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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1980

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Array Major parties join call for UBC poll
By TOM HAWTHORN
Candidates from all three major
parties have petitioned Canada's
chief electoral officer for campus
polling stations at UBC.
"Location of balloting boxes for
students in residence at UBC inconvenient," states a telegram from
New Democrat Alan Bush, Conservative Bill Clarke and Liberal
Peter Pearse, sent late Thursday
night to chief electoral officer Jean-
Marc Hamel in Ottawa.
"University Hill secondary
school now proposed but too far
from student residences. We the
candidates of the three major par
ties in Vancouver Quadra urge you
to instruct R.O. (returning officer)
Harold Morris to add two polling
places."
The candidates are recommending that new polling stations be set
up in the lounges at Gage Towers
and Totem Park residence.
The move comes a day after Morris refused to establish any campus
polling place, and less than a week
after NDP candidate Bush filed a
formal complaint over the five kilometre distance between Totem Park
and Place Vanier residences and
University Hill, where all residence
students have been told to vote.
(About 3,000 UBC residence students will be voting at University
Hill.)
And the New Democrats are
angry with Morris' stubbornness
not to change the location of polling stations used in the May, 1979
federal election.
"The job of the returning officer
is to make voting convenient, not
making it convenient for himself or
his paperwork," said Quadra NDP
campaign manager Les Storey.
Storey said three NDP representatives spoke to Morris about the
voting difficulties, with little success.
"Mr. Morris' reaction to all three
of us was less than adequate. It became difficult to talk to him about
the issue. I'm disappointed with his
actions to say the least."
Morris left his office early Thursday, and was unavailable for comment.
Liberal candidate Pearse said he
cannot accept Morris' decision that
the polling station list from May is
still adequate, because 3,000 residence students were living scattered
throughout the country then.
"I think there is a case for making special provisions for students
in this election," he said while can
vassing at UBC Thursday.
"Students face a special problem
this time. And they were caught
without any enumeration."
And without campus polling stations, the parties fear that students
simply will not bother to hike to
University Hill, with one estimate
that as many as half will not vote if
the weather is poor.
"The turnout is a large measure
dependent on the weather," says
Clarke's campaign manager Doug
Morrison. "But even if it's a sunny
day 1 don't think people in Totem
Park will want to walk all the way
to University Hill secondary school!'
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 47
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, February 1,1380
'Feed hike
is harmful1
KINDLY PATROL OFFICER gently accosts deranged tow truck driver
who has terrorized campus for past few weeks by towing cars for no particular reason. Campus cowboy explained to confused fellow students had
— kevin finnegan photo
enough problems without getting cars towed away and then contacted
school of social work, who found employment for driver as administration
vice-president, where he could do no further harm.
A UBC food services plan to
boost residence food prices by 22
i per cent is unreasonable and harmful to students, says a student board
of governors member.
"The living conditions in Totem
(and Vanier) are not great and by
raising the prices — it's not going to
help," John Pellizzon, who was
elected to the board last week, said
Thursday.
"I've lived in residence and I personally don't like (the increase)."
Food services director Christine
Samson said Thursday the hike,
proposed for next year, would
cover the cost of recent food price
increases and introduce higher
quality food programs. (The UBC
housing department would be forced to raise residence fees in Place
See page 3: VANIER
Armstrong new,
used. AMS pres
Students have elected a new but
used Alma Mater Society president
in the first UBC at-large elections
for executive positions since 1975.
Bruce Armstrong, former 1978
AMS president and outgoing student board of governors member,
won with 794 votes. Bob Staley,
arts undergraduate society representative trailed with 460 votes and
Shayne Boyd finished last with 306.
In the only close race of the election Marlea Haugen won the vice-
presidency with 539 votes, narrowly
defeating Bob Waddell with 519.
Frank Lee lagged behind with 240
votes, Chris Fulker with 145.
Science undergraduate representative Craig Brooks is the director of
administration,  a  new  post  that
See page 3: BROOKS
Armstrong sells out students for pet prefects
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The age of the sellout is here.
Only one week after the election of two
yes-men to the board of governors, students
have elected an administration pawn to the
position of Alma Mater Society president.
Bruce Armstrong showed himself last
year to be a friend of the administration
and board, while remaining indifferent to
real student issues. His ineffectual record as
a board member speaks for itself in predicting a bevy of administrative deals for Armstrong's pet AMS projects while tuition fees
rise and the bulldozers clear land for
Discovery Park.
. As the board quietly made plans last year
for one of the biggest expansion projects
the university has ever seen, Armstrong's
silence on the issue was easily bought by
slipping the AMS a few dollars here and
there for orientation week T-shirts, hamburgers and other items essential to
students.
But Armstrong was not satisfied with occupying student board representation with
such trivia, and soon launched the Alma
Mater Society into a time-wasting and self-
serving constitutional debate.
Though the new constitution was clouded
by charges of improprieties, Armstrong
rammed it through a short referendum
campaign claiming that he had students'
best interests at heart. But it was clear at
that point that Armstrong had his eye on
the president's chair.
He had been president once before in
1978, but had to resign for academic
reasons. Now he has been returned to
power, but still plans to take a 12 unit
course load while recovering from a difficult two month illness.
Armstrong's campaign manager Shirley
Waters says he will have no problem handling the course load and the presidency this
time, but for him to attempt it right now
seems sheer egotistical folly.
He will not be on campus full-time until
March,    although    Waters    optimistically
predicts his health will not be a problem
after that time. But even if Armstrong has
no problems with his health or his workload, students are going to have problems
with his policies.
He has made promises to make the AMS
and its clubs more attractive to students by
erecting a new display in the SUB main concourse, and working with the UBC administration for more provincial grant
monies.
A display in SUB would be another excellent monument to Armstrong's presence
and would be more visible than his paper
monument constitution, but it would not
do much to help most students.
And Armstrong's promise to work with
the administration for more grant money
holds little hope in view of his record.
He was given a golden opportunity to
work with the administration to fight for
higher grant increases in his capacity as a
board member, but found little time to do
so. As a result, student dissension to a
board proposal to index tuition fee increases was not heard until a time when the
board felt they could handle it.
Armstrong's credibility as an effective
student politician is low, and the only thing
that will save it is another important accomplishment towards student concerns.
Armstrong was largely responsible for introducing the student bus pass system two
years ago. The system was a major achieve-
Analysis
ment for students and improved accessibility to the campus. But Armstrong dropped
out of the transit fight too, while other
students protested decreasing bus service
and rising bus fares.
Armstrong used his bus pass victory as a
launching point for his lacklustre board
career, and then used his board experience
to run in the recent presidential election
race. Why didn't he quit while he was
ahead? THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1,1980
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tories announce
research boost
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Conservative government has announced research funding increases of $8
million for 1980-81 which it claims
will create several hundred new jobs
on Canadian campuses.
Science and technology minister
Heward Grafftey said Thursday the
Natural Sciences and Engineering
Research Council (NSERC), which
received a budget increase of $39
million in November, will get an additional $2.8 million and the Social
Sciences and Humanities Research
Council (SSHRC) will receive a $5.8
million budget boost.
Grafftey said the increase means
NSERC's budget has gone up 35
per cent over 1979-80 while
SSHRC's budget will have risen
16.2 per cent.
Grafftey, speaking in Sherbrooke,   also  mentioned  a  $12.2
million increase for the Medical
Research Council announced earlier
this year by health minister David
Crombie, as a key move toward increasing federal support for
research.
"Research and development is
the cornerstone of Canada's
economic development and the increased funding, in addition to promoting excellence in university
research and encouraging more of
our outstanding students to go into
research, will stimulate the creation
of a larger number of interesting
and better paying jobs," Grafftey
said.
The minister said the $59.8
million budget increase to the three
councils will help achieve the
government target of research and
development expenditures of 2.5
per cent of the gross national product during the 1980s.
Liberal attacks huge
Manitoba cutbacks
WINNIPEG (CUP) — A Liberal
candidate here is attacking the provincial Conservative government
for misdirecting $44.8 million earmarked for post-secondary education.
David Matas produced figures at
a press conference which he says
showed that had the provincial government matched federal grant increases from 1977-79, universities
and community colleges would be
$44.8 million richer.
An overall 9.7 per cent increase in
educational funding since 1977 was
Vanier, Totem
residents will
pay 22% more
From page 1
Vanier and Totem Park to cover the
increase in charges from food services.)
But only one quarter of the increase will be used to improve food
quality while the rest will cover the
cost of inflation, Samson said. She
said food prices have risen between
18 and 50 per cent in the last year.
UBC residence food costs are the
second lowest in Canada behind
those at the Universite de Moncton
in New Brunswick, she added.
But Pellizzon said residents will
react angrily to the proposal.
"Students are going to be very annoyed. It's going to hurt the
students," he said.
Both Al Soltis, Gage community
council president and Craig Brooks,
Alma Mater Society student housing access committee chair, said the
increases will be beneficial if the
quality of food improves.
"To me it's a necessity because
they need the increase. If they do
this and students approve of it, it
will mean better food," said Soltis.
Brooks added the proposed 22
per cent increase is "very high" but
said the increase "could do a lot to
increase the quality of the food."
Samson also said food services
would increase the cost of food to
conference guests by 20.5 per cent
and to the summer language program by 22 per cent.
Samson said the food services
plan would mean a $4.50 per day
charge per resident at UBC, compared with $4.78 at the University
of Victoria and $6.27 and $6.30 at
the University of Calgary and the
University of Alberta respectively.
totally the result of federal funding
hikes, he said.
(Before 1977, educational funding was done on a federal-provincial cost-sharing basis, where federal funds were matched by the provincial government. But since then,
funding has been done as a block
grant which has no built-in agreement for matching contributions.)
Sterling Lyon's Tory government
has since been using federally-provided funds to replace its own contributions, Matas said.
In 1977 alone, Matas said, federal
funding for post-secondary education went up 60 per cent, while provincial spending only increased 11
per cent.
Matas said the "ballooning" effect on the federal funding amount,
giving increases far in excess of inflation, was irrelevant to his accusation, since some of this is due to a
tax-based revenue clause.
And Matas admitted that while
the Tories were involved in some
numbers games, they are not "doing anything illegal."
Brooks wins as new
AMS admin director
From page 1
combines the former positions of
the student administrative commission chair and AMS director of
services.
Brooks won with 707 votes, leaving Onkar Athwal with 487 and
David Jefferys, 224.
Al Soltis, currently Gage community council president is the new
external affairs officer with 746
votes, beating out Peter Chant with
547. Len Clarke was re-elected as
director of finance in the only uncontested seat with 1,125 yes votes.
The no vote was 234.
The new finance director said
Thursday he is optimistic the new
executive will be an improvement
on the outgoing representatives.
"They're the type of people that
are going to communicate and talk
to each other. This is something the
entire group was not able to do last
time," said Clarke.
Haugen said she will help out the
president to make his job easier, as
it is a large responsibility for one
person.
"In the past the president has
been one very heavy position and I
intend to help him in whatever way
I can to make sure that he can do
his job more smoothly," she said.
Armstrong was unavailable for
comment as he is currently in Vancouver General Hospital recovering
from a brain aneurism.
— stuart dee photo
FINE ARTS STUDENTS use fellow student as model in "drawing from life" class Thursday, sympathetic with
problems faced in digesting Totem Park food and still being able to sit through 50 minute class. Complaints food
was sticking to ribs were dismissed as practical joke by housing department after it was discovered student's
wallet was thinner than profile.
r
Savs chief army historian
'Nam honorable action
U.S. military involvement in
Vietnam was an honored and respectable action, says U.S. army's chief military historian.
"I'm involved emotionally,"
general James Collins said Thursday. "I fought it. My personal
feeling is that it was a very proper
thing for the Americans to do."
The U.S. could have won the
Vietnam war if the U.S. government had sent over more soldiers
at earlier stages in the conflict, he
told 50 people in Buch. 102.
"We could have whipped the
North Vietnamese and trained up
the South Vietnamese," he said,
adding that once the Americans
had entered the war, they should
have stayed and won.
Dissension in army ranks is
usually not a "big problem" but
was a threatening and disrupting
force in 1973, just before U.S.
troops left Vietnam, Collins said.
"It (protest) expresses another
point of view and that's what
democracy is. It's probably been
to the advantage of the nation as a
whole.
"All you can do is try to convince them that what they are doing (fighting war) is proper."
Civilian opposition to U.S.
military involvement in foreign
countries is as American as apple
pie, said Collins. "It's a fact of
America's life," he said. "In
addition to the general antipathy
towards militarism and a standing
army, there has been a strong religious pacifism."
Public protest against U.S. wars
is healthy and war is a catalyst for
great social changes, said Collins.
American military professionalism, as embodied in military
academies, increases after most
U.S. wars, he added.
"We get into wars very frequently. At the end of the war the
whole establishment is dismantled."
The invasion of Afghanistan
has increased the possibility of
American confrontation with the
COLLINS . . . war is 'proper'
Soviet Union and changed world
strategic positions, he said.
"If they (the Russians) cut off
our oil, we'll send a task force to
open up the Persian Gulf." Collins was referring to the possibility
of Russians trying to seize Middle
East oil fields and as a result, cutting off U.S. oil supplies.
Admits visiting professor
Nation's leaders inoffensive
BROWN
no charisma
Most Canadian prime ministers
were elected because they were inoffensive and not obnoxious, a
visiting history professor said
Thursday.
But the measuring stick for
Canadian leaders is their reaction
to adversity, University of Toronto professor Craig Brown told 200
people in Buch 104.
Prime ministers have recognized they are creatures of their own
party and attain success by being
inoffensive, Brown said. But they
have often been forced to contend
with harsh circumstances and
their ability to rise to the situation
has determined their effectiveness
as leaders, he added.
Brown said Canadian leaders
tend to gain legitimacy through
party support rather than divine
right or charismatic quality. "In
Canada, certainly none of the
prime ministers have claimed to
rule by divine right, although
stating their own infallibility was
another matter," he said.
Brown said no Canadian prime
minister has gained power throug
charisma and added many people
have mistaken personality for
charisma in Pierre Trudeau.
Canada's first prime minister
John A. MacDonald was an example of a leader who encountered a combination of tough
political problems and tragic personal events.
"But he always took things
cheerfully," said Brown, who
quoted MacDonald as saying,
"When fortune empties her
chamber pot on my head I smile
and say we're having a summer
shower."
But despite their inoffen-
siveness, Canadian leaders must
be ambitious, Brown said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1,1980
Take a hike
Once upon a time, in a strange land beyond the mountains, the head of
many lands was given an unceremonious boot from his throne. And the
entire kingdom prepared to do boon by trudging to the king's polls. But not
all were happy about this, having been asked to do boon work only 12 fortnights previous.
And since the last ballot day was not long past, there was no quick census in the land, which suited most everyone's needs except these of the
student serfs.
You see, these student serfs were scattered to the four corners in the
past election, but had by now congregated in their own little hamlets
throughout the land. But most student serfs weren't written in the village
roles. So, they had to have it done themselves.
But I digress. This tale is really about student serfs in the Duchy of
Quadra, which was a pleasent enough place for them usually, except for an
evil earl who only had power during campaigns.
Earl Morris was a pleasant enough man most of the time. But one election he was told that student serfs had to walk five kilometres to vote,
much farther than anyone else in the Duchy. And when the serfs told the
now-evil earl of their dilemma, he said, "Quit your griping. Can't you walk
those few kilometres?" And he would hear no more of it.
Many of the student serfs had thought their cause was lost and quietly
consoled one another about how few of their friends could vote.
But at the darkest hour, the serfs found an unlikely champion for their
cause. Not one, not two, but ALL THREE! of the candidates in the Duchy
agreed that the serfs indeed had to walk too far. And the candidates tried
to have the voting location changed.
The evil earl saw the error of his ways, and let the serfs vote right in their
own village, hardly a novel idea, but one the serfs appreciated. And
everyone in the village voted, and all was good. Even the earl felt better.
But who believes in fairy tales, right? What probably happens is that
those in-the-land-beyond-the-mountains say it's too late to change the
polling stations. And it rains on Feb. 18 (or worse). And no students vote.
And everyone is right royally pissed off. Welcome to reality.
■'yymm
'-mm-
<^>u^crn/rS&r
By JIM ROWED
Mankind lives in absolute
obligate symbiosis with the crops he
grows. As we exist, we can not live
without the plants nor they without
us. As the plants are dependent
upon the sun, the soil, the air, the
water and the cycle of the seasons,
so are we. Yet the earth and the
rivers, our life support system, are
endangered by the polluting products of the egocentric greed and insatiable growing expansion of our
developing society. Daily as our
numbers   grow,   more   and   more
Hope off survival
succumbing to
Socred greed
arable land is being lost to industrial, recreational and urban encroachment. This irreplaceable loss
is to the immediate benefit of a few
and to the detriment of us all now
and in the future. This destruction
is being condoned and perpetrated
by our provincially elected
representation through cronyism,
legislative manipulation and total
disregard for the spirit of the Lands
Act, 1973. As human beings,
especially during Aggie week, we
must protest against this indecency
to both the earth and its people.
Out of B.C.'s 95 million hectares
(one hectare equals three football
fields) less than one per cent is
classified as capable of growing a
wide range of crops. Simply put,
each of B.C.'s 2.5 million citizens
has about two-thirds of a football
field upon which to rely for
sustenance. By the year 2000, that
will be shrunk drastically due to
world and local population
pressures. Presently we rely on
California and Mexico for 60 per
cent of our nutritional needs. Yet
California is facing its own problems with lack of water, lack of
fuels, expanding population and the
phenomenal agriculture land loss of
about 48,000 hectares per year. It
would be a sucker's gamble to rely
on that state for your daily bread.
In 1973 the Land Commission
Act set aside the province's best
farmland based on the productivity
potential of the soil. The
Agriculture Lands Commission was
set up to administer the act and to
hear appeals. In 1977 the Act was
altered by the present government
so that the Land Commission essentially lost its jurisdiction. Now any
landowner disagreeing with the independent, collected, professional
opinion of the Land Commission
can appeal directly to the politically
appointed Minister of the Environment to have land removed. It has
been the rule of this government to
refer all appeals, despite lack of
merit, to the environmental land
use committee of the cabinet for a
final ruling.
Against the recommendations of
the A.L. Commission Regional
District, the B.C. Institute of
Agrologists and others, the cabinet
committee has released much land
from the reserve. The former chairman of the Land Commission,
Gary Runka, resigned from the
commission altogether in protest.
Last year, soil specialist Fred Reid
was fired for talking to the press.
In the Fraser Valley, the 626 acre
Gloucester properties near Langley
have been released by cabinet
orders despite the absolute protest
of the Land Commission. The
cabinet showed no respect for the
commission's studied and collected
opinion. After the press pointed out
the obvious conflict of interest and
cronyism between the government
and the developers, a barrage of
public protest followed and the
government backpedalled on its
decision. The A.L. Commission is
to re-review the appeal.
B.C. Hydro, our crown corporation in which we have no say, urged
the cabinet to release the land
reserve. Hydro is to be one of the
customers of the Chilean-financed
developers.
The developers' representative
Ms. Loretta was a Bob McClelland
(SC— Langley) campaign worker.
Bob McClelland sat on the committee that heard the appeal even
though he says he didn't vote on the
decision. Jim Hewitt
(SC—Okanagan South) sits on the
E.L.U. committee as well as being
on the board of directors of B.C.
Hydro.
In Richmond, once a fertile
garden of Eden, Canadian
developers are threatening to
eradicate the last of Lulu Island
farmland. The Gilmer Estates (325
acres, class 1-2 farmland) owners
are pressuring to have the land removed from the A.L.R. If we allow
the provincial government to continue in its established habits there
is little doubt that we will lose this
land also. The developers argue that
it is okay because they are locals
rather than foreigners. The land,
the food base, is being destroyed. It
is not okay.
In the Okanagan much prime orchard land has been lost. The city of
Kelowna has a block appeal before
the commission that could wipe out
2,000 acres of class 1-2 orchard
land.
THE UBYSSEY
A
February 1, 1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
"Time for surgery," shreiked Heather Conn and in the process woke up docile assistants Ed O'Brien
and Christine Wright. Kevin Finnegan, declining to sing soprano clutched his drooping ovaries sending
Wendy Hunt and Julie Wheelwright into fits of laughter. "I hope she doesn't chop up my platform,"
thought Verne McDonald while Peter Menyasz hoped his better half would be spared. Tom Hawthorn
and Geof Wheelwright tried to figure out which one of them had had the lobotomy while Gary
Brookfield and Richard Schreiner searched desperately for the anastesia. Steve McClure, suffering an
indentity crisis, toyed with the idea of having all his facial hair removed much to the dismay of Peter
Ferguson and Randy Hahn. Chryl Menyasz and Stuart Dee sharpened the scalpels. Only Glen Sand-
ford remained intact as the blood stained chainsaw started up. The Medical seminar will meet Saturday
night at Long John Baldry's abode with a followup Sunday evening at the wheelhouse.
-kevin finnegan photo
Further north B.C. Hydro has
pre-empted much of the Class 1-2-3
farmland in the Peace River Valley
for the construction of another
dam. This land is the only area in
B.C. north of Prince George
capable of producing root crops for
northern peoples. Even the local
politicians do not want the dam.
Loss of the farmland will leave
northern peoples totally reliant on
the south and east for sustenance. A
site E proposal is also a future
possibility. If all the land in the
Peace River is flooded then our
generation will be responsible for
the destruction of one-fifth of all
the class 1-2 farmland in B.C. Surely our consciences cannot allow this
to happen.
I feel hurt. I am angry and I am
worried. Worried not only for those
little ones who follow us, but quite
frankly for my own chances of survival. What has been portrayed here
is a small chapter in the larger and
continuous assault on the environment. Unless we protect the land
and the rivers, our survival will be
in real jeopardy.
By the year 2000, most of us will
be reaching our productive and con-
tributive peaks. The movers and
shakers of this province are selling
out our birthright. The right to survival alone.
Protest! At minimum write your
MLA and tell him or her that you
want agricultural land made sacred
— untouchable. Tell the MLA's
that you want the Land Reserves
out of the hands of politicians and
back under the public jurisdiction
of a professional non-political commission. Repeal the 1977 Lands Act
Amendment.
In 1855 Chief Seattle had this to
say about the sale of land that was
forced upon him by the U.S.
government:
"How can you buy or sell the sky
— the warmth of the land? The idea
is strange to us. Every part of this
earth is sacred to my people. Every
shining pine needle, every sandy
shore, every nest in the dark woods,
every clearing and humming insect
is sacred in the memory and experience of our people. Our God is
the same God. This earth is
precious to him. And to harm the
earth is to heap contempt on its
creator. Preserve the land for your
children. This earth is precious."
Jim Rowed is a third-year soil
sciences student. Perspectives is a
column of opinion, comment and
even utter drivel open to all
members of the university community. And anyone else interested.
Don't take
the same
bullshit
By STEVE McCLURE
So we've been hearing a lot
about Afghanistan these days.
Talk of Olympic boycotts,
threats of global conflagration,
and now our very own defence
minister, Allan MacKinnon,
wants to raise the complement of
our armed forces so we too can
be ready to send troops over to
Afghanistan.
Once again the politicians in
Ottawa have chosen to follow
American foreign policy without
question. It sounds good in an
election I suppose. Looks like
we're taking a tough stand and
all that. Of course that's easy
enough to do when you're sending other people over there to
be killed and your ass isn't on
the line.
It's an old story, of course. As
long as there have been wars the
old have sent the young off to
the slaughter. How much longer
are we going to take this
bullshit?
As long as we remain passive
and apathetic. It's too bad that it
takes a war to get people moving
and thinking about what's going
on in the world. We've got to
make it clear that we're not going to accept this insanity any
longer.
freestyle
But rather than mouth nice
pacifistic sentiments we've got to
look deeper into the matter.
Why are these fools threatening
the world with war? Is it because
they really care about people in
Afghanistan? Not bloody likely.
The only reason they're trying to
con us into this one is because of
conflicting imperial visions of
the world. Both sides in the
global conflict want oil and want
it bad. It's up to us, the ordinary
people on both sides, to say:
look, we've had enough, we
don't share your vision of the
world. The true enemies in this
affair are the madmen in Ottawa, Moscow and Washington.
They don't have to pay the price
of war, we do.
I suppose many will say that
such idealistic rantings can only
encourage defeatism and are
symptomatic of a widespread decline of will in our society. To
such critics I would reply that it
is we who are the realists, it is we
who have the coldest and
clearest vision of the world. For
as long as we let ourselves be ruled by the irrational credo that is
nationalism we will never be
free. Nationalism and the petty
mentality associated with it have
already led us to the brink of the
world's destruction. It's high
time we stopped the beast in its
tracks and began to stand up for
something better.
We're probably going to be
seeing a lot of this type of confrontation in the coming years as
the world's rival imperial systems attempt to get in on the
scramble for the world's resources. Instead of trying to develop rational alternative methods of keeping industrial society
going, our short-sighted leaders
are leading us to Armageddon.
Steve McClure is a Ubyssey
writer, who, like all of us, is far
too young to die.
If you have some great, or not
so great, words to get off your
chest, deposit the entire mess at
your nearest Ubyssey office
(SUB 24IK) and we'll see that it
all gets into print. Friday, February 1, 1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Cub reporter gets buzzed
(In attempting to gain a wider audience, the editors of The Cubys-
sey, the other student newspaper of
the University of Blockheads of
Canada, has written a letter to the
editors of its chief rival. That letter
is herewith reprinted over the complaints of our PR department,
which says that The Cubyssey may
take away some of our readers if it
is published.)
Well, spring will soon be upon us
once again (in another two months,
anyway), and once again the UBC
hacks have neglected the most burning issue of the entire campus.
Every spring it is all around us, yet
everyone responsible refuses all
comment.
The issue is wasps. They swarm
around the bus stop snack bar, they
fly voraciously around SUB, they
invade first-floor classrooms. This
year, as every year, some poor bastard will be stung by a wasp, suffer
extreme pain in his writing arm, fail
a test because of that pain, and subsequently drop out of university
and kill himself by an overdose of
exam booklets.
All the candidates for the recent
BoG elections, with the exception
of Valgeet Johl, ignored the wasp
issue entirely. Miss Johl (who, contrary to popular belief, did not lose
the election solely because The Cubyssey and The Ubyssey supported
her) was reported to have said, in an
informal speech outside the snack
bar last April: "These damn
wasps."
Pit crabs
all wet
In reply to a letter in the Jan. 22
edition of The Ubyssey, I would
like to point out a few facts.
The letter was correct in stating
that the Pit was out of Molson Export, Kronenbrau (1308), and Heidelberg on the night referred to.
The fact is we do not stock those
brands.
We also do not stock Carling
Cream Stout, Carling Pilsner,
Carlsberg, Old Vienna, Lite, Kootenay, Uncle Ben's, Pacific Gold, Yukon Gold, Columbia or Lucky Lager, to name a few. Some of these
brands have been offered at the Pit
in the past and sales were negligible.
We do, however, sell a variety of
beer from the different breweries
and as our cooler space is limited we
feel it most apropriate to stock the
most popular ones. Brands offered
include draft, Blue, "50," Old
Style, Extra Stock, Kokanee, Extra
Old Stock, Toby, Colt 45, Canadian, Black Label, Labatt's Special
Lite, medium and dry cider, and
three import beers.
We regulariy review which brands
of beer to offer and changes are
made as feasibility permits.
If there are any further questions
in regard to this matter the employees of the Pit would be more than
happy to assist you.
Bob Croft
Pit employee
Thanks... kinda
We would like to take this opportunity to applaud Geof Wheelwright on his objective and in-depth
"analysis" of the recent board of
governors election. This
knowledgeable and informed article
is a succinct example of the investigative journalism that is so sadly
lacking in the press today.
We sincerely hope that The Ubyssey will be able to maintain the high
standard of reporting that was
established by this fine article. Congratulations on a job well done.
Brian Ross and 6 others.
But now we have Pellizzon and
Dickinson on the board, who will
clearly kowtow to the administration's cynical position on wasps.
We at The Cubyssey have no intention of ignoring the disgusting toadying of these gears. It would be
poetic justice if the aforesaid poor
stung bastard turned out to be one
of these hacks.
("Hacks," in case your readers
must be informed, is the standard
Cubyssey code word denoting "student politicians," "teaching assistants," "university administrators,"
and anyone else we need a derogatory name for. Besides, it saves
space in headlines.)
As for our admin president,
Doug Kenny, we have it from a reliable source that he once said,
"Who cares if a few petty students
die painfully violent deaths because
of these insects? The only use I have
for wasps is to mutate them into
giant man-eating monsters in our
new research park." On the other
hand, our "reliable source," Kenny's janitor, is 96, senile, and will
say anything if offered a drink at
the Lethe.
The only glimmer of light and
hope in the whole raging wasp controversy comes, as usual, from The
Cubyssey. In the following weeks,
you will see many articles like this in
our paper; unlike The Ubyssey, we
will not stop after only a couple of
months of dreary repetition. We
will set them in large type, call them
editorials, and put them on the
fourth page.
We will tone down the reactionary prose, call them hard-hitting
news stories, and put them on the
front page. We will step up the reactionary prose, call them analysis,
and still put them on the front page.
No matter what we do, rest assured
that The Cubyssey will continue its
tradition of printing hysterical articles on issues that nobody gives a
damn about.
Jamie Andrews
science 2
ARTS
STUDENTS
Nominations are now open for
1. Arts President
2. Vice President
3. Treasurer
4. Secretary
5. 4 Student Council Representatives
6. Social Coordinator
7. Ombudsperson
NOMINATIONS CLOSE FEB.8
ELECTIONS ARE FEB.13
Advice, information and nomination forms available at the
Arts Office (Buch 107)
MONDAY
THE HONORABLE
FLORA MACDONALD
MINISTER OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
MON., FEB. 4,12:30
SUB BALLROOM
AUTHORIZED BY THE PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE PARTY OF CANADA 2411 - 700 W. GEORGIA VAN., B.C.
On February 18th
LET'S MAKE A CHANGE FOR THE BETTER
An NDP Government Will Act To Ensure
* improvements to the Canada Student Loan Fund
* better housing for students
* equality for women
* increased funding for research
* an industrial strategy to create skilled employment
ELECT
ALAN BUSH
NDP IN VANCOUVER QUADRA
Campaign Headquarters
4360 Main Street -:- Phone 873-4804
UBC SUB 226 -:- Phone 228-2493 Page 6
THE    U BYS S EY
Friday, February 1,1980
BROADBENT, TRUDEAU AND CLARK ... let the public share energy profits, grant a package deal, or stimulate the private sector?
Federal parties spill energy promises
By PHIL HURCOMB
for Canadian University Press
Energy. Where we find it, how we use it
and who will profit from it.
No issue in this federal election campaign
provides a better showcase for the essential
political philosophies of Canada's three major parties.
Different models for PetroCanada, a
crown corporation the Liberals established in
1974, demonstrate each federal party's view
of government involvement in the developing, purchasing and sales of petroleum products.
When created, PetroCan was supposed to
reinforce the nation's interests in the multinational dominated industry. In its brief history it has been most active in northern exploration, the offshore potential of Newfoundland, Labrador and Nova Scotia, and
the tar sands projects in Alberta.
Conservative policy on PetroCan has
changed drastically since the last election
campaign. Last spring Joe Clark called for
the dismantling of the crown corporation.
After coming to power, a task force was
struck to advise the government on which of
the corporations' assets should be sold to the
private sector.
The task force recommended that the profit making aspects of the corporation be sold
and that the public receive shares in the remaining projects free of charge.
Just before Christmas, Clark announced a
new approach to make PetroCan a "semi-
private" corporation. Half the shares would
be given to Canadian citizens, 20 per cent offered for sale to the private sector and 30 per
cent retained by the federal government.
PetroCan would operate on a competitive
basis with private industry, contracted by the
federal government in exploration ventures
and oil and gas deals with other countries.
The Liberals are as critical of this arrangement as they have been of its two
predecessors. The Liberals would retain
PetroCan as a completely government-owned
crown corporation. PetroCan was established, according to the Liberals, because
private industry was preoccupied with profit,
not with the long-term exploration needs of
the country. If it incorporated a shareholder
system PetroCan's potential would be undermined by conflict between the profit goal of
shareholders and our national need for exploration in high risk areas of our oil and gas
potential.
The Liberals would allow PetroCan to
make all of the nation's petroleum deals.
They think petroleum prices can be kept
down if only one company is bidding for foreign oil for Canada.
The NDP is calling for a PetroCan with
increased participation in all aspects of oil
and gas exploration, refinement and international sales. Party leader Ed Broadbent wants
PetroCan to be the number one "oil business" in Canada by 1985 (it is now Canada's
eighth largest oil company). The NDP would
extend PetroCan's retail operations across
the country and issue credit cards to help expand its business. The NDP, like the Liberals, want PetroCan to make all of Canada's
import and export deals. The NDP would implement expansion of PetroCan's involvement in Alberta's oil sands projects and the
industry's refining section.
OIL PRICING
The Conservatives are the only party that
has put general pricing policies into real financial terms. A Conservative government
would stand by its decision to increase domestic oil prices by $4 a barrel this year, and
by $4.50 a barrel per year thereafter until our
domestic prices are equivalent to 85 per cent
of the price of oil in the United States.
Pierre Trudeau and the Liberals cannot
give an exact figure on the rise in oil prices
they would incur but do say the increases
would be smaller and more gradual than
those proposed by the Conservatives. The
Liberals would arrive at a final price after negotiating with the producing and consuming
provinces of Canada, as they did when they
formed the government.
The NDP does not offer a new domestic
price for oil. They recognize the inevitability
of price increases but think a federal commission to control oil prices and profits
should advise the government before a final
price decision is made. The commission
would advise the government on acceptable
profit margins at every stage of the industry
and oil prices would be adjusted accordingly.
Under an NDP government no increase in
corporate profits from price increases would
be allowed until this commission has an opportunity to consider the present profit levels
of the industry. But this does not mean increases could not happen under an NDP government with the extra revenue going to
PetroCan, provincial government or federal
coffers.
Production of heavy oil in the tar sands developments should be dominated by PetroCan and oil produced in this area should be
provided to Canadians at cost, says the NDP.
GAS PRICING AND EXPORT
The NDP and Liberal parties have condemned the Conservative 18 cents a gallon
excise tax on gas because of its potential effect on lower income groups and transportation industries. The Tories claim the heaviest
burden of the excise tax will not fall on these
groups due to their proposed $80 per adult
and $30 per child users rebate for families
that make less than $21,000 per year, and
their 10 cents per gallon rebate to commercial
users of gasoline.
If elected, the NDP would cancel the Conservative government's recent approval of a
license for the export of 3.75 trillion cubic
feet of natural gas to the United states. They
feel the new licence, which will increase our
natural gas exports to the U.S. by 40 per
cent, could undermine Canada's energy
future.
The Liberals think the Conservative government decided to grant the licence without
looking closely enough at the consequences
of the move. The Liberals also think the licence granting should have been part of a
package deal guaranteeing the gas would be
shipped via a Canadian pipeline.
CONSERVATION
All three major parties are calling for increased conservation measures to ensure our
energy future. The Liberals would undertake
a $1.4 billion home insulation grant program
for Canadian householders, and removal of
federal sales tax on home insulation.
The Conservatives say they think the increase in the cost of oil will help force Canadians to be conservation-minded. (That is
one of the Conservative rationales for putting
the extra 18 cent tax on gas.) They would also
have strict conservation standards within
government agencies.
The NDP and Liberals parties do not think
that rising prices will result in less consumption. The NDP would support:
• the lowering of highway speed limits
(this does not fall within the federal jurisdiction);
• furnace certification prior to house
sales;
• subsidization of the costs that householders would incur in switching their heating
systems from oil to gas; and
• efficiency standards for automobiles,
appliances and other energy-consuming products.
NUCLEAR ENERGY
The future of Canada's nuclear industry is
the great non-issue of this election's energy
debate. None of the parties seems willing to
debate the safety, or feasibility of either an
expanded or contracted nuclear industry.
The Conservative party will not make a decision until a parliamentary enquiry into the
nuclear industry is struck and has time to
make well-informed recommendations. The
Conservatives included a proposal for such
an enquiry in their budget that was defeated
in the House of Commons.
The NDP has condemned both the
Liberals and Conservatives for ignoring public scepticism about the safety of nuclear energy. The NDP would call a moratorium on
further nuclear power development until a
royal commission can report its findings on
nuclear energy.
The nuclear issue has been conspicuously
absent from all Liberal energy policy statements. From their condemnations of the
Conservative government for losing Candu
reactor deals with Argentina, their attempts
to sell Candu reactors to Japan late in their
term of office and their tacit consent while
they were in office to nuclear licenses given
out by the Atomic Energy Control Board, it
appears that a Liberal government would not
oppose further expansion of the nuclear industry. Friday, February 1, 1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Hardial Bains, president of the Communist
Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist), has been
on the Canadian political scene for years yet
few people are aware of his existence. Bains
got his start in politics in his native India with
a group known as the Naxalites, a Maoist organization. He went to Ireland in 1958 and
taught biochemistry at Trinity College for a
year before coming to Canada in 1959.
As a graduate student at UBC Bains helped
found an organization called the Internationalists which later developed into the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist).
Since then the CPC(M-L) has never ceased to
be at the centre of one controversy or
another.
In 1975 the party made the headlines locally when the East Indian Defence Committee
was formed under the auspices of the
CPC(M-L), and was involved in vigilante actions against racist attacks on the East Indian
community.
Bains has been threatened with deportation in the past but has managed to remain in
Canada to promote his cause. His party's often unsavory tactics have earned them a reputation for extremism and sectarianism. The
party recently repudiated China as the socialist fatherland and now considers Albania the
only genuine socialist nation in the world. No
doubt we shall hear more from Bains in the
future.
Ubyssey: How many candidates are you
running in this election?
Bains: There will be 181 candidates.
Ubyssey: How many were there last time?
Bains: 144.
Ubyssey: Is there any particular area where
you anticipate your best results to come
from?
Bains: Well there are usually some areas
where we have more supporters than others.
. . southern Ontario, Quebec. In between
Quebec City and Windsor we normally get
better results than other areas.
Ubyssey: Is your party hoping seriously for
an electoral victory or is the campaign merely
to bring the Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist) into the public eye?
Bains: We have to bring the party into the
public eye? (laughs) We want to oppose the
programs of the capitalist political parties on
the electoral front so we are presenting candidates with an entirely opposite program to
the capitalist political parties.
Ubyssey: But it is a tenet of Marxism-
Leninism, is it not, that electoral means in
themselves are limited, and this can only be
part of a greater strategy, you yourself would
admit that?
Bains: Yes, but the crisis in Canada at this
time is not a revolutionary crisis, so you cannot give a call for insurrection or taking up of
arms. So you have to operate within
whatever conditions, possibilities are
available.
Ubyssey: Of the candidates you put up for
election last time, how many lost their
deposits?
Bains: Uhhh, every one.
Ubyssey: So will you be running essentially
the same campaign as you did last election?
Bains: Yes.
Ubyssey: Do you have any particular comments to make about the international situation, such as the invasion of Afganistan?
Bains: The way the international situation
is developing in this period is that because of
acute economic crisis, all the imperialist
countries are preparing for a war and a war is
one way in which they can make maximum
profits and so the people in Canada should
not side with any imperialist powers, when
they're preparing for war or when the war
breaks out. The people in Canada should oppose the imperialists both in Canada and internationally.
Ubyssey: Through what means?
Bains: Through all the means available.
Ubyssey: Which are?
Bains: At this time the political programs
of the capitalist parties should be opposed
through mass struggle. Various agitations
should be organized that Canada should not
side with U.S. imperialism or that Canada
should get out of NATO, or when aggression
comes against workers there should be strike
struggles, mass political agitations, and if the
capitalists withdraw legal conditions then we
will have to work under those conditions,
which will be merely illegal conditions.
Ubyssey: What specific things would you
do then if you had a majority in parliament?
I see here (in your literature) "Make the Rich
Pay?"
Bains: Well we would definitely make the
rich pay. We would install a new constitution.
Ubyssey: Based on the equality of nations I
presume?
Bains: Yes and also based on democracy
on the economic and political front.
Democracy on the economic front is expropriation of the handful of the rich who
own all the means of production and
socialize property in Canada. And eliminate
the exploiters in the country in a stage by
stage manner.
Ubyssey: What do you mean by the word
"eliminate"? Remove them from positions
of economic power or what?
Bains: Eliminate means both. One is that
you eliminate them from the positions of
economic power, number two means that
you do not let them resurrect themselves, that
this class does not come back into power.
And there will be some criminals, those who
have committed crimes against the Canadian
people who will be also eliminated physically.
Ubyssey: Would you be prepared to quote
a figure as to what your annual budget is?
Bains: What is this, for what reason do
you want to know?
Ubyssey: As a measure of your party's
Bains: No, I will not tell you how many
members there are.
Ubyssey: Why not?
Bains: It is for security reasons. You are a
journalist, you should know of our activities.
Ubyssey: On the electoral front, I'd like to
know about the Rhinoceros Party, basically
in Quebec, in the last election garnered more
votes than the CPC(M-L), the Communist
party, and In Struggle combined. I wonder
what your analysis is of why the Rhino Party
is picking up votes.
Bains: It is a straightforward party of the
rich. It is to discourage people from taking
the issue of the crisis in Canada seriously. It
is a party of petty-bourgeois intellectuals who
are full of despair and they want to fool the
masses of the people that there are no
possibilities whatsoever for change in
Canada. And they are the darlings of the
press and you name it, every dreg of society
loves them. They nominated a candidate in
Saskatoon who fought previously as a Conservative. And there are many examples of
this. We know these people.
Ubyssey: Why do they appeal to the
public?
Bains: They don't appeal to the public.
Ubyssey: After your proposed revolution
to what extent would so-called "bourgeois"
freedoms be institutionalized in a new state?
Would they be expanded upon or diminished? I'm interested in your conception. I suppose it's rather petty-bourgeois individualist
concern, but I'm interested in your concep-
'And there will be
some criminals,
those who have
committed crimes
against Canadian
people who will
be also eliminated
physically9
-BAINS
THE ONLY SOLUTION TO THE CRISIS:
strength, the base of support of your party . .
Bains: If you want to measure our
strength, let me run through the list, we have
a daily newspaper ...
Ubyssey: I'm interested in the financial
resources of your organization.
Bains: But why, what is the reason? If you
want to know the strength of the party I can
give you the strength of the party. Running a
daily newspaper is quite an advancement for
the party's work, and it requires quite a lot of
strength.
Ubyssey: So you're not prepared to give us
a figure on the party's annual budget then?
Bains: I can't say yes or no to this question
which is like "When did you start beating
your wife?" I mean what is your point?
Ubyssey: Perhaps a better indication of the
party's strength would be the number of party members. Would you say roughly how
many members there are in Canada?
tion of individual rights and the capacity for
dissent in post-revolutionary society.
Bains: It's a funny sort of situation in that
you ask "What will we do with bourgeois
freedoms?" Just imagine in a socialist society
bourgeois freedom is allowed. First,
bourgeois freedom is freedom to exploit,
which the bourgeoisie likes.
Ubyssey: Yes, I assume that in socialist
society that would be done away with. I'm
not worried about that. I'm worried about
personal freedom, and collective freedom,
political rights . . .
Bains: The freedom which the bourgeoisie
does not give to the masses of the people,
those freedoms will be guaranteed under
socialism. That is number one, democracy on
the economic front. The instruments and the
means of production of the country will be
owned by the masses of the people. Number
two, democracy on the political front, that is
the freedom to hold political, social, cultural,
and religious views. Number three, freedom
Interview by
STEVE McCLURE
and BILL TIELEMAN
to participate actively in the social advancement, scientific and social advancement.
These are freedoms which are not relevant
under this so-called "bourgeois democracy".
Ubyssey: So you're saying one class, one
party, one state.
Bains: Yes. So, when the proletariat captures political power, then it captures
political power for its own ends not for
anyone else. It's exactly the same thing in the
capitalist system.
Ubyssey: I see your point. In your view,
Mr. Bains, what has happened in Iran and
why have we had a religious revolution instead of a Marxist-Leninist revolution in that
country, and further to that, can you see if
this revolution is going to change to a revolution of Marxist-Leninist character?
Bains: First of all it is neither a religious
revolution nor is it a Marxist-Leninist revolution. It is a democratic revolution which has
two aspects: anti-imperialist and anti-feudal.
This democratic revolution has arrived at a
certain stage whereby certain forces want to
put brakes on this revolution so it is not
taken to its conclusion.
Now Khomeini is caught in this. On one
hand he was opposed to the shah, opposed to
U.S. imperialism and he supported this
democratic change. But to have complete
democratic change the old state has to be
thoroughly smashed, which he is not in favor
of.
Ubyssey: You don't think Islam is the central question?
Bains: No, of course not, it has nothing to
do with it.
Ubyssey: And yet Khomeini himself
phrases all his political propaganda in Islamic
terms. Don't you think that he himself is out
to give the revolution a reactionary Islamic
character?
Bains: When the bourgeois democratic
revolutions were taking place in Britain and
in France and other countries in Europe they
used to present their ideas coated with
various religious phrases. So you could have
honest elements in Iran who will spread the
anti-imperialist revolution coated with these
religious phrases. At the same time for Khomeini to characterize it as an Islamic revolution shows his bankruptcy, because what is
the content of Islam? Nothing.
Ubyssey: On a Canadian question, the
Communist Party of Canada as far as I
know, is in favor of nuclear power as long as
the state is involved and not capitalism. Does
your party line differ on that, do you say that
nuclear power is not safe under any condition
or is safe under state control?
Bains: Well I don't know the revisionist
position on this question because as far as the
issues in Canada are concerned it is not an
important issue.
Ubyssey: Nuclear power is not important?
Bains: No. The important issue is the question of health and safety. Both of the
workers as well as the broad masses of the
people. When you talk of nuclear policy and
so on and so forth it is the health and safety
aspect which we are talking about. The
capitalist system cannot guarantee health and
safety of the workers, of ordinary people.
And, as far as our party is concerned, we
support all the struggles which point out that
we must guarantee the health and safety of
the workers and people.
Ubyssey: I have to ask this out of curiosity:
where did the slogan "Make the Rich Pay"
come from and why is it a four-word, very
simple slogan? Is it because it's easy to
remember or does it really embody the basic
concepts of the party's work?
Bains: The "Make the Rich Pay" slogan
basically comes from the 1930s. It was a
slogan advanced by, not directly advanced in
this form, but a slogan presented as part of
anti-fascist struggle by the Seventh Congress
of the Communist International in 1935. You
can find that in the political report of
Dimitrov, Georgi Dimitrov. Page 8
THE    U BYSSEY
Friday, February 1,1980
'Tween classes
TODAY
AG US
The Great Race, noon, from MacMillan to SUB.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,   noon,   International   House
lounge.
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
Organizational meeting for Mann eviction and
demonstration, noon, SUB 224.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Coffee house, 8:30 to 11 p.m., Matey's restaurant at Burrard and Davie St.
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 115.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Robert Davidson graphics and silver on display
until Sunday, Museum of Anthropology.
SATURDAY
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Winter ball, dinner and dance, 6 p.m., UBC grad
centre.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Dutch-Belgian   carnival,   8   p.m..
House upper lounge.
International
MONDAY
CCCM
Anglican-United   communion,   noon,   Lutheran
Campus Centre.
FUS AND THE RED CROSS
Blood drive, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., SUB 209.
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
Demonstration against eviction from expropriated house, all day, 9637 Cameron St., Burnaby.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Recent Benthic Forminifera: zoogeographic provinces by S. J. Culver, 3:30 p.m.. Geological
Sciences Centre room 330A.
TUESDAY
EL CIRCULO
Conversation groups, noon,Buch. 218.
CUSO
Dr. A. Siemens on population — challenging the
myth, 7:30 p.m., International House.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 117.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Regular meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Fat is a feminist issue discussion group, noon,
SUB 130.
CCCM
Anglican-United SCM community meal, noon,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
THURSDAY
LSA FILM COMMUNITY
Film, Men's lives, male stereotyping in today's
society, noon, Law 101.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in. 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
AMS ART GALLERY
General meeting, noon, SUB 230.
FRIDAY
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Some new concepts of limestone genesis, 2:30
p.m., geological sciences 330A.
Hot flashes
Drip, drip, drip
-red stuff falls
Deep in the quiet of the night he
comes. A lonely and despairing
creature, tired of living but unable
to die. He bends slowly and bites
into the victim's neck, and quickly
the blood drains from the body.
But the Red Cross people are
much gentler and the process Nosferatu pioneered is now less pain
ful and nasty. From Feb. 4 to 8 the
forestry undergraduate society and
the Red Cross are having a blood
drive and donors are welcome, just
drop by SUB 209 and 211, from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Matte* dance
The Newman Catholic Centre is
having a winter dinner and dance
with the Young Europeans providing the music at the UBC Grad centre, this Saturday at 6 p.m.
CAMMY MAK, p.S.C; D.M.D.
Wishes to announce the opening of his office
for the practice of
GENERAL DENTISTRY
at
1645 W. Broadway
(Between Burrard & Granville)
Vancouver, B.C. V6J-1W9
Office hours by appointment 738-1816
CITY OF VANCOUVER
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR
CIVIL ENGINEERS
IN 1980
The Engineering Department is anticipating
several vacancies for Engineers graduating in 1980.
The positions will be in various Divisions of the
Department and could involve Traffic Engineering,
Engineering Systems Research including
Economic and Feasibility studies, and Municipal
Engineering Design. There are excellent opportunities for rotation within the Divisions of the
Department enabling the Engineer-in-Training to
obtain a valuable background in Municipal
Engineering.
Interviews will be held on Campus on February
26th and 28th, 1980. Appointments should be arranged NOW by contacting the Canada Employment Centre on Campus, Room 214, Brock Hali,
U.B.C.
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
MUSSOC PRESENTS
January 31 - February 10
8:30 p.m.
U.B.C. Old Auditorium
PREVIEW: Jan. 30
Tickets:
STUDENTS $3.00
(Tues., Wed.. Thur.)
ADULTS $4.00
Vancouver Ticket Centre or
A.M.S. Business Office
226 S.U.B.
STUDENT MATINEE
Feb. 7th - 12:30
TICKETS $2.00 (Students)
THURS SUN 7:00 FRI SAT 7:00 9:30 Sub Aud $1.00
GRAD CLASS
GENERAL
MEETING
Feb. 7 12:30
Hebb Theatre
All students graduating in
1980 are invited to attend.
Signed: Public Relations
Officer
Raydene Good
TUE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 tin* 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial - 3 lima, 1 day «3,00; additional line* 50c. Additional day* #2.76 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a. m., tha aay before publication.
PubticatiortsOffice, Room 241.S.UB., UBC, Van., B.C V6T1W5.
5 — Coming Events
30 — Jobs
70 — Services
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
presents
2ND ANNUAL
DUTCH CARNIVAL
Members $1 .SO        Non-Members $2.50
PRIZES FOR BEST COSTUMES
SAT., FEB. 2-8:30 p.m.
ATHLETIC   PERSON   required   to   teach
fitness programs. Call 327-0408.
35 — Lost
PREGNANT? NEED HELP? Call Birthright
for free confidential help. 687-7223. We
care about you.
The Vancouver Institute
Free Public Lecture
Prof. Geoffrey Parker
Visiting    professor,    U.B.C.
Department   of   History,    from
Ste.    Andrews    University,
Scotland.
CONSCIENCE AND POWER:
PHILIP OF SPAIN
IN HISTORY and LEGEND
Prof. Parker will use the events of the 16th
century to point up a moral for our own
time: The danger of linking national interests with a supernatural causa like Christianity or Communism.
SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 1st
8:15 P.M. IN LECTURE HALL 2
WOODWARD BUILDING
PEN. Silver Tiffany pen lost Jan. 29. Reward
above value will be given. Call Wilson
263-8172.
TWO AGGIE SWEATERS missing from the
Pit Mon. Jan. 28. Please return soon.
Phone Nancy 922-1837. Reward!
85 — Typing
40 — Messages
FRANCOIS, j'ai oublie votre numero de
telephone samedi 26. Telephoner 734-2655
or 873-7752 s'il vous plait. Ken Le Gaffeur.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS SPECIALS: Sherwood H12ROK Hockey sticks $4.95; grey
sweat pants $9.95; polyester hockey jerseys
$9.95; racquetball racquets $9.95; bicycle
panniers, $14.95; Wilson World Class ten
nts racquets $29.95 (strung); grey-colored
down jackets $34.95; Nike LDV Or Osaga
joggers $39.95: Waxless X-Country ski
package $79.50; and dozens of other well-
priced items at 3615 West Broadwav,
733-1612.
tt
THIS
tt
9,
PAGE
RESERVED
*
ie.
for
"**L
m
VALENTINE'S
MESSAGES
tt
at
Thursday, Feb.14
f^»
SPECIAL RATES
X
3 lines for $1.00
yz
tt
Deadline
tt
11:00 a.m. Wednesday
«
Feb. 13th
a
65 -
Scandals
FOR RENT OR SALE. Male French
Lover.
224-7394. Anytime.
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND expert essay and theses
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
EXPERT TYPIST. Essays, term papers $.75
per page. Theses $1.00 per page. Phone
Rose: 266-7710.
90 - Wanted
11 -
For Sale — Private
HP41C CALCULATOR
Very good shape $675.
and  Card  Reader
Call Jack 684-3562.
15 -
Found
CHAIN BRACELET Jan
5 in IRC 873-8784.
20 -
Housing
ON MONDAY FEB. 4TH see "THE
ORIGINAL SINNERS and TEDDY and the
TORSION TESTERS" will be playing at
the FOG SHOW IN THE PIT.
WANTED TO BUY. Your grandparents old
toys and trinkets. Phone 224-6550 after 600
p.m.
VOLUNTEERS WANTED. Cantonese and
Laotian interpreters, 1:00-4:00, Monday,
Tuesday Et Wednesoay on campus. Call
274-5837.
ARE YOU HAVING TROUBLE keeping
physically fit? If so, you are invited to (Oin a
new program, in which we will attempt to
match you with an exercise partner. Get involved, get fit, no cost. For further information call David Myies 733-9015 (early even
ings)
99 — Miscellaneous
70 — Services
ROOMS FOR RENT 2280 Wesbrook  Phone
224-9679. Ask for Chris o- Ted.
ATTENTION! GET PAID FOR
THINKING! Learn about psychology and
get money for it by being a participant in
memory, perception experiments. Take
part in one or many studies, at
$3.00/hour. To sign up. call 228-6130 or
drop by the Attention Lab, room 204-B
Henry Angus building UBC 8:30-4:30.
Canadian Photographic
Adventure Series
A fi. C. Quest outdoor program
MON. FEB. 4-2 part slide presentation
by Chris Harris
Part I: Kayaking in the Queen Charlottes
- hiking Canada's Great Divide - climbing
on Mt. Waddington Er slides of Bowron
Prov. Park.
Part II: A narrated look at Chris' expedition to the too of Mt. Logan -Canada's
highest peak
ALL SHOWS 7:30 p.m.
PRINCE OF WALES
High School Auditorium
Adults $2.00 -:- Students $1.CG mm.
P/kCE FRIDAY
(requiftscat in pace)
Page Friday
goes down ... for third time
See PF 3 Squads of Mods do the Quad
By STEVE McCLURE
The Who is a band that's been
around for so long that it's hard to
imagine the world without them.
Since their beginnings in
London's Shepherd's Bush
district they've moved with
whatever trends that came along.
As The Who's leader and
spokesman Peter Townshend says
in a song from Quadrophenia: "I
gotta move with the fashion or be
outcast."
Finding oneself in the world is
one of the themes that
Townshend's always enjoyed
writing about and there is no better example of this than his ambitiously conceived work called
Quadrophenia. It's the story of a
typical English Mod growing up in
1965 and deals with his attempts
to remain sane in the face of all
the confusion around him. First
recorded in 1973, Quadrophenia is
now the subject of a full-length
motion picture currently playing at
the Vogue Theatre.
The Who's roots are here, in
the world of Mods and Rockers,
of bikes and pills, of rave-ups and
scooters. The band started out as
The High Numbers, an R and B
based band that primarily played
cover versions of blues and soul
numbers.
Astute management and the
happy addition of Keith Moon on
drums guaranteed the success of
the four Shepherd's Bush lads, by
1965 known as The Who.
The four were quite a unique
bunch. Up front there was the
always charismatic Roger Daltrey,
whose voice is still unequalled for
sheer power and emotion. Attacking the guitar madly was the
ungainly figure of Pete Townshend, also known as "the bird-
man" because of the size of his
nose. The base of the band's
sound, in many's opinion, was the
legendary Keith Moon, one of
rock and rolr's true psychos.
Moon was the polar opposite to
bassist John Entwistle, who look-
SYMBOL OF MODNESS
I ride my scooter in the wind and sleet"
ed on bemusedly while the rest of
the band writhed and screamed.
The Who  scored  several  pop
hits in the mid-sixties with songs
like the classic My Generation and
others.Townshend says that it was
not until the Monterey Pop
Festival in 1967 that the band
began making significant progress
in America. The Who thus shifted
its image from the world of Mods
to the then-emerging culture of
psychedelia and became one of
the prime exponents of acid-rock.
But the clincher came in 1969 at
the Woodstock Festival in New
York. Here the band premiered
their revolutionary rock opera
Tommy and were received
estatically by North American
youth. Tommy broke new ground
as rock began to take itself
seriously for perhaps the first time
and Townshend's mystical
broodings came more to the fore.
The Pretty Things were actually
first to come up with the idea of a
rock opera but due to hassles with
their record company were unable
to release their S.F. Sorrow until
after Tommy's appearance.
Tommy was seriously flawed in
many ways. The story line was
vague and many of the ideas
weren't developed well enough.
The story of the deaf, dumb and
blind boy was one with which
many could identify as they searched amidst the hallucinogenic
wreckage of the late sixties for
some sanity and reality.
After Tommy, The Who tried to
feel their way back to a simpler
way of structuring their music and
eventually came up with Who's
Next, a single disc album with no
overt theme. But every Who
album since Tommy has had
some implicit theme running
through it and it was perhaps this
realization that led Townshend to
write Quadrophenia, another rock
opera loosely based on the theme
of a young person trapped in the
world of illusion.
This time Townshend was more
exacting and specific in writing his
rock opera. And the result was a
double album with a strong story
line and a full, almost orchestral
sound due largely to
Townshend's brilliant use of the
synthesizer in creating the sound
of  the  sea   and   the  whole  at-
SeePF8
Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1980 Fuck it
By PETER MENYASZ
The headline caught your attention, didn't it? Well, read
on.
You were probably thinking this week's Page Friday cover
didn't make much sense. And what the hell is this garbage
doing surrounded by great Powder Blues photographs?
It's simple. These great shots would have been wasted
without this little diatribe, because there was no one to write
a review of the concert. And it's not that the concert was a
bore — everyone I've talked to said it was a winner.
So why no review? No Page Friday staff, that's why. Not
meaning to cry on anyone's shoulder, it's impossible to turn
out a decent arts and review section for this newspaper
without bodies (preferably with minds included) to write the
articles.
There are lots of advantages to writing for Page Friday,
and for The Ubyssey in general. There's lots of drinking, lots
of drugs, telephone book fights, and the ego boost of seeing
your name in print. And on Page Friday, you almost always
get a by-line.
Not convinced? There's more. If some of you brilliant in-
tellectualizers don't get into the real world and help out your
campus rag, there won't be a hell of a lot in it to criticize next
year. Because all you'll be reading will be blank pages.
Still not convinced? There's not much more that can be
said. But even if you only have a little time to spare, come
and try us on for size. We're not nearly as hard to get along
with as the garlic-eaters club, and writing for a student
newspaper is not nearly as dangerous as the karate, skydiving, or scuba-diving clubs.
So how about it? You're not scared to take a chance, are
you?
We're waiting for you in Room 241K in SUB. If you look
really interested, we might even buy you a free beer. If we
really like you, we might pelt you with telephone books. And
if we love you, we might let you win a few games of table
hockey on our deluxe table hockey game just to keep you
around.
Peter Menyasz is this year's (and definitely not next year's)
Page Friday editor, and sometimes a contributor to this vile
section of an equally vile rag. This is purely an editorial opinion, and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Page Friday's staff, the few of them there are.
WOODWARD . . . from Downchild ever upwards
POWDER BLUES . . . backing up new album with live performances
Friday, February 1, 1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 mmmmm
,"KV--"»
Words For Sale is freelancing 4 profit
By PETER MENYASZ
So you always wanted to write.
Magazines, you say?
There's a book that can help you.
It won't tell you how to write, won't
give you hints about punctuation,
spelling, grammer or style. But it
will help you sell your efforts.
Words For Sale is a compilation
of ideas collected from members of
the Periodical Writers Association
of Canada. Freelance writers Eve
Drobot and Hal Tennant co-edited
the book, and both are touring the
country promoting Words For Sale
and P.W.A.C. (pronounced pee-
wac).
Sitting in a comfortable chair in
the lounge of the Denman Place
Inn, talking to Drobot and Tennant
is a lively proposition. They've been
interviewed by press people all day,
including an appearance on an
open-line radio show. And they've
just got time to squeeze me in
before a rushed dinner and a televi
sion appearance on CKVU's Vancouver Show.
But after the drinks arrive, the
mood mellows somewhat, and it
becomes easier to talk about the
book, and the two weary journalists
fluidly answer the same questions
they have been asked from coast to
coast.
Tennant explains that a group of
freelancers formed P.W.A.C. in
1976. The response was heartening, and the organization was bombarded with questions from aspiring writers. So a committee was
established to answer the inquiries.
"We started to put on seminars,"
says Tennant. But he quickly points
out that the seminar's participants
soon began to want written
material.
"People would come up to us
and say 'Could we have a
transcript?' " So the idea formed to
create a booklet, but soon bloomed
into a book-length proposition,
Tennant says.
That's where Tennant and
Drobot came in. "We agreed to
have a couple of us volunteer to
edit the thing."    .
The rationale behind the book's
conception is simple. "We can win
more respect from editors if the
quality of freelancing improves,"
Tennant says. And Words For Sale
puts the bare facts of magazine
freelancing out on the table for the
writers to see. "We wanted to present the realities of the profession,"
Tennant says.
The realities of the business
aren't always rosy, and Drobot admits that some parts of the book
were meant to discourage the less
dedicated journalist-to-be.
But a little discouragement won't
keep a writer away from working,
Drobot says. "You're not going to
keep those people out of the
market," she says.
But it isn't only the potential
freelancer who benefits from
Words For Sale. Editors are part of
the game, and improved communication with their writers can
only lead to a longer life and fewer
grey hairs.
"Editors love the book," says
Drobot. "It gave them a chance to
get a lot of things off their chest."
And P.W.A.C. will benefit from
an improvement in freelancers' relationships with magazine editors.
The book may attract some
members to the organization, and
the more P.W.A.C. freelancers
there are, the more editors will have
to follow the organization's
guidelines.
And thaf s a good thing for prospective magazine contributors.
There are currently no set contractual relationships between
magazines and their contributors,
except for those who have agreed
Baroque music brings on spring glow
By KERRY REGIER
A Baroque Extravaganza, produced by the Early Music Society
Sunday night in the Queen
Elizabeth Playhouse, was a performance which, like a field of flowers
in spring, held forth an abundance
of beautiful things. Sadly, the
listener had also to endure a plague
of tiny troubles swarming like flies
over the flowers.
A large group of musicians, local
and imported, presented a varied
program in a style as close as possible to the practice of the 17th century, playing on period instruments
or copies. The first half of the program was devoted to instrumental
concertos by Corelli, Marcello, and
Bach, and the second half was
vocal and choral music by Bach and
his son Johann Christoph, closing
with three Bach canons.
The inspired moments were
largely the result of the individual
genius of many of the performers.
while the gnatlike problems stemmed principally from the lack of coordination of these ideas, and an apparent lack of rehearsal which led to
a proliferation of literally hundreds
of mistakes, miscues, and other little errors.
Violinist Carlo Novi stands as a
case in point. In his solo work with
the Cecilian Ensemble he is well-
known for his superb artistry, yet
his playing as leader of Sunday's orchestra was rarely in consonance
Mussoc begs Sweet Charity
but no mercy for audience
By VERNE McDONALD
Where Mussoc dug up this
dinosaur is a mystery. Why they
dug it up is more than an idle
question. And what they're doing
to it is a crime.
To paraphrase Monty Python,
it's not quite fossilized yet. Such a
large carcass could get smelly if
not put on ice soon.
Sweet Charity
Produced by Mussoc
At the Old Auditorium
Until Feb. 9	
My fat mate, who accompanies
me on assignments to give me a
sense of balance, said maybe I
should just talk about the sets. My
fat mate sees the good in everybody, bless her. Wednesday
night, though, she wouldn't even
agree with me that the female lead
was close to adequate. It is a great
sadness to see an optimistic person so grindingly disillusioned.
It began even before we were
through the doors. Instead of asking for tickets, the woman seized
us and thrust us into the auditorium as if afraid we'd change our
minds. Inside was a grim scattering of relatives and friends Doing
Their Duty.
Fifteen minutes after curtain
time, my fat mate pointed out the
curtains showed no sign of moving and the band in the pit was be
ginning to play avant-garde jazz
out of boredom.
I properly admonished her for
not taking it into account that it
was opening night. We agreed
the band should show more discipline. As it happened, we were
listening to the best performance
of the evening.
There are no words for what we
saw next. My fat mate's theory is
that we stepped accidentally into
a time warp. If so, it was a weirdly
distorted one.
My own theory is that the production was trying for high camp.
As with the direction, choreography, singing, music and dancing,
reach exceeded grasp by a light-
year or two. The sets stole the
show with ease.
Part of the attempt at campi-
ness was a try at reducing the
characters to cartoon caricatures.
But even Donald Duck has motives and a personality. The characters became so unreal, so unattached to any realm of belief
that the cast could have been
machine-gunned and the audience wouldn't have blinked or
cared. Such creatures could feel
no pain.
The audience, however, could.
A show should have an audience
hypnotized, unaware anymore
that they are in a theatre, unwilling to speak and break the spell.
At this performance, the people
in the audience should have been
entertaining each other with jokes
and small talk about what was going on up front while ushers went
up and down the aisles with
wagons dispensing cheap wine in
plastic cups. Distractions would
have been welcome.
The greatest crime is that
Sweet Charity is obviously the result of a lavish amount of work.
Musicals rely on the extravagance
of the presentation and this production measures up. When I told
my fat mate we could leave any
time she said, "Let's wait for the
next set change." She later voiced praise for the stage manager.
We didn't make it to the next
set change. Sweet Charity, after
all, is an escapist musical. We escaped after a little over half an
hour.
As we left, the cast was struggling desperately with a nightclub
scene. Perhaps, I said to my fat
mate, if the vocals were audible, if
the pacing was more precise, if
the band sounded as if it cared, if
the dancing had been synchronized, if the camp had been more
deftly handled. . .
My fat mate flatly disagreed.
The most cynical people are those
that are new at it.
with the rest of the musicians. His
rubato often snaked off in strange
directions, dynamically he often
vanished beneath the sound of the
harpsichord, and he regularly produced piercing harmonic squeaks
from his instrument.
In direct contrast, in the three
Bach canons which closed the program, his playing was splendid.
There he played with only two other
musicians; Novi's problem is simply
that he does not like playing with
lots of other people, as in an orchestra.
And yet, despite the innumerable
little flaws in the performance, the
music was suffused with a warm
glow. The flaws could not obscure
the carefully thought musicianship
of everyone involved on stage.
The problems of baroque performance practice are gigantic, as
players must almost literally think
themselves into a different culture
of a different century. In everything
they did on Sunday, these musicians showed their commitment to
their ideal of making three-hundred-
year-old music vibrant and alive,
and not merely a museum curiosity.
It was the greatness of a few individuals that brought the life into
the music, and countertenor (male
alto) Michael Culver deserves
special mention. A male alto voice
is incredibly difficult to sustain in an
adult, but Culver's gentle strength
and perfect control made his voice
unforgettable. His flutelike trill sent
a visible and tangible wave of
pleasure through the audience.
All 47 musicians contributed a
thoughtfulness, and a delicacy of
ornamentation, which could not be
obscured by the clouds of
blemishes like wrong notes. Carlo
Novi's distractingly neurotic body
gyrations, and the uninformative
and serf-indulgent program notes.
But thinking is not enough; the
proof of musicial thought is in the
playing. I know by my own experience that I can think for days
about some music, but until I pick
up my cello and play it repeatedly, it
remains still an abstraction. And so
the Extravaganza performers
almost failed. Their thought was
clear and sharp, but they just didn't
rehearse together enough, playing
instead of thinking about playing.
to go along with P.W.A.C's code
of ethics.
Some freelancers are grossly
underpaid for their efforts, and
many come to grief when their
stories are published again and
again without their permission and
without any further payment. And
thafs what P.W.A.C. wants to
stop.
The organization's goal is to form
a union-like collective of writers,
with strength coming from their
numbers, Drobot says. "An editor's
going to sit up and notice when all
the last issue's contributors march
into his office and demand
changes," she says.
But the book has other, more
specific lessons to teach. Before
you can be shafted by an editor,
you have to have your stories
published. And thafs the hard part.
The picture Drobot and Tennant
paint in Words For Sale isn't
cheery. Statistics work against the
freelancer. The top rate for a
magazine article in a national rag is
about $1,000. And a top-notch
freelancer turns out no more than
14 such efforts per year. That
doesn't amount to many shekels in
the bank. And it assumes that you
can write that many successful articles in every year — or you starve.
But how do you get Macleans to
accept your magnus opus? Do you
type it up and send it along?
Not if you're bright. And especially
not if you've read Words For Sale.
There's a procedure to go
through before you can see your
name in print nationwide. It starts
out with a query, a proposed story
idea that you send the editor. Actually, you may send a dozen or
more ideas before you hit on one
the magazine needs.
And if they like your idea, then
you write up an outline, which is a
shortened version of your story
aimed at giving the editor a better
idea of what it's about. If you pass
that test, you'll actually get to write
the piece.
So you slave away on it for a few
weeks, or months, and get it in just
before your assigned deadline.
Deadline? Thafs right, you'll even
find out what they're all about.
Okay, you got it in. Now you can
relax, right? Wrong.
You could be asked to rewrite
your effort, maybe more than once.
Words For, Sale cites examples of
five-month period between the
birth of an idea and its appearance
in print.
Getting discouraged? It's not as
bad as it sounds.
Words For Sale gives you an idea
of the rewards of freelancing. And
there's advice from magazine
editors on what they expect from
their writers. There are tips on how
to play the income tax game, and
what your rights are and how to
stand up for them.
There's an in-depth view from
the editor's side of the desk — it
might give you some insight into
why your pet project doesn't make
the magazine moguls cream your
jeans.
Words For Sale is a good investment. Even the MacMillan paperback's $8.95 price tag shouldn't
discourage you. If II save you a lot
of grief, and you never know — you
just might make your fortune as a
freelancer.
Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1,1980 Inflation claws into Talonbooks
By WENDY HUNT
Talonbooks is in limbo.
Vancouver's literary press is laboring under a large deficit and
has suspended the 13 new titles
on its 1980 publication list. It will
continue to supply titles on its
backlist, except for 12 of its most
popular titles which are out of
print. These will not be reprinted
until the company comes up with
enough capital to print enough
books for two to three years, bringing the production costs per
book down to manageable levels.
"We have things to invest in,
we just don't have the money,"
says Karl Siegler of Talonbooks.
"The motivation to stop new titles
is that we would put our other
authors and books in jeopardy."
Talonbooks has been in a tight
financial spot since its inception
12 years ago but inflation and governmental indifference have finally
pushed it to the edge.
"We're characterized as crying
wolf," says Siegler. "The media
doesn't understand the dynamics
of our situation. The problem is
basic and ongoing.
"We've found ways since 1975
to cover our asses. But our deficit
is $40,000 to $54,000 for 1979.
We're fresh out of ideas and here
we sit waiting for things to
change." The exact amount of
the deficit will be known when
Siegler finishes the financial statement for last year.
David Robinson and Siegler are
the two remaining employees of
Talonbooks. They let go a part-
time employee last October, and
drama editor Peter Hay, who had
been with the company since
1969, left in December.
In 1963 Robinson and a group
of other Vancouver high school
students started a small poetry
magazine called Talon. When
Robinson came to UBC in 1965 to
study Canadian literature he
brought the magazine with him
and eventually turned it into Talon
books. The young publishing
house drew on its contributors
from high school days for its first
poetry books. Siegler joined the
company in 1974.
The B.C. government does not
have a publishing policy and Siegler blames this lack of provincia
support and to a lesser extent the
Canada Council for Talonbooks
financial woes.
Besides providing grants and
subsidies to publishers, Siegler
says a comprehensive package
could encourage small business
development through low interest
loans. Sales on textbooks could
be assured by having a committee
from the Department of Education
approve manuscripts.
Ontario implemented a comprehensive publishing policy in 1971.
Eighty per cent of English Canadian publishers are in Ontario and
receive provincial assistance.
Talonbooks receives financial
assistance from the Canada Council. The Canada Council bases its
grants on the assumption that
publishers are receiving provincial
funds. And most of them are —
the ones in Ontario. The Canada
Council makes no exceptions for
B.C. publishers which receive
nothing from a provincial source.
Siegler says he feels that publishers suffer significantly for establishing themselves in B.C., as
during most years Ontario publishers receive more provincial aid
than federal.
Linda Turnbull, executive director of the Association of Book
Publishers of B.C., confirms the
fact that all B.C. publishers are at
a disadvantage in respect to their
Ontario counterparts. They pay
higher interest rates, receive
smaller grants and transport their
books farther to major markets,
and are expected to remain competitive. Talonbooks' financial
problems do not make it unique.
The Association of Book Publishers of B.C. has been lobbying
the provincial government for a
policy. The provincial secretary's
office under Hugh Curtis initiated
a study of the industry and hired
consultant Edward Ward-Harris.
The study is continuing under
present provincial secretary Evan
Wolfe and Siegler and other members of the association are currently   engaged   in   confidential
, MLLAD OF A
TALONBOOKS
. quality literature in quantity
meetings with Ward-Harris. The
study is due March 15 but it is unknown whether the recommendations will be incorporated into the
budget by April 15 for the coming
fiscal year.
ECSTASY OF RITA JOE . . . Chief Dan George in Playhouse production
Siegler is hopeful but not expectant. "I really don't know.
We've been disappointed so
often. I have some optimism that
things will happen on the provincial level."
Turnbull says that hiring a consultant to do an objective study is
a rjood sign. "Obviously if the
government is prepared to study
the industry, it means we've made
some mark."
Successive B.C. governments
have shied away from the idea of
financially supporting the publishing industry, seeing it as free enterprise and profitable and
therefore able to sink or swim on
its own merits. Siegler says the
government has not yet recognized the idea of a "cultural
industry."
Siegler says that inflation has
pushed up publication costs by
135 per cent since 1974. In 1973
the retail price of a Talonbook title
was $2.50, in 1979 $4.95. Talonbooks must keep its prices low to
remain competitive and it cannot
risk losing the college market
which is over one-half of its total
market.
"Publishing is not a profitable
activity. The average is 1.4 per
cent profit after taxes," says Siegler. "The leap in imagination occurs when the government realizes that there are certain organizations which are preferably organized on a profit-incentive basis
but do not make a profit.
"Talonbooks could be a nonprofit society. But a non-profit
society can deteriorate into an organization which is introverted.
There is no external incentive to
be as entrepreneurial and aggressive as possible. There is no incentive to maximize profit."
Turnbull says that as a cultural
industry publishing is shuffled
back and forth between government departments. The provincial
secretary's office takes care of the
arts while small business looks after the economic side of things.
Being a blend of economic factors
and art, publishing finds itself in a
no man's land, unable to get productive action on the part of the
government.
Publishers are not an albatross
around the neck of the Canadian
economy. Government subsidies
are often considered to be gifts to
the publishers but Siegler points
out that direct subsidy to the publisher is the most effective way to
subsidize the consumer. One
dollar to the publisher results in a
$5 saving to the consumer.
Siegler says that instead of
grants and subsidies he would
prefer to charge $12.95 per book if
the market could bear that much.
He adds that publishers provide a
great deal of revenue to printers,
binders, advertisers and graphic
artists, areas which do turn a profit.
Until now Talonbooks has coped with its deficit without provincial help. In 1975 the company used $22,000 in federal funding to
cover its deficit and two years
later it sold its archives to SFU for
$10,000.
Last fall Canada Council offered
$20,000 if Talonbooks published
its new 1980 titles and raised an
equal amount of money. Siegler
says they are trying to raise their
share of the money but the current publishing program will continue only if the Canada Counci!
will amend its programs to end
deficits and accommodate regional variables.
See PF 6
Friday, February 1. 1930
THE    UBYSSE
Page Friday ? Talonbooks goes
under, almost
From PF 5
"The Canada Council can't treat
publishing or the arts as a generality. They must deal with the variants
the publisher operates under," he
says.
Talonbooks has not just been
languishing in the background as a
hippie poetry press. It has 130 titles
and 80 authors. In 10 years it has
published. 60 plays and has become
identified especially with that genre
in its Canadian form.
George Ryga's The Ecstacy of
Rita Joe, Beverly Simon's Crab-
dance and James Reany's Colours
in the Dark are only three titles on
Talonbooks' prestigious play list
which Siegler accredits to Hay.
"Our contribution to Canadian
culture is very identifiable," says
Siegler.
"Talonbooks has most definitely
made a contribution to Canadian
culture," says Turnbull. "I hope
that's no longer a problem for people when they look at what they've
published over the last 10 years.
There's nobody else doing what
they are, especially in theatre.
There's great support for them
throughout the industry."
Siegler says their sales have been
growing slowly in Canada. "We
have reached our Canadian market.
We have reached the limit of pricing
capability and market. There is a
quantifiable shortfall in terms of
money. We could disappear."
Siegler is not making idle threats.
Turnbull can name presses which
have gone under or changed their
publication lists from literary to
commercial titles.
"Over the past two or three years
we've lost a lot of small literary
presses. Blewointmentpress stopped publishing last year. It found
itself in the same financial situation
as Talonbooks. The same thing
happened to Air Press two years
ago," says Turnbull.
"Oolichan and Intermedia have
increased their number of trade-
oriented titles and have less literature and poetry. The problem is
more serious with Talonbooks because it is an established press. It's
not just starting out and trying to
see what it can do or do well."
The company's international
sales to the U.S., Britain, Australia
and New Zealand have increased
1600 per cent. Talonbooks has a
warehouse in Buffalo, a branch office in Los Angeles and reciprocal
distribution agreements with companies in Britain and Australia.
"Canadians cannot get used to
the fact that we have world class
literary authors, a hangover of cultural colonialism which is still very
real," says Siegler.
"Canadian producers of cultural
products should start paying attention to international markets. We're
too used to taking the colonial
view. If it's Canadian, it's second
rate. By buying our work, the
See PF 10
FIRST YEAR DINNER
Feb. 7 5:30 Cecil Green Park, UBC
Sponsored by the First Year Council
and the Alumni Association
speaker: Dr. D. Kenny
UBC President
Tickets — $3.00 from:
Alumni Association   228-3313
Kathy Ophel   224-6158
Joe Winkler   926-1194
Meeting of First Yr. Council
January 22, 1980 12:30 pm
Room 211 SUB
THE FIRST ANNUAL
PIT RACES
— Every Tuesday, at 8:00 p.m.—
Featuring ....
1.
Feb.
5   "JUG RACES"
2.
Feb.
12   "PYJAMA GAME"
3.
Feb.
19   "the 4-MINUTE BANANA"
4.
Feb.
26   "the TALENT TONIGHT
SHOW"
5.
Mar
4   "the WET T-SHIRT/
JOCKEY SHORT CONTEST"
"This is an Inter-Faculty competition with the respective teams
receiving bonus points for:"
— Faculty donations to the RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE
— Faculty support each night
— Mystery question answers.
WINNING TEAM RECEIVES THE "PIT TOKEN AWARD"
 one jug full of tokens	
COME OUT AND SUPPORT
YOUR FACULTY
LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $35.00 additional to all other fees will be
assessed if payment of the second instalment is not made on or
before January 18. Refund of this fee will be considered only on
the basis of a medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of
domestic affliction. If fees are not paid in full by February 1, 1980,
registration will be cancelled and the student concerned excluded
from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for nonpayment of fees applies for reinstatement and the application is
approved by the Registrar, the student will be required to pay a
reinstatement fee of $35.00, the late fee of $35.00, and all other
outstanding fees before being permitted to resume classes.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
6882481
•!iti&f^few%to£fliSr
>*
MATTY GOLAN;
lawyer, speaker and author
of controversial bestseller
"The Secret Conversations of
Henry Kissinger"
speaks at Hillel House
Monday, February 4th 12:30
Special Lunch: Homemade Blintzes.
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
Held Over
Monday, February 4
&
Tuesday, February 5
8:00 p.m.
A MIDSUMMER
NIGHT'S DREAM
By William Shakespeare
Student Tickets: $3.00
BOX OFFICE
FREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE
ROOM 207
Page Friday 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1980 Mughal dynasty
evolves Indian art
By CHRISTINE WRIGHT
To most British Columbians, "Indian art" means the Bill Reid prints
mounted in West Coast office
buildings and on living room walls.
The UBC Museum of Anthropology, with its host of totem
poles greeting heritage-hungry
tourists at the entrance door, is a
monument to native Indian art.
But the temporary exhibition on
loan from the Royal Ontario
Museum until Feb. 11 offers a
glimpse of the other brand of Indian
art — for a change.
The exhibition, entitled Reflections of India, is circulating
throughout Canada to celebrate the
tenth anniversary of the Shastri
Indo-Canadian Institute. The institute was formed in 1968 to further the development of Indian
studies in Canada.
The exhibition includes paintings
from the sixteenth century to the
nineteenth century, when India was
under the political and cultural
domination of the Mughal dynasty.
Whereas the paintings of Hindu India before this time depicted
religious scenes in a vivid folk style,
the Mughals introduced new subjects and more refined techniques
to Indian art.
The paintings of the pre-Mughal
era are characterized by vibrant col
ors, bold forms and rough execution. The series illustrating the life
of Krishna have a primitive vitality
that is lacking in some of the later,
more precise works.
Even though the god (differentiated from other figures by his blue
skin) is shown as an active participant in the day-to-day life of mortals, the characters are not individualized and the style is far
removed from reality. The early
religious paintings are flat; later
works demonstrate a growing
awareness of proportion and
perspective.
The Mughals brought sophistication and subtlety to Indian art along
with a more naturalistic style. The
colors are subdued: muted ear-
thtones are used for background
scenery, and shades blend more
smoothly. The composition is
manipulated for the sake of visual
clarity in detail work, sometimes at
the expense of natural perspective.
One sees the neat geometric patterns of floor tiles with a bird's-eye
view. Intricate borders, sometimes
illuminated in gold, frame the paintings with arabesque and floral
designs.
The Mughals used art to record
historical events and explore individual  personalitities. There are
Lutheran
Campus Centre
WORSHIP THIS SUNDAY
9:00 — Eucharist
11:00 — Eucharist
7:30 — Evening Prayer
5885 University Blvd.
224-1614
International House
presents an opportunity
to meet the world's people:
Feb.      2—      Dutch-Belgian Carnival
Special foods, prizes for best costumes -8:00 p.m.
Admission $1.50 members
$2.50 non-members
Feb.      8 Valentine's Dance
Dance to the music of The Act' -9:00
Admission $2.00 members
$3.00  non-members
Feb.      9 Romanian Festival
Exhibits of sculpture, handicrafts, traditional costumes, folkdan-
cing: sampling of Romanian foods; a talk on the vampire of
Transylvania - 4:00 p.m.
Dinner tickets $3.00 in advance from I.H. office.
Feb.    15 Caribbean Night
Come and.enjoy pina coladas and other Caribbean delightsl —
8:30 p.m.   Admission free to members 50c to non-members
Feb.    21 Folk Night
In Coffeeplace starting at 7:30 p.m.   Bring an instrument rf you
play one and help make this evening!
Feb.   29 Barn Dance
Ken Oakley is to call for another of our popular square dances
-8:30 p.m. Admission 75c members $1.50 non-members
March   8       Oriental Food Fair
Watch for details about this event. It will also mark the end of
the Asian Colloquy being held on campus the preceding week.
PLUS: Every Tuesday is Games Night at coffeeplace, 7:30 p.m. Admission free to all
AN ANNUAL $2.00 MEMBERSHIP ENSURES A REDUCED ADMISSION TO ALL
EVENTS PLUS OTHER BENEFITS. FOR DETAILS AND TICKET INFORMATION
PHONE 228-5021.
paintings to commemorate feasts,
receptions and enthronements.
Portraits of Indian rulers are drawn
in profile, giving strong, distinctive
lines to the facial features.
The daily events of court life are
evoked in a series of semi-erotic
scenes. Princes languish with their
harems, supervised by bored
chaperones and surrounded by
food and wine. The mood is created
with light illusions, color contrasts
and dramatic spacing. Although the
characters are elaborately adorned,
the composition is uncluttered. In
Lovers by Moonlight and Lovers on
a Terrace, the figures are set
against a naturalistic background of
dark evening tones. The tension
between the foreground and
background gives depth to the
paintings.
As the Mughal dynasty declined,
the European culture became an
important influence. The Judgement of Paris draws on classical
mythology and Western techniques. The fleshy bodies and natural
postures are distinctly European,
although the Indian style is apparent in the elaborate border-work
and bright colors.
Lisa Golombek, of the Royal Ontario Museum, says, "The arts of
India are becoming a source of en-
ART OF INDIA . . . sophisticated and colorful
joyment and delight to the West,
and with this exhibition it is hoped
that further aspects of Indian
culture will come to the fore."
However, for the cultural exchange to be reciprocal, perhaps
we should send a totem pole to India.
|=ii.The unique taste of Southern Comfort, enjoyed for over 125 years.
Friday, February 1,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 Up and down with the Who
From PF 2
mosphere associated with being
alone on a beach with one's
thoughts.
Which brings us to the film. The
release of Quadrophenia on film
and in a re-done, re-mixed album
package has set off a Mod revival in
the U.K. and so the saga of The
Who has come full circle to a point
where The Who have become their
own historians.
The movie is done exactingly and
with a great deal of care. Much attention is paid to period styles and
trademarks: the Mod haircuts, the
peculiarly Mod expressions, and the
generally punky Mod outlook are all
reproduced with what one would
assume is at least a fair degree of
accuracy. A problem here is that at
times the movie seems like a
museum tour, an exhibit without
any spontaneity or life.
The movie soon comes to life
when we first meet the nasty
Rockers, whose main joy in life
seems to be kicking the shit out of
our poor little friends the Mods.
The Mods get theirs back as they
prove that they can be just as
vicious and sadistic as the leather-
clad Rockers. The climax of the film
comes all too soon as the Mods and
JIMMY . . . why should I care
Rockers fight it out at the seaside-
resort of Brighton.
The acting during these scenes is
great, contrasting sharply with the
rather stilted scenes in the beginning of the film.
In general we get a good look at
the world of the Mod, which for all
its allure our hero Jimmy finally ret
jects as he reconciles the disparate
elements of his split personality.
This theme, so central to the
original disc version of
Quadrophenia, is downplayed in
the film, perhaps because of time
limitations. Unfortunately, it results
in an ending that is unsatisfactory.
There are many beautiful moments
in the film. When The Who's music
is cranked up to provide the
backdrop for moody, introspective
scenes like the one used for the
song Love, Reign O'er Me the film
is simply unsurpassed in terms of
sheer power and majesty.
Diehard Who fans will note that
many of their favorite songs from
Quadrophenia are either missing or
not played in their entirety. The
people at the Vogue could also turn
the volume up about 20 or 30
decibels as well. Despite its faults
this is the movie to see if you love
The Who and their music and if you
ever felt like smashing your head
against a wall.
Bacardi rum.
Sip it before you
mix it.
Just this once, taste Bacardi rum
before you add anything. It's a
beautiful way to see why Bacardi goes so well
with soda, water, ginger and almost anything else.
BACARDI rum
tOR A KX)f) AM' UHiNK HtCiHt BOOK,H   WHi't   KIM DiSTiu l«> ' 0   lT['    (-'      tV
Si.jPLWwiS.i.'N  ,)r   t,A,.AK[,'  &  l.OMPAI\t   liM'UL*   HAl'4«h   ANL;  HAT   Dt .'U   S'.'l  ..'[?
Page Friday 8
■iyyiCy";:i   "CAKD: »uMiS; L'KGDuClC BV iPLC* «u1mOBiIv AND UNDID iMt
• fcKs l,,  (,ac««u. 1 tOMPANv i«,i[S   BOTTLED 8» FBM D'STiLltR. LI)   .TD    CANADA
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THEATRE BEYOND WORDS
Canada's Leading Mime Troupe
in
"The Potato People"
THURSDAY, February 7, 12:30 Noon
FREE TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT
THE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE BOX OFFICE, ROOM 207
OR AT THE DOOR
The Theatre Beyond Words are Artists in Residence
this week at U.B.C.
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
918   GRANVILLE
685-5434
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION (
THE WHO  PRESENTS THE MOVIE
QUADROPHENIA
Warning: coarse language
  throughout; soma nudity, suggestive scenes and violence.
Showtimes -B.C. Dir.
2:26 4:50
7:15 9:40     ,
OdEON
881   GRANVILLE
682-7468
duNbAR
DUNBAR  at 30th
224-7252
REDFORD FONDA
THE
ELECTRIC
KT-rsrSJ HORSEMAN
Warning:
occasional   swear
ing. -B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: Odeon
2
E^-bTS,c°"" STEVE MARTIN*
Showtimes: 2:00 4:00 6:00 8:00 10:00
85)   GRANVILLE
685-6828
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
CORONET 2
151   GRANVILLE
685-6828
bROAd WAV 1
|70 7   W. BROADWAY
8741927
Showtimes:
Coronet 1:30 3:30 6:30
7:30 9:30
Broadway 7:16 9:15
TIM CONWAY  DONKNOTTS
IHE PRIZE
FIGHTER
A Knockout Comedy!
Warning: occasional nudity
rand swearing. —B.C. Dir.
Showtimes: 7:30 9:30
Winner of 4 Golden Globe Awards
including "Best Picture"
DARK
CAMBIE at  18th
876-2747
T -.     DUSTIN HOFFMAN
Kramer
Kramer
i Showtimes: 7:30 9:30
Golden Globe Award
"Best Foreign Film"
bROAd WAV 2
70 7 W   BROADWAY
 8741927
mm
(The comedy thai comes out of the closet)
French, w/English subtitles.
Restores the word epic to
its original force. A
masterpiece of cinema art.
Irene Papas . Michael Cacoyannis's
IPHIGENIA
A'tr   Tatiana Papamoskou   Musn. d> Mik's T^eccic <i« <.
Greek with English subtitles
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1980 Vote Rhino
the game
warden's choice
Friday, February 1,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 Can publisher keep printin'?
From PF 6
British and Australians convince us
of the fact that we have first rate
authors."
Pushing into the international
market is costly and 80 per cent of
foreign sales are reinvested to this
end says Siegler. Once authors
have been established in a market,
less money is needed to actually
keep them there.
Siegler has plans for the growth
of the company. Talonbooks has
matured and is no longer the small
press which could afford to print a
small number of books by an unknown poet. That job has fallen to
the number of small literary presses
which have sprung up since Talonbooks began.
These small presses are often run
by people who have another source
of income and do not depend
primarily on their press for income.
Talonbooks must publish work
which will sell in large enough
quantities to keep production costs
down.
In the field of poetry, Siegler sees
the job of Talonbooks as consolidating small, older editions of
Canadian poetry, many of which
are out of print and stand to fade into obscurity. By publishing anthologies edited by teachers and with
introductions written by them,
Siegler feels that poetry can be
made accessible to first- and
second-year students and the
general public.
Beyond his interest in poetry and
literature, Siegler would like Talonbooks to publish more social and
literary criticism and more scholarly
works, such as its recent The Salish
People.
"Scholarly publishing is a very
expensive field. I'm not going after
the semi-disguised Ph.D. thesis, the
navel-gazing academia best publish
ed by university presses. I want
something marketable, not opinions but solid work," says Siegler.
"Twelve to 15 years ago there
was no established literary press.
There was McClelland and Stewart
or nothing. Now we've grown. The
small presses are still around. The
difference is we're around."
Talonbooks has filled out the
publishing scene, and just as importantly the publishing scene in
B.C. It has brought several Canadian authors to the literary forefront. The question is, how valuable does the B.C. government consider its work to be and will it pay
the price necessary to keep it thriving?
i
(Japan, 1953)
KORRES
** MOVING AND 7.
[»1 TRANSFER LTD
I    Si
MOVING AND T^
STORAGE" ""
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements. Yards
CLEAN-UPS
Women's Athletic Association
Executive Positions 1980/81
Nominations are open from:
February 4 to February 18, 1980
Executive positions are:
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Member-at-Large
Nomination forms are available in Room 208, War Memorial
Gymnasium. Elections will take place at the W.A.A. Annual
Meeting on March 3, 1980 at 12:30 p.m., Room 211, War
Memorial Gymnasium.
Pacific Cinematheque    J
presents •
MASTERWORKS      t
OF THE CINEMA     |
Sunday afternoon matinees     a
at 2:00 p.m. in the x
Varsity Fine Arts Theatre      £
Info: 732-6119
4375 W. 10th Ave.
, Feb. 3 Tomas Gutierrez Alea's (
MEMORIES
OF
UNDERDEVELOPMENT
(Cuba, 1968)
Feb. 10 Peter Watkin'si
EDVARD MUNCH
(Norway, 1976)
Feb. 17 Marcel Carrie's i
CHILDREN
OF PARADISE
(France, 1944)
_, Feb. 24 Orson Welles <
! CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT
(Spain, 1965)
• March 2 Rainer Werner Fassbinder's 8
• EFFIBRIEST *
(West Germany, 1974)
19 Francis Ford Cof
THE GODFATHER       #
(USA, 1972) S
•
I March 16 Ozu Yasujiro's •
TOKYO STORY 2
J March 23    Michelangelo Antonioni's 5
THE RED DESERT       5
(Italy, 1964) 2
•
0 March 30 Ingmar Bergman's 0
SMILES OF 2
Cut Your Study Time
By 2/3!
Wll show you how...free.
Would you like to:
□ Raise your grade average without long hours
over texts.
□ End all-night cramming sessions.
D Breeze through all your studying in as little as
1/3 the time.
□ Have more free time to enjoy yourself.
□ Read 3 to 10 times faster, with better concentration, understanding, and recall.
Evelyn Wood works — over 1 million people,
including students, executives, senators, and even
presidents have proven it. A free 1 hour demonstration will show you how to save hundreds of
hours of drudgery this year (as well as how to
increase your speed immediately with some simple
new reading techniques).
It only takes an hour, and it's free. Don't miss it.
-SCHEDULE OF FREE SPEED READING -LESSONS
You'll increase your reading speed
up to 100% on the spot!
SUNDAY & MONDAY
5:30 pm or 8:00 pm
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
ROOM 205
i
A SUMMER NI William Hellermann will appear
at Western Front, 303 East 8th
Avenue, on Monday, Feb. 4 at 9:00
p.m. Hellerman's performance
could be described as multi-media,
but he describes his work as falling
in the cracks between music, art
and literature.
Mussoc's production of Sweet
Charity opens this weekend and
runs until Saturday, February 9.
The show goes on in the Old
Auditorium at 8:30 p.m. Tickets
available from the AMS office in
SUB.
THE POLICE . . . Reggae-rock
The People's Law School is
sponsoring a free course on
unemployment insurance. The
course runs Monday to Wednesday, February 4, 5 and 6, from 7:30
to 9:30 each evening at the
Hastings Community Centre,
3096 East Hastings. Space is
limited. Call 734-1126 to pre-
register.
Le Groupe de la Place Royale
will dance at the North Vancouver
Centennial Theatre at Presentation House. Performances are on
Friday and Saturday, February 1
and 2, and are fifth in the
Canadance performance series.
Tickets are $6 and $4.50, available
from VTC outlets and Eatons.
The   Vancouver   Folk   Music
Festival will present three musicians over the month of February
during their winter concert series.
Tony Bird will appear on February
4, Elizabeth Cotten and Mike
Seeger on February 11, and Claudia
Schmidt on February 25. All performances will take place at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre at
8:00 p.m. Price is $5.50 per concert
or $13.50 for the three. Tickets at
Black Swan Records, 2936 West
4th Avenue, or call VECC at
254-9578.
The Purcell String Quartet,
SFU's quartet-in-residence, will
perform on Friday, February 1 at 8
p.m. in the SFU theatre. Pianist
Robin Wood and cellist James
Hunter will be the evening's guest
artists. The program will feature
music by Dvorak and Schubert.
Student tickets $2.25. Call the SFU
theatre Box office at 291-3514.
Doc & Merle Watson and The
David Grisman Quintet will be
featured in a musical double bill at
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Sunday, February 3.
Violinist Yehudi Menuhin joins
the VSO in the Orpheum. The first
performance is at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, February 3, and the other two
performances are to be held at 8:30
p.m. on Monday, February 4, and
at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February
5. Music will be taken from the
work of Brahms, Schubert and
Mendelssohn. Tickets from the
VTC and Eatons.
England's No. 1 Reggae-rock
band The Police will be appearing
at the P.N.E. Gardens Feb. 2 and 3
along with sky-blue beat band The
Specials.   A   Perryscope  Concert
HOCKEY
THUNDERBIRD STYLE
UBC vs CALGARY
FRI. & SAT. FEB. 1, 2-8:00 P.M.
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
STUDENTS FREE ADMISSION
Invest in precious metal with an
stereo cassette deck from
H^ Commercial Electronics
ck exc
• ®
oo
oo
srsr-i—   — -Ego* j
Thel-lpagaAL-300 is fully equipped
io make use of all available major types of
cassette tapes on the market today. Particularly
the more recent high performing metal tapes.
The front panel 4-way selector permits the bias
and equilization characteristics to be switched to
the most suitable levels for metal, chrome,
ferrichrome, and normal tapes.
3 heads, closed loop, dual
capstan, tape transport
The AL-300 Sets Amazing New Standards in
Quality and Performance—Superb Sound Clarity
with Minimum Distortion
Under $900-
Opagen-5100
Meial Tape Handling Ability, Fluorescein
Peak/VU Meters, r.\ir;i-l arge Flyuheel
Tape Transpori. .
A Nen (feneration (assetIe Deck From
Alpage's Advanced Technolog>
Under $400
Investment funds
M^.9     III     }*%*t
The new meial lape cassettes mm (in ihe market offer you speciaeular, improved frequency response and
dynamic range.
Bui in order io record ou meial lape your lape deck musi he able io provide much grealer bias current
and special recording equalisation. The lape heads (erase and record  play) must also be specially designed to
withstand the higher input levels required for proper recording on metal tape.
You will notice the difference, especially if you own direct to disc, master or digiial recorded albums
which put extra demands on cassette performance.
TheCMpageAl -300 and FI -5100 decks are fully equipped to meet the exciting potential of meial lape, in
addition io all other major lape grades.Cllpage reliability is backed by a 2 year parts and labour warranty.
All models sold are serviced in house at —
—-B Commercial Electronics ltd
"since 1957 only quality sfereo and service"
1305 Burrard St. Vancouver. tel: 669-5525
(free parking at rear of store) VISA        budget terms
please keep me informed about all
your new stereo components with
your FREE quarterly newsletter
"creative sound"
name	
address .
. postal code .
I
n/
■*£?«
Ob.
{p^looeC
2.904 W. ■***» AVE.     733-3713
An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
if is all about!
OPEN TUES.-SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
ft
•f*
*
5732 University Blvd.   P\
Eat In and Take Out    ]£■
OPEN EVERY DAY      x,
4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.   lK
PHONE: 224-6121 A
gemm
Live Belly Dancing on
Friday & Saturday Nights
LUNCH   11:30 -3:00 Mon.    Sat.
DINNER   5:00-1:00 Mon. - Sat.
5:00- 11:00 Sunday
4Ww.I0th.Av*.
22W2Y
UBG Gampas
Pizza
\UBc7
JPimzaK
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.; Fri.
11:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; Sat. 4:00 p.m.-3:00 a.m.;
Sun. 4:00 p.m.-1:00'a.m.
2136 Western Parkway
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - DUNBAFt - PT. GREY
A variety of great dishes includ
mg    Moussaka,     Kal a man
Souvlakia, and Greek
salads.
Mon- Thurs 4 pm 2:30 am
Fri &  Sat 4 pm-3:30 ami
Sunday    4   pm 12    pm,
7389520
or 738 1113      |   DOWNTOWN
■      Ilea   OnKcnn
1359 Robson
688-5491
3611 West Broadway
PARKING AT REAR
Dining Lounge - Full Facilities -
Take Out or Horn* Delivery
Late delivery call V hour before closing.
SHAMA
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
RED LEAF   ^f
RESTAURANT*
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
M     228-9114.
<ik FREE DELIVERY
J,ti from 4:30 p.m. '■
10% Discount on all
cash pick-up orders
    2142 Western Parkway
JUST'  U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
THE "SUPER" CURRY
IN TOWN
*
1754 WEST4TH 732-5313
Open 5 P.M. Every Day
FULLY LICENSED
CHARGEXMASTLRCHARGE
AMEX DINNERSCLUB
JFSUS
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 324-6336
(Lpr=Jr^r^r^r^r^r^r=^r^r^rf7f^r^rJr=Jr^'r^r^r^r=r
1
a
2
a
gms
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE FAST DELIVERY
228-9513
4510 VA 10th Ave. ffl
33i3i=llrdr=lr=ii=li=lr=l=ii=ii=Jr^r=lr=l|=li=lrdcv]j'
Friday, February 1,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 11 Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1,1980
CapitolEMI Records
mcoim
Entire Selection
ON SALE.
CAPITOL RECORDS
and A & B SOUND
BRING YOU A SALE
ON THE ENTIRE
| SELECTION OF
RECORDS & TAPESI
DISTRIBUTED BY |
CAPITOLEMI
CANADA.
STrack
-j--*""!
UTTLE RIVER BAND
—    Flrat Un6m The Wire
ASU
Dark Side of the Moon
PINK FLOYD
8Track
Cassette
Cassette
Cassette
1021  Permanent    [_
Waves - Ruth (new)
1 11954 First Under
the Win
-UMe River Bind j
11163 Dark Side of
the Moon
-PWifloyd
SALE STARTS FEB. 1
SALE ENDS FEB. 29
Sammy Hagar. Tavares, Raydio, Moon Martin,
Asleep At The Wheel. Anne Mortifee, Long
John Baldry. Cliff Richard, Kate Bush, Tom
Robinson Band, John Lennon, Bob Welch,
Mink Devitle, Glen Campbell. Renaissance,
Shirley Bassey, Ferrante & Teicher, Paul Anita,
Stranglers, Gerry Rafferty, Chris Rea, Gordon
Lightfoot, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Brinsley
Schwartz. Commander Cody, Iggy Pop,
Grateful Dead, Ronnie Laws, Ventures, Mary
O'Hara, Generation X, F.M., Klaatu, Stephan
Grappelli, Johnny Rivers. Dottie West, Nick
Gilder, Linda Ronstadt, Grand Funk Railroad,
Al Martino, Gentle Giant, Jessie Colter, Natalie
Cole, A Taste of Honey, Jennifer Warnes.
PLUS MANY, MANY MORE!!
V^   '*- - *>
Angel
ANGEL
RECORDS
THE ENTIRE SELECTION OF
ANGEL RECORDS AND TAPES
ON SALE
AS LOW AS
$4"
_ PER DISC OR TAPE
—■ T THE ENTIRE SELECTION
SERAPHIM     0FSERAPHIM
▲▲.*
RECORDS & TAPES
ON SALE
$349
Pf R MSC OR TAPE
Quality Listening at Budget Pleasing Prices
on Disc & Tape
UK CH Q&6sound
The Yamaha Audio
'BLACKFACE' System
YAMAHA'S
FULL 5-YEAR
WARRANTY
YAMAHA SYSTEM CR55 YP66 NS55
Introducing the "Blackface" design, featuring shimmering ebony black facings, and decorative warm
rosewood finish. The Yamaha Audio CR55 receiver combines a high sensitivity AM/FM tuner with a
stereo amplifier that delivers 15/15 warts of continuous RMS power, with ultra low distortion of
0.05%. Trie YP66 turntable is a super smooth semi-automatic belt-drive table that features professional precision controls. This component has gold plated head shell contacts and comes complete at
no additional cost with a diamond tipped stylus/cartridge. The NS55 Rock monitors recreate powerful and dynamic sound with extremely high efficiency whether it's disco or classical music. Superb
overall response provides excellent stereo effect.
SHB       OD
CERTIFIED PERFORMANCE
Li   "Ct'ti
CONSUMER
MAGAZINE
SHERWOOD CERTIFIED
PERFORMANCE means:
— Every unit is tuned and fine aligned to
maximum performance.
— Every unit is tested and verified as to
actual performance.
— Every unit includes an individual test
certificate as to its guaranteed performance.
CERTIFIED
PERFORMANCE
SHERWOOD 7250
"Top rated" receiver in recent consumer magazine. Typical "Certified
Performance" unit delivers over 30
watts RMS/channel and boasts 92 dB
S/N ratio on phono for super quiet performance while listening to records.
Phase-look loop tuner for drift free FM
70C
SPEAKERS
100
SPEAKERS
"Top rated" compact speaker system.
Uses the same 1" inverted ferro-ftuid
tweeter as the EPi 100 model for excellent definition. Ideal speakers for
high-fi repreduction when space is at a
premium.
reception.
The 7250
ONLY'
1.95
ONLY
$79-95
-•:.■ %
%''—■
THE MOST HIGHLY ACCLAIMED
BOOKSHELF SPEAKER IN THE
INDUSTRY. Incredibly accurate
reproduction for all types of music and
suitable for use with amplifiers of 10 to
80 watts RMS/channel. 5 year parts
and labour warranty.
1.95
O&6sound
556 SEYMOUR ST. DOWNTOWN
Open until 9 Thursday and Friday
687-5837

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