
additional lines, 750. (10%
DISCOUNT ON 25 ISSUES OR
MORE)
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:00 on the day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S. U. B., UBC, Van.,
B. C. V6T 2A7
5 - COMING EVENTS
NEW WOMEN'S CHOIR. Somaghtsinging.
1st mtg Thurs Sept 17 7:30 pm, Canadian
Memorial Community Centre 1811 W 16.
All kinds of music. Info Dorrie 254-9871,
Chris 733-4837.
RUMMAGE SALE SAT SEPT. 12, 9:00
a.m. at the soon-to be-relocated Agora Food
Co-op, 3420 W. Broadway at Waterloo.
OPEN HOUSE
AT YMCA DAYCARE
ON FRIDAY SEPT. 11th 3:30 - 7:00 P.M.
OPENINGS AVAILABLE
FOR 3-5 YR OLDS
4595 West 8th Ave.
Visit or call 224-6414
THE RIVALRY CONTINUES
SHRUM BOWL SHOWDOWN '87
UBC. VS. S.F.U.
Saturday September 12,1987 7:30 pm
Swangard Stadium, Burnaby
Tickets: Reserve Seating Available
at all V.T.C. & CBO. also
at War Memorial Gym
(12:30-2:00) Tues. thru Fri.
- STUDENT SEATING AVAILABLE
AT W.M.G. AND T.W.S.C.
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
MOVING SALE IKEA APT FURN, desk,
shelving, lights, etc, very reasonable prices,
please call 683-4996
"77 TOYOTA HATCHBACK for the price of
a buspass engine. Good, body needs some
work. 224-6429 eves.
1976 COLT (MITSUBISHI) 5 SPD. Manual trans. /FM. New radials. 4 dr. exc. cond.
$1350.281-0013.
FOAM CORE FUTON AND SOFABED
for sale, like new $145. Call After 5:30 733-
6994Elizabeth._
PORTBABLE CLOTHES WASHER, 1"
smaller than standard washer, $175. 321 -
0150. Assortment of mattresses _ singlebox
spring 321-0150 or 263-0765.
4 SALE. 1982 RD350 LC Fairing. Black.
Very fast Must sell to pay tuition. Phone JP
738-4689. $900 obo. A destitute student.
APPLE IIC COMPUTER ImageWriter
monitor, joystick & lots of software. $1300.
Call 734-2853 eve.
EINSTEIN'S THE SCIENCE CENTRE
Hiring now, need P/T help must have science
& education background-mail resume to
4424 Dunbar St.
PANAGOPOULOS 2 FOR 1 Pizza, 2517
Alma St. req. p.t. delivery drivers & prep,
helpers. Must have own car. Ideal for students. Pick your own days of work, eves. &
wknds. $5/hr. & tips. Apply in person after 4
p.m. or phone Mrs. Nickel, 222-0001.
LOVING N/S NANNIE for 2 boys. W. Pt.
Grey, 4 Days/Wk. Exc. for night student /
student's spouse
228-9118 eves.
N/S CHILD MINDER for 3 V2 yr old.
Thurs, 8am-lpm & possibly 3-5:30 Mon.,
Tues. & Wed. afternoons in Kits. 736-7967 or
324-5404.
BAFTER SCHOOL CARE for 2 children 9
_ 6 yrs. Approx. 3 days/wk, 3-6 p.m. Drivers
licence & cooking req.Live in or out 736-
5082.
MONITORING STATION OPERATOR
Work any shift or combo, of Mon.-Fri 6-9
a.m. or 10 p.m.-l a.m.; Sat. _ Sun. 7 a.m.-3
p.m. or 3 p.m.-11 p.m. Exc. English & phone
manner. Call Donna 731-8204.
EARL'S, 4937 W. 10TH (at Trimble). Needs
energetic floor stafT day/eve. Waiters, waitresses, bus persons, host, hostesses & bartenders. Pis reply in person Sept 14 btw. 3-
5 p.m.
N^
^WUCONGlfca^
United and Presbyterian.
A Christian Community of Faith representing the Reformed & Evangelical traditions
INVITES YOU TO JOIN US IN WORSHIP
IN THE CHAPEl. OF THE EPIPHANY
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
6050 CHANCELLOR BLVD
SUNDAYS-10:30 a.m.
MINISTER: REV. ALAN REYNOLDS
CHURCH OFFICE PHONE: 224-7011
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS
CENTRE
• WIN FREE TICKETS for the
Shrum Bowl every night from
Tues. Sept. 8 to Fri. Sept. 11
Draw at midnight
• SHRUM BOWL SPECIAL !!?
Buy your tickets at T.W.S.C.
Lounge (Thunderbar???).
See us for the best deal.
-3-SEATER COLONIAL maple couch,
$45; matching maple sofa table, $30; cane
bentwoord rocker, $25; dark wood arborite
kitchen set (30x48 & 4 chairs), $50; 10 speed
bike, $45 obo.
1970 MAZDA 4 DOOR Sedan. Automatic,
original owner, $795 obo. 263-8292 or 683-
3111, Local 263.
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS TI55 III (same
as TI56) Abso. New. C/W case & 171 Page
manual, $40 943-6532.
'72 DODGE, GOOD RUNNING CAR, better than a beater. $995. OBO. 272-9930.
20 - HOUSING
WANTED N/S FEM. student with sense
of humour to share lux. apt, incl. ind. pool &
fitness ctr., with resp. male student Leave
message, Peter, 682-3444, Mon.-Fri., 9-6
p.m., Sat, 10-2 p.m.
LG. ROOM WITH kitchenette & private
bath, Dunbar Area in exchange for occasional after school care of 2 children736-
5082
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS BY Judy Alexander.
Grad of Julliard School of Music & member
of B. C. Reg. MusicTeachers Assoc. 321 -4809
Oakridge.
30 - JOBS
NORTH VAN, M/F companion, twice
weekly for 28 yr. old young lady severely
handicapped with M.S. in Evergreen House
adjacent to LGH, minimum wage 980-21R1
mornings only.
BABYSITTER   WANTED,   7-9AM,   3-4
mornings per wk. for 3 1/2 yr. old boy $4/hr.
&breakfast. Call Susan 737-8310 own child
OK. 4th/Alma area.
??-LOST
VERY VALUABLE - GOLD ST. Christophers medallion and chain. Lost Friday nite
somewhere around the SUB. Sentimental
value-Steve 222-4741.
70 - SERVICES
PROFIT FROM NON-PROFIT groceries
at Agora food Co-op. A profitic and prophetic
experience at Dunbar & 17th.
FUND RAISER WITH expertise in Indian Act & Canadian Granting Agencies etc.
can obtain commissioned freelance Assoc,
with a native group. Call McCoy, 580-3484.
11 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING-MINIMUM   NOTICE.
SERVICE essays & resumes scripts, Proof
reading, writing/research help. 327-0425
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: student
discounts. Laser & letter quality printers.
10th & Discovery 222-2122
JUDITH FILTNESS, 3206 W. 38TH AVE
263-0351 experienced & accurate student
rates available.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 YRS exp.
word proc. _ IBM typewriter. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson 228-8346
ACCURATE REPORTS.
Broadway & Granville
732-4426. Student rates available.
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
September 11,1987 Blair goes to court
to legalize pot
By JENNIFER LYALL
UBC's self-proclaimed "professional troublemaker"isgoingto
court to fight for what he considers
his constitutional right to cultivate marijuana in the Acadia
Camp garden.
"A person should be able to get
a licence to cultivate cannabis for
personal consumption," said Blair
Longley.
Longley said laws prohibiting
cultivation of cannabis contradict
Section One of the Charter of
Rights, which says legal limitations on personal freedoms must
be "reasonable and demonstrably
justified in a democratic society."
"The question at hand is
whether or not it's reasonable to
sentence someone to fail for seven
years for growing the cannabis
plant," said Longley. "If anybody
listens to the arguments it's impossible to think that it's reasonable and justified. It appears
crazy and bizarre."
Longley ishappy to be going to
court, which he said will finally
give him a platform to express his
views.
To protest the drug laws, he
has openly been growing marijuana in community gardens at
SFU and UBC since the Charter
came down in 1982. He said police
have often destroyed his crop but
have been reluctant to lay charges.
Longley said marijuana is not
a dangerous enough drug to justify
the degree of criminality attached
to it.
"The law would be reasonable
Rick Hansen
is now a doc
By DEANNE FISHER
War Memorial  gym  echoed
with applause on Wednesday.
Leslie Peterson was convo-
cated as new UBC Chancellor and
Man in Motion Rick Hansen as
well as past Chancellor Robert
Wyman were given honorary degrees in a special ceremony in
recognition of their acheivements.
Rick Hansen received a series
of standing ovations when conferred with his degree of laws. In
his short speech, Dr. Hansen
spoke of his first days at UBC as a
handicapped physical education
student and said he was "full of
optimism and hope." But he felt
his first year was also filled with ''a
lot of uncertainty." His message to
students was "anything you believe possible will come true."
Peterson was formally
installed by Lieutenant-Govenor
if it (pot) drove people delirious
until they died, but it's not that
way," he said. "Tobacco's more
poisonous, more addictive, and a
worse substance to smoke."
"The plant...is not toxic, nor
does it become physiologically
addictive."
Cannabis is only harmful if
smoked, as any substance is harmful if smoked, said Longley. But,
although he admits cultivation
implies consumption, he claims
his fight is not to legalize smoking
the drug.
"The smoking is irrelevant,"
hesaid. "WhatI'msayingisthatit
should be legal to grow it in your
garden." Longley prefers his pot in
omelets, and said eating it is not
harmful but "nutritious."
The illegality of cannabis is
hypocritical, because opium poppies and other narcotic herbs are
freely grown and legally available
through seed catalogues, Longley
said.
Because gardeners can legally grow poppies as long as
opium is not produced, "the parallel situation would be you could
grow cannabis as long as you
weren't producing hash," he said.
Longley said he also opposes
marijuana laws because they are
the product of racist policies.
Marijuana, along with opium,
was first outlawed in Canada not
because of medical dangers but to
persecute the Chinese and deter
immigration, said Longley. Racist
sentiment against the Chinese
was strong in the early 1900s and
many elements of their culture,
including opium andlndian hemp,
were made illegal, he said.
"It is possible to make a case
that it was rational to prevent
Chinese immigration, and one of
the tools was making various
parts of their culture illegal," said
Longley. Even though the original
reason for it is obsolete, "it's a tool
of persecution that's still operat-
Blair Longley
ing," he said.
The Narcotics Control Act
prohibiting the use of opium and
other drugs, including Indian
hemp, was passed in 1923, the
same year as the passage of the
Chinese Immigration Act placed a
head tax on Chinese immigrants.
Robert Rogers, dis-robed and re-
robed and welcomed by representatives of nineteen other institutions from as far off as Oxford,
Belfast and Melbou-ne.
Advanced education minister
Stanley Hagen described Peterson
as "a man of integrity, intelligence
and wisdom."
Representing the Alma Mater
Society, President Rebecca
Nevraumont said Peterson "has a
grasp on what it's like to be a
student here" and encouraged
students to approach and shake
hands with the new Chancellor as
he tours the campus.
Peterson himself expressed
concerns about unequal access to
education and spoke of a time to
come "when ability will be the
discriminator for education." .
Other speakers reflected
Hansen's positive tone. UBC
President David Strangway encouraged new students in attendance to "choose UBC because it
gives you a
chance to fulfill your own hopes
and aspirations."
Hagen said students should
"take part of every aspect of UBC
(to) expand horizons beyond a
single focus."
Many of the student audience
members left after Hansen's moving speech and though the ceremonies continued with the conferring of Wyman's degree and subsequent remarks, the fervor had
disappeared.
NDP proposes new
elections bill
Leslie Peterson is invested as Chancellor by UBC president David Strangway
dan andrews photo
By PETER MEHLING
An NDP MLA has introduced a private members bill to
safeguard fair election practices in
B.C.
NDP Bill-M208 would
preserve the right to vote on election day by allowing those people
already registered in another riding to reregister in the riding of
their residence, Gordon Hanson
said.
"We believe that anyone
should be able to (register to) vote
on election day," he said.
The bill stands in opposition to Social Credit Bill 28, which
would eliminate election day registrations.
Hanson said many students would be disenfranchised by
Social credit proposals to eliminate section 80 voting. He said
election day registration is especially important to students because they change their place of
residence more often than most
people.
"Students have a lot to
lose under the Socreds' (election)
plans," said Hanson. "It's a very
very dangerous b;V."
Hanson's bill also proposes to lower the provincial vot
ing age from 19 to 18. "It is discrimination to stop 18 year olds
from voting," he said, adding that
eighteen year olds "should be full
citizens."
Hanson said the Socred
proposal is calculated to disenfranchise NDP voters.
"The Socreds' bill is a
plasticine document designed to
keep the government in power,"
Hanson said. "People are losing
votes and the right to change their
government."
But Bob Patterson, B.C.'s
deputy chief electoral officer, said
that under the amendments re
posed by the government, students would have ample time to
register prior to an election.
Bill 28 creates for six
additional registration days during an election and this should
more than make up for the elimination of election day registration,
Patterson said.
Under the present system eligible voters can register
any time prior to an election being
called or during the first ten days
after an election is called. Election
day registration is only allowed for
those not already registered in
another electoral district.
The changes proposed by
the government are required in
order to "maintain the integrity of
tho voters list," Patterson said.
Voting day registration
"can lead to concerns that the elec
tion itself is not as legitimate as it
could be," Patterson said. "People
have to have confidence in the
system."
He said that expanded
section 80 election day registration, as proposed by the NDP,
could lead to "confusion and congestion at the polls."
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont wants the present
system of section 80 voting to be
preserved.
The removal of section
80's would be "a large inconvenience to students," she said. "It
will made life more difficult."
"Removing section 80 will
give students the dual responsibility of registration and voting. The
government will have to educate
the students as to the process required for them to exercise their
rights," she said.
Page3
September 11,1987
UBYSSEY Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
September 11,1987 Law bars women
Lack of parity in legal system discriminates
By ALLISON FELKER
Male domination and discrima-
tion against women permeates
every facet of the legal system in
Canada, two law professors told a
crowd of 200 at Hebb theatre
Thursday.
Kathleen Lahey, professor of
law at the University of Windsor
in Ontario, said this discrimination starts at law school. "Professors are of an overwhelmingly
male Caucasian persuasion.rarely
physically challenged or openly
homosexual." Women are involved at law school, she added,
but are segregated largely IN secretarial and administrative positions.
Lahey also objected to the educational material used at law
school. Legal issues affecting
women, such as abortion, rape,
and prostitution "are taught in
abstract discussions without reference to lives and experiences.
It's traumatic for women who have
experienced these things. We
want to say" stop it, that's my body
THE UBYSSEY NEEDS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHERS
LAY-OUT PEOPLE
CRITICS
TYPISTS
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you're dealing with as a legal,
moral issue.'"
Catherine MacKinnon, law professor at Yale, Harvard, and
UCLA, spoke about the male bias
Professors are of an overwhelmingly male Caucasian
persuasion, rarely physically
challenged or openly homesex-
ual.
of Canadian law. In Canada, the
Charter of Rights is written from a
defensive stance against the government. But, MacKinnon adds,
this is from a male standpoint.
"Men are on women's backs before the government is. While men
are worried about the government
taking their rights away, women
have to worry about men taking
their rights away. Women are
oppressed in privacy out of the
government's jurisdiction," she
said.
MacKinnon focused on rape
laws as an example of women's
legal rights being overlooked.
"Rape laws are constructed from
the point of view of the man and
the rapist. There is a pervasive
presumption of equality between
men and women in sex. It's considered a legal defense for the
rapist to believe that the woman
gave him consent to her body," she
said.
The lecture was sponsored by
the Law Faculty Association, the
Law Student Association, and the
Western Legal Educational Aid
Foundation.
Media misleads public
By CELIA HENSLOWE
Canadians are being deceived by the media and should
"demand quality newspapers for
the sake of democracy," said
Simma Holt last Tuesday night
at Britannia Secondary School.
The journalist, author and
former MP spoke to preview her
upcoming course -"Journalism:
General Reporting.".
"What is happening in Canada today is not what is being reported. If people knew there
would be a bloody revolution,"
said Holt.
Holt said the • National
Enquirer and the Star are better
examples of journalism than the
Vancouver Province and the
Globe and Mail, which contain
editorial comments in their news
coverage.
"We don't have newspapers
because we don't have journalism in our papers," she said.
k
"Accuracy, objectivity, and
fairness" are the cornerstones of
good journalism and the facts
alone should present the complete story, said Holt. She referred to the recent furors over
Mulroney's slipping popularity
and over free trade as examples
of Canadian papers' biased and
incomplete reporting.
Holt said the newspapers
have the power to control information and that someone should
be examiningit. "Nobody is looking behind the scenes to see who
is controlling Canada," she said.
While Holt touched on a few
guidelines for prospective journalists, her presentation was
marred by frequent digressions
into reminiscences of her experiences as a reporter for the Vancouver Sun.
Holt will be teaching an eight
session course titled "Journalism: General Reporting." .
Chernobyl accident victim chats with doctor at UBC hearth spa.
noel delahunt photo
GMAT     LSAT
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
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WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
University of British Columbia
Next courses October 2,3,4
• Includes Sexton text book, lectures and
• One year personalized services.
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recently appointed
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SUNDAY, SEPT. 13,10 am at UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
5375 University Blvd. (5 minute mik Irom U.B.C. campus) FREE CORN ROAST WILL FOLLOW THE SERVICE.
At Granada, we're offering special student rates on a wide assortment
of top-quality home entertainment products. We'll give you our low 12-month
rate for a special 8-month term so you can enjoy a colour TV for as
little as $19.95 a month. Or rent a full-function VCR for $24.95 a month. And,
to top it off, our in-home Granadacover service is yours at no extra charge.
Just clip this ad and take it to your nearest Granada Home Entertainment
Centre today for the complete picture. But hurry, offer expires September 30th.
After all, if you don't have a TV, where will you do all your studying?
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September 11,1987
UBYSSEY
PageS Shrum Bowl will be great bash
This Saturday at 7:30 the UBC
football team will face the Simon
Fraser Clansmen under Swangard Stadium's bright lights to
decide B.C. university football
supremecy in the revival of the
Shrum Bowl.
UBC will take a 2-0 WIFL record into Saturday's game while
SFU has yet to play this season.
The contest will mark the first
meeting between the two schools
since 1982 when the 'Birds won 19-
7. Since its inception in 1967 the
Clansmen have won ten times in
the on-again-off-again classic;
holding a 5-4 advantage with one
game ending in a tie.
The game will pit the best in
Canadian football against a powerhouse in the NAIA's Division
One Columbia Football League.
Because the game will be governed by American rules fans can
expect the soaring aerial attack of
the 'Birds grounded in favor of
running the ball and increasing
their time of possession.
"We're definitely a pass oriented
team? said head coach Frank
Smith, " but we may run the ball a
little more in Saturday's game
than we would against a Canadian
school."
Starting quarterback Jordan
Ganger has already compiled 545
passing yards in the two games,
versus 250 total team rushing
yards.
The key, however, to a Thuner-
bird victory will be their time of
possession with the ball: UBC's
possession of the ball will nullify
the effectiveness of SFU's outstanding running back, Orville
Lee.
Lee is a game breaking back
who rushed for a total of 980 yards
last year, and scored 17 touch
downs; accumulating an incredible 423 yards net offence while
scoring five touch downs in a
single game.
It's going to be war out there?
said Lee.
Yes Mr. Lee, you may be right.
AMS lottery
better than 6/49
By NIKOLA MARIN
Everyone stands to benefit from
this year's AMS Tuition lottery.
A one dollar ticket is not only a
chance to win $1500, the average
tuition, it's 20 cents towards the
club or undergraduate society that
sells it.
"The most exciting part of this
Problem spirals
continued from page 1
President Dr. Leo Kristjanson
called called the reduced accessa-
bility "particularly unfortunate
because Arts and Sciences was the
last undergraduate faculty to introduce quotas. Consequently, for
the first time in the history of the
university we are having to turn
away students."
Surjik echoed the alarm of
Kristjanson, appealing to the premier "on behalf of these potential
students: for decency and fairness'
sake, your government must increase funding, first to ensure that
these travesties are corrected, and
second, to ensure that they will not
happen in the future."
Surjik added, "If we do not arrest
this problem immediately, it will
spiral until we have an entire
generation of the citizens who
were on the wrong side of the coin
when it was flipped in 1987."
lottery is that it's an incredible
opportunity for clubs and undergraduate societies to raise funds
for themselves," said AMS director
of administration Tim Bird.
There is also a bonus for the
seller of the winning ticket. Last
year it was a trip for two to the
Virgin Islands. Thisyear's prize is
still a mystery.
As in the past, profits will go
towards AMS bursaries, "A cause
close to home," said Bird.
Clubs and undergrad societies
can obtain tables and books often
tickets from SUB 266 for return by
November 5. Individual tickets
are available at the AMS Box Office, SUB main concourse and at
the used book store.
The draw date is Nov. 20. On
Nov. 24 The winner will be announced in our fantastic newspaper, the Ubyssey," said Bird.
4
* Tr*!'
"*xnZii
■■?' a
**',- s<*
* *.
*  J*-\*
*    * * j    iSw
DARLENE MARZARI,
M.L.A. VANCOUVER. PT. GREY
is available to help you with
- student aid appeals
- landlord & tenant problems
- up to date information on
government programs
at her community office
3606 West Broadway (at Dunbar)
Tel: 732-8683
Hours: Monday-Friday 9:30 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m.- 1p.m.
Serving All Point Grey Residents
"OUT OF MY way, I'm on my way to join the Ubyssey"
GRAND OPENING
COPY SALE
3'
COPIES
• 81/2x11 20 lb. white or standard colors
• Sale ends September 27th
Hmns   Murnljy  I h ,. .rl,)y M ')
I nitjy M t
S.ilurddy Sunddy 11 b
2nd Floor, 2174 Western Parkway iat u b c across iiom chevron)
Vancouver, B.C. 224-6225
THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
If you are in third or fourth year and you're looking for a
career in the business world, come see us. We're Chartered
Accountants from firms downtown and in the Lower Mainland
and we'll be on campus September 15 to talk about career
possibilities in one of the most stable professions - chartered
accountancy.
There are jobs available in chartered accountancy for
non-Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered
Accountants come from all backgrounds, bringing new skills
and diversity to this growing, dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for accounting
and auditing in Canada and, because of their education and
training, are in demand by business around the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal
basis and explore opportunities. You may be an ideal
candidate for Canada's fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to:
Music Room
UBC Faculty Club
Tuesday, September 15
5 - 7 p.m.
Foi more information contact Jan Arnold at 681-3264,
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
_«
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia
Page 6
UBYSSEY
September 11,1987 FRIDAY
U
ffl
CD
O
PQ
o
43
H
« *i>
S s
c$iJ
GO  §
September 11,1987
UBYSSEY
Page 7 SAVE A FORTUNE
From the copy specialists
at Kinko's. you can get high
quality copies at a price that
will save you a fortune.
kinko's
(,R[ AT C'OPILSCiRL.AT PLOP I I
5"706 University Blvd.
222-1688
M TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11 6
CAMPUS
CUTS
Haircutting for men & women
5736 University Blvd.
(In The Village)
228-1471
Chomsky lacks manners
_u__
CALL FOR
APPLICATIONS
Applications are now being accepted to fill
one (1) vacant student SENATE-AT-LARGE
seat. The term of office will commence
October 1,1987 to March 30th, 1988.
As per the Universities Act and the A.M.S.
code of procedures and by-laws, the
successful candidate will be an A.M.S.
member. Applications may be picked up from
SUB 238 and returned by 4pm, Friday,
September 25th, 1987.
For more information, please contact A.M.S.
president Rebecca Nevraumont, SUB 256,
228-3972
tyardtfy COMPUTERS
3737 W. 10th Ave. (and Alma) Van.
222-2326
We are your neighbourhood quality computer
store. We don't cut corners like some others
do and yet our prices are most competitive.
-10 Mhz AT, 640K with monitor $1360
-Turbo XT, 640K, 2 drives, monitor $998
-30 MB hard dr. with system $560
-20 MB hard dr. with system $520
Excellent services and support provided.
Please ask for student discount with valid
AMS card.
APPLICATIONS
are now being accepted
for
5 positions on the
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
and 1 position
for
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
Applications and further information can be
obtained in the Administrative Assistant's office,
SUB Room 238.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED NO
LATER THAN 4:00 p.m. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER
25,1987 TO SUB ROOM 238.
By ADAM JONES
Give us this day our daily
Chomsky. For 1987, the
continent's foremost radical commentator has two worthy new
contributions on the shelves.
Reading Noam Chomsky for
the first time can be an unnerving
experience. Less than two paragraphs into any of the renowned
linguist's dozen or so major political works, you realize it: the man
has no manners.
There's no delicate circumspection. When Chomsky chooses
to pillory another commentator,
he launches into the fray with a
withering direct attack, calling
into question not only the logical
consistency but the actual moral
credibility of his target. And
when he carves up a sacred cow,
be it Israeli policy or liberal-
democratic freedoms, he sets
about his task with all the no-
nonsense finesse of a veteran
butcher — albeit an unusually
cerebral one.
Books
Pirates and Emperors: International Terrorism in the
Real World, by Noam
Chomsky. Black Rose Books.
After a while you get used to
this approach. After a while
longer, chances are you come to
find any other approach a bit
pallid. At his best (in the Vietnam-era American Power and
New Mandarins, for example, or
last year's Turning the Tide),
Chomsky attains a standard of
sustained polemic rarely seen in
our decorum-choked western society: perhaps not since Kierkegaard launched his brilliant
broadside against Danish Christendom more than a century ago.
Chomsky's latest effort is Pirates and Emporors:    Interna
tional Terrorism in the Real
world. The title is taken froma
tale told by StAugustine, relating an encounter between a bandit and a great ruler. Called to
account for his crimes, the pirate
demands: "How dare you molest
the whole world? Because I do it
with a little ship only, I am called
a thief; you, doing it with a great
navy, are called an Emperor."
is that intellectual and media
commentary on the subject has
become a "comical frenzy." Reputable analysts earnesttly
acramble to denounce the latest
PLO or Libyan action, real or
imagined, and compose sober rejoinders on the need for swift and
devastating "countermeasures."
He concludes pointedly: "There is
little here to surprise any honest
"Chomsky attains a standard of sustained polemic rarely seen in our decorum - choked western society."
This is the springboard for
Chomsky's analysis of small-
scale "retail" terrorism, as practiced by Libys's Qaddafi, factions
of the PLO, and others, versus
massive "wholesale" terrorism.
The fertile irony is that the latter
brand of violence is largely monopolized by those very powers—
especially the United States
and Israel—who so vocally denounce, and "retaliate" against,
the isolated atrocities of the retailers.
"[A] proper history and appropriate form of Newspeak have
been contrived," Chomsky writes,
"in which terrorism is the province of Palestinians, while Israelis carry out 'retaliation', or
sometimes. legitimate 'preemp-
tiion'... The doctrinal system is
designed to ensure that these
conclusions are true by definition, regardless of the facts—
which are either not reported, or
reported in such a manner as to
conform to doctrinal necessities,
or—occasionally—reported honestly but then dismissed to the
memory hole."
The result, Chomsky charges,
student of history."
Pirates and Emperors is comprised of three essays. Two are
fairly straightforward and un-
spectular, expanding on and
updating some themes Chomsky
has explored in earlier books and
essays on the Middle East. The
last, Libya in US Demonology", is
a small masterpiecs. It contrasts
Libyan terrorism—sufficiently
minimal that killings, mostly of
Qaddafi's opponents, can be individually cited—with the indiscriminate ferocity of American
"retaliation" against Libyan naval craft and the civilian population of Tripoli.
Chomsky effectively demolishes the legal rationale given by
US spokesmen for the attacks on
Libya, and is quite clear about the
real purpose of the raids. "It is an
interesting fact about American
culture," he comments in one of
his more pensive moments, "that
this regular show of [US] cowardice and two-bit thuggery seems to
strike a responsive chord, as it
sometimes does abroad."
Disturbing reading and,   as
always, indispensable stuff.
Mike Caine's movie this week
SAN JAY SINGHAL
The Fourth Protocol is based
on a novel by Frederick Forsythe
who also wrote Day of the Jackal,
an excellent novel which was
made into an excellent film. The
Fourth Protocol is a good movie,
but not in the class of the former.
The title refers to the four
protocols of a nuclear non-proliferation treaty signed between the
Warsaw Pact countries and the
NATO alliance in 1968. The story
takes place in present day England, and basically consists of the
Russians trying to break the
fourth protocol, and the British
trying to stop them.
MOVIE REVIEW: The Fourth
Protocol, Lorimar Motion Pic-
turesstarring Michael Caine
and Pierce Brosnan.
Oakridge Centre, Bay Theatre. Rated 14 years.by
The Russians unfortunately
seem to be doing this just because
they're nasty, but at least Forsythe doesn't glorify the British
by stomping on the Russians. In
this movie, everyone is incompetent. Infact, once I realized what
the fourth protocol was, I couldn't
understand how the KGB could
possibly be stupid enough to try
and break it. The Americans are
going to love this one.
Still, the movie is actually fun
to watch and has some admirable
qualities. Michael Caine does a
masterful job as the world weary
top British agent, John Preston.
While he is on the screen the
movie is a joy to behold. Preston is
disliked by his supervisor, but
excels despite this handicap.
Sound familiar?   You watch too
much American television.
Stereotyping seems to be this
picture's strong point.
Preston's adversary, the ruthless KGB operative Valeri Pet-
rofsky, is played well by Pierce
Brosnan. Remington Steele fans
(I'm one) may, however, be disappointed. Brosnan is not given
much of a role, and to top it off,
he's a bad guy. Nevertheless, he's
still the most believable Russian
in the bunch. At least he doesn't
have a Texas accent.
The movie is action oriented,
with enough plot twists to maintain my interest. The storyline
progresses smoothly, and the
movie becomes rivetting towards
the end.But then, with a silly
attempt at denoument, or whatever, the ending is ruined. Completely.
The audience obviously enjoyed the show throughout the
movie, but at the very end, I overheard the following comments: "If
you think that that's a good
enough reason to kill all those
people, then you're nuts!".
Page 8
UBYSSEY
September 11,1987 The university is hard, at work planning a large new
library building between Angus and Sedgewick.
Regent College's new building at University Boulevard and Wesbrook Mall is already under construction. David Lam has donated $1 million to each of
these projects as well as a centre for Pacific Rim
Studies at University of Victoria and various other
projects in Vancouver and Hong Kong. Who is he?
DAVID LAM:
Vancouver's entrepreneurial philanthropist talks
about universities, guns and
Chinese philosophy
BY STEPHEN WISENTHAL
In his comfortably elegant office
on the fourth floor of a building he
owns on Seymour street, David
Lam, a quiet, friendly, confident
man, complains good-naturedly
about how busy he is now that he is
retired.
But few would call major responsibility for the Sun Yat Sen
Classical Gardens in Chinatown,
The David Lam Management
Research Library at UBC and
other projects at all of B.C.'s universities a normal quiet retirement.
He has used his time since retirement for entrepreneurial philanthropy — giving substantial
sums of money to catalyze projects
he wants to see realized.
And this is nothing but good
news for Universities in British
Columbia which have already received millions of dollars from
Lam. He believes there is nothing
more important than education,
particularly higher education.
"Without education we are just
primitive animals."
But he says education must
have a proper grounding in a
combination of Christian and Chi
nese philosophy.
"Education without the correct
philosophy is only fast gun," The
says, explaining that some people
confuse education with mere "fast
gun" training. "A fast gun doesn't
know when to shoot where." He
says he doubts there is any benefit
from education that is mere training and doesn't change and expand a person's mind.
In Lam's vision, the desirable
aspects of Chinese philosophy are
harmony with yourself, with nature and among people, a positive
attitude, moderation in demands
and a simple, healthy life.
And Christianity contributes
the idea of charity and service.
"Christianity is a positive philosophy because Christians are supposed to go to the world and help,"
he says.
Lam wants to "combat me-ism"
and feels "there is too much hatred
in this world." He says that hatred
and love are two ways to achieve
ends. "Love takes a long time but
you create more happiness.
Hatred is quick but then you destroy."
He says Canada should take
advantage of its position as "one of
the highest educated nations in
the world" and bring in bright
minds from third world countries
to our universities. He sees the
imposition of differential fees as
an unfortunate measure
whichhas created an image of discrimination.
The $100,000 or so gained from
having differential fees compared
with the millions spent on universities is "too high a price to pay for
having an image of discrimination," he says.
"More bright brains in a university stimulates and creates and
brings the standard up," he says,
adding that when the students go
home they will think of Canada.
The benefits are forever."
But Lam makes clear that in
addition to having "good good students," universities need "very
very good faculty."
"We need to create a working
atmosphere so that they like to
come to the university," he says.
The university has to be competitive in the world market and pay
faculty what they could get elsewhere, says Lam.
"This is the strength of our
country for years and years to
come," he says. "If we fail in our
education system, I guaranteeour
country will start sliding down to
becoming a has been country."
Lam adds that universities
have three roles: education, research and service to the community. He feels the service part
doesn't always get the attention it
deserves and that is one of the
reasons he gave money to the
Management Research Library.
"The library can help by providing some sort of service that can
serve the business community on a
long-term basis and at the same
time serve the needs of students,"
he says.
He says corporate leaders have
thanked him for setting up
aservice which provides in minutes information they used to have
to get from New York and wait
days for.
And Lam sees other ways the
university could serve the community.
He says the botanical garden
should go beyond serving education and research needs. "It should
be vastly expanded and beautified
to serve the public."
He adds that the Museum of
Anthropology is a good example of
a part of the university that serves
all three functions, helping to
bring town and gown together.
Lam came to Canada in 1967
from Hong Kong with $5000 and a
family of five. It has been in the
last twenty years that he has become a wealthy man, working as a
Stephen wisenthal photo
successful real estate developer
and helping people from Hong
Kong invest their money here.
He says money is the least
important thing you need to succeed and credits his success to his
education. He has a BA in Economics from a college in Canton
and an MBA from Temple University in Philadelphia. When he arrived in Vancouver, he earned a
diploma in real estate and mortgage finance at UBC.
Now he sees Canada as his
home and China and the rest of
Asia as the frontier. "Home is
where the heart is and my heart is
here," says Lam.
"The heaviest concentration of
Chinese intellectuals is in North
America," he says. "The cultural
revolution in China has taken one
whole generation [there] off the
educated list."
As far as wealth goes, Peter
Newman wrote in a July 1986
article in MacLeans that Lam's
"greatest coup was buying and
selling the Insurance Exchange
Building in San Francisco at a $23
million profit." Newman added
that Lam put all the money into
his charitable foundation.
But Lam lives in a modest
house and his only indulgences are
see page 15: Lam
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
AISO
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Applications for Ten Positions on the 1987/88
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
Are Now Being Accepted
The Security Team works Friday, Saturday, and
other designated days in the Student Union
Building. The Team is responsible for assisting the
Proctor in protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding
security teams hired for any SUB function and
implementing SAC policy in SUB.
Application forms are now available in the AMS
Executive secretary's office , SUB room 238.
These positions are open to male and female
U.B.C. students.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED
BY
4P.M. Friday September 18 1987
We know that
a cheap calculator can
cost you blood, sweat
and time.
Investing in a
Hewlett-Packard calculator, on the other
hand, can save you
time and again.
HP calculators not
only have better
functions. They function better. Without
sticking keys and bad
connections.
Through October
31. you can get the
cream of the calculators at a non-fat price.
We're cutting $15
off the HP-12C. That
buys you more built-
in functions than
anyone else's financial calculator.
And w'e're giving
awav a free Advantage
Module, a $84.95
value, with every HP-41
Advanced Scientific
calculator you buy.
This l_K-byte plug-
in. menu-driven ROM
was designed specially
for students.
So drop by your
campus bookstore or
local dealer and compare HP calculators
with, (he rest. Hy midterm, you'll see what
a deal this is.
InW HEWLETT
UM PACKARD
September 11,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 By LAURA BUSHEIKIN
Director Charlie McFarland
is coonvinced that classical plays,
too often dismissed as 'old
fashioned', can have great significance to a contemporary.
McFarland is currently in
Vancouver directing A Doll's
House a Freddy Wood Theatre
(opening September 18), and he's
confident that he can brush off
any dust that may have settled
on the shoulders of this play,
which, he says, many people
think of as an old Chestnut'.
"You needn't roll your eyes
when you hear someone's doing
an Ibsen play. A Doll's House
was extremely controversial
when it was first performed,"
McFarland says. He's hoping to
make this controversy felt by
modern audiences.
"There are ways of bringing
a classical play forward so that,
by being true to the spirit of the
writer's intention, but not the
letter, we can give a current
audience an experience equivalent to that of the original
Dusting
off the
crinolines
audience."
To achieve this aim, he's
made some innovative production choices—in particular, the
decision not to set the play in the
1890's. "It's a play about
marriage in modern society. If
we do it in Victorian Crinolines it
won't look like marriage in
modern society," McFarland
says.
"But it can't be done in
modern dress. Nora (the main
character) has been taught to
fulfill masculine images of
women. Today we'd look at her
and say, why did she marry that
asshole in the first place?"
So McFarland has set the
play in the early 60's, so that it
has "a number of resonances.
We can easily beleive that a
woman who grew up in the 50's
has been brought up to be
Daddy's baby-doll and husband's
doll-wife. A further resonance is
created in terms of one of the last
great icons of the doll-wife:
Jackie Kennedy. I'M using
Jackie Kennedy as a sort of
model for Nora."
McFarland, who has worked
at Stratford Ontario and is
presently Associate Director the
The Manitoba Theatre Centre,
hails originally from England.
He attended Cambridge University, where he received his
English Degree and was President of the CAmbridge Drama
Society. He moved to Canada six
years ago.
"Fm here because Canadian
theatre is potentially very
exciting. Canada is in the midst
of building theatre traditions.
There are new voices to be heard
here."
McFarland cites John
Murelle and Sharon Pollock as
Canadian Playwrights who he
admires. He has a very clear
vision of what qualities comprise
a great play.
"A play must discuss things
in as complex a way as possible—be as inclusive as possible.
A great play displays a relentless
photos by Steve Chan
quality of intellect. I beleive in
mythic writing in the sense that
a play has an element not just
dealing with kitchen sinks and
bow sets. Domestic drama must
have resonances far beyond its
immediate 'existence'. I always
ask "How large is the spirit of the
play?' Ultimately, largeness of
outlook defines a good play."
McFarland feels that A
Doll's House qualifies as a great
play, and he is determined to
make its greatness accessible to
contemporary audiences. He
insists that ,^Ve should understand that Ibsen wasn't writing
about people in period costumes
and period sets; rather, he was
writing about people like us."
How bad is bad?
By STEPHEN HUNT
The CBS guys standing by
the front entrance are enthusiastic tonight. Refugees from the
Don Johnson School of Baggy
Italian Linen Suits, thev smile,
catch your eye, inspect your invitation to the premiere of
Michael Jackson's new album
Bad (on the invitation Bad
stands for "Better Attend Dammit") and only then, satisfied
that you are indeed legitimate,
do they thrust into your outstretched palm the evening's
most coveted prize: four Free
Drink Tickets.
The premiere is taking place
at a club called Waves. Seventy -
five record store and radio station
employees, the wheels that turn
the record industry, are sitting
around, stirring their one-ticket-
per-ounce mixed drinks, trying to
make them last.
Five    years    ago    Michael
Jackson released Thriller. It sold
38 million records, more than any
other album ever, more than twice
as much as even the second-greatest selling album ever, the audio
equivalent of Wavne GretzkVs
winning the scoring title. In the
process, Thriller revived a sagging
recording industry and turned
Michael Jackson, who was not
exactly a nobody prior to its release, into a mega -star.
Bad is Jackson's follow-up to
Thriller, the impossible act to follow - how do you better an album
that sold 38 million copies? After
Rumours sold 13 million for Fleetwood Mac, Tusk sold diddly squat,
despite being an excellent, innovative album. The Bee Gees spontaneously comusted after the soundtrack to Saturday Night Live sold
10 million. Clearly, the precedent
has been set for the flop that follows the monster hit.
Bad   has   been   delayed  for
_**
:s
<_:
~_#
and
>s?
PRESENTS *    °
THE 4TH ANNUAL ^
AMS BBQ
FRIDAY
SEPTEMBER 11
NOON-7:30
featuring
k.d. lang
and the reclines w
Wailin' Demons and
Mercury Festival
in a FREE concert
Maclnnes Field (next to S.U.B)
Please bring I.D.
upwards of a year now.    There
were a lot of rumours:   Michael
didn't want to compete with sister
Janet's   hot-selling   album;   he
wanted to make Peter Pan with
Steven Spielberg; he was too busy
buying up the Beatles' catalogue
and creating new neuroses for
himself to concentrate on writing
new stuff.   Michael had become
paralyzed by his own mega-ness.
Now, five years after Thriller,
Bad is ready.
But first, goes the CBS Discount Don Johnson, we're going to
show a retrospective of Michael's
A-Mazing Career!
Everyone groans. The last of
the drink tickets are spent.
Attention is focused on the
video screen. Michael is shown as
a member of the Jackson 5, a
sweet-faced 9 year old singing "I
Want You Back", then a flash cut
to post-surgical Mikey, then backwards in time to the Off the Wall
and Thriller singles - "That Girl of
Mine", "Billie Jean", "Beat It".
They show Mikey winning everything at the American Music
Awards and Emmys, then singing
"Beat It" at the Motown 25th
Anniversary.
Michael Jackson may have
become a personality cult, someone so fawned over and followed by
the popular culture that the cynics
among us tind him an easy target
to hate, but all is forgiven whenhe
starts to dance.
Finally they play Bad. The
video, directed by Martin Score -
ese, starts of black and white, a
gang clash of sorts in an underground parking garage. There are
bits and pieces of inane dialogue -
mostly tough black dudes taunting Mikey who shouts back like a
five year old with girl's voice somethinglike: "Are you bad? Are you
bad?*
It's mostly dumb, until the
B&W falls away into colour and all
the gangsters start to dance, and
then Mikey starts to sing: "Your
butt is mine, gonna tell you right."
You almost don't want it to Le a
good song, but to be perfectly
frank, the song is hot. It's going to
take about 20 seconds to rise to
number one on the pop and soul
and album charts.
The video in question is little
more than a repeat of "Thriller"
combined with "Beat It" - it's too
cluttered, too Hollywood, there's
too much Fabulousness and too
little Mikey himself. Tut let's face
it: any video with Michael Jackson
doing his amazing dance is better
than 98% of all the videos ever
made, so why quibble about a rerun?
Discount Don Johnson leans
over our table and smiles. He gets
a table full of classic Canadian
shoulder shrugs, the body language equivalent of OK, I have to
admit it's pretty good.
It's what he was looking for.
He drops two fistfulls of Free!
Drink! Tickets! on to our table and
says, "conservatively you have to
believe it will do twelve million, t
hat's a third of Thriller. Maybe 20.
If it's a huge flop it will still do five.
I'm not complaining."
I suppose not.
The University of British Columbia
Frederic   Wood Theatre
Presents
A Doll's House
by Henrik Ibsen
Directed by Charles McFarland
September 16-26
Special Previews - Sept. 16 & 17
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8pm
Matinees :    Sat. 19th & Sat 26th - 2pm
Thurs 24th - 12:30 pm
Student Season Tickets - 4 Plays for $15
A Doll's House
Ibsen September 16-26
The Collected Works of Billy the Kid
Ondaatje ..November 18-28
Juno and the Paycock
O'Casey January 13-23
A Flea In Her Ear
Feydcau March 9-19
Box Office • Frederick Wood Theatre • Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
Page 10
UBYSSEY
September 11,1987 Don't Sit Under The Apple Tree - A Review
photo by: Peg Campbell
New, risky, innovative
Third fringe festival boldly goes where no fringe has
gone before.
By ALAR OLL JUM
For the next ten days,
Vancouver's notorious Mt. Pleasant neighbourhood will play host
to an explosion of 'alternative'
theatre and performance art.
About 100 groups will present
about 500 shows spread out over
ten indoor and two outdoor venues, all within walking distance of
Main and Broadway.
The festival is very accessible to
the public. Show tickets all cost
five dollars or less and performances take place at a variety of
times between noon and midnight.
Inexpensive refreshments are
available at the Fringe Club located in the center of Mt. Pleasant
on llth Ave. at Main St. A series
of 'Fringe Forums' will be held at
the Club between noon and two
p.m. These forums are free and
open to the public and will discuss
a number of topical issues of interest to the arts community, its patrons and audiences.
According to its producer
Joanna Maratta, the third annual
Vancouver Fringe Festival will
present work that is "by and large
experimental, new, risky, innovative." although the 1987 "Fringe'
has no central theme, Maratta
identified "crime and punishment'
as one topic which several groups
have chosen to highlight in their
programs.
The issue of capital punishment, for example, is featured in
two productions of Sam
Shepherd's play Killer's Head and
in Richard Lett's play Cook, based
on the true story of one Robert
Cook, the last person to be hanged
in Alberta. Japanese-Canadian
playwright R. A. Shiomi will present Play Ball, a work based on tfie
traumatic prison camp experiences of Japanese-Canadians during World War Two. In The Prisoner, Dean Fogal will use corpo
real mime to "...trace the emotional life and gradual transformation of the prisoner from dream
state, to life in a cell, to escape and
recapture, back to dream state and
life in his cell." On a lighter note,
the Theatre Deluxe Collective
presents Pain: the Musical, "a
tuneful look at the common de-
nominatorineveryone'slife: Pain.
Come enjoy everything from
needles in the foot to knives in the
heart."
Another strong theme which
emerges from this year's Fringe
program is sex and the politics of
gender. Works with titles such as
Single Life With Condom, Free
Love, Fags, Lana Lust: The Bitch
Stops Here abound. Interestingly,
among the twenty or so works
which focus on this theme, several
take their inspiration from bygone
times. Medieval and late-Victorian stories dealing with sexual
repressionand hypocrisy appear
side by side with plays about AIDS
and contemporary sexual mores.
Approximately eighty percent of
the Fringe program is new, original material andmostof the works
are Canadian productions. Multimedia and cross-disciplinary
works are strongly represented in
the program, and cabaret, dance
and physical theatre have been
expanded. The English Suitcase
Theatre from Britain will present
works by the noted playwright
Peter Barnes. Groups from the
USA, Newfoundland, Toronto,
Edmonton and Calgary will present a wide variety of shows.
Festival producer Maratta
notes, "the programming is very,
very strong locally this year. It
appears that Vancouver has
jumped on the bandwagon, especially with the strong representation from the professional arts
community."
The increased professional in
volvement in the Fringe this year
is welcomed by Maratta: "They
have something very valuable to
contribute...as well as the very
new artist...it's a rich experience
for both and there's a lot for both to
learn.
"It's very interesting for many
seasoned professionals who are
involved with the Fringe...they
never produce their own work...so
they're very much on their own,
the same as a group who may
never have produced a work before. They're faced with the same
problems: they've got to do their
own publicity, find their own rehearsal hall, cast their own shows,
build their own sets." Instead of
constructing elaborate sets and
using fancy costumes, participants in the Fringe are, according
to Maratta, encouraged to pay
more attention to scripts, creativity and innovation in theatre and
performance art.
The value of the Fringe, according to Maratta, "...is that artists
get to do shows that they would
normally not get to do in a mainstream, commercial cultural
environment....The Fringe is
about the artist as producer, the
artist as self-motivated. It's an
opportunity for people who are
picking up the odd stagework or
screenwork or dancework or mu-
sicwork to say Tm in control - once
a year, I'm going to be in control of
my work'. And that, I think, is of
tremendous value for everyone."
"It goes on and on...it's amazing,
it really is," said Maratta. "You've
got to get hold of a program and
just look through it and hang
around the Fringe Club and find
out what's good and take your
chances. The good thing is that if
you're coming down (to the Fringe)
for a few days you can see seve
rai things and decide for yourself."
If Men Would Speak
photo by: Steve Payne
L
UBC BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
COURSEBOOKS
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for full refund any time up to the followingsession deadlines:
FALL SESSION
OCTOBER 2,1987
WINTER SESSION    JANUARY 29,1987
SPRING SESSION    MAY 14,1987
SUMMER SESSION JULY 16,1987
After the respective deadline all course books will be non-returnable.
Books must be unmarked'and saleable-as-new condition.
NQN-CQURSE BOOKS, MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES
Returns will normally be accepted up to IO days from date of purchase, when
accompanied by SALES RECEIPT.
NO RETURNS on sale items, special orders, electronic and computer goods,
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BOCaCSTORE
WORSHIPPING COMMUNITIES ON OR NEAR CAMPUS
ANGLICAN CHURCH
St. Anselm's Parish Church
University Blvd. (near University Golf Course)
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m. & 11:00a.m.
Pastor: Rev. CF. Raymond
Phone: 224-1410, 224-2568
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Lutheran Campus Ministry
5885 University Blvd. (at Wesbrook)
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Pastor: Raymond Schultz
Phone: 224-1614
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
St. Mark's College Chapel
5935 Iona Dr. (NE of Gage Towers)
Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.
Phone: 224-3311
UNIVERSITY CHAPEL
5375 University Blvd.
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
Phone: 222-0800
Contact Person: Mike Nicolls
UNIVERSITY HILL CONGREGATION
United and Presbyterian Churches
Chapel of the Epiphany in the
Vancouver School of Theology
6030 Chancellor Blvd.
Sunday Worship:  10:30 a.m.
Minister: Alan Reynolds
SORORITIES OF UBC
MAKE THE MOST OUT
OF U.B.C. THIS YEAR!
- Meet new people
- Enjoy the parties
- Exchanges with fraternities
- Participate   in  charity fundraising  &
volunteer in community
- Intramural sports and activities
- Develop and exercise leadership skills
- But most of all in a sorority you will
form special friendships that will last a
lifetime
Come see what we're all about:
Sunday tours: Sept. 20th 10 am
at International House
For more information call:
Carey     -266-2169
Cynthia - 986-2540
Janice   - 732-0471
September 11,1987
UBYSSEY
Page 11 Davis turns back to audience
by ROLF BOON
On Monday night at the Orpheum
the aging Miles Davis and company performed a unique version
of jazz fusion that drew upon
elements of rock, pop, traditional
jazz, funk, and the avant-garde.
As usual Davis spent mostof the
two hours with either his back to
the audience, bent over in his patented stance, or close to another
member of the band communicating with him through his trumpet.
He only acknowledged the
crowd of 2000 on three brief occasions. When he first appeared he
removed   his   sun   glasses   and
shielded his eyes to see just how
big the crowd was. Then, after a
solo, he encouraged the audience
to clap and they responded. He
Miles Davis Concert
Monday Sept. 7,1987
Orpheum Theatre, Vancouver
was having fun and had control.
As he left the stage he made a
gracious good-bye salute with his
horn, something he rarely does,
which gave one the feeling he may
not be touring much longer.
His best improvisations came
from the slower Jazz arranged pop
tunes of Jeff Porcaros' Human
Nature (recorded by Michael
Jackson) and Cindy Laupers'
Time After Time. During these
and his final solo he offered sensitive, lyrical, and emotional styl-
ings which carried his personal
thumb-print. They were the crowd
pleasers but just as the solos were
beginning to get involved he would
stop, leaving the listener wanting
more. His force and intensitiy
simply wasn't there. Davis, in his
early 60's, must be getting tired.
At times his presence was
strictly that of observer and con
ductor. Davis played sparingly
saving energy and leaving lots of
room for his band members to
show off their own mastery of the
instruments. He was certainly in
good company.
The band, made up of two keyboards, two percussion, guitar,
bass, and sax, was extremely
tight. Each member took several
solos and Davis would coax them
to the front to acknowledge the applause. The bass and sax solos
were the highlights of the concert.
Both were certainly artists in their
own right. Unfortunately there
was no program to identify this
talent.
The sound quality in the balcony of the Orpheum was distorted and lacked separation.
However, the largest portion of
the audience, on the main floor,
received a much cleaner sound.
There were some mixing difficulties with both keyboard solos but
for the most part the engineers
provided a solid mix.
Davis has been better. He's
passing on the resposibilities to
the younger more energetic musicians that he has carefully selected. Miles Davis's journey with
the language of jazz is nearing its
end but the legend will always remain.
Conservatives are funny, damnit!
By RICK HIEBERT
Conservatives aren't supposed
to be this funny, dammit.
It is often said that people with
conservative political or moral
views do not usually make good
satirists or humourists. Thisisbe-
cause satirists and humourists
need to have a jaundiced, critical
view of the world around them, a
view that tends to lead to advocating social reform or change. Thus,
it is unusual that someone who
values and respects tradition and
old fashioned morality will go
beyond the safe and harmless
brands of humour that conservative people often prefer.
Which is why P.J. CRourke's
Republican Party Reptile, a collection of humourous essays, is such a
wonderful and delightful suprise.
O'Rourke, editor of National
Lampoon during the late 70's, is
definitely a conservative.
He obviously has staunchly
conservative views, but is enough
of a humourist not to take his beliefs entirely seriously. He irreverently defines the "Republican
Party Reptile's" political beliefs
thus; " We are opposed to: government spending, Kennedy kids,
seatbelt laws, being a pussy about
nuclear power, busing our chil
dren anywhere other than Yale,
trailer courts near our vacation
homes, Gary Hart, all tiny Third
World countries that don't have
banking secrecy laws, aerobics,
the U.N., and jewelry on men.
We are in favour of: guns,
drugs, fast cars, free love (if our
wives don't find out), a sound dollar,   cleaner  environment  (poor
Republican Party Reptile
By P.J. O'Rourke
Atlantic Monthly Press
people should cut it out with the
graffiti), a strong military with
spiffy uniforms, Nastassia Kinski,
Star Wars (and anything else that
scares the Russkis) , and a firm
stand on the Middle East (raze
buildings, burn crops, plow the
earth with salt and sell the population into bondage)."
O'Rourke also feels "conservatives can be buttheads too," so he
blasts everything, which makes
his book fun for those of every
political persuasion.
O'Rourke can best be described
as a cross between Barry Goldwa-
ter, John Belushi and Jonathan
Swift. He is at turns intellectual,
acerbic and downright zany, often
all three.
O'Rourke often uses a mock
intellectual approach that gives a
half-assed dignity to the craziest
theses, as in the essay "An Intellectual Experimen, that compares
the intellectual benefits of reading
an issue of The New York Review
of Books to an evening of prime
time TV.
He also has an acerbic side to his
writing that seeks out and destroys human folly and pomposity, notably in the hilarious piece,
"Ship of Fools", that lambastes a
troupe of halfwitted pacifist pilgrims taking a river cruise
through Russia . However,
O'Rourke does not overdraw his
subjects and the people he writes
about remain real and lovable.
O'Rourke also has a bizarre side
to his humour, a gift for the truly
strange. This comes out best in
what should become one of the
classic humour pieces of our time,
"King of Sandusky Ohio". I won't
spoil it by writing about it, but this
piece, and others like it in the
book, will appeal to those who like
off the wall humour.
However, O'Rourke does have a
tendency to go a little overboard in
believing that drugs, liquor, sex
and mayhem in general are amusing when carried to excess. A little
restraint in such areas is useful, as
O'Rourke, to his credit, realizes
most of the time.
If you're looking for something
light and funny with which to
vanquish the "back-to-school" doldrums, this book is it. O'Rourke is
a funny writer. A very funny one,
for a conservative minded kind of
guy. Dammit.
U.B.C.
BOOKSTORE
20°/o OFF CALCULATORS
111 D A1PV    GET AN HP-41CX NOW & GET 20% OFF THE REGULAR
111 ■ UH I UA   PRICE PLUS AN ADVANTAGE MODULE FREE!
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one of HP's most advanced calculators. And you'll have
at your fingertips the HP-41 Advantage Module • a plug-
in powerhouse of engineering utilities.
Take advantage of the HP-41 Advantage! Come in
today for a hands-on demonstration of the HP-41CX!
Sale ends September 30,1987 Special module offer
ends October 31,1987
Reg. $439.00.
COMING     SOON
HP DAY - FRIDAY, SEPT. 18th
What HEWLETT
_L_/_J PACKARD
gBSS BOOKSTORE
228-4741
PATSCAN
news
Want a new angle
on your pet
research project?
Try a patent search, now available at
a 90% discount to all students at the
Main UBC Library, Science Division.
Called PATSCAN, this new on-line
search service finds citations to
Canadian and International patents.
Patents are a great source of information on innovative technology —
over 70% of the information published in recent patent literature does
not appear anywhere else.
Contact Ron Simmer at 228-5404 for
an informational patent search.
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
AND
ANGLICAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
CHORAL EVENSONG
Sunday Evening
Sept. 13
7:30 p.m.
speaker:
DEBBIE SANDERSON
"TAIZE"
INFO: 224-2568
University Boulevard
(across from Golf Course)
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
September 11,1987 K&
A distorted JI 3**
mirror
Photo-
paintings
reflect
an odd  ^
reality
ir -
i        2 - f.
nMr*
By KATHY CHUNG
Los Angeles based photographer
Patrick Nagatani and painter
Andree Tracey's large polaroid
photographs are collages of painting, photography, installation and
performance art. Poignant observations of American cultural
mores and social issues lie beneath
a veil of wit and humour. On first
viewing, these photos are wild and
fun. Yet, there is a strange elusive
quality about them which impels
the viewer to a second, closer look.
Tracey's paintings form the
backdrop before which innovative
and sometimes elaborate installations are photographed. Different
media paintings, cut-out photographs, real objects and people are
layered together, weaving a masterful illusion. Each title, at times
marvelously witty, adds another
dimension of meaning to the work.
"Bikini Test" and "Magnetic
Storm" are part of a series concerned with the nuclear threat.
Staged before a flaming red sky,
the former piece shows a man in a
radiation suit with a geiger
counter approaching a row of bathing beauties sunning themselves
in the nuclear glow. The latter
shows a herd of men with home
video cameras recording the blast,
4-Sjj:_,-*7
rS9M_te
like visitors at a tourist attraction.
In the same series, a Japanese
group in traditional dressiseating
sushi when suddenly caught in the
red glow of the bomb. Entitled
NAGATANI AND TRACEY COLLABORATE:
Patrick   Nagatani   and   Andree
Tracey
Presentation   House   Gallery,
NVan.
Sept. 4 - 27,1987
"Indian Summer, Nuclear Winter"
this is a moving statement on
man's evolution.
There are also less serious
works. "Unlikely Earthquake" is a
chaotic visual symphony of
kitchen objects caught in an earthquake. "Shangri - L.A." shows the
city of L.A. erupting from a rural
field. Sarcasm presides in "Snickers, Snickers", with its rain of
candy bars on two bulbous ladies
snickering at a diet softdrink
commercial. In some pieces, tabloid newspapers with sensational
headlines make humorous comments on the events depicted.
The work as a whole gives one
the sense of looking into a strange
mirror and seeing a distorted reflection of the world. The vision is
unsettling because its elements
are so rooted in our everyday reality. This fascinating show should
not be missed. In addition, artists
Nagatani and Tracey will be giving a free publie slide show/lecture
on Sept. 18,10 am, at Emily Carr
College of Art and Design.
NOTE: Admission tickets are
good for both the Nagatani and
Tracey and the Tousignant/
BuQuet exhibits. Presentation
House Gallery welcomes volunteers interested in photography
and visual arts.
Art Challenges
by KATHY CHUNG
LIGHT STAGINGS is one of two new shows on
exhibit at Presentation House Gallery. It comprises
the independent photographic works of Canadians
Serge Tousignant and Jack Buquet. Here, the camera is freed from its traditional documentary function. In these pieces, the elements of light and
staging are'manipulated to express the artist's aesthetic vision, which is at once provocative and beautiful.
il   I
^*«, _**^
Seige Tousignant "Nature morte aux balies"
Tousignant's large format prints combine drawing
and sculpture with photography to challenge our
perception of space and form. Three dimensional
objects meld wwith two dimensional drawings. Dark
shades and tones create an atmosphere of stillness
punctuated by bright spotlights of energy and intensity.
In "Nature morte aux balies" (Balls Still Life), a r
ubber ball and a marble balance on sketches of tables.
A spotlight magically defines the plane of the table
top giving the drawing depth and surfaces.
"Nature morte aux cones" shows a cone sitting on a
table and a pyramid on a wooden stool, both placed
against a wall. Lines drawn on the wall and floor
LIGHT STAGINGS:  Serge Tousignant and Jack
Buquet
Presentation House Gallery, North Vancouver
Sept. 4 - 27,1987.
become extensions of the three dimensional forms.
The beautifully poetic "L'artiste" shows a small figurine balancing precariously on a circle of light which
is the summit of a mountain peak.
Buquet's untitled prints are explorations of
coloured light and its effect on surfaces. One series
shows the play of light on large suspended sheets of
paper. They have the ethereal and translucent qualities of a wet on wet watercolour. The light blues, pinks
and greens are the colours of soap bubbles and rainbows.
Another series of larger prints show violent strips
of paper, some with black jagged edges, hung like a
series of doorways drawing the viewer into the picture plane. In the centre are pieces of slashed paper,
the light transforming them into sheets of broken
glass or punched metal.
Through the use of lighting and staged objects, both
artists show us a vision which challenges us to review
how we see and understand reality. As a bonus, they
fill us with wonder and delight at the ability of intangible light to possess form and physicality.
Come hear
-Rice Broocks-
Internationally renowned
Christian leader and speaker,
September 22,23,24, & 25
in
Woodward 4 at 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Maranatha Christian Club      Phone 228-8554
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612
We offer 1 0% OFF
regular prices of ALL
merchandise to ALL
Students, Faculty and Staff
Hours: Sat. to Wed.   9:30 a.m. - 6:00 pm
u Thurs. - Fri.    9:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
'^^___JU_C
For the Roads
to Higher Education
Attention all post-secondary students! Before
you open a textbook this term, study the benefits
of fast, affordable transit to and from school.
FAST TRAX, the post-secondary student's transit
guide, will be available on campus this fall. Pick
one up for complete information on routes serving
your college or university, how they connect with
the rest of the system, and how you can save time
and money with prepaid fares. Watch for details
on posters and in the September 11 edition of
The Buzzer.
BOW*
T_v____-_«-   Vancouver Regional
iranSll   Transit System
September 11,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 13 Faculty children
on free ride
For once Doug Collins really has got it straight.
His column in Sunday's North Shore News accuses UBC academics of hypocrisy in negotiating free tuition for faculty kids.
Children of UBC faculty were awarded free
tuition in July as part of a negotiated wage
settlement.
Collins' accusation hits the mark, for, as he so
aptly puts it, "if there is any group that talks
smugly about equal opportunity, it is the academics."
And yet, these very same academics who pride
themselves on their social enlightenment have
agreed to a scam that will bless their own already privileged kids with easier access than
others.
Unemployed parents are struggling just to send
their kids to college while the well to do get a free
ride; this is the antithesis of equal opportunity.
No UBC faculty member has yet emerged from
the woodwork tc support the fee waivers in a
public debate. Perhaps their reluctance to support such an unfair position indicates the dregs
of some sort of social conscience.
There must be some faculty members out there
who still believe in equality of opportunity and
want to see it preserved at UBC. If only they
would step forth and oppose the injustice of tuition waivers.
It would allow them to preserve their credibility,
and it might help UBC to preserve its dignity.
Support your
student paper
It is five in the morning.
The Ubyssey editors are wrapping up production on this issue of your student newspaper. We
have been here since 10:00 in the morning.
We do this twice a week; some of us have done it
regularly for almost two years.
Each editor puts in about 60 hours every week.
We do it because we believe in what we are
doing. We want to make this paper the best the
campus has seen - and The Ubyssey has been
pretty good.
But several of us don't know where our rent is
coming from next month. Although we all work
full time, we work for free.
On Wednesday Student Council tabled a motion
to provide Ubj'ssey editors with a monthly
honoraria of $500 a month. A decision will be
made at the next meeting, on September 23.
We want to make this paper the best we can, but
we can't do that if we have to take paying jobs.
We want to be able to afford to spend all our time
in the Ubyssey office.
If you want to support our bid for salaries, let
your council representative know how you feel.
Or come to the meeting on the 23rd.
$500. It's not a lot of money. It's not as much as
many Canadian student editors receive. But for
The Ubyssey editors it would mean money for
food after paying the rent.
 . s
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily
those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian University
Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-
2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Celia Henslowe, Rick Hiebert, Deanne Fisher, Jennifer Lyall, Wanda Chow, Katherine Monk, Rolf Boon,
Ross McLaren, Allison Felker, Malcolm Pearson, Kenneth Kam, Dan Andrews, Steve Chan, Nikola Marin,
Steve Hunt, Elynn Richter, Lara Olson, Victor Wong,
Laura Busheikin, Corinne Bjorge, Tony W., and
thanks to the other people whose names we forgot.
V   tftf
vS
Graphic hy Chris Kielesinski
Reprinted by permission of
Christian Info
LETTERS
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issues. Letters
should be as short as possible and maybe edited for brevity
as we-1 as for sexism, racism and homophobia. Bring them
in person with your ID to the Ubyssey Office, SUB 241K.
SUB condoms
don't appeal
to Carol
It is incomprehensible
to me that the sole condom
machine in the women's
washroom in SUB contains
nothing; but ribbed condoms. Ribbed condoms are
often uncomfortable to the
point of pain for the woman,
and they are definitely too
thick for the male. They are
coated with too much bad-
smelling and tasting lubricant and/or spermicide. Not
only that, they are ugly, and
have   you   ever   tried   to
commit fellatio over one?
Clearly, the AMS has
tried to express its concern
about the health and reproductive freedom of the student body by having this
machine installed. Condoms are indispensable
these days, and if people
forget their condom supply
at home, or run out of condoms while on campus, it's
necessary to have a quick
supply as close to hand as
possible. However, the AMS
has shown poor judgement
by providing a style of condom more unpleasant than
disease and death.
I   have   brought   this
matter to the attention of
Jody Woodland, Vice-President of the AMS, but I don't
believe he took the problem
very seriously. One wonders which kind of condoms
Engineers favor. On the
other hand, I'm sure that
our sensual and beauteous
President would understand, agree with, and in-
Aquatic
locker prices
ludicrous
As a UBC alumnus and
frequent u=er of the aquatic
centre, I find the increase in
locker prices to fifty cents
from a quarter to be ludicrous and unwarranted.
NO other pool charges
this much and with tuition
fees, income taxes, and
other costs going up, paying
fifty cents for a locker is
absurd and petty. Ifthisisa
reflection of Socred funding
cuts then perhaps their cuts
are justified after all, despite my distast for the
hacks.
J. Dows
west end, Vancouver
End legislated poverty
Someday you may be
unemployed too.
By ELIZABETH IIORSFIELD
So you think 'on the dole' and unemployment is not for
you, that was that weird 60's group who ripped off the
system not their yuppified offspring. Have you ever visited
the line ups at the Food Banks? Perhaps you should go
there before you make any rosy generalizations about the
state of the economy and the working climate of this
province. Traditionally Newfoundland was where the unemployed of Canada lived and the Newfie jokes thrived.
Now the joke's on us. We live in the city with the highest
unemployment rate in the country.
The End Legislated Poverty group, an amalgamation of
many small anti-poverty groups is trying to do something.
They're not despairing like the food liners who they try to
educate and protect do. They are trying to inform people
about their rights, about what can be done to appeal their
never ending cutbacks and how to counter their abusive
treatment.
The End Legislated Poverty Group is trying. Of course
they must leaflet food lines and make people aware of their
rights. Of course people on welfare sound abusive and
ungrateful . Could you live off the basic rate of $375.00 a
month? They need that Food Bank stale bread and leathery
bag of carrots so they stand in line. Okay, so that stinking
guy ahead of you just blew some of his money on cigarettes
and booze in fact he blew his whole cheque in a three night
bash. If the money hardly lasts two weeks why not? You got
nothing to lose when you've lost it all. So he's a little
depressed maybe even desperate. Any wonder?
Yes and about this looking for work bit... Sure they need
fruit pickers in the Okanagon but i t costs money to get there
and when you do how do you find the farms that'll hire a
forty-five year old man with a broken accent? Where do you
stay? How do you get around with no car when you're there?
Howlong will the work last? What's the pay? Isitminimum
or below? And...what do you do when it finishes?
Contrary to some reports the food li nes aren't getting any
shorter. People are now working for wages below the
minimum wage level and they need extra food as well so
they take hand outs too.
Are we that different from the food liners? In fact by the
time we graduate will there be economic prospects for B.C.
or will we have sold out in free trade deals to Japan or
America by then? It's not a question we can afford to ignore.
Nor, can we ignore people being cut back and the crime
rates that look pretty grim. Anti-poverty groups staffed by
volunters of overworked and underpaid people are trying.
They believe in the democratic process, even if they have to
constantly take their own government to court. However
they must be getting tired of constantly being accused that
they are way out in left field when the play is always to the
right.
Last week we registered at a university, a cut back
university at that. Where will we register when we're
unemployed a few years down the line and we're trying to
pay back loan money? What will be left of the Food Banks
by then? Who will staff them? Donate to them? Who has
rights? Why do they?
If you really want to register for the future go and talk to
the guys on the food line ups. Its a good place to begin.
They'll tell you and it'll register. It did with me anyway.
Elizabeth horsfield is an unemployed teacher of sixties
vintage who is now studying at UBC.
Page 14
UBYSSEY
September 11,1987 UBC: theinsand outs
By   JUDY   JOHNSON   AND
CHRISTINA VON BORMANN
CHOOSING YOUR FACULTY
Welcome to U.B.C. You
are about to embark on a four year
odyssey into the halls ofg academia. Your first challenge is to
choose your area of expertise. The
possibilities are endless so we
have compiled this simple guide to
help you make what could be the
most important decision of your
life!
ENGINEERING
Our sprightly pals in
EUS will introduce you to a world
you never knew existed. The
"gears" have proved that it is possible to function (albeit in a limited
fashion) with very few brain cells.
The thrill of a dunking in an ice-
cold fountain, the challenge of
chug-a-lugging that all-important
twentieth beer, as well as the
honor of wearing your very own set
of "colors" (red, of course!), all add
to the glamor and excitement of
belonging to "the faculty that
never sleeps!".
ARTS
Feeling alienated?
Hypersensitive? Nobody understands the inner you? Look no
farther, this is the faculty for you.
With a daunting three to five
hours of class time a week the arts
student must possess superhuman abilities in order to fit in the
requisite five hours a day in
Buchanan lounge, "networking",
and ingesting those "big gulp"
sized coffees. After all, you're
going to end up teaching and you
can't teach without coffee.
SCIENCE
Are your leisure suits
composed of colors not found in
nature? Were you shunned, liper-
like, by your much coller high-
school classmates? The science
faculty welcomes you with open
arms. There are no goofs here;
brainiacs are the rule and you're
not going to call each other egghead, are you? In the faculty nof
science you can feel free to go beyond the bounds of socially acceptable behavior. So go wild! Grow a
goatee like David Suzuki. The
world has it's eyes on you.
SCIENCE
Are your suits composed
of colors not found in nature?
Were you shunned, leper-like, by
your   much   cooler   high-school
classmates?   The science faculty
perspectives
welcomes you with
open arms.   There are no goofs
here; brainiacs are the rule
and you're not going to call each
other egg-head, are you?
In the faculty of science you can
feel free to go beyond
the bounds of socially acceptable
behavior. So go wild!
Grow a goatee like David Suzuki.
The world has its eyes
on you.
COMMERCE
Before you buy books, think
again. What famous school
did B.C. magnates Jim Pattison
and Bill Vanderzalm attend?
The school of hard knocks, that's
where. So what are you doing
spending money? You should be
making it!
HOME EC.
Get serious.
PHYS.ED.
See above.
YOU AND YOUR PROFESSOR
Don't be afraid to ask
questions. No matter how stupid,
after all you're paying for this so
that makes the
prof your employee doesn't it? By
the same token no problem
is too small to take to your professor- they've b$en there so take advantage of
their experience. There
has been
more
than one love-
match arranged by an enterprising student through his or her
"head of the class". Go ahead, ask
your
prof the name of that cute co-ed
who sits up front. Remember,
profs are only here to make your
stay at U.B.C. more pleasant.
HOMEWORK
Here, it's always important to remember that old saying
"her mouth says no, but her eyes
say yes". Sure, a prof assigns
homework but they don't want to
mark it anymore than you want to
write it. It's just perpetuating a
vicious circle. Better to spend your
time productively by pumping
your friends for information, reading Coles notes,and cultivating
mutually rewarding relationships
with those who have taken the
course before you. Finding a
medical excuse that's perfect for
you can do much more for your
scholastic
career than any number of hours
logged in at the library. Repeat
after me, psychosis, schitzophrenia, manic-depressive, see
how easy it is?
THE IMPORTANCE OF LYING
The most important lessons you will learn are not found in
books. Save yourself the heartache of failure by memorizing afew
basic lying techniques. Why say
you didn't
have enough time to finish an
assignment when you can just
say that you were brainwashed at
the Maranatha kool-aid stand.
Not only will your prof respect you
for your honesty
but these "confessions" may open
doors towards new and rewarding
student-faculty relationships.
THE ART OF WHINING
When all else fails whining is a sure-fire shortcut to even
the hardest professorial heart.
Your snivelling will add an indis-
pensible element of pathos which
can only work
in your favor. This exercise can be
used to its full potential through
various, yet effective methods.
Begin to
question everything your prof says
in class. Claim that you
do not understand the explanations, this will make your prof
want to work more closely with
you. Remember to wear
your pyjamas to all of your morning classes. Upon removing
your coat burst into tears and
explain loudly that you forgot to
U.B.C.
BOOKSTORE
20% OFF
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BOOKSTORE
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dress. Professors feel sorry for
mental cases.
MAKING THAT ALL-IMPORTANT GOOD IMPRESSION
You know you're a genius
so why deprive those around you of
that knowledge? Speak up in
class! Anything that sounds important should be loud. Profs love
it! Drop names of people and
places to add to your no-doubt
burgeoning reputations. Saying
that you met Karl Marx lends
more creedence to your argument
than actually understanding any
of his work. Information is important, that's what school's
all about, so include as much information as possible, relevant or
irrelevant to the subject in question. This is essential exam-time
procedure and hey! It all comes out
in
the scholastic wash. If anybody
asks you your grade average, lie;
or better yet, lambaste their phil-
istinic attitudes towards the
whole process of education.
CONCLUSION
The concerned writers of
this guide wish you the best of luck
in your future studies. These are
the best years of your life so why
rush to graduate? With the new
student loan deduction program it
pays to accumulate several degrees. Who knowd, someday you
may hear one of your own students
cry out...HEY PROFESSOR!
Lam
likes
life
and creates
opportunities
for others
con't torn paga 9
a 35-foot sailboat and a motor-
home which he has used to travel
all over Canada and to every state
in the U.S.
"If you name 10 places in Canada, chances are that I havebeen
to all of them," he says.
He says he derives happiness
from within by appreciating
nature and enjoying simple things
such as gardening.
Lam says one way to give is the
reactive way, giving money
to groups who ask, but he wants to
work differently while he
still has the energy.
"The other way which I am still
trying is the creative way,"
he says. "You are trying to give
money to something that is not
there."
So, he doesn't want to give
money to bring in poor but
bright students from overseas yet.
"When I get into a reactive
mode then I will get into scholarship things because they are
much easier."
"I am still on the creative
mode," he says. And that
"creative mode" which Lam calls
retirement includes helping to
build a downtown campus for
Simon Fraser University and
many
other plans still in preliminary
stages. He will be busy for a
long time to come.
David Lam has given himself
an enviable if difficult task
which few people get a chance to
attempt. Perhaps the world would
be a better place if more wealthy
people thought like David Lam.
"There are just so many things
that one could do or shoulddo but
there is just not enough time or
September 11,1987
UBYSSEY
Page 15 Thumbprinting in
the marketplace
By ROSS McLAREN
Walk into a Money Mart
check cashing service and you will
be unpleasantly surprised. Before
you can cash your check you will be
thumbprinted. This print will
then remain on file at Money
Mart. The next time you use their
services, at a cost of 4% of the
check's value, the company takes
another thumbprint and matches
the two to make sure no one is
using your name illegaly. The
customer is protected and the
company is protected, right ... or
wrong?
Right if you are Chuck Bain-
bridge, Registrar of Reporting
Agencies. He says, "the number of
fraudelent checks runs in the millions of dollars. In my opinion,
honest people shouldn't be worried'' about a request for a thumbprint.
But wrong according to John
Russell, executive director of the
B.C. Civil Liberties Association.
"It is a device intended to intimidate people not to abuse the privileges. Thumbprinting interferes
with an individual's right to privacy," he says.
Russell is concerned that with
no specific legislation the public
does not know the final destination of thumbprints in Money
Mart data banks.
Presently, government legislation to deal with commercial
companies fingerprinting customers is limited. Credit card companies and banks(ie. reporting agencies) which supply personal credit
information to others, and only
with individuals' consent, are
regulated by the B.C. Credit Reporting Act. This act ensures that
reporting agencies registered with
the government only release certain information, and ensure indi
viduals' access to their credit file.
Money Mart, however, is not a
reporting agency so their actions
are not covered by this act. According to Phil Bryden, UBC Law professor, the legislation covering
Money Mart's data banks is the
Privacy Act. This act says a person
can bring a 'tort (sue for damages)
when a person or company willfully violates the privacy of another when the nature and degree
of privacy a person is entitled to
under reasonable circumstances
is violated.'
Bryden says the Privacy Act is
a "general piece of legislation that
has never been used effectively. If
someone brings an action it would
go to Supreme Court, and no one
has ever brought a successful
claim against the Privacy Act. To
regulate this area (fingerprinting)
you would need specific legislation."
The issue of fingerprinting
versus individual rights is going to
become more important as fraud
inacreases.
Retailers and credit companies try to stem the fraud problem
with ingenous devices. The old and
cumbersome system of phoning
the card number to a central location has been replace by machines
that tell the retailer immediately
if the card is stolen or overdrawn
on its account.
The latest development in
the credit card field is the optical
credit card. These cards have a
storage capaci ty of two megabytes,
or over 800 typewritten pages.
Magnetic strip cards by contrast
have storage capacity for 1500 bits
of digital data.
In layman's terms, optical
credit cards can store information
such as digital photos, signatures,
voice prints, hand geometry, medical information, savings account
numbers, or fingerprints. Truly a
retailers' dream. But for those
with suspicous minds who fear
encroachments upon individual
liberty a nightmare.
Bryden calls the nightmare
the Big Brother syndrome. "In one
sense, identity cards are legitimate if people are doing illegal
acts but if people are constantly
scrutinized it results in a repressive society. I can understand why
Money Mart fingerprints: they are
vulnerable to bad checks; but if
they are going to fingerprint, I
want to make sure my file does not
end up in the FBI's files," Bryden
says.
In the short term those who
suffer are the poor. Often with a
poor credit rating and so unable to
use banks, the poor use check
cashing services as an alternative
bank. People in a financial
straightjacket cannot use the
marketplace as an alternative to a
company like Money Mart because
the marketplace has rejected
them. Stranded between two
rocks they must to consent to fingerprinting.
In the longer term, fingerprinting affects the rights of all
citizens. If individual liberty is
determined by the market the
community will have little or no
say in what direction personal
privacy heads.
To prevent the loss or drifting
away of individual freedoms, Phil
Bryden advises that, "people
should influence through reason
what kind of society we want.
When decisions (about fingerprinting) are made people should
decide if it is worth it, not the
economic process."	
RED LEAF
[ Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
! Authentic Chinese Cuisine
!   ______ • 9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
i PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon.-Fri. 11 30-9:00 p m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays   '
4:00 p m   9 p m
2142 Wettorn Parkway
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Station
The Ubyssey Presents
NO FUN
Friday, Sept. 18th
SUB 241k (2nd floor, NE corner)
Cheap Bzzr
"Come on kids
writ? like us"
This is a Ubyssey entertainment
and recruitment event—the
editors will be wearing "ask-me"
T-shirts, so talk to them.
APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
for one (1) student position on the
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Management Committee and one (1)
student position on the Aquatic
Center Management Committee.
Positions run Oct. 1,'87 to Sept. 30, '88.
Applications Deadline
4pm Friday
Sept. 25, 1987
Forms Available
SUB 238
WE WILL
BE OPEN TO
DO MORE FOR YOU
September 8-11
& September 14-18
Our University Branch Will Be
Open 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
To Process Student Loan Requests
FIND OUT MORE TODAY
CALL 665-3768
Bankof Montreal
DOING MORE FOR YOU
BACK^
sc
holarS
dema^
You!
Remember Us.
Thunderbird Bar & Grill at the
University Golf Club. We're open
as usual for luncheon buffets and
sporting events on the large screen.
Welcome Back!
^£S£_> University Golf Club
z___*§&__€ ^^ University Boulevard
^JEjjPf Vancouver, B.C.
-*4t3^ 224-7513
V6T 1X5
This year use
a calculator
you can
count on.
A cheap calculator can cost you plenty. But a
Hewlett-Packard pays. Time and again. Engineers,
scientists and business students know HP calculators
have the built-in power they need to cut calculating
time. Start the school year off right. Get a calculator
you can depend on - and, next time, breeze.
What HEWLETT
■_/__  PACKARD
PHONE OR DROP IN TO CANSEL FOR OUR
SPECIAL BACK-TO-SCHOOL SALE PRICES!
In addition to our special prices,
H. P. will give you:
- $15.00 rebate on an HP12C.
- Free Advantage Module on an HP41CV or 41CX.
PRICES VALID UNTIL OCT. 31/87.
SUBJECT TO EXISTLNG STOCK.
Cansel Survey Equipment
4040 Graveley St.. Burnaby, B.C.     \Mfci
299-5794 _*^E
Page 16
UBYSSEY
September 11,1987

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