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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 12, 1988

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Array By Katherine Monk
? ? T? -E-S-P-E-C-T, ooh
lv now what that
means to me. Sock it to
me...," was the soul cry of
Aretha Franklin in the
sixties; it is also the ethic
behind gay activist Rob
Joyce's newest project: Q
magazine.
A figurehead in the gay liberation
movement, Rob Joyce smiles across
the table ofthe tiny downtown office
which has become the home ofthe
year-old Q magazine, and dismisses
his role of a hero in the Gay community.
"I'm most proud of my 165 Aretha
Franklin records, nearly three whole
collections," he says.
But Joyce's achievements speak
for themselves: founder ofthe Gay
Rights Union in 1980, and spokesperson/editor for Gay Tide.
As vice-president ofthe West End
community centre, he pushed for gay
representation in community centre
events. As a job counsellor he
brought a precedent setting case to
the Supreme Court, legislating that
no one had the right to be discriminated against based on sexual preference.
Now, as editor and founder of Q
magazine, Joyce continues his battle
s
to bring gay issues into the public
forum.
"What we are trying to do at Q is
what Barry Gordy did to motown: he
brought black music to a white
culture. And he did it with pride, not
sacrifice. We're trying to bring gay
pride, but we're also bringing it to the
general population," Joyce says.
"Q is dignity, not a pecking order.
We treat everyone with respect. A
Volleyball jock isn't more important
than a drag cup of tea. But these
people are political, and they've been
out there on the streets," he adds.
Q magazine celebrated its first
birthday in January, and already it's
walking on both feet. It can be picked
up at over one hundred and fifty
distribution points in the city both
gay and straight, and according to
Joyce, advertising has not been a
problem.
"People come into the office, and
they are astounded at the quality of
Q. People have grown to expect that
a gay publication has to look bad, and
read bad, but there's no paper in the
city that can outmatch us for quality,"
says Joyce.
That's what Q means: quality, if
it means anything at all, says Joyce.
"It means queen, queer. It's a
word ingrained in gay men. It also
means queue up, take your cue, anything," he adds.
Q has been so successful that its
circulation has increased from eight
to twelve thousand copies in
just eight issues and the
offices are already too small
for the growing staff.
Joyce attributes the
success of Q to its new
viewpoint. "We're a new
breed of publication, like
Xtra in Toronto. We see
ourselves as a reflection of
the community. We aren't
trying to preach."
When he created Q,
i Joyce recognized the need
S , to explore different areas in
the gay press, and established a new set of priorities.
"I don't mean to speak
out against other gay
publications, but some feel
that it's essential to be
erotic to be a gay paper,"
Joyce says. "Q is a sensual
paper, but not erotic. Other
papers tend to want to shock and
confront their readers, we want our
readers to think. But we don't think
shock serves anyone's purpose. We
haven't had to compromise. And we
certainly haven't had to compromise
to our advertisers."
Although he's no longer as publi-
cally vocal as he was in the mid-
seventies, Joyce says it's not him
that's changed, it's the times.
"Gay people are invited to
straight parties, but more
for colour."
"It's 1988, things have changed.
In the seventies there were countless
demonstrations, there isn't that kind
of movement now. The movement
and the activism now is through
AIDS, but these aren't activists by
trade.
"Vander Zalm will change legislation when he's pressured to do so.
And that will happen, because now
the foundations are in place. Eventually what will happen is that there
will be a coalition., and that's unstoppable."
But the progress hasn't come
without a price. Joyce was hospitalized for two weeks in 1977.
"I was just walking along English
Bay, and a group of guys just attacked me. I was in complete shock,
but they just kept kicking me in the
head.
"That was a common occurence in
the mid-seventies, when Gay liberation was just taking off, we had gangs
of people that would just converge on
the West End and just start beating.
A lot of that is behind us, there's still
violence, but we've come a long way."
Joyce nonetheless sees a
long road ahead.
"Gay people are invited to
straight parties, but more for
colour. It's still not acceptable
for he or she to talk about their
relationships. You know the
barriers, but you can't touch
therfi.
"It's almost like black
people, segregated from the
white society, so they developed
their own culture. We have
been isolated, and so there's a
kind of camp humour, an inner
support group. All that would break
down and will break down when
we've been integrated into the community."
"It's not assimilation, but integration with integrity. We have a lot to
learn from the black community, and
the tendency to take on white values.
Some gays want to take on straight
values."
As we talk, people wander in and
out ofthe office. The atmosphere is
relaxed, although it's close to deadline. A man walks in and brings a
photograph of a lover who has died of
AIDS.
Joyce tells me he has tried to talk
with him for over seven months.
'These are the real heroes," he says.
The problems involved, even in
printing a photograph of an AIDS
victim are enormous, says Joyce.
"We went around the office, and
none of our parents would agree to
having our picture published if we
died of AIDS. There's this shame and
guilt, almost as if they were damned
because they happen to have a
disease."
Joyce thinks about the roots he
had to leave behind in Newfoundland.
His family is supportive at a distance.
But Joyce feels he wouldn't have been
able to live "out", like he lives here in
Vancouver.
He remembers black people from
the US Air Force base wouldn't be
allowed to eat in restaurants. "Now if
people suggested that someone
shouldn't be allowed in, there'd be
riot?' says Joyce with a winner's smile
and a raised fist.
'This is a period that will be
looked back on in history, like the
black movement in the sixties. We
should rise to the occasion. Because
we are involved in history, I really
want to do evrything we can now. It
will change. We'll either win or lose,
and I suspect we'll win."
VOLUME 70, Number 37
Head
and
shoulders
above
the rest
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, February 12,1988 Classifieds
05 - COMING EVENTS
GRAD VALENTINE DANCE
Chemistry grads, the Free Radicals, will
shake you up on Friday, Feb. 12th, 8:00-
12:00 p.m. at the Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre. Everyone is welcome. No cover
charge. For information call 228-3203.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
VIRUSES, CANCER AND AIDS: TODAY AND TOMORROW
Dr. Robert Gallo
Chief, Laboratory of Tumor Cell Biology
National Cancer Institute,  Bethesda,
Maryland
Saturday, February 13
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Building
8:15 p.m.
CANADIAN   CROSSROADS   INTERNATIONAL
Presents a benefit fundraiser
KOYAANISQATSI
Sunday, February 14, 2 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema
2290 Commercial Drive
Admission: $5.00.
SINGLES FAIR
Everything you every wanted to know about
beingsinglein Vancouver. On the ExpoSite,
Feb. 12,12 p.m.-lO p.m. Feb. 13, 10 a.m.10
p.m. Feb. 14,10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tel. 984-6255
for more info. Tickets at VTC-CBO.
!    TODAY!
S.W.A.P. TALK
Come learn about working holidays in
Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan.
Fri., February 12th
SUB AUDITORIUM
12:30-1:30
Presented by TRAVEL CUTS
|:1=UW=H1
CLASSES
NOTE: "Noon'' = 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
Ballet UBC Jazz
Modern, jazz, ballet. $3 drop-ins.
Daily. Details SUB 208.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Lesbian/Gay Week '88 - tables in
SUB concourse. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., SUB
concourse. Today: Speaker and video
on Celebration '90: Gay Games III
and Cultural Festival.
Institute of Asian Research
Exhibition: "Deities" - an exhibition
of sculptural ceramics by Stanley C.
Tang. Daily through Feb. 19, 10:30
a.m.-5:30 p.m., Asian Centre
Auditorium.
Ar/s Undergraduate Society
A/ts (AUS) Jacket Sales. 11:30-1:30,
Buchanan Lounge (A200).
Le Club Francais
Reunions de Club. Noon, International House.
Law Students of UBC
Conference on Law and Contemporary Social Issues. 2 p.m.: Aboriginal
fishing rights. Main lecture hall of
G.F. Curtis Bldg.
Students for a Free South Africa
Informational Video: "Arrest."
Discussion to follow. Noon, Grad
Center.
UBC Ski Club
Bzzr Garden (cynical singles and/or
cute couples). 2:30-8 p.m., SUB 212.
Graduate Student Society
Bzzr Garden. 4-7:30 p.m.. Ballroom,
Grad Centre.
English Students' Society
Bzzr and Margarita Garden with
nachos. 4:30-7:30 p.m., Buchanan
Lounge.
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
WATERBED, good condition with liner and
heater, king size. $100 obo. 251-6083 leave
message on recording. Must sell.
VOLVO 1976 244DL. Good condition, some
rust. Must sell - $2,000 OBO, 875-8025.
1973 DODGE DART4-doorSedan225CUin
slant six engine automatic trans radio 2
winter tires on extra rim owner's & workshop manual repair records 1974-Present.
$650 OBO 321-8324 Weekdays 6-10 p.m.
20 - HOUSING
N/S FEMALE PREF. to share apt. on campus, Feb. 15-May 1, $185/mo., 266-7611.
Maria.
30 - JOBS
JAPANESE SPEAKING TOUR
GUIDES
We are looking for tour guides and driver
guides who can work from early May to
September. Applicants must be fluently
bilingual (Japanese/English) and be able
to work in Vancouver and take short
trips to surrounding areas. We are also
looking for office staff, preferably bilingual and with basic accounting knowledge. Experience is an asset in both jobs
but we will train promising applicants.
Send resumes to: Tourland Travel Ltd.,
200-900 W. Georgia St., Vancouver, B.C.,
V6C 2W6. Resumes should be written in
native language of applicant but follow
traditional Canadian resume format.
"BUSINESS & SOCIETY IN JAPAN"
Optional credit/financial aid
International Internship Programs
406 Colman Bldg. 811 1st Ave.
Seattle, WA 98104 (206) 623-5539
N/S MOTHER OF 15-MONTH-OLD will
babysit 1-2 yr. old in my Kits home weekdays. Snacks & lunch incl. 734-8348.
CITR FM 102
Hockey broadcast: UBC vs. Brandon.
7:30 p.m., Winter Sports Centre.
Graduate Student Society
Darts Night. 7:30 p.m., Fireside
Lounge, Grad Centre.
B.C. Skeptics
Talk: "The Mystic, the Skeptic, and
the Parapsychologist," by Dr.
Leonard Angel, author of "The
Silence ofthe Mystic." 7:30 p.m.,
Woodward Instructional Centre, Rm.
G53.
Arts Undergraduate Society
Arts Valentine's Dance    ith Art
Bergman/The Scramblers. 8 p.m.-
Midnite, SUB Ballroom.
UBC Classics Club
Play reading of Plautus' "Mostel-
laria." Admission free, all welcome. 8
p.m., Buchanan Penthouse.
Graduate Student Society
Valentine's Dance with live band:
Free Radicals from chemistry. 8-12
p.m., Fireside Lounge, Grad Centre.
SATURDAY
Law Students of UBC
Conference on Law and Contemporary Social Issues continues: "Aids
Testing and Quarantine" at 9 a.m.,
"Maternal/Fetal Rights" at 2 p.m.
Main Lecture Hall of G.F. Curtis
Bldg.
CITR FM 102
Hockey Broadcast: UBC vs. Brandon. 5 p.m.
Orthodox Christian Fellowship
Vigil, 5 p.m., St. Andrew's Hall, 6040
Iona Dr.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Valentine's Dance: A Heart Act to
Follow. 8 p.m. on. Tickets $5.00,
available at Little Sister's and
GLUBC office, SUB 237B, ph. 228-
4638.
SUNDAY
Orthodox Christian Fellowship
Sunday ofthe Last Judgement -
Liturgy. 9:30 a.m., St. Andrew's
Hall, 6040 Iona Dr.
SMALL TRUCK OR VAN driver needed for
fastgrowingdecoratingbusiness. Must have
abilities in horticulture and basic carpentry
and be well groomed for customer service.
Flexible hrs. Apply in writing only to 8235
Cartier St., Vancouver, B.C. V6P 4T6.
WORK ABROAD. Permanent, temporary or
working holidays. Send 37-cent stamp for
Total Jobsearch Catalogue. Mr. Information, Box 955, 674 Ganges, B.C. V0S 1E0.
40 - MESSAGES	
"V" is for Valentine and volunteering. The
first one breaks your heart, but the latter
enhances your spirit. Come to Volunteer
Connections, Brock Hall, or call 228-3811.
GUY WHO SAW GIRL dramatically trip
over nothing - Mon. aft. Feb. 8 outside Buch
D. - Thanks for the kindness (you didn't
laugh TOO hard).
70 - SERVICES
NEW AGE CHANNELLER - Psychic Advisor - ESP/UFO Research & Investigation -
Daniel 683-0864.
75 - WANTED
SHEET MUSIC & BOOKS in reasonable
condition buy/sell/trade; Secondo Music
Store, 2744 W. 4th Ave. (at Macdonald). 734-
2339.
i I
YOU COULD SPEND NEXT
SUMMER WORKING IN:
BRITAIN, IRELAND, NEW
ZEALAND, AUSTRALIA ...
OR JAPAN!
ASK TRAVEL CUTS ABOUT
THE STUDENT WORK
ABROAD PROGRAMME
"WE'RE ON CAMPUS IN THE
S.U.B." 224-2344
SEAMSTRESS REQUIRED immediately to
hem pants and sew mil. patches. Call Rob
224-5531.
Lutheran Student Movement
Communion Service. 10 a.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Also: Open House, 11:30 a.m. - 8
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Maranatha Christian Church
Sunday worship service. Anyone
welcome. 12 noon, 2490 W. 2nd (at
Larch).
MONDAY
Institute of Asian Research
Free noon-hour film: "Sad Song of
Yellow Skin." Asian Centre Audito-
UBC Personal Computer Club
IBM Meeting. Noon, SUB 211.
Japan Exchange Club
Japan Trip Information Meeting.
Noon, SUB 119 (near Cafeteria).
Ballet UBC Jazz
Dancercise - $3 drop-in. Noon, SUB
Partyroom.
English Students' Society
General Meeting for all graduating
English students. Noon, Buchanan
Penthouse.
Disabled Students' Society
General Meeting, Noon, SUB 215.
Political Science Students' Association
Dr. Bo Huldt, Swedish Institute of
International Affairs: "Gorbachev's
Foreign Policy." Noon, Buch B214.
Graduate Student Society
Video Night: "Gone With the Wind."
6 p.m., Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre.
UBC Windsurfing
Meeting (general). 7 p.m., SUB 215.
UBC Film Society
Classic SUBFilms: "A Night At the
Opera," starring the Marx Brothers.
Plus a special Bugs Bunny cartoon! 7
& 9:30 p.m., SUB Theatre.
UBC Geography Students' Employment Organization
Forum: answering "Who Hires
Geographers and Why?" 7:30 p.m.,
TRAVEL CUTS is...
Going Your Way!!
•"Student Flights*
*Cultural Exchanges*
*Adventure Tours*
*And much more*
Visit the Student Travel experts
on Campus
S.U.B.   224-2344
75 - WANTED
ALREADY WORRIED about summer employment? We need ambitious, open-minded
people. No exp. necessary. We provide-train-
lng. Part or full time forappt. Call 531-1166.
80 - TUTORING
YOU CANNOT AFFORD to lose marks on
essays. Let me help you with the grammar,
punctuation, and layout of your term paper.
Rate: $15/hr. 222-2505.
GRAMMATICALLY PERFECT PAPERS
get better marks. If your writingis less than
perfect, have your work edited. Call Katie
737-0575.
SPANISH OR FRENCH with native
speaker Ph.D. student. Grammar-conversation. Oscar 738-4102.
85 - TYPING	
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.
Word Proc. & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
write, we type. Theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves, wknds, 736-1208.
WORDPOWER - Word Processing - IBM &
Macintosh laser printouts. Student discounts. 222-2661.
LETTER PERFECT Word Processing: Reasonable rates, student discount. Quality
printer & paper. 224-2424.
Graduate Student Centre, Garden
Room.
TUESDAY
Bal.let UBC Jazz
Drop-ins $3: Beginner Ballet, Noon;
Jazz I, 3:30; Contemporary, 5:30.
Plaza South & Sub PartyRoom.
Maranatha Christian Club
Who is this Jesus Christ anyway?
Bring your opinions. Anyone welcome. Noon, SUB 205.
UBC Film Society
Classic SUBFilms: "A Passage to
India," an English 100 film. 12:40,
6:30, and 9:30 p.m., SUB Theatre.
WORD-PROCESSING $2.00/page, IBM or
Apple, DTP also. ComputerSmiths, 3732
West Broadway (at Alma) 224-5242.
FAST! Word Processing $1.50/pg. daisy
wheel, draft copy provided, overnight orders
welcome. 737-8981.
WORD WEAVERS - 41st bus line, upstairs
at 101-2258 W. 41st Ave. Faculty and student rates for quality, custom word processing. FAX. Translation and transcription in
major languages. Thesis specialists on multilingual terminals. Specialite en francais.
Japanese & Chinese document preparation
available.
MacINTOSH WORDPROCESSING: Experienced editing, reason, rates. Call Jack -
224-0486.
KER-WORD PROCESSING SERVICE.
Using IBM-XT with Wordperfect #202-1515
E. 5th Ave. Call Kerry 253-8444.
TYPING - NO NOTICE REQUIRED. Essays, theses (low price), resumes. Editing &<
Research assistance. 327-0425 (before 10
p.m.).
WORD PROCESSING: A & Y Manuscript
Masters. Incomparable quality. Essays,
term papers, theses, manuscripts. Spelling,
grammar, style corr. References. 253-0899.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: Student
discounts. Letter quality printers. 10th &
Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist, 3206
W. 38th Ave, 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING. Term papers, manuscripts, resumes, etc. Whatever you need.
Quality products. Rapid service available.
738-2492 anytime.
OPEN EVERY DAY M-TH 8-9
FRI 8-6 SAT-SUN 11-6
RED LEAF
Restaurant
Luncheon Smorgasbord
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon   Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4:00 p m.-9 p.m.
2142 Waatarn Parkway
UBC Village
Opposite Chevron Station
I
m///mm^^^
\
\
§
FREE MONEY
FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS &
THEIR UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
OR DEPARTMENTAL CLUB.
- Applications are now being taken by your
Undergraduate Society for $4.00 refund per
graduating student. All undergraduate societies must hand in the applications they
receive by
MARCH 4, 1988
For more information or to submit applications please contact your undergraduate
society or
SIMON SESHADRI
Treasurer, Grad Class Council
228-6101, SUB Box 118
2/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 Quarantine bill arouses
fear, sparks protest
by Mike Gordon
Protests stopped down
town shoppers. Posters popped up in cafes and
community centres a-
round the city, calling
people to public meetings.
But to most people in B.C.,
the "quarantine bill" has
been a distant issue, a
faint whisper on the back
pages ofthe daily newspapers.
And almost literally while the province slept,
one month ago, B.C.'s controversial Bill 34 became
law.
A coalition of community and civil rights groups
continues its fight against the recent changes to the
B.C. Health Act that give health officials sweeping
powers to detain, test, and quarantine people with
AIDS and other communicable diseases.
Opponents of Bill 34 say the new law has put fear
into the prostitute, IV drug user and gay community,
driving those with AIDS and diseases which have
otherwise been controlled, such as gonnorhea and
syphillis, underground.
Under Bill 34, definintions of broad terms such
as "communicable disease? "health hazard" and
"quarantine" to be used by medical officers are left in
the hands of the province's lieutenant-governor in
council, Premier Bill Vander Zalm.
Bill 34 requires that a medical officer seek a
court order to have someone tested for AIDS or other
diseases, or put into detention or quarantine if that
officer has Reasonable grounds" to believe that a
person is "likely to willfully, carelessly or because of
mental incompetence," expose someone to the disease.
The court will decide what is "reasonable
grounds" using guidelines laid down by Van der Zalm.
B.C.'s chief medical health officer, Dr. John
Blatherwick, says he lobbied for the recent changes
in the Health Act to give him court backing in dealing
mainly with Tuberculosis carriers "because any proof
of burden for AIDS is much more difficult. .The ways
AIDS is spread require some consent from another
person."
Blatherwick says quarantine for AIDS carriers
is only a last resort. "You can't quarantine people
with AIDS," he said, "It's not a practical eilternative
with this disease. Quarantine doesn't work with any
disease?
He also wanted legal clarification on what body
has the right to access medical records. Under Bill 34,
the Cancer Control Society of B.C. can directly, or
through any individual or agency, solicit any medical
records or research on individuals, not on a "class of
persons."
Health officials can also issue court orders
against anyone who stands in the wa}' of those carrying out the bill.
Blatherwick saidhe has not yet used the new law
in a case involving AIDS. "With education and voluntary testing? he said, "we should be able to contain
this disease."
"safe sex is no sex"
—BC government AIDS
prevention campaign
Dusy bee
ONE HOUR CLEANERS
20% DISCOUNT
Present your AMS student
card and receive 20%
off your dry cleaning.
(Not valid with any other
promotion and excludes
laundry & leather cleaning).
4480-2 West 10th Ave.
(at Sasamat)
PH.: 224-4212
CAMPUS
CUTS
Haircutting for men & Women
5736 University Blvd.
(In The Village)
228-1471
But the new bill puts people with AIDS, or those
who wish to get tested, in a double bind. Bill 34 not
only puts fear around how one's test results will be
used, but also prohibits groups like AIDS Vancouver
from advising people against government testing.
"It makes it harder to stand up and fight, to say
you're a gay man, if you're worried a .out the repre-
cussions? said Bett Cecil, a member ofthe Coalition
for Responsible Health Legislation.
Coalition members say they know of at least one
man with AIDS who has left the pro\.nce for fear of
see "BIN" page 4
For the Relentlessly
Un ~ Trendy
there is always
The Frog & Peach
a West Point Grey
Tradition
4473 W. 10th AVE.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
PHONE: 228-8815
20% off with this coupon
February 12, 1988
THE UBYSSEY/3 Bill forces B.C. gay men underground
from page 3
the bill, and many more who are
going across the border to Seattle
for private testing.
Meanwhile, the B.C. government has been very cautious,
slowly retinkering its quarantine
laws and holding back crucial
funding.
The Socreds have earmarked
a total of $1.4 million for AIDS
prevention and treatment. Last
spring, they refused a $250,000
grant to AIDS Vancouver, and did
not appoint anyone from the gay
community or AIDS Vancouver to
the government AIDS advisory
committee.
The government was also
heavily criticized for what was
described as its "safe sex is no sex"
AIDS prevention campaign — a
move that sparked the B.C. Medical Association to spend $10,000 of
its own budget to send factual
pamphlets to every doctor's office
in the province.
Critics have proposed a number of alternatives, most of which
involve work already being done
by community-based volunteers.
"The focus ofthe government
should be on prevention (of AIDS
and other diseases;," said Cecil.
Cecil   says  that  straightfor
ward self-education on safer sex
within San Francisco's gay community, for example, has lowered
the rate of sexually transmitted
diseases by up to 80 per cent.
Blatherwick said his "biggest
concern in the next little while is
support services for people who
have come down with AIDS? adding that effective, "grass-roots"
work by groups like AIDS Vancouver has helped prevent the spread
of AIDS.
But critics say that Bill 34, by
focusing on legal powers to lock up
virus carriers or impose mandatory testing, will do nothing to stop
the spread of AIDS throughout the
province.
"The U.S. government
rounded up prostitutes in the
1930s to try and stop the spread of
syphillis, and it didn't work? said
gay activist and educator Bob
Tivey at a protest last November.
Kairn Mladenovic of Prostitutes and Other Women for Equal
Rights says the government and
mainstream media create a false
sense of public security by targeting prostitutes and IV drug users.
As well, critics of Bill 34 say
that the risk of abuse by medical
and police officers — in a province
without laws against discrimina
tion on the basis of sexual orientation — is too great.
"There's no way mandatory
testing can be kept out of this?
said coalition member, Tim Shire-
mi an.
Shiremian said that people on
the street — prostitutes, the
homeless, poor, IV drug users desperate for a fix — don't often know
their rights, and can be easily
threatened by the police into giving blood, or into being taken into
custody.
POWER'S Mladenovic said
public health nurses routinely
take blood samples from prosti-
tutesinjail. She cited a recent case
where a prostitute who was arrested and charged was told she
was HIV positive only after the
medical officer had told her probation officer and her mother. She
also said that the woman, like
most HIV positive or AIDS carrier
prisoners, was quarantined in jail.
Mladenovic also said police
officers have been going into the
city's "shooting galleries" to pick
up IV drug users up for random
blood tests.
Of the prostitutes who have
tested HIV positive in Vancouver,
all were IV drug users, she said.
Meanwhile,   there   are   only
two drugstores in Vancouver that
sell syringes over the counter. "It
used to be that clean syringes sold
on the street for $5? she said.
"Now they're $20."
"What we're trying to do is to
get information to women on the
streets before the cops get to
them? said Mladenovic, referring
to the "dirty trick" pamphlets
members of her group pass out to
prostitutes to protect them from
high-risk clients and fraudulent
police officers.
"We feel an immediate response to what's happening on the
street? said Shiremian. "Our first
priority is to protect people."
Given the hysteria and misinformation around AIDS, Shire-
man and other coalition members
say that the government and
communities should be looking at
a social, rather than a medical,
policy on "how we organize our
society to deal with social problems."
"What (the government)
needs to do is something about
social conditions - why women
have no other options but to work
on the street, or what drives
people to use IV drugs in the first
place? said Cecil.
Though Blatherwick said the
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health ministry is looking into a
program used in San Francisco
and other cities, where streetworkers hand out bleach bottles to
IV drug users to clean their syringes, he said the real problem is
the sharing of needles.
The coalition plans to continue fighting the bill on all fronts,
building support from labour and
Native groups for actions ranging
from lawsuits to civil disobedience.
"We're trying to define the
issues to include as many people
as possible? said Shiremian.
But while the coalition organizes to make AIDS and health law
a public issue, the B.C. government is moving in the opposite
direction.
Bill 34 undoubtably recognizes AIDS as a public health
threat. But where health officials
can't actually stop the disease, the
government has moved in to stop
potential carriers.
The new law underscores how
the Socreds have alienated a community support network that is
working to educate the public
about the individual responsibility in preventing AIDS, and comfort those the government has left
behind.
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4/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 Gay rights advance
The law and sexual orientation
By Mike Laanela
Gay rights have made significant advances in the past two
years but differ greatly from province to province, said UBC law
professor Bill Black yesterday at a
SUB panel lecture on Canadian
gay rights.
"Any human rights
was seen as a wild
socialist notion,"
- Shelagh Day
Legislation protecting Canadians from discrimination on the
basis of sexual orientation has
been introduced in Ontario, Manitoba, and the Yukon since the
enshrinement of the charter of
rights in 1982, Black said.
But in 1973, under the name
of restraint, the BC government
removed a crucial part of BC's
human   rights   code   preventing
dicrimination without reasonable
cause, he said.
The Yukon government's legislation "caused a furor" in that
territory, former Yukon resident
Shelagh Day told the lecture audience.
"Any human right was seen as
a wild socialist notion? Day said.
Also alarming, the lengthy
legalistic nature ofthe legislation
prompted fundamentalist church
groups to link homosexuals with
violent sex murders, he said.
Day deplored the arguments
presented in the Yukon legislature, where he said the Progressive Conservative opposition said
the legislation would necessitate
three types of public washrooms:
men, women, and homosexuals.
The Conservatives also maintained that BC homosexuals
would move to the Yukon for protection from repressive BC attitudes, driving up the medical costs
of caring for the AIDS infested
group, Day said.
Robert Hughes, a lawyer specializing in gay rights, spoke on
current attempts to challenge the
Armed Forces position on homosexuals. Currently, gays are
barred from entering the Armed
Forces because the government
says they are open to blackmail.
Hughes hoped to force a re-,
peal ofthe Army's position when a
gay man's security clearance was
revoked after a superior officer
heard he had admitted to being
gay. After Hughes prepared the
case for the man's defence, the
man declined to proceed, scared of
the effects the exposure might
have on his family, especially his
teenage boys.
The panel agreed that what is
needed is a united national effort
to obtain fair legislation for gays.
Other effective results, the speakers said, are coming from nondiscriminatory clauses in labor
agreements.
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England bans gay lifestyle
Reprinted from Angles
On Saturday, January 9,
more than 10 000 London lesbians, gay men and supporters
marched against Clause 27 of
the Local Government Bill,
which bans the "promotion" of
homosexuality.
The National Council for
Civil Liberties has strongly opposed the bill, which leaves the
interpretation of "promoting
homosexuality" totally open.
The bill also prohibits teaching homosexuality as a "pretended
family relationship" and stops local government from funding any
gay person or any group thought to
promote homosexuality.
The bill passed the English
House of Commons by a large
majority in December and will be
up for debate in the House of Lords
on January 25. It could be in force
by early February.
Local lesbian and gay activ
ists and Los Angles comic activist Robin Tyler addressed a
rally at the end of the march.
During the rally, police arrested two lesbians for kissing
and fifteen others 'on various
other charges.
Labour MP Bob Crossman
opposed the bill saying, "this
isn't Germany in the Third
Reich - it's Englandin the Third
Term."
Sexual
Harassment Clinic
Is Open For
• Information
• Counselling
• Support
Wed. 3 - 5, Thur. 12:30-2:30
SUB- 130, #228-2163
APPLICATIONS
are now being accepted
for
5 positions on the
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION,
1 position for
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
and 1 position for
OMBUDSPERSON
Applications and further information can be obtained in the
Administrative Assistant's office,
SUB Room 238.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
NO LATER THAN 4:00 PM.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1988
TO SUB RM 238
Display your
true colours!
A full -colour laser photo-copier Is now available
right here on campus to provide you with crisp
clear reproductions of your posters, maps,
drawings, photographs or transparencies, at a
price that can brighten even your winter days!
With a zoom range of 50% to 400% & creative
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onto standard bond papers or overhead film.
Drop by & see our samples or bring in some
originals & let us 'improve your image'.
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February 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/5 THAT'LL STOP YOU
N       O
7
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N
A
R       I
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Can you decide which pictures have been printed backward?
6/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 SFU fights fee increases
Student society launches campaign to mobilize students
By Andy Tomec
BURNABY (CUP) — The students' union at Simon Fraser
University will launch an elaborate campaign this week to mobilize students against impending
fee increases.
Through the "freeze the fees"
campaign, SFU students' society
external relations officer, Paul
Mendes, hopes to convince the
university's board of governors to
vote down the package of fee increases scheduled for the board's
Feb.23 meeting.
"The administration seems to
think they can keep jacking up our
fees every year with impunity?
said Mendes, "but with alittle help
from the student body, we can
show them enough is enough."
Fees are rising across the
province, keeping B.C.'s tuition at
the second highest in Canada,
behind the Atlantic provinces.
Tuition at SFU and the University of British Columbia make
up roughly 16 per cent ofthe universities' operating budgets, causing the fees to rise every time the
budget changes.
While UBC's student society
has not announced organized resistance of any kind to their own
fee increases, efforts to stop rising
fees are also underway at the
University of Victoria, where student president, Pam Frache, has
been leading the campaign to persuade their own board not to raise
fees.
"We packed tht; gallery at the
last board meeting? said student
union vice-president Michael Geoghegan. "Pam presented (the
union's) arguments, and the board
seemed quite impressed by it. We
think we've been successful at con-
FREE
GRADUATION
PHOTO SESSION
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This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a
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Application For
REMINDER
All students who expect to graduate in May or November 1988
are requested to submit "Application for Graduation" cards to
the Registrar's Office by February 15, 1988 for graduation in
May and August 15, 1988 for graduation in November. This
includes students who are registered in a year not normally considered to be a graduating year but who are expecting to
complete a degree or diploma program this year.
.   1
PLEASE NOTE: Every Student who expects to graduate must make
application for graduation. Any student who does not apply is inelegible
to graduate.
vincing at least a few members."
UVic's campaign has focused
on assuring future fee i ncreases be
tied to the rate of inflation, rather
than the 20 per cent ofthe universities $71 million operating
budget. Although the final board
decision .has yet to be handed
down, optimism is high.
"Pam Frache did an outstanding job? said Geoghegan, "I think
her effort and initiative have carried the day."
SFU's campaign will take a
multi-pronged approach, directed
at students, faculty, the BoG, and
ultimately the provincial government, including:
•a "freeze the fees" table
staffed by Mendes and 40 student volunteers;
sive, scrolled, open letter to the
board protesting the fee hike;
•a post card campaign, aimed
at flooding advanced education
minister, Stan Hagen, and local
MLAs with anti-fee hike mail.
•a series of short classroom
talks by student volunteers.
The events will culminate on
Feb.23 in a "freeze the fees gala,"
an elaborate inter-student union
social which will precede the board
of governors meeting.
"If we can get enough people
at this gala? says Mendes, "and if
we can pack the board meeting,
then we can present a clear, concise, thoughtful argument against
the increases, and at the same
time show that the student body
stands behind us 100 per cent.
"We are not impotent in this
matter? said Mendes. "We don't
have to stand by and watch these
increases happen time and again.
If we can mobilize and effectively
show a consensus, then we can
►a "100 meter beef? - a mas-    prevail in this."
Opposite sex no
longer required
By Deanne Fisher
Billboards advertising Granville Island Hotel's Pelican Bay
nightclub reading 'Tor Members
of the Opposite Sex Only" will
disappear by February 28.
"I found the campaign a bit
offensive? said Raoul Malak, who
became hotel manager after the
signs were erected.
Malak said he doesn't know if
the campaign was meant to discourage homosexual clients. "I
don't know what the previous
owners meant by it? said Malak,
"It was the wrong approach anyway. Certainly we don't discriminate against anyone."
Under B.C.'s Human Rights
Code, discrimination on the basis
of sexual orientation is legal.
"Human Rights Commissions
have recommended (making discrimination on the basis of sexual
orientation illegal) more than
once? said Bill Black, UBC law
professor of human rights. The
Code as it stands "givescompletely
inadequate protection? he added.
But   controlling   the   sexual
orientation of nightclub clientele
is still a problem and is not limited
to heterosexual establishments.
Vincent Burt, owner of the
gay club The Gandydancer, was
offended by the Peiican Bay ads.
"I'm trying to be more positive
about (appealing to a particular
crowd'!? said Burt.
"We are trying to discourage
what we call sight-seers? said
Burt. "Gay people have been discriminated against for years.
Sometimes they just want to be in
a place that's all gay."
Burt said he is getting "too
many straight people in on Saturday nights," and to combat this
trend is "trying to gear events on
Saturday nigh ts that appeal to gay
people? such as male strippers
and all male revues.
"I want a mix of interesting
people? said Burt, "a bar where a
gay person can bring straight
friends."
"A lot of the "gay" gay bars
have a crummy decor. I don't see
why gay people have to be content
with second best " said Burt.
Capilano paper under
fire by homophobes
Students at Capilano College, offended by their student
newspaper's February 9 human
sexuality issue, complained to
the ombudsperson, emptied the
newspaper boxes and burned
copies in front of the Capilano
Ccurier office.
"You're shoving homosexuality down our throats," yelled
one irate student outside the
Courier office.
The issue contained graphic
images of a man and a woman
embracing, "Adam and Steve"
wearing fig-leaves, two women
caressing each others' breasts,
and an opinion piece titled "The
Virgin Was a Slut".
Cap Courier staff member
Imtiaz Popat found the reaction
confusing. "What's wrong with
nudity?" he asked. "Why are
people not upset with The Province running the Sunshine
Girl?"
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THE UBYSSEY/7 r..r.i.:rfr&!.
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If you are bothered by "cold sores" or "fever blisters" - 3 or more in the past 12
months...
If you get a "warning" prior to their eruption...
If you are healthy, over 16 and unquestionably not pregnant...
If you wish to participate in a study of a new cream treatment called
undecylenic acid...
If you don't mind that the study is 'Placebo-controlled" (1/2 of the entrants get
a "fake" cream with no active drug)...
If you would accept an honorarium after completion of approximately 9 daily
study visits to the UBC Herpes Clinic...
If you are interested in finding out about participation in a drug study..
Then call 228-7565 or page 687-7711 #2887 before your next recurrence.
NOTE: These instructions are for information only. A decision about entry
into a study will occur only after the research assistant has talked to you
further and you have decided you wish to participate.
8/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 By Corinne Bjorge
UBC's student council has
taken a hands-off approach to the
video machine Double Dragon following heated debate over the
removal of the allegedly sexist
game from the arcade several
weeks ago.
During last week's council
meeting, representatives defeated
a motion 23 to 8, to write a letter to
the owner of Double Dragon, saying the AMS is not opposed to the
game.
On February 1 the owner voluntarily removed the game from
the AMS arcade, after receiving
complaints from students that the
game is sexist.
Bob Seeman, a student representative on the board of governors, said the removal ofthe game
was an act of censorship, and
added the letter would show the
owner the AMS did not encourage
the removal ofthe game.
"They have evolved to the
state of interactive videogames?
said Seeman. "They are no longer
games, they are storybooks?
Mark Quail, a third year law
student said the issue was not
about censorship but about the
subjugation of women. "It (the
game) glamourizes violence. It
makes the whole thing exciting.
We have to take a (stand) against
the game?
Other council members
agreed with Quail saying the
opening sequence of the game, in
which a woman is hit over the
head and dragged away by the
villian, was offensive.
"You get kids saying "die
bitch, die, when the game is playing? said arts representative Lisa
Eckman.
Director of administration
Tim Bird said the owner of the
game made the correct decision to
remove the gam e.
"It's not a censorship issue.
It's just abusiness decision. When
you have a source that disrupts
your business operations, you
remove that source? said Bird.
And "I don't think we're stepping on the rights (of the video
players), because there are plenty
of video games i;hat are stimulating and that don't promote violence against women? said Bird.
AMS president Rebecca^
Nevraumont spoke out against the
content ofthe letter. If the motion
passes, "I will not write this letter? she said.
According to a roll call vote requested by arts representative
Carolyn Egan, no women voted in
favour of the motion.
THE 3RD ANNUAL
CONFERENCE ON LAW &
CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES
LAW AND THE FUTURE/THE FUTURE OF LAW
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12TH
9 A.M. PANEL
•IMMIGRATION POLICY IN CANADA
2 P.M. PANEL
•ABORIGINAL FISHING RIGHTS
INFORMAL RECEPTION TO FOLLOW
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13TH
9 A.M. PANEL
•A.I.D.S -MANDATORY TESTING
AND QUARANTINE LEGISLATION
2 P.M. PANEL
• MATERNAL AND FETAL RIGHTS
INFORMAL RECEPTION TO FOLLOW
ALL SESSIONS WILL BE HELD IN THE MAIN LECTURE HALL OF THE FACULTY
OF LAW, UBC.
ADMISSION TO THE CONFERENCE IS FREE.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION,
CONTACT THE FACULTY OF LAW AT 228-3151.
PRESENTED BY-TI IE LAW STUDENTS OF UBC
Geers move
to remove
sexist image
Pro-choice abortion rally last Saturday at Robson square attracted many people including these two youngsters
Council backs off Dragon dispute
By David Butler
(Ottawa CUP)—Carleton's student engineering society has
moved to keep tabs on the acti vi -
ties of itself and other engineering student organizations
across Canada in an effort to diminish their destructive, antisocial image.
During the national Congress of Canadian Engineering
Students, the Carleton delegates supported a motion that
will hopefully regulate members of engineering societies
and guide them towards a better
public image.
The conference has directed its national executive to
keep a dossier on members who
represent engineers in a negative manner. Engineering societies across the country are legendary for activities that are
deemed anti-social or degrading
to certain groups such as feminists.
"We feel it's moving towards a more professional image? said CSES president Cynthia Lucas. Five students from
CSES, including Lucas, went to
the national conference which
was held in Quebec City from
Jan. 5-10. The conference provides more than a forum for
discussion on policy issues since
technical seminars are held
throughout the week.
The McGill student engineering society started the debate pertaining to certain activities of fellow erij^neeririg societies. McGill attacked the sexist image ofthe Lakehead Uni
versity engineering society.
Lakehead's argument that they
were entitled to make their own
decisions did not hold water on
the general plenary floor. The
conference voted to establish a
watchdog function within the
existing national executive.
Andy Nelson, a Carleton
engineering student, sits on the
seven-member national executive board. He feels the
executive's job will now include
keeping an eye on the more
questionable activities of some
societies. He added that the national executive has no power to
punish guilty societies. The
watchdog file will be given to a
committee at next year's conference which will decide what action to take. Nelson said the
executive will keep track of the
efforts that present a more positive image.
Along that line the conference voted to create a day in
March where all member society will perform charity or community work. The coordinated
effort by all members will hopefully help create some positive
attention for engineers said
Nelson.
Lucas stressed that a broad
spectrum of techinical concerns
were addressed during seminars. She said this feature ofthe
conference is important since
engineering schools are continually updating their courses.
The conference offers an opportunity for students to compare
their courses against current
trends in the business world.
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WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
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PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION
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February 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/9 (Kappy
Valmtim 's
TAZEEM MAWJI, "Your eyes,
your hair, your thoughts lingering
in the air like a perfectly sculptured rose. You are so rare" -
Happy Valentine's Day???
DEAR POOPERS
I may be in the Big Apple
But you're still the apple of my eye!
Love ya!
That Little Redheaded Girl.
TERRE BEAR
Here's to the day we wake up
in Vegas, eating chocolate ice
cream crepes.
All my love and forever yours,
Stuey.
B.: Surging black waves cross
The deep Straight of Georgia,
They may keep us apart
But I still adores ya! - C.
(Day
SUSAN WALKER
I love you! XOX.
DINO G. You're the one for me.
But, what's this MLS stuff? Baritones should sing con amore!
Happy Valentine's Day.
LAURA B ofthe Ubyssey:
April is the crudest month
Breeding lilacs out of the dead
land
Mixing memory and desire
Stirring dull roots with spring
rain.
End of term. Shantih...
MB
J'ai besoin ...
un canadien
errant!
CORINNE B ofthe Ubyssey:
I have a mean ugly bad desire to
give you a great big hug. Thanx for
being you...
City Desk Fan Club
TO   MY  LUSCIOUS   POOKIE
BEAR,
Your hot and ravishing beauty
stunned me the first time I saw
you and I have remained stunned
ever since. I love, luv, wuv, lubby
lubby,  you!   Happy  V  Day!   B.
Brown (D & B).
"MY" PLAID,
caring, sharing, cute as can be
A better boyfriend I can't see
U have qualities that appeal
And make me happy, that I feel.
PLAID-LOVER
TO B.G.:
You are more than a lover and a
friend! Happy Valentine!
Love, B.Z.
CONFIDANTE: Winter spring
summer or fall, all you have to do
is call, and 111 be thefe, you got a
friend' - Critter.
GORDON - TE QUIERO, je
t'aime, ich liebe dich. No matter
how many times or how many
ways, it never says enough! Always yours - will you be mine?
"Ribsy"
DAVID - YOU ARE MY MENTOR
and my tormentor. You have been
my blackest nights but my most
golden moments were spent in
your arms. The strength of my love
is matched only by the power of
you. Love, Tracy.
TO THE BANANA OF
MY LIFE
Happy Valentine's
Day!
Love, Sweetie.
BINA
Valentine's Day is
like any other day when
we are together - very
special.
Don't ever forget
New Year's '88, stay in
love, together, forever.
Love, Chris.
CAPTAIN BILL,
Thru rain and wind and snow, my
love for you will ever grow! Yours
always,
Alyss.
SCOOB
I think about u day and night
I'm happiest when you're in my
sight
You've touched my heart like no
other
I love you scoob, be mine forever.
Luv, SNUF
TO MY SUPERMAN WITH SEXY
ANKLES: Happy V-Day! Do, do,
do, I love stirfrying with you! Hugs
& kisses from Tired One.
TO OUR SPECIAL VALENTINE
Lome Bodin:
Happy Birthday Feb. Fourteen,
These wishes come with heat and
steam.
From AMS - The Udder Team
XXOO
HAPPY V-DAY GREEN EYES. I
dream of snowy days and car trips
that end up stranded. Let's run
away again soon and share more
memories. I love u.
TO MABEL, KIM AND SUE:
Won't you be my Valentine,
we love the sweet memories
we had together.
With love,
Kelly (Dong), K.W., K.C, J.C. &
S.C.
S.K., MY LOVE -If only...
Happy Valentine's, Sweetheart.
Love, T.B. XOXOXOX
TO H.B., G'day and greetings from
the   land  downunder   -  have  a
happy Valentine's Day.
With love,
S.G.
TO THE SEXIEST FIREMAN ON
CAMPUS,
come on baby, light my fire,
I'm smokin' for you!
Love, Your Hot Liebchen.
DEAR SNUGGLEBUNNY
Hugs and kisses all year thru are
just the beginning of my love for
you. Happy Valentine's Day!!!
Love always, Guppy.
SUE, you fiery little ball of lust,
come away with me and well rock
and roll forever. Love, your
pookums, Bruce.
DEANNE OF THE UBYSSEY
You have absolutely the nicest smile on campus. Believe it!
Happy V-Day - from
A. Nadmirer.
TO A.M.:
My aim is true, but would you
rehabilitate a broken heart?
-K.H.
PICCINO
Solo tu sei
La rosa del mio cuore.
Ti amo,
Sam.
"OID" IN TO.
There once was a boy in Vancouver,
Who on a dirt bike could really
maneuver
But he had career on the mind,
And the gears they did grind
And now the girl is alone in Vancouver.
The girl sits at home and eats
Borscht,
As the boy spins around in his
Porsche
No need to despair
For soon she will be on Wardair
And   happiness   will   prevail   of
coursh!
Happy <V Day,
Love"Zeek"in V.
To claim the prij
choice awards"
above winning
his or her reed
SUB
DEAR SAM -
It's now been 2 years
You still move my gears
Your chocolate cheesecake
Makes me want to bake!
Love, Punker.
BUNNY,
Work is lonely without you. I miss
having coffee at SUB together and
doing the crossword. Have a cinnamon bun on me (yes, on me!). 3
years and loving you more every
day.
Love, Killer.
THIRD TIME LUCKY? K., Happy
Valentine's Day! I have no regrets
- let's see where it goes - maybe to
the moon. Love, Lolita.
PUNKIN, Happy B-Day! Here's to
a few more mountain meadows,
for the flowers of course!
Your Hugglebum.
TO THE CHEESIEST of all
cheese, you are my one and only
Valentine. If I loved you any more,
my heart would burst!
- Hugs and kisses, - Sweetie!
10/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 TO  THE  LOVELY  TWINKLE
STARS,
Could you enclose thy honey
intrude amour?
Could your endless tenderness
hide inside a heart?
'Cause you enter the hope
I adore,
Combine you and the he in all
Confiscate you and thee holy
inherited angel,
Caressing youth and the
heaven in affection;
Come ye and the happily I along,
Celebrate your entire true
highness inside Apollo's!
Love, S. Sunshine.
AJCM, Dear Valentine!
Happy Birthday! 4U the world, 4
me u oink 6.8.93. Love CM2B P.S.
Happy Anniversary!
SNOOKY-WHOOKY WHITEY! I
love you like crazy, and I'm glad
we're together on Valentine's Day.
I'm yours forever, darling. Love
Lizzie-Lipsey Lover-Lips!!
HEY PANCAKES!
How's this for a Valentine's
with stupid names?
I'm fuuuunny!
"Poodlums"
"Proofers'
Choices"
There  once   was  a  girl   named
Nuala
Who had so much charm she could
fool ya ...
With a wink of her eye
Your heart starts to fly
And your head spins around like a
hula
Love, Mr. Tall Dark and Handful
» for the "Droolers'
the authors of the
sntry should bring
it to room 266 in
ANGELA, PRINCESS ANGELA:
Sweetheart Angela, so Chu
Chu, no matter how cold the
weather is, how unbearable the
journey is, how the great monsters
and white sharks want me to be
their lunches, through fire and
water, I would come to see your
beautiful smiling face and say, "I
cain't help myself but loving you
forever, Angela, you have brightened my life from the moment we
first met."
I LOVE YOU - Johnny.
TO TINA - You know I love you
because you make life hard.
With love - Your King.
T.J.L. -
Hope you know dear
Still after the fourth year
With Grad so near
For your loving geer
I love you big much
Love, B.B.
JEN of the Ubyssey:
Now that you're back on your feet,
can I sweep you off them?	
RACE BANNON a.k.a.
Court Maxxon Hmmm!
BIG TIME. It's got a
good beat and we can
dance to it! I LOVE
YOU, Bunny Poo. Your
Valentine, Boobie.
DEAR MOO, I just want
to tell you mean so much
to me. Happy
Valentine's Day. Love,
Vince.
PUPPY: I've had duper
times with you & Lunch
Club & your Hernando
& your skiing & you &
you & you, etc. Love,
Teddy.
ALEX the typesetter:
you brighten my days.
Thanks...
PRINCESS
Will you be my Valentine?
D.L.C.
THERE'S THIS GUY in Biology
Whose smile really got to me
When in the lab
I want him so bad
Tim meet me in the darkroom at
three.
STEVE N.
You take my breath away.
WILBETH, LIEBETH:
China, Mexico, the mists of
Guatemala - but no landscape is as
beautiful as you, I love you, my faraway honigkuchen.
A.
M.S.O. (1st Year Science): A rose
among thorns, a smile among
empty faces, a friend who lights up
every day.
TO G.H. -
My love is silent like a sleeping volcano.
To the eye it appears placid;
Yet 'neath its dome lies a restless
soul anxious to burst forth with
hot burning passion.
MUNCHKIN
2-nite, just you and I!
Love, Your Hubby Valentine.
AINSLEY,   Happy
Day. Still friends?
Lena Home.
Valentine's
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY to
Lisa, Jackie, Sharon, Sandi, Yee,
Ari, Chris, Heather, Erin C, Erin
H., Evie, Coleen, Mavis, Angela,
Fay, Christine B., Shelli, and to
anyone else I missed out. Love you
all! Lina M.
DARRYL!
Another year?!? You're still my
phavourite pharmacist ... love is
the drug for me -
Love ya!
Andrew.
PRINCESS - Thanks for making
all my dreams come true. I hope we
can share some new ones together.
Love, Your Baby.
CK.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Thanks very much
We'll really miss you.
Have a good trip
Love
The Saturday Night Crew
oxoxox
WOODSTOCK
Hey, sweetie, I'll always be by
your side, even just to lick your
feathers dry.
I luv u. Happy Valentine's
from your favorite beagle!
Snoopy.
DEAR LITTLE BABY N.
I love you
more than anything.
Big Baby D.
SNOOKIE-WOOGLES -
I love you though you're far away,
Will you be mine on Valentine's
Day??
Mugwamp
KEN NG: Was that smile from
Tues. nite 3 mos. ago or a good lecture? Happy Valentine's Day!!!!!
We luv you!
DEAR JONATHAN BLARE
WORNELL
(incredibly kinky)
I love you endlessly. IFIC.
GIRL, you are my jungle-bunny
With you I always feel sunny
I'm in paradise when we kiss
Loving you is tropical bliss.
Carolina Sia Mia Valentina.
MARY BETH, this is dedicated for
you. I love you always.
Forever, Michael.
The Wan is the man who takes care
of me
Deciding my finances diligently
But more often than not he's stingy
and cheap
Oh Gerry, I wish you were here
Because I can't sleep
Admiring you from afar
Door Slammer
DEAR BABY DRAGON,
I'm so glad I met you, I have to let
you know
You're on my mind most all the
time and everywhere I go,
My love is forever and since corny
this may seem,
I must admit I like you best
Cuz I'm the most fatigued I've ever
been.
Be mine,
Love,
My Buns.
February 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/11 SUNSHINE!
I came, I saw, you conquered.
Lots o' luscious, lusty thoughts,
Your Physicist.
TO THE GUYS OF PHYSSOC,
You can blow our fuses
anytime
From the three blind mice
HUGS & KISSES to the gang in
Physical Plant for looking after us
in   SUB.   Love,   AMS   Bookings
xxoo.
RA,
Every day I realize how much
I need you. May our second year be
as good as the first.
WEN.
TO MY SECRET LOVE,
It's that friendship ends in
love
And I believe that's what I've
found,
Since   happiness   knows   no
limits
Whenever you're around!
THE GUY WITH THE
ROSE!
DEAR LAURA, you're so adorable.
I hope we can plan a Brahms Sonata. That'd be the greatest way
we could "make beautiful music
together." Luv, your secret admirer. P.S. - Good luck on your
ARCTexam!!!
TO MY GORGEOUS BIG
BOOGER
How we've learned in Scarfe and
played Doctor in Woodward. You
can come over for tea anytime.
Remember our vow? Ill love you
always, big guy
XOXOXOX Little Booger
TO MY CANDYMAN:
Thanks  for making my life  so
sweet. I weewy wuv you!
Your Ko (Kammaa)
TO B.G.
A love so deep, a love so fine
How can love ever be blind?
Tears may fall, tears may dry;
My tears shall never make thee
cry;
Possessions so dear,
Possessions under the sun;
But if I'm allowed just one,
I would pick thee from my
garden, to forever
be mine, Love B.Z.
TO MY SWEETEST BUNKSTER.
I am your Love Minister. Let me
tango you into the sunset.
Love from Uncle James.
SPUD
YOU MAKE ME CRAZY
SCATBEAST
DEAR PUPPY-TO-BE:
Forever and ever our love will
grow, as will our little dogs in their
kennel. Also, here's to underbears
(or the lack thereof). Ruff
MY ANDY KITTEN
I'll hug and squeeze you
All I can
In the hope that you just might
Be my valentine tonight!
Happy Valentine's Day
LOVE COLIN
YOU'RE THE KISS to my lips, the
hands to my cup; the brandy and
the waves to my life babykins,
chukazel, Love - Your Leila.
LISA,
You always say I'm such a
"silly boy" -
Not this time, though,
Be my Valentine ... cause ..
I wuv you a wot
Love, Craig
A SECRET MESSAGE for my fiance: Ruff. Ruffl Ruffl Ruff! Ruff! I
love you!
RS & K AT LONG LAST, not just
another song that I gotta dance to,
but a song that makes me wanna
dance. Love, JS & K.
QUE
Happy Valentine's Day
All my love, Spanky
MY DEAREST DAVID
My love for you is boundless, passionate, and eternal. Your kisses
are ambrosia to me and your love
is more golden and precious than
sunshine. I am your one true love.
LORI,
Obviously this space is too
small to tell you everything but it's
big enough to say I love you very
very much. I am having too much
fun!
I love you,
Greg
DEAR FANNY, more po po and sac
sac for you, wing yuen wingyuen oi
lay! Wilson.
MR. PRESIDENT,
Could we convene to discuss
another 18-month peace treaty?
Miss Madeleine
LOVEBOAT,
Do you want to know a secret?
Wamhas ... Cuddlebear
HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY to
my hog buddies ... Janet, Freyja,
Barb, Jean, Shelley ... from Hog
#2.
PRINCESS:
Mr. Magoo
Loves you too
Happy   Valentine's
VALENTINE'S
SALE
20 - 50% Off On Selected
Footwear And Sportswear
Come In And See Our Line
Of   Jf^E^     Merchandise.
*Next Recreational Beginners Running Clinic
Thurs. March 31, 6:15pm
3504 W. 4th Ave., Vancouver B.C.
732-4535
MY UNICORN
Nothing's going to change my love
for you.
Always and forever,
Your Griffin
LUMPKIN, 4 years pass quickly
when they're spent with you.
Without my huggly muffinface, I
don't know what I'd do! TJL
D. MATHIESON
You leave me breathless ...
a Secret adMirer (ILY).
TO P.C.
A million and one hogs and kisses
to you! Love, Tigger.
BOOBOO,
I'll stop the world
And melt with you.
Princess M
Day
TO MY FAVORITE PERSON GV:
Thanks for making this year
worthwhile. Love, Your Arky.
FACULTY OF BUSINESS
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
Kdmonton. Albert.
MASTER OF
PUBLIC
MANAGEMENT
In us Master (if Public Management Program the Facullv of Business at the
University of Alberta offers a managerial approach to the study of public
administration. This unique program draws on the strength of the entire
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Persons with varied undergraduate degrees will hndlhe University ol Alberta
Master of Public Management program intellectually stimulating and geared
towards developing expertise in making and implementing decisions in the
public and nol-lor-prolit sectors of Canadian society
A number ol graduate assistantships are available.
Associate Dean. MBA/MPM Programs
Faculty of Business
University of Alberta
Kdmonton. Alberta. I6(j 2R(>
Please send MPM information to
Name	
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Code
12/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 Council opposition ignored
By John Gray
B.C. Transit will proceed with
plans to install trolley lines down
University Avenue to the Student
Union Building even though Vancouver city council rejected the
idea last Tuesday.
City council voted eight to
three to reject a city engineer's
report that recommended the
extension.
"It's not in their (Vancouver
city council's) jurisdiction, and as
far as we're concerned it's underway? said Diane Gendron, B.C.
Transit Media Relations Officer.
Gendron said B.C. Transit
had approval from the University
of British Columbia, the Endowment Lands and recently received
financial approval.
Trolley lines will make UBC
accessible to more than ninety per
cent of Vancouver's trolley bus
fleet.
But council member Helen
Boyce said "if we don't start fighting for our natural areas we won't
have them anymore."
"They can minimize all they
want but it is still an intrusion and
will spoil the area," Boyce said.
"How long will it be before they say
that the trees and wind affect the
trolley lines and have to even
prune more or cut down some
trees."
Gendron, however, expressed
confusion about Council's decision.
"We've done extensive study
before putting this report together
and had an arboreologist and a
tree specialist come in... we
shouldn't have to cut down any
trees and would only have to do
some prunmng.
B.C. Transit would be using a
special Cantilever Bracket System, similar to one on Cambie by
Queen Elizabeth Park, that would
minimize the intrusion of poles
and wire, Gendron said.
Council member Libby Davis,
who voted for Eicceptance of the
report, said "it's insane, I don't
think that the aldermen know
what their doing."
Council members Davis,
Erickson and Owen were the only
three to vote for acceptance of the
report.
Council also recommended
exploring an option to run the trolley lines down 16th Avenue, instead of the proposed University
Boulevard.
Anti-Free Traders speak out
By Ross McLaren
The free trade agreement is
unethical because its consequences will be inequitable and
will destroy Canadian social programs, said two speakers at a forum on free trade last Saturday.
Multinational corporations
will benefit from free trade while
single mothers, the homeless and
those under the poverty line will
not, Victoria's Roman Catholic
Bishop Remi De Roo said.
De Roo said Canada needs
more redistribution of wealth and
power whereas free trade will divide the country between winners
and losers.
'Tree trade will not benefit
the less powerful. We are asked to
trust market forces but market
forces never bring justice? De Roo
said. "We must insist on the duty
ofthe state to protect and promote
the common good. A vigorous
public sector and unions are indis
pensable to that end."
But the public sector, De Roo
said, is under attack by a powerful
world-wide campaign spearheaded by the multinationals.
"The world labor force is at the
mercy of world capital. The multinationals caught on before others
and made a global extended family. What they want is an international cheap labor pool so there is
a massive battle to destroy
unions," De Roo said.
Economist Marjorie Cohen
sai d free trade threatens Canada's
social services by introducing privatized services.
Hospitals, old-age homes,
universities, blood-banks, and
handicapped homes will contract
out management services, such as
data processing, to the US, Cohen
said.
"Privatization and free trade
go hand in hand."
Cohen, who works as an eco
nomics professor at the Ontario
Institute for Studies and Education, also said the Canadian government will have a hard time
establishing public monopolies
under the free trade agreement.
"We will have to buy out
American insurance companies
who provide Canadians with dental insurance to set up a public
dental plan? said Cohen.
Free trade is the most important political decision of our lifetime, said Cohen, who agreed with
conference participants that
unions should go out on strike to
protest the agreement.
The Pacific Group for Policy
Alternatives, a think tank for alternative economic and social poli-
cies for trade unions, cooperatives, women's groups, and
community groups, sponsored the
two day forum.
By John Patrick Shanley
'brutal. . . beautiful. . . terrifying
...moving . . .superb" Dykk Sun
Mon-Thurs $9 Fri & Sat $11 Weds Mat S5
Students $5 All Perfs.
Mon-Fri 8:30 Sat 6:30 & 9:30 Weds Mat 5:30
Warning: Extremely coarse language.
SEYMOUR STREET STAGE
1181 Seymour St.
Box Office 687-1644
CUT
$6.95
HAIRSTYLING FOR MEN AND WOMEN
733-3831 • 3621 WEST 4TH AVE.
t
Chronicles-
fe«
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The psychology department role reversal
e,*pe.Wnt qets out of hand.
MUG
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Shot <>/ Southern Comfort
Top with mini-marshmalloivs
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Hot black coffee
Shot of Southern Comfort
feaspoon of sugai
Top with whipped cream
February 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/13 im:
im
NOTICE OF
AMS ANNUAL
ram
GENERAL MEETING
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17
12 NOON
Council Chambers
(SUB 206)
ALL STUDENTS
WELCOME
CUT OUT FOR THE
TASTE OF FEBRUARY!
OFF-CAMPUS QUALITY FROM UMBERTINO'S
1. FETUCCINE ALFREDO
2. CAESAR SALAD
3. COFFEE, TEA OR
LARGE SOFT DRINK
ALL FOR ONLY
395
LICENSED PREMISES
Not valid with any other offer.
I Expires Feb. 29, 88. Present this
I coupon at time of purchase only
_ at the location below. -
Have you entered the Umbertino's
$1000? It could be vours!
BROADWAY AT BALACLAVA 731-3232
(ACROSS FROM ORESTES)
Moody sizzles
By Chris Fraser
Check this out,"
suggested the
slightly aged black man
with a broad grin.
"We're going to open
with an old Charlie
Parker tune."
MUSIC
James Moody
Van   East   Cultural
Centre, Feb. 6
The legendary
James Moody had just
shuffled onstage in the
stiff-gaited, cautious
manner of one well-acquainted with the pain
of arthritic knees. The
sight made me wonder
if this opening gig of
the Coastal Jazz and
Blues Society's tenor
madness weekend
(Lew Tabackin cruised
through town on Monday) was going to be
full of "tenor sadness."
Was his rendering of Parker going to have the   \
"be" or the "bop" required to breathe life into the
old master's stuff?
The sold-out crowd hushed as Moody gingerly
raised his gleaming tenor, deliberately and carefully wetting his reed. My doubts intensified - this
guy's metronome seemed to be set on slow.
Then Moody stamped his foot like a sprinter
accelerating out of the blocks and proceeded to burn
his way through an absolutely awesome be-bop
blitz. Parker, Gillespie, Coltrane - Moody played
superbly and with the intensity of a young man
yearning to break into the "big time" by impressing
the "big wheels".
The range, the phrasing, the understanding       i
of,and the feeling for the music were all overwhelm-;
ing. James has great rapport with his Canadian
rhythm section of Bob Murphy (piano), Rick
Kilbum (bass) and Claude Ranger (drums).
James let his sax cool down for a few minutes
in the first set and let the crowd catch their breath  i
as he eased his way through some Antonio Carlos    i
Jobin on flute.
The second set found James' lungs still itching
to rid themselves of some rich tenor solos. He
slowed things down a bit with "I Can't Get Started"
and "Cherokee" - some very sensitive and unforgettable playing being pushed out like floating
irridescent bubbles to the entranced crowd. !
It was an amazing walk through some ofthe
major jazz ofthe past thirty years, with an elegant
and expert guide.
A bit of blah— Diary doesnft satisfy
By Adam Jones
The last time Guadalcanal Diary rolled into
town, opening for R.E.M. at the War
Memorial Gym fifteen months ago, they were out
to impress. From the first rumble of John Poe's
drums to the last smartass wisecrack from headman Murray Attaway, impress is what they did.
Attaway had even taken time back at home
base in Athens, Georgia to familiarize himself
with the pantheon of Canadian music greats -
Anne Murray, Loverboy, and the rest. And he
made certain to tell all of us just how important
our heroes had been to his band's development.
We jeered, we booed, and we loved it.
MUSIC
Guadalcanal Diary
86 Street, Feb. 7
In a nutshell, this band rocked the house
down in '86. Forty-five minutes or so of irresista-
bly cheerful, occasionally perverse music that
deftly subverted the expectations of a crowd
primed for the richer, darker hues of
Guadalcanal's fellow Athenians, R.E.M.
Vancouver has had over a year to look
forward to a return engagement by Guadalcanal
Diary, this time as headliners. Their set at 86
Street last Sunday night showed the anticipation
was mostly unwarranted.
Granted, all the ingredients were there. The
songs are generally strong. Attaway has one ofthe
better voices in rock, full and eloquent even after
weeks of pub and club gigs, and it was in good
shape Sunday. Jeff Walls chips in with speedy
lead-guitar turns. Rhett Crowe, on bass, is a
delight, flouncing and jitterbugging around the
UBC's
Olympic Gold Medal Winners
Chili or Hot Dog with Fries and a Druft
(including all the '88 Olympic action on our Large Screen Sports T.V.)
only $1.99
12:00 noon to 6:00 pm Mondays To Fridays, during the Olympics - Catch all the
daily T.V. coverage of The Olympics while you relax in our lounge including the
following Hockey Highlights:
Mon.
Tues.
Wed.
Thurs.
Fri.
Feb. 15 Germany vs Norway
Feb. 16 Canada vs Switzerland
Feb. 17 Austria vs Germany
Feb. 18 France vs Poland
Feb. 19 Austria vs Czechs
Austria vs Soviets
Poland vs Sweden
Czechs vs Norway
Canada vs Finland
Russia vs Germany
Czechs vs U.S.A.
Finland vs France
Russia vs U.S.A.
Sweden vs Switz.
Norway vs U.S.A.
Mon. Feb.      22
Tues. Feb.     23
Wed. Feb.      24
Thurs. Feb.     25
Fri. Feb.     26
Check In The Lounge For The Starting Times
Sweden vs Canada 1:00 pm
Medal Rounds For Hockey
Medal Rounds For I Iockey
Medal Rounds For Hockey
Medal Rounds For Hockey
This Special only in the bar at Thunderbird Winter Sports Center
Open Noon T<3:1;00 a.m; Daily. Tel: 228-6121
(Close to Totem Park?Osb0rne Center. Fairview?in the South Campus.}
stage like a boxer permanently on the ropes,
groggy but unbowed. And then there's the erstwhile Poe, a truly thunderous rock drummer. This
guy is everywhere at once, Keith Moon alive and
kicking, with never a hair out of place or a gleam
of sweat on his boyish brow.
So what was missing? The sense of a band
moving forward, perhaps. There's some evidence
of this on their latest release, "2 x 4," which
departs from the sometimes coy hillbilly punk of
the first two Guadalcanal LPs in favour of a more
anthemic, committed sound. Tunes from "2 x 4"
sounded just fine live, especially the soaring "Litany" ("This song is about... everything") and a
careeni ng "Lips of Steel."
But the core ofthe set - including the first two
songs - was drawn from the earlier efforts. The
Diary don't seem to be having a particularly
revelatory time playing this material anymore.
Too much of it sounded perfunctory, automatic.
Nobody on stage smiled very much. And only
a severely deficient imagination could have
mapped out the set-closer, "Watusi Rodeo," and
the final encore, "Kumbayah." The latter has
become a major albatross: once a pretty cool joke,
the punchline has long since lost its punch, and
even a semi-inspired interpolation of "Stayin'
Alive" (by "a band that influenced us more than
any other ...you know who it is ...") couldn't save
it.
Part ofthe problem might lie with 86 Street
itself, which seems tailor-made for uninspired and
formulaic performances. Or perhaps it was those
keen expectations, in a city that this time found
itself tossed off like any other date on the tour.
Whatever the rason, Guadalcanal Diary rocked
hard enough to entertain, but not ambitiously
enough to satisfy.
Present your UBC
student card before ordering and receive a complimentary order of
regular trench fries or
hash browns with any
purchase.
Valid only at
McDonald's on Broadway
at Blenheim.
3310 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.
IT'S A GOOD TIME
FOR THE GREAT TASTE
  .    .     .T.M
No cash value   ■ Limit or.e per customer per visit   • Valid until April 30,1988
14/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 From fringe to Firehall
Director looks for late-night success
By Laura Busheikin
^he^pi,, Vancouver', theatre
__L   community and UBC Film graduate
Keith Clarkson is bent on filling it.
"I have this dream? he says with a
half-shy, half-precocious smile, "of being
the founder ofthe first professional gay
theatre in Vancouver".
His is no idle dream. He's taken a
substantial first step which has landed
him at the Firehall Theatre on Friday and
Saturday nights between February 19 and
March 20 where his play Fags, one ofthe
hits of last year's Fringe Festival, opens
in the late night slot at 11:00 p.m.
"Most sub-groups have their own
theatre groups which speak about and
inform their group. Women have theatre
groups, there are Chinese theatre groups,
and I think the gay community would
support a theatre company which does
plays by about or for gay people—but not
exclusively. It's a way of promoting and
fostering a positive image of gays in
Vancouver which I don't think is being
served by other theatre companies? he
says.
INTERVIEW
Keith Clarkson
It may seem odd that someone intent
on promoting a positive image of gays is
presenting a play called Fags—generally
thought of as a derogatory term. And
Clarkson has had some negative response
from the gay community.
"People have asked, Why are you
doing a play called that? That's really
insulting. You should do something
uplifting and positive,' but when gay
people have seen it they realize that it's a
fairly accurate representation; it doesn't
gloss over things to make everything look
wonderful and sweet."
The title is actually a Canadianiz<-d
version ofthe title of a British novel
called Queens, by Stephen Pickles — "as
in 'Bicks'," quips Clarkson.
"I picked it up when I was in London
about a year ago.  I read it as I was
coming home on the plane—I read the
whole book—it was a long plane ride,
obviously. As I read more and more I
thought 'gee this is familiar, gee this is
interesting, gee I'd love to see this on
stage'. I'd been looking for something for
last year's Fringe Festival and it just
seemed that this was it.
Over a period of about three months I
rewrote it and changed it from its setting
in London in 1981-1982 to Vancouver.
The whole translation, adaptation, editing
process took a long time, to take it from a
200 page novel down to a 75 minute show.
There were a lot of characters and I had
to cut some out, because you can only fit
so many people on the stage.
"In this version there are 12 characters and six actors. Ben, the central
character, is constant throughout—but
the other actors play 2 or 3 characters
each so it's change the costume, change
the hair, put on a mustache and become a
different character? explains Clarkson.
The play traces the development of
Ben, "a young guy coming of age emotionally, sexually...in this subculture, this
world within a world. He goes out every
night looking for sex, at least at first, then
he decides that just sex is sort of boring
and starts looking for a boyfriend...once
he finds this guy he has to learn how to
continue, not just have it be a one-night
stand."
Clarkson sees Ben as an everyman
figure. "There's elements of every type of
gay man in him; he's an amalgamation of
different types? he says.
When Clarkson first read the novel,
he saw himself in Ben. "I felt almost as if
I was Ben; there was so much there that
I remembered experiencing. So I had a
strong attraction to the Ben character,
but also a strong repulsion because I
thought, 'Oh yeah, I can't believe I said
that, I can't beleive I did that,' so it was
kind of a love-hate thing..like looking at
yourself in the mirror, and that's what the
play is Hke for the audience...let's hold
this mirror up to the audience, let's play
out the scenes and you create the details."
This mirror, says Clarkson,"...will jog
a lot of people's memories...may make
people wince a bit in painful recognition
but will also make them laugh, and
there's nothing wrong with that.   We've
been laughed at for years, why not laugh
at ourselves? (He laughs.) The gay scene
is no sacred cow, and who better than gay
people to poke fun at it?"
Some ofthe fun in the play is poked
at gay stereotypes. "I'm not afraid to show
stereotypes...every stereotype has a basis
in fact? says Clarkson. "In the gay world
people do, or at least used to, type
themselves a lot. In bar scenes it's very
much easier to type people like 'that's a
clone, that's a trendy, that's a leather...'
whatever. And gays would often assume
these roles. When you show a certain
character it brings a lot of associations to
me, and to other gay men, because I
remember that type of person...I'm using
these characters to nudge people
and say remember when we
were like that?"
According to
Clarkson, gays are no
longer like that'—
like they were in
1982, when the play
is set. The big difference is, of course,
the onset of AIDS.
Clarkson sees his
play as a commentary on the relationship between
what he calls the
"zenith of me-me-
me, do-everything
hedonism...the cult
of promiscuity" and
today's cautious
times.
'We can see
why e.re here based
on where we were
then.  It's the
results of our
fictions; now we
have co take re-
sponsibiltiy for
them, which is
something no one
wanted to do back
then. The play's set,
in '82 but it has an '88 sensibility to it".
But Clarkson hurries to add that he's
not being moralistic. "AIDS could have
hit any group, because it wasn't just gays
who were promiscuous; it just happened
to start there. It could have been straight
white Lithuanians. Gay people don't have
a monopoly on AIDS, and they never had
a monopoly on promiscuity either?
Clarkson is also confident that gay
people won't have a monopoly on enjoying
his play. "Emotionally, spiritually, intellectually, Ben is going through the same
things that everyone else does. You don't
have to be gay to enjoy the play? he says.
The response at last year's Vancouver
Fringe Festival, where Fags played (in
slightly different form) was "very, very
good? says Clarkson, "We played to
packed houses every night; we had to turn
people away. We knew we had a hit on
our hands."
If Clarkson's dream comes true, it
will be the first of many.
Paul Bjorn and Pat Gray in "Fags
andrel godoroja photo
Bergman compares music-to-bullshit ratio
By Kelly Duncan
In person, Art Bergman is extremely soft-spoken — not at
all what you would expect from
the man who spits out his words
so vehemently in performance.
Art has been a prominent
figure in Vancouver's alternative
music scene for about ten years
now, by his own reckoning. He
was the member of the infamous
Young Canadians who wrote
"Let's Go To Fuckin' Hawaii", an
anthem which even the least informed of us under thirty have
heard performed impromptu at
parties, if we never saw the
Young Canadians perform.
INTERVIEW
Art Bergman
He never performs "Let's Go
To Fuckin' Hawaii" anymore.
"Some joker always asks for it —
I wrote it in about five minutes.
Maybe I should write the
sequel...'Go to Hawaii, get raped
and mugged' or something."
Things have changed for Art
Bergman and his band (once
called Poisoned until the L.A.
glam-rock band Poison sold more
records and therefore got to
claim the name). They have a
new record deal with Duke
Street records (who also handle
Jane Siberry and Chalk Circle).
Record contracts are few
and far between in Canada, par
ticularily for alternative bands.
"In England you have a new
idea and you're signed. BAM! On
one idea. That doesn't happen
over here because of all the shit
you have to go through. Over
there, if you don't have an
original idea, people throw beer
bottles at you. Over here, it's just
the opposite. Campus radio
stations are fine; they're willing
to give alternative bands airplay.
Except some people think I'm too
commercial. I'm sort of caught in
the middle. After a while I
learned how to wri te songs better
and I'm sorry, but I know how to
play my instrument. I can't help
it? says Art facetiously, running
a hand through hi 5 unruly mop
of hair.
Record contracts are a lot of
work when you finally get them.
"We have to find a producer —
one that's not busy. That could
take up to six months. Six
months to find a producer, four
months to get the paperwork
done on this bloody thing. It's
just so frustrating. The record
company executives — they've all
got their homes, their comfortable lives, their salaries. I don't
have any of that. I want to get
going on it?
"The actual amount of music
played compared to the bullshit
you have to get through is about
ten to one — bullshit to music.
It'll be nice to get in there and do
what I'm supposed to do best?
You can see them do what
they do best in the SUB Ballroom tonight—their first show
for a student audience :.n "years
and years".
Art doesn't really know what
to expect of a student audience:
"Apparently students really don't
give a shit anymore, don't care
about much except; the business
end of things. I've heard that the
students at UBC are really
apathetic. It'll be a good show,
though. The Scramblers (their
back up band) are really hot
right now. About half of our
songs are fairly new. We have a
new song that Susann (Richter,
keyboards/vocals) wrote and gets
to sing — it's a surprise — a
change of pace, actually."
"It's kind of wierd to pull out
a song on an audience that
hasn't heard it before because
j they don't know it; they can't
relate to it at all — we don't do it
too much, but I'm going to do it
on Friday anyway just for the
practice."
Art will 'practice' tonight
with Ray Fulber on bass, Taylor j
Nelson Little on drums, and
Susann Richter on keyboards
and backup vocals. Doors open    j
at 8:00 p.m. '
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By Victor Chew Wong
To be a star on a successful
high school team and then to dwell
on the bench behind a row of starters at university is a challenge for
any rookie.
For three-quarters of this basketball season such a fate has
fallen on Chris Frye, arookie out of
Lord Byng High. But UBC's two
victories this weekend over the
University of Alberta at War
Memorial may have moved Frye
up a few notches on the bench.
On Friday night the Thunderbirds defeated Alberta by a comfortable margin, 91-82 then managed to barely hang on for an 84-80
victory Saturday.
Friday's game was an exercise
in patience for the 'Birds as they
were down 48-43 at the half. But
UBC opened the second half with a
scoring binge where they outgunned Alberta 27-13 in an eight
minute stretch.
J.D. Jackson led UBC's attack
Friday with a 29 point performance.
If UBC showed cool collectivity in Friday's second half then
they displayed confusion in
Saturday's.
It was a game in which UBC
held a 21 point lead with 15 minutes left in the game. But Alberta
closed the margin to 82-80 with 30
seconds left. UBC preserved the
win on the heels of another 29
point performance from Jackson.
"We were very fortunate to
win? UBC head coach Bruce Enns
said. "If we don't get better post
defence we're not going to win."
Frye's contribution to this
weekend's victories was minimal.
In fact, were it not for injuries to
high school teammate Jason
Leslie and sixth man Reg Wiebe,
Frye probably wouldn't have
played at all.
On the weekend he recorded
modest statistics: eight points,
four rebounds, and four assists -
numbers that won't drop too many
jaws.
But he played with confidence,
played tough defense, and threw
no turnovers - just the kind of
performance that makes a coach
smile.
"Since mid-December I've
been playing better? Frye said.
"For the first three or four months
I just struggled. It's taken me
awhile to get acclimatized?
With the suspension of Mike
Clarke, and the flu bug running
rampant on the team, Frye will
probably travel to Lethbridge this
weekend.
Despite his lack of playing
time, because of the 'Birds depth
at the guard position, Frye remains positive.
"It's just as good playing behind Perrie (Scarlett) and J.D. as
it would be playing ahead of
them."
Thunderbirds centre suspended
By Victor Chew Wong
Conspicuously absent from
UBC men's basketball practices
this week was an inconspicuous
6'8" Mike Clarke.
No, UBC's starting centre is not
injured or suffering from the flu -
he has been suspended indefinitely for disciplinary reasons.
"It's a disciplinary action that
we hope will result in an improved
attitude and an improved work
ethic on his part? UBC head coach
Bruce Enns said.
The suspension followed
Saturday's 84-80 victory over the
University of Alberta. With five
minutes gone in the second half,
the "Birds led by 21 points but
relenquished that lead to as few as
two points in the dying minutes of
the game.
Clarke was pulled from the the
floor following a trio of consecutive
missed shots three feet from the
basket. On his way to the end of
the bench Clarke and Enns en-
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gaged in a heated exchange. Enns
suspended Clarke Monday morning.
"It's something that's been
growing and something we had to
stop before it got out of hand?
Enns said.
"The point is, I'm not here for a
good time, I'm here for a long time
- and I hope Mike is too?
The team was given the news at
a pre-practice meeting Monday
evening.
"I'm a little surprised," Clarke
said. "I didn't think it was as big of
a problem as it was made out to
be."
"Bruce and I haven't been seeing
eye to eye on things. Tempers sort
of flared over? he said. "I think the
thing between Bruce and me is
separated from what happened
Saturday (the loss to Alberta)."
From a play-off perspective, the
suspension couldn't have come at
a worse time with a pair of games
in Lethbridge this weekend.
Clarke is UBC's second leading
scorer (16.9 points per game) and
leading rebounder (5.9 rebounds
per game) and will be missed
against an improving Lethbridge
team.
Clarke and Enns will meet
Monday morning to discuss the
sophomore centre's future with
the Thunderbirds.
"I decided that I would like to
finish this season if Bruce wants
me back? Clarke said. "I haven't
thought of anything beyond that."
Volley 'Birds split on Prairies
By Franka C-von Specht
Inconsistency ailed the UBC
women's volleyball team this
weekend. UBC glided to victory
over the University of Saskatchewan on Saturday, then col
lided and lost against the University of Alberta Sunday.
In Saturday's game the "Birds
easily downed the Saskatoon's
Huskies in straight games, 15-10,
15-7,15-8.
"We played like a well-oiled
machine; our few unforced errors
and strong hitting were key factors", said UBC coach Donna
Baydock.
"Everyone was playing well.
Setter Amy Ku played the best
game I've ever seen her play." said
Baydock.
TBird's power-hitter Debbie
Landon led the team with 14 kills
with a high hitting efficiency of 44
per cent.
But rusty inconsistency set in
Sunday as the 'Birds were beaten
by the University of Alberta
Pandas in straight games 15-8,
15-11, 15-11 - the first loss that
UBC has had to bear from the
Panda s.
"Physically they (Alberta) are
bigger, so we had to rely on our fast
offense which failed because of
poor passing and unforced errors,"
said Baydock.
UBC's player ofthe game was
power hitter Micki Mallette who
collected 8 kills and had a respectable 2.41 passing game.
The loss plummets the "Birds
out of the nation's top- ten standings. They face tough competition
this weekend at War Memorial
Gym against the third ranked
University of Victoria.
The students of Engineering Physics
would like to acknowledge the
following sponsors for their support
on the 1988 Engineering Physics'
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16/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 Pucksters ice Lethbridge
By Sean McLaughlin
The UBC ice hockey team
continued their winning ways by
humbling the Lethbridge Pronghorns twice on the Point Grey
campus' frozen pond last weekend.
The 'Birds won 8-4 Saturday
and outgunned their opponents 6-
4 Sunday despite falling behind
early in both games.
In Saturday's game the 'Birds
whipped the puck around faster
than Hercules moved about in the
Augean stables. This tactic kept
the Pronghorns on their heels or
on the chase throughout the contest.
"We've been throwing the
puck around like we did last weekend since well before the Christ
mas break? said 'Birds assistant
coach Dave Hindmarch. "The
Pronghorns countered with a
grind-it-out style that has been
working for them."
Despite the Pronghorns' close
checking style of play the T_irds
managed to cast-off their shadows
six times en route to a second consecutive win.
'Birds goalie Carl Repp, who
recently rebounded from a mid-
season knee injury was a standout
in the two games. Not even the
offensive prowess of his teammates could steal the limelight
from Repp.
The Thirds are undefeated in
four games, but remain far behind
the Manitoba Bisons in the battle
for a playoff spot in the Canada
West division.
"This is a tough division? said
Hindmarch. "It's probably the
strongest in terms of depth in
Canada. They're all tough clubs to
play against and anyone can win
at anytime."
Hindmarch's statements are
backed up by CIAU rankings
which place Canaca West rivals
Calgary, Alberta and Saskatchewan in the too ten.
"The fans are very faithful,
but you would always like to see
more fans? said Hindmarch. This
team is working hard to continue
to make CIAU hockey great entertainment?
The 'Birds host Brandon this
Friday and Saturday.
Break away...
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Thunderbird forward swoops in for UBC scoring attempt
steve chan photo
Volley-'Birds
split pair on
prairies
The UBC men's volleyball
team continued riding the win-
lose rollercoaster with a split in
Canada West action on the prairies this weekend.
On Saturday afternoon the
'Birds dropped a straight games
match to the second ranked
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies, 15-8,15-5,16-14.
Greg Williscroft led the
UBC attack with 10 kills while
Kelly Bukowski added eight.
On Sunday afternoon in
Edmonton, UBC turned things
around and downed the University of Alberta in four games. 15-
11,15-9,9-15,15-8
Williscroft dominated the
match with a healthy harvest of
25 kills. Freshmen Dave Farrell and Jon Hammer added 15
and 11 respectively.
Basket-'Birds
sweep series
This weekend at War Memorial Gytnn, the UBC
worn en's basketball team broke
a decade-long dry spell by
sweeping a two game series,
and kept their play-off hopes
alive in the process.
On Friday night the 'Birds
downed the University of Alberta Pandas 69-64 then 73-68
the following evening. The
wins avenge an embarassing
74-45 loss to the Alberta last
weekend.
Sue MacPherson led the
UBC scoring attack Friday
night with 26 points while Teresa DeBou added 14.
On Saturday Val Philpot
paced the 'Birds with 21 points
and Sue MacPherson added 16.
The two wins improve
UBC's record to 4-12 and a tie
with Alberta for the fourth and
ftnal play-off position m the
Canada West conference.
Soccer-'Birds■
capture title ;
This weekend the UBC!
women's soccer team added an- ,
other jewel to their crown of \
championships with al -0 victory \
west she Surrey Strikers in
Vancouver's Premier Division,   j
UBC played superior defence, giving keeper Sa ndra Neil'
hsr fourth league shut-oat, and *
shut down SiHT-y"- potent at*]
tack- j
The game's only goal came I
from midfielder Mitch Ring m
the first half.
Sunday's win closed league
play for UBC and left the 'Birds"
with *i record of 9-2-1 in Premier
Division, play and 21-3-. for the
season.
The team now enters Provincial Cup play to determine
B.C.'s beat club side * tre winner
will represent the provjnceat the
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February 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/17 Never again?
The Ubyssey didn't want to run a Gays and Lesbians
issue this year. We don't want to run one next year either.
In fact, we never want to run one again.
When the bombings of gay bookstores stop, when the
physical violence against the gay community ends, when
the prejudice that gays and lesbians face is a part ofthe
past, that year will mark the last time The Ubyssey publishes a Gay and Lesbian issue.
But today gays and lesbians run the risk of physical
and emotional abuse if they choose to express themselves.
They are persecuted for what they feel and believe themselves to be. This persecution violates the rights and
freedoms ofthe individual. Heterosexual society continues to use its power as the majority to deny basic human
rights to a minority.
Recently, in England, the House of Lords voted overwhelmingly in favor ofthe Local Government Bill, which
bans the promotion of homosexuality. Because of this bill
two lesbians were arrested for kissing.
Meanwhile, in BC, the provincial government has
passed a quarantine law that allows a mental health
officer to test, isolate or quarantine anyone "he believes is
likely to wilfully, carelessly or because of mental incompetence expose others to the disease (AIDS)". This law is
an open gateway to abuse.
Heterosexuals take for granted the freedom to go
about their sexual business unbothered. Most of us can't
even imagine being persecuted for our sexual desires. Yet
our society continues to discriminate against gays because they choose not to conform to what is perceived as
normal.
The laws will remain unjust until our perceptions
change, but our perceptions will not change while the
popular media promotes heterosexual values as normal
and gays as people to be laughed at or pitied.
Paranoid and stereotyed media coverage simply reinforces deeply entrenched prejudices. As children we
are indocrinated with heterosexual values from the
minute we pick up Jack and Jill, or tune into Leave it to
Beaver. Did Mike and Carol Brady have to deal with
Peter coming out of the closet, or Cindy playing doctor
with her girl-friends?
But progress is not impossible. Gays have made
major strides in the last few years. The Vancouver gay
community is stronger than it has ever been. Gay sporting events will be held in Vancouver in 1990. Vancouver
now has two gay newspapers. Gay movies, literature, and
theatre which promote positive images of gays are flourishing.
In Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, and The Yukon Territories, laws now exist which explicitly protect the rights
of gay people. While they haven't revolutionized gay life
in those provinces, they are valuable steps towards creating a society in which papers like The Ubyssey won't want
to print a Gays and Lesbians Issue.
British Columbia should have similar laws. The
Ubyssey publishes today in the hope that you will become
part ofthe movement towards justice.
Heart act to follow
UBC's large homophobic community, demonstrating
its usual puerile sense of humor, has this year plastered
the campus with spoof posters advertising "The Up The
Bum Dance? a take-off of the annual GLUBC dance.
This is not new. "A similar poster was done in '83 with
better graphics," says Patrick LeCerf of GLUBC.
The people responsible for the posters presumably
think they have found a funny and appropriate way to
express their disapproval of non-heterosexuals. This
must be as close as they can come to a constructive argument.
The real "Heart Act to Follow..." dance will be held
Saturday at eight in the Grad Student Centre.
THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and not necessarily those ofthe university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of
Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k
of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301;  advertising, 228-3977.
Jennifer Lyall looked up from her editing, pissed ofTat the world. "I hate you
UossMcIjaren.Ihateyou, f hate you, I ha.e you. "But secretly she loved Ross, unable
to tear her eyes off him.
"I hate you Ross," cried Elynn Richter. "You pick my ass." I^aura Busheikin
agreed. But secretly they loved Ross and craved his body.
"I love you Ross," Randy Shore said , but secretly he hated Ross' guts even
though he didn't know Ross'secret winning personality."! spit on your grave Ross,"
said Kyoko Oka. Kel'y Duncan forced herself to rub hot pig grease over James
!   Young's body (as a way to repress her lust for guess who?...) Patrick LeCerf was
i    floating on the islands of mold in the coffee pot as Victor Wong lusted for Corinne
Bjorge. Sean Mcl^aughlm, Bob Harris and Mande! Ngan looked lovingly at each
1   other. Adam Jones phoned out for Chinese food seeing Franka C. von-Specht and
Mary McAllister wrestling won-ton-ly in the dark room. Chris Fraser growled,
baring his fangs, "I hale Chinese food...but I love blood." He seized Deanne Fisher
and buried his pointy fangs into her veinou.s neck.   "Oh no, vampires!" shouted
Gwyneth Cathyl, Mike Gordon and Alex Johnson who jumped into a vat of garlic-
flavoured jello. I'eter Francis and Derek Craig tangoed endlessly into the moonlit
night.   Chris Wiesinger, Katherine Monk, and John Grey abstained from any
vicarious thrills, although they were all hot.   Rick Hiebert was there too.
What Exactly
Is Heterosexuality?
Heterosexuality is a condition in which people have a
driving emotional and sexual interest in members of
the opposite sex. Because of the anatomical, physiological social and cultural limitations involved, then?
arc formidable obstacles to be overcome. 1 lowcver
many heterosexuals look upon this as a challenge and
approach it with ingenuity and energy. Indeed it can be
said thiit most heterosexuals are obsessed with the
grafification  of their curious desires.
One theory advanced is that
heterosexuals have an imbalance in their sex hormones: instead of the normal mixture of
the two, they have an excess of
one or a dearth of the other resulting in an inability to enjoy
full and satisfying relationships
with their own sex.
In most cases of compulsive heterosexual behaviour the parents will be found to have suffered  from similar difficulties.
A bad experience with a member of the same sex
while young may cause rejection of all members
of the same sex through fear. The desire continues in the subconscious and emerges as a
heterosexul   neurosis.
Our society giants financial and other incentives
for exclusively (Le. neurotic) heterosexual coupling: from tax concessions to council houses.
To be gay is expensive and
marry people simply cannot afford it
...& What
Causes It?
Many unthinking heterosexuals succumb to the daily bombardment of
conditioning from the mass media and
live out their lives trapped in oppressive
stereotypes. We should feel compassion for such people, not hostility, for
their rejection of all those parts of the
self that do not conform to the "married-
couple" ideal is a measure of their loss
of contact with their own unique sexuality.
A terror of mortality lies beneath
much heterosexual coupling.
Driven to perpetuate themselves
at any cost, most heterosexuals
are indifferent to the prospect of
the world-wide famine that will result if the present population explosion  continues   unchecked.
r
Most heterosexuals will be found to have
come from a background in which an appreciation of the beauty of their own bodies has
been   ruthlessly   supresscd. Heterosexual
men in particular think themselves 'ugly",
beauty being ascribed only to women. Many
psychic disorders stem from this self rejection.
Many heterosexuals claim that they were
just 'bom that way. Unfortunately this
dosn't hold water. AD human beings are
the result of the interaction between their
substance and their environment and
heterosexuals, like the rest of us, must
share in the responsibility for their condition.
Letters
Responsible
sex needed
Abortion isn't the answer, friends. It is an easy
solution to probably one of
the most difficult social issues we, as a community,
are facing today. Of all the
people I have discussed the
issue with, not one person is
able to say an abortion is a
pleasant option or experience. Abortion illustrates
the contamination left as a
legacy to our inadequate
education on the principles
of social interaction. Saying
this, it is left to both movements on the abortion issue
to re-examine their commitments.
Quite simply, I am proposing that our generation
has to educate subsequent
generations in self-discipline. Our efforts must encourage our children to respect their sexuality. As our
communities place younger
and younger children in a
turbulent social environment, we are obliged to
teach the youth the skills
necessary   to   interact   re-
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with identification, to SUB 241k.  Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.
sponsibly. Educating those
that follow our example in
the principles of human dignity, tolerance, community,
and social responsiblity just
might produce a better social environment than our
own.
With the apparent expanding social activity of
the adolescence consequently developing an exploring libido at an early
age, we must caution them
and assist them in understanding their social responsibility. What is this
social responsibility? Similar to other human activities, engaging in sexual activities necessitates personal responsible judgement.
Our   society   does   not
function in the vacuum of
social anarachy. Where the
law   can   not   requisition
descent behc/iour, it is left
up   to  our  community   to
slow-down and examine our
consciences   so   that   we
might preserve humanity.
Tom Bolland
St. Mark's College
Newman Club
Club to save UEL forest
Dragon game is OK
$
city desk:
features:
entertainment:
sports:
production:
Corinne Bjorge
Ross McLaren
Laura Busheikin
Victor Chew Wong
R. D. Shore
<£
I would like to protest
the stupidity of those upstart, narrow-minded individuals who caused the
removal of a number of
Double Dragon video
games. Having played the
game end-to-end quite often, I find its content does
not promote violence
against women any more
than it does so against men.
And in no way is the game's
opening sequence sufficient
grounds for its dismissal as
"sexist". Have any anti-
Dragon protestors seen the
whole game played
through? Better yet, have
they seen Renegade, an
older, similar game? Any
proficient player of that
game will tell you there is a
violently sexist screen far
worse than anything in
Double Dragon.
No problems will
solved by the game's
moval. I sincerely hope that
somebody will see the light;
in the meantime, how about
reinstalling the machines?
Nhat-Viet Phi
Music 1
be
re-
I hereby found a new
campus club called the
Friends of Woodland. Its
purpose is to avert the
threat by President David
Strangway and his fellow
comfortable bureaucrats to
chainsaw one quarter of our
lovely University Endowment Lands forest and sell it
to the developers.
This is a classic case of
short-term gain for long-
term pain. The gain is that
Strangway saves his bureaucratic hide by getting
badly needed cash for UBC's
budget without confronting
Vander Zalm andhis friends
who are shorting UBC's
budget because they don't
realize the value of higher
education. The pain is that
the threatened forest is a
priceless asset to UBC and
the surrounding urban
area. It is the last decent-
sized forestleft within walking and cycling distance of
hundreds of thousands of
nature-loving Vancouverites; a valuable source of
mental health-restoring
tranquility. It is beautiful
and of great educational
value to UBC students, particularly biology students. If
we allow this irreplaceable
asset to be chewed up by
bureaucrats, UBC will lose
greatly. The current budget
shortfall is rough, but
budget crises come and go
with political cycles; once
pavedover, parklandisgone
for keeps.
Friends of Woodland
has no structure, no officers,
and only one membership
requirement. This requirement is that you do something to let Strangway know
how concerned and annoyed
you are at his plan. Tell him
personally; take legal action; write a letter; do some
guerrilla theatre - whatever. Tell your fellow lovers
of biological diversity what
you've done at the March
Friends of Woodland party
I'm organizing (details
TBA), and the creators of
the most imaginative, effective acts will be honored
with liquid gifts.
Strangway's office informs
me that he is out of town
until February 13, so that
gives us a few days to think
up actions that will get his
attention and with luck
educate him.
Itis sad that Strangway
is either unaware of or
unmovedby the many horrifying examples around the
world ofthe fates of societies
which continuously nibble
away at their long-term living assets to finance band-
aid solutions to their problems; all the way from industrial nations' acid rain
fiascos to third world desolation caused by slash-and-
burn agriculture. To think
that Strangway, who is
being paid big money to
make responsible decisions,
is advocating 'slash-and-
burn' education.
Individual members of
the campus community are
relatively powerless, but I
have a hunch that there are
quite a few of us who are
simply unwilling to put up
with Strangway's current
intentions on this matter.
Together we can make saner
thought prevail.
Nick Sleigh
Friends of Woodland
18/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988 Media censors gays
News stereotypes mean dire, deadly results
The treatment of Gay people
by the "straight" media has been
inconsistent, to say the least.
There have been recently some
positive and sympathetic articles
about gay people afflicted with
AIDS. These articles have
stressed tolerance for such individuals, and have outlined abuses
which these people have had to
suffer. There have also been some
inroads made in regards to views
on Gays, such as Ann Landers
expressing her ardent disagreement with a homophobic writer
who felt that AIDS was a good way
to cut down the numbers of the
Gay population.
But most of the understanding that the "straight" press has
allowed to the Gay community, is
once again, for the sick individual
whom we should not condemn but
merely pity. Even so, it can be seen
that the straight press is trying to
counter a hysterical reaction to the
disease by the general public.
The media on the whole,
however, has perpetuated the
stereotypes of gay people without
allowing gay organizations access
to it in order to present their side.
Susan Hemmings wrote on
the sensationalism that the media
attempts, most often successfully,
to create when a public figure is
"found out" to be Gay. The example she uses is that of Maureen
Colquihoun, Labour Union member of Parliament in England who
was harrassed because of her lesbian relationship with Barbara
Todd (in Homosexuality: Power
and Politics, London 1980, p.160),
The Press does not seem to
realize the devastating effect that
a story can have on a Gay person's
life. This effect is not surprising if
one takes into consideration the
stigma of being Gay in this society.
A distressing example of this
was given by Keith Howes in
Prejudice and Pride (London,
1983).
"In local communities, the
penalties imposed upon gay men
found guilty of so-called "gross
indecency' have been regularly
compounded by the publication of
the full names and addresses of
those involved? Howes writes.
"Aman committeed suicide in
Norwich in 1980 after reading
such a report of his own case.
Others have harmed themselves
in other ways, or left their neighbourhoods as aresult of this public
flogging? Howe adds.
This situation is even more
volatile now in the AIDS era, especially if the man is employed in the
school system or the food industry.
Since the "straight" media is
not in touch with the Gay community, it is ignorant about that
community and its problems. One
Perspective
ofthe reasons for this ignorance is
the belief that to write a positive
article about Gay people necessarily means that you are either actively Gay yourself, or repressing
the "unnatural" urge.
But without this exchange of
information between the two
worlds, Gay and straight, a lack of
understanding results. This lack
of understanding causes the formation of stereotypes, and can
inadvertantly lead to dire, and in
some cases deadly, results.
An example of this insulation
of the "straight" media from the
Gay community is Vancouver Sun
vs. Gay Alliance Towards Equality. The newspaper Gay Alliance
Towards Equality attempted to
place an ad in the Vancouver Sun's
classified section. The ad read:
"Subs, to GAY TIDE, gay lib paper
$1.00 for six issues. 2146 Yew St.,
Vancouver.
They were refused. This refusal lead them filing a complaint
under the B.C. Human Rights Act.
At that time sexual orientation
was considered to be protected
under the Code. This is not the
case today.
The case was appealed to the
Supreme Court of Canada which
chose the right ofthe newspaper to
freedom of expression over the
right to equality of the Gay people
involved.
One could argue that the policy reason for this judgement was
to stop a "respectable" newspaper
from being forced to accept an ad
from a homosexual organization.
If this is so then the case was lost
be for it started.
As Gorham stated: "The die is
already cast there is little left to
argue, when an individual's homosexuality is by definition considered to be reasonable cause for
discrimination." (Canadian Bar
Review, 59:170).
It would seem that the
"straight" media, bolstered by the
judgement of the Supreme Court
of Canada, has the right in law to
deny access to homosexuals. If
democracy entails the populace
being able to examine both sides of
any issue, it becomes essential
that the Gay communities across
Canada be allowed to publish their
own news and entertainment
media. This hopefully will also
create more awareness v/ithin the
Gay community, so that its members who work within the
"straight" press will find the
strength to speak out.
But Gay publications have
been met by resistance from state
authorities who consider their
magazines, newspaper and videos
"obscene", "immoral" and "indecent".
If Gorham is correct that
homosexuality itself is reasonable
cause for discrimination, all material on homosexuality, explicit or
not, can be labeled "obscene" and
therefore censored. This censorship discriminates not only
against the Gay community but
also against the community as a
whole, who are being denied their
right to hear both sides.
Elisabeth Strain
Law III
Lesbian lexicon enlivens life
Many of the words used
within the gay community have a
long history, reaching back to the
beginnings of literate civilisation.
Some of our 'special' words are of
more recent derivation. In any
event, the gay vernacular is rich
with special meanings, which
lends strength to our culture.
The term 'Lesbian' is derived
from the island of Lesbos, where
the poetess Sappho lived around
600 B.C. Sappho was a member of
an aristocratic family which stood
high in the politics and social life of
Lesbos - high enough that she was
twice exiled for political reasons.
Her poetry, however, does not reflect the political cross currents in
which she nearly drowned, but
instead her intense attachment to
various women.
Sappho became the head of a
school of women, a literary circle
or guild dedicated to Aphrodite,
where music, dancing and poetry
were studied. The bulk of Sappho's
surviving poems and fragments,
no more than one-twentieth of
what she wrote, deal with her love
affairs and emotional crises, to the
exclusion of everything else. Her
works assume a brightness and
beauty in all her relationships,
which may explain her popularity
with the ancient Greeks. In fact,
many Greeks considered her the
equal of Homer, which may explain why her native country
honoured her by stamping her
image on its coins.
The word 'dike' also has an
indirect Hellenic origin. It is actu
ally derived from 'dite', part ofthe
Latin word 'hermaphrodite',
which in turn comes from the
Greek Hermaphroditus, who was
the son of Hermes (Mars) and
Aphrodite (Venus). According to
Ovid, when Hermaphroditus was
fifteen, he went to the fountain of
Salmacis, where the water nymph
Naiads lived. Naiads fell in love
with the gorgeous boy and tried to
seduce him, but Hermaphroditus
rejected her. Pretending to go
away, Naiads hid in the bushes.
When Hermaphroditus went
swimming, she could no longer
contain herself and attempted to
Perspective
rape him. Again Hermaphroditus
resisted, and in despair Naiads
cried out "You may fight, cruel
villain, but you will not escape.
May the gods so ordain and may
we never be separated in future
time, you from me nor me from
you? The gods answered her
prayers, for as they were entwined
together, they became one, so that
"they were no longer two but a
single form that could not be called
girl or boy and appeared at the
same time neither one, but both."
Faggot has a much more recent derivation. Before it became a
pejorative, Taggot' referred to a
bundle of sticks or twigs, collected
for use as fuel. Hence, coming from
Middle English, 'flaming faggot'
described a heretic being burned
alive. During the Middle Ages,
homosexuals, along with witches,
were often burned at the stake.
Although faggot comes from
the Middle Ages, the shortened
form 'fag" appears to have originated in World War I slang. At
that time - and even today in New
Zealand, fag referred to a cigarette. The term was extended to
homosexuals because cigarette-
smoking was considered effeminate by macho, cigar-smoking he-
men. While the above is probably
the origin ofthe word fag, it may
also have come from British
schoolboy slang in which fag
stands for an inferior to older students. An even more questionable
derivation may be from Charles
Dicken's character Fagin in Oliver
Twist, who taught boys to be dishonest.
Another word with more recent origin is 'queer'. It come s from
the British slang 'quare' which
means unusual. 'Queen', also British, comes from the word 'quean',
which means a woman of low
morals.
'Gay', on the other hand, has a
16th Century French origin, from
the word 'gaje', meaning simply a
homosexual man. 'Homosexual'
itself is a modern term, coined in
the 19th Century. The 'homo'
comes from the Greek "homos'
which means same. Put together
with 'sexual', the term today refers
to those having a sexual desire for
someone of the same sex. Previously, such terms as 'Greek love'
had been used.
by Rhea Cleischild
sow
DINER
Fully Licensed
2 fori
ONE FREE BURGER
(Of equal or lesser value)
Buy One Get One Free!
Valid until February 26
4497 Dunbar at 29th
Phone; 222-9922
• Must present this coupon
375 Water Street at The Landing
Phone: 683-7632
Mardi Gras 88
It's back, our fifth annual Mardi Gras celebration
Nine days of fun and entertainment to get you
through the winter. Banish care and Party!
We'll be all decked out. Come and join us!
A.
° a
fYiday fx'b.  12
Rory and Roman
Kick off the tun with two ot
everybody's favorite strippers
Saturday Feb. 13
Red and White Party
Wear Red .ind White anti pay Vi priee
Red-Hot entertainment by Jody Kay
Members free
i ♦
/> Sunday Feb. 14
Masked Madness
The Vancouver Men's Chorus presents
a Masked Valentines Party 8.00 P.M.
Masks provided or create your own
Fabulous Entertainment 9:30 P.M.
^
Monday Feb. 15 .    •
Amateur Strip Night
1st Prize $100 phone 684-7321 for info.
Judging by Joe Ford Number One Agency
^
Tuesday Feb 16
Campaign Shoio
Emperor candidate Kirk
^
Wednesday Feb. 17
Campaign Show
Empress candidate J.D. Rene
Thursday Feb. 18
A Classic Classics Night
^
•9
•0
Friday Feb. 19 ,
Macks Leather Presents
A show of leather fashions
from the stylish to the sleazy
Showtime 10:00 P.M. with
four very stylishly sleazy models
<J
<? '*':
a
Saturday Feb. 20
The Male Factor
Our GRANDE FINALE on tour from Florida
A professional revue with six of the
US of A's hunkiest men. Profiled in Playboy
'rt      HOT! HOT! HOT! Showtime 10:00 P.M   sharp!
<•>•
"And everynight the hest
dance music in the city!"
1222 Hamilton Street
February 12,1988
THE UBYSSEY/19 Vancouver's gay/lesbian
community under attack
By Corinne Bjorge
Vancouver's ga\ and lesbian restaur.d Is, bars,
and community centr< are tightening up security fi .owing the
recent bombing of a downtown gay
bookstore.
The February 6 bombing of
Little Sisters bookstore is only one
of several recent of violent acts
against the gay and lesbian community. Since December several
downtown gay businesses, including the Lotus Club, Buddy's and
Celebrities, have received bomb
threats.
Fred Gilbertson, vice chair of
the Gay and Lesbian Community
Centre, said he thinks the violence
is increasing.
"...we're sitting here
with a government
that doesn't give a
damn about what's
happening."
"The beatings are not limited
to parks and beaches. They're
(now) happening outside bars,
even hospitals? said Gilbertson.
Bet Cecill of Vancouver Lesbian Connections said the violence
has affected the gay and lesbian
community in different ways:
"Some try to hide more, some come
out more. Our safety depends on
how many are willing to stand up."
Cecill said the provincial government must take part of the
blame for the increased homophobia in the province.
"There are four or five provinces that actually have sexual
orientation protection in their
province? she said. "Fm angry
we're sitting here with a government that doesn't give a damn
about what's happening."
Gilbertson said the violence is
also affecting gay men in an unexpected way: "It's making gay men
face women's issues."
Gay men are learning what
it's like when "they can't walk in a
dark city street by themselves,
and when they have to arrange for
a ride after a meeting? said Gilbertson.
Cecill criticised news coverage of gay issues. The media only
mentions gays and lesbians when
there are violent incidents, and
even then the coverage isn't that
good, she said. "Had this (the
bombing of Little Sisters) been
Duthies Books, it would be all over
the place."
"The lack of public and media
response to direct attacks is terrifying and infuriating? she said.
But Gary Holmes, manager of
the gay bar The Gandydancer said
"considering the newspapers we
have, the coverage has been fair."
"They'll print what sells
newspapers, but they haven't
tried to sensationalize the issue."
A member of Vancouver's
media disagreed with criticisms of
the press.
"The lack of public
and media response to
direct attacks is terrifying and infuriat-
ing,"	
"If there is a bombing in a
downtown store you report the fact
that there is a bombing? said
Province city editor Bonnie
Kettner.
"It's a straightforward news
story? she said.
The Province's coverage ofthe
bombing of Little Sister's bookstore did not mention the anti-gay
aspect ofthe bombing.
Most members of the gay and
lesbian community are happy
with how the Vancouver police
have dealt with the bombs and
threats.
"They gave us a circular on
what to do, left instructions.
They're taking it very seriously?
said Holmes.
t
________fA» ___________ ^f-                    *-^________________
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/es&lisr
The
Western
MBA
Canada's "National" Business School is looking for future business leaders
Tho Chairman of the MBA Program from
Tho University of Western Ontario will host
a discussion of the Western MBA Program
Place:
Date:     February   17,   1988
Time:     12:30   -   2:00  p.m.
Room  1215
Mechanical Engineering Building
The University of British Columbia
Please join us.
ONE HOUR
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NEAR MAIN STREET
GRAY LINE
GRAYLINE OF VANCOUVER
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Gray Line of Vancouver, Leaders in Sightseeing Tours, Package Holidays, Convention Planning and Charters is currently
accepting applications for the following seasonal summer positions commencing in April/May and terminating in
September/October. Company Uniforms will be supplied.
SALES AGENTS
Sales and Marketing
Responsible for the promotion and sale of
Gray Line of Vancouver Sightseeing Tours and
its approved services from booths located in
various Vancouver hotels, applicants should
possess excellent PR skills. Previous sales experience, a genuine interest in the travel and
tourism industry and the ability to work in a responsible and independent manner are required.
Applicants should have a pleasant personality, a good personal appearance andbe highly
motivated. The ability to converse in one or
more foreign languages and knowledge of
Vancouver area attractions and services would
be an asset.
Please direct resumes to the attention of:
Darryl Grace	
RESERVATIONS AGENTS
Sales and Marketing
Responsible for the sale and promotion of
Gray Line of Vancouver sightseeing tours utilizing our telephone reservations centre.
Applicants should be sales oriented and
have a professional telephone manner. The
ability to record and provide accurate information to tourists and hotel employees is imperative. A high standard in both appearance and
customer relations is imperative. Previous telephone reception, sales and/or reservations
would be an asset.
Please direct resumes to the attention of:
 Lynda Balson	
DRIVERS, GUIDES, HOSTS
Operations
Positions include providing guided tours
of Vancouver and area as a driver and/or guide
hosting convention and cruise ship guests during visits to Vancouver, and the servicing of our
motor-coach fleet.
Applicants should possess a pleasant and
outgoing personality, a strong personal appearance and be highly motivated.
Note:     Additional  Supervisor'*,'  positions  are
available for outstanding candidates.
For further information regarding these
Operations positions please contact your Canada Employment Office on campus.
Please direct resumes to the attention of:
Hugh McKay
Interested applicants should forward a resume with handwritten covering letter, specifying position applied for, to
Gray Line Of Vancouver. #108-900 W. Georgia St. Vancouver, B.C. V6C 2W6.    No Phone Calls Please.
20/THE UBYSSEY
February 12,1988

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