UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 6, 1973

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125914.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125914.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125914-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125914-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125914-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125914-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125914-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125914-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125914-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125914.ris

Full Text

Array Loners challenge slates
By GARY COULL
Three independent
candidates are running for
Alma Mater Society president
Wednesday; one serious, one
satirical and one plain
confusing.
Starting on a positive note,
Tony Formby calls himself a
concerned student who cares
more. He says he believes slate
campaigning is a deceitful
method of electing people who
would not otherwise be elected.
He said he is making no
special promises because they
can't be guaranteed. Money
matters must pass the student
council, not the executive, he
said.
He cited student
representation   as   a   major
FOSTER ... confusing
issue which is "necessary at
every level of the university."
As for slate promises
concerning budgetary matters,
Formby said UBC will likely
have fewer students and less
revenue next year so it will be
impossible to guarantee who
gets cut-back and who does
not. He called the no-cut back
platforms a "bribe" and asked
how sincere the Democratic
Students Caucus was in issuing
it.
He noted the Students
Coalition was running for a
second term and added: "I
hope they are not running on
the merits of their first term."
Formsby said the balanced
approach platform of the
Students Coalition came and
died in B.C. already and was
too conservative even for UBC.
FORMBY . . . slates 'deceitful'
"Long live the Tory torch and
all that, but we can handle only
one Bob Stanfield," he said.
Formby said apathy on
campus was not the fault of the
student. "The lack of student
input is related to the lack of
AMS executive output" he
claimed.
"Contrary to general belief
the executive does not have
special powers — only duties"
he said.
The candidate who is
somewhat confusing is Stuart
Foster, applied science 3. In an
interview Monday, he would
only say he stood in
conventional spotlights on
conventional issues. He cited
those issues as being the same
as the Democratic Students
Caucus; student involvement,
See page 2: FOSTER
WE UBYSSEY
an mai, uui wc isaii iidiiuie uniy occ page z: rusiiSK
Board agrees to
discuss opening
meets to public
CHINESE FOOD returned to old auditorium cafeteria Monday. The
kitchen, which was burnt out in a Dec. 7 fire, is back in operation,
serving huge delicious helpings of hung mung, octopus soup, chop
suey, chow mein and tea. -mark hamiiton photo
Four residences now face increase
By KEN DODD
There will be a 9.75-per-cent rent
increase in all four UBC residences
beginning in September, The Ubyssey
learned Monday.
Previously it was reported this
increase applied only  to  the  Acadia
Camp and Park graduate residence.
The increase means Place Vanier and
Totem Park residents face an $85 full
sessional increase to $857 from $772. The
rent increase in the Walter Gage Towers
will be $45. rising to. $588 from $543.
Neither housing director Les
Rohringer or his direct subordinate,
housing business manager Keith Davis
were available for comment Monday.
However Place Vanier co-ordinator,
Dan Gardner said Monday the increases
are basically due to increased operating
costs in each area.
"Labor costs are up and they account
for 25-26 per cent of the budget. Food
prices are up as well," Gardner said.
Gardner said the other reason for the
increases is this past summer was a bad
one for conventions at UBC. Payments
from convention groups constitute the
main source of income other than
student fees.
Gardner said the decision was made at
a board of governor meeting two weeks
ago on a recommendation from housing
who need the increase in order to break
even on expenses.
Housing representatives, including
Rohringer have met with student
representatives from Totem Park, Place
Vanier and Gage residences within the
last week to discuss the increases.
Student reaction has been sympathetic
but unfavorable.
"A lot of people won't be coming back
to residence next year because of this,"
Place Vanier residence association
treasurer, Charlie Hamilton said
Monday.
"They had a bad year for conventions
last summer and they're taking out on us
now," said Hamilton.
He said a large part of the increase is
to subsidize the construction and
mortgage costs of the Gage Towers.
"We've been having trouble getting
money from them all year because of
this," he said.
Hamilton said he is aware of the
increased operating costs the housing
department is facing but noted there
have been smaller increases in Totem
Park and Place Vanier each of the last
three years. "However if the rents
remain stable for the next five years
then perhaps they're justified," he said.
By LEN JOHNSON
Members of the UBC board
of governors have agreed to
discuss opening board
meetings to the public.
Administration president
Walter Gage said while it was
possible the discussion was
instigated because the board
has been seen in an
unfavourable light "the main
problem is students don't
understand the board's
function."
Gage said he favors
discussion of open meetings
but refused to comment on the
possible outcome "because
different members would have
different opinions."
"This topic has been
discussed in years previous.
This time it was instigated by
Alma Mater Society president
Doug  Aldridge,"   Gage  said.
Aldridge said the board will
consider opening meetings
which do not include discussion
of such things as senior staff
appointments and building
contracts.
"The opening of the
meetings should put an end to
the suspicion that surrounds
the board of governors," he
said.
Aldridge said he was
interested in the student body
"getting away from the idea
that the board of governors has
a great effect on the academic
life of the university, which
just isn't true."
He said most of the duties of
the board of governors
consisted of being a rubber
stamp for senate and acting as
a financial advisory board to
the various faculties.
Student senator Stan Persky
said the announcement is "a
joke". He said it is an attempt
by the board of governors to
placate the student body and
make it believe the board is a
liberal body when it is really a
representative of big business.
Persky said the move is "the
last gasp of a dying dinosaur"
because the NDP has promised
to alter the composition of the
board to make it more
representative of the student
body and the community,
which would mean the
inclusion of students and
community members.
BoG member Paul Plant
said he had agreed to discuss
open meetings but did not wish
See page 2: BOG Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1973
Strike leads to teach-in
MONTREAL (CUPI) —
Students from Montreal
universities came together at
McGill Saturday to hold a
teach-in on the current
struggle of Quebec students
against the provincial
government's new fee ruling.
The teach-in occurred as the
student strike keeping the
University of Quebec here
closed, entered its second
week.
The fee ruling states that
students must pay all past
debts to the university
including second term tuition
by Feb. 15 or they will be
expelled permanently. (
A student from the
University of Quebec here
expressed the necessity for
solidarity among students
from all universities who, if not
now, will later face similar
economic blackmail.
At UQAM 3,000 out of an
11,000-student population and
at Universite de Montreal
(UDEM) 1,000 out of 15,000
students will be eligible for
expulsion by the university
because of the ruling.
With the opening of
community colleges and the
University of Quebec the
Quebec student population has
greatly increased.
However, due to today's
economic crisis and the
resulting rising
unemployment, the
government is attempting to
cut back on the already too
great number of university
graduates.
The students most affected
by this ruling are those from
the working class who must
rely on part-time jobs and
government loans and
bursaries to pay their tuition.
Although 3,000 students at
UQAM receive government
aid, only 300 of these do not
have to repay the province.
The students have
denounced "economic
measures that become
selective measures". They
want up to three years after
graduation in  which  to  pay
Foster matches
DSC issues
From page 1
parity with honor, and
women's rights.
Foster said the campaign
was intolerably too dull but
refused to comment further.
Finally, the satirical
candidate is Doug Tuck, arts 4.
There is no doubt he will win
the AMS presidency on
Wednesday — at least
according to his description.
Tuck is the apathy candidate
in this election and by his
calculations he will get 14,000
votes. His rationale is that
abstentions and votes against
him are» actually votes for him
because students are
displaying their apathy and he
is the apathy candidate. A vote
for him is a spoiled ballot but
they are not likely to interfere
in his victory.
A crowd of 200 gathered in
the SUB ballroom Monday
noon for an all-candidates
meeting. The candidates
outlined their platforms again
before an audience made up of
close supporters of both slates.
The Students Coalition was
questioned on their perception
of students as being consumers
because of the SC's apparent
preoccupation  with  services.
SC presidential candidate
Bob Angus replied it was only
one part of their platform.
However, he conceded the
present AMS government was
fairly service oriented.
Joanne Lindsay, DSC coordinator candidate, called for
the art gallery in SUB to be
opened for student artists and
that students be allowed to eat
lunch there when no show was
on.
After Lindsay had sat down,
SC co-ordinator candiate John
Keating rose and called her
"my naive opponent", saying
Lindsay was not even aware of
what the job entails.
A spectator then asked if
Keating was sure about that
andhereplied: "I'm positive."
Stuart Foster asked students
during his introductory
address how they liked the dull
campus politics. He pointed to
Angus and said ".an interesting
fellow but none the less dull."
The unity of the S.C. slate
was questioned when Angus
said they only met once a year
to elect a slate. He said he
assumed the Democratic
Students Caucus worked
together all year round.
The two secretarial
candidates Pemmie Muir,
nursing 2, and grad studies
senator Stan Persky both
wanted to expand the role of
secretary.
Muir said she would like to
work with both the internal and
external affairs officers in
creating an acedemic council
to press for implementation of
student representation on
faculty committees at all
levels.
Persky said he was very
serious about real
investigation and proper
organization of next year's
AMS elections.
Persky said he has
extensive office practice, can
take minutes and has a good
knowledge of parliamentary
procedure to qualify him for
the job as secretary.
The candidates were
confronted by Coreen Douglas
of the Young Socialists about
the ban on political groups to
run under their party banner.
Formsby said students get
enough political activity from
outside UBC and he associated
party politics with giant
corporations. He said he
wanted to reverse the trend
and bring politics back to the
student level.
Persky, speaking for the
DSC, said they believe the
clause prohibiting students
from running under party
affiliation should be struck
from the constitution of the
AMS.
Angus said he had no
objection to the Young
Socialists running under their
political banner. He said he
was more afraid about the
Liberals or the Conservatives
running with professional
staffs for the entire election.
Angus said he would like to
see the elections committee
make specific rulings on the
question. "I would put the
referendum again next year if
students wanted it," he said.
their fees so that no one will be
denied an education through
lack of money.
They pointed out that the $15
million owed by them to the
university is nothing compared
to the $55 million the
administration sees fit to spend
on building a new UQAM
campus.
The UQAM administration
continues to insist that the
university is open despite the
fact that picketing has shut
down the university since the
strike began. Students went on
strike   Jan.   25.
BoG makes
business
decisions
From page 1
to speculate on the outcome of
the proposals and would to wait
until he had heard all the
proposals before he made up
his mind.
Plant said the function of the
board of governors is to make
business decisions. When you
need an academic decision you
ask an academic, when you
need a business decision you
ask a businessman," he said.
He denied the proposal had
been made because of the
threat to change the
composition of the board of
governors. "Everything has to
change sometime, you can't
stop that. Most people don't
realize we are all volunteers."
Deputy president William
Armstrong said the idea had
previously been brought up by
members of the board on other
occasions but probably would
not be discussed until March,
due to a work backlog.
Mmkt®
Specialised Service
'/* S>.. •
^■*     s • * '
i^1
.a.**-
9?  Ye**'
Sales and-Seruice.
8914 Oak St.   263-8121
WESTERN CANADA'S FIRST SEX BOUTIQUE
BOOKS
A     WIDE     SELECTION     OF     NON-FICTION     BOOKS
PERTAINING TO ALL ASPECTS OF SEX & LOVE.
• LINGERIE »WATERBEDS
• POSTERS • ADULT GAMES & PUZZLES
• SENSUAL LIGHTING • MASSAGE CREAMS
European sexual aids to enhance a couple's most intimate
relationship.
HOURS OF BUSINESS: Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-10 p.m.
SUB FILMSOC PRESENTS
Paranwunt Pictures Presents
I A Sagittarius Production A BO VWOeRBERG RLM
"foe Hill"
Thurs. 7:00
Fri. 7:00 & 9:30
Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
Sun. 7:00
SUB
AUD
50°
Feb.
8-11
"SPLENDID
BEYOND REALITY!
Thommy Berggren
is mythically
fiandsome,
tou£hingly mortal
x %d radiant
!tji3&h humor!"
—Pauf^itpierman, Newsweek
GET OUT
AND
VOTE
There will be an election for the following positions today,
February 6 and Wednesday, February 7,1973.
PRESIDENT COORDINATOR
SECRETARY INTERNAL AFFAIRS
Polls will be open as follows:
Wednesday. February 7,1973
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Buchanan
Angus
Civil
MacMillan
Main Library
Sedgwick Library
Sub North
Sub South
Woodward Library
Advance Polls will be open as follows:
Today, February 6.1973
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
SUB LAW WAR MEMORIAL GYM
EDUCATION MEDICINE
and from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
PLACE VANIER - TOTEM PARK - GAGE
Bring Your AMS Card - Take an Interest
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL Tuesday,  February 6,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Childcare sit-in: 'You
t
—kini mcdonald photo
DAYCARE MOTHERS, workers and the kids themselves begin sixth day of Daycare Information Centre
sit-in. Workers say they will continue to sit until demands are met and a meeting with NDP cabinet
ministers Levi, Cocke and Dailly is agreed upon.
NDP easy on capitalism
Social democratic parties such as the New
Democratic Party are severely limited in their
ability to change capitalist society, economist
and Manitoba NDP MLA Cy Gonick said
Monday.
Gonick, a member of Canadian Dimension's
editorial board: "Social democrats aim at the
symptoms and alleviate the worst abuses of the
capitalist system rather than the root causes of
inequality.
"The party organization has to be the key
for change but it (the Manitoba NDP) is now an
elevatoral machine not in contact on a day-today basis with the community," he said.
Gonick cited the public auto insurance
legislation in Manitoba, saying the NDP ran
into considerable trouble because members of
the legislature were not in contact with the
party rank and file over planning and
implementing the scheme.
He said another problem the social
democratic parties have is their reliance on old
bureaucrats who don't care one way or another
about the government's programs.
As well as dealing with the realities of social
democratic governments Gonick outlined their
limitations in the areas of equality, liberation,
independence and ecological balance.
"There is not talk of changing the capitalist
system. The profit motive remains intact as the
major means of finding food, shelter and
clothing.
"Social democratic parties aim not at
equality of human condition but at equal
opportunity to compete in the market place.
"Equal pay for equal work for men and
women can be achieved but equal access to
responsible high paying jobs is not as easy
because sexist behaviour is at the root of the
capitalist system.
come to us'
By FORREST NELSON
The sit-in at the provincial child-care information centre
began its sixth day with both sides still saying: "You come to
us."
About 20 protestors continue to eat and sleep in the newly
opened information centre waiting for their demands to be met.
The three daycare centres of Pooh Corner in the West End,'
South Hill at 47th and Fraser, and Grandview Terrace from the
East End account for most of the sit-downers and all of the
organization.
The occupation of the building has shut down the centre's
business. The workers at the information centre were asked to
leave if they could not agree to the demands. B.C. files were
prevented from being removed by the protestors.
Rehabilitation minister Norman Levi Monday phoned the
protestors and offered to meet them within 48 hours after they
vacated the building.
He also offered to fly them all to Victoria for the meeting
after they explained that they could not afford the trip.
The offer was rejected. The sitdowners want to meet Levi,
health minister Dennis Cocke, and education minister Eileen
Daily at the centre face to face.
Margret Sigurgeirson, a spokesman for the sitdowners said:
"It will continue until we get some serious committment —
which doesn't mean Norman Levi's word."
The four major grievances of the daycare protestors are :
* Licencing is hard to come by;
* Money is delayed for month after month;
* There is am acute shortage of care and no 24-hour
service;
* Under three's are not open to care except in special cases.
"It's places like UBC, Simon Fraser, Langara and 12th and
Oak which care for under three year olds. The intellectual
centres are all cared for. There's no such care in a worker's
neighborhood," said Sigurgeirson.
Last Friday the sitdowners had a conference with Gladys
Maycock and Peggy Conway, workers in the new information
centre. The sitdowners showed the demands to the employees
one by one.
When Maycock and Conway disagreed with the demands,
they were asked to leave. Betsy Wood of the sitdowner's said:
"Mrs Conway didn't agree with the demand that nutritional
lunches be prepared for the children — she thought that it would
cost too much."
Wood said: "There were two policemen the first night, but
they were quite friendly.
"Several people have arrived at the request of Don
Bingham's office. One ostensively to check on child neglect in
the building. One stayed the night to 'protect the building'.''
Wood continued: "Levi said there was only one 24-hour
daycare in North America — and that is in Atlanta, Geo. Since
when did B.C. follow Georgia.
"Women who get the lowest salaries often work evenings,
so how do they take care of their kids." '
Future trouble may come from Richmond Realty Ltd., the
building's owners. They may ask for an eviction if they think the
sitdowners are troublesome.
South Hill one of the daycare groups protesting, is open 7
a.m. to 11:30 p.m. and has a waiting list three times its
enrolment.
The sitdowners included Cocke in their demand for a face-
to-face meeting because daycare for under three year olds
involves health regulations.
Daily is included because the staff for new centres would be
contolled through her department.
Sigurgierson said she would guess the sitdown will be
continuing until at least the weekend.
Dailly speaks
Provincial education minister Eileen Dailly will be on
campus to discuss problems in education, noon Thursday in the
SUB ballroom.
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
The arrival of Western publisher Mel Hurtig last
week on behalf of the Committee for an Independent
Canada was a badly neede shot in the arm for the
Vancouver CIC chapter whose spirits have been
declining since the national convention last fall.
Hurtig, an unsuccessful Liberal candidate in last
October's election, has de facto become the chief
spokesman of the CIC since his defeat, gradually
replacing Toronto publisher Jack McClelland in that
role.
One of the reasons for the local chapter's
depression is the large debt run up by the Toronto
office and which chapters all across the country are
being asked to pay for.
Another, is with the election of the new NDP
government a host of "national-minded" policies
have been served up from Victoria. One example of
this is Alex Macdonald's (a member of the CIC) new
bill making it mandatory that a majority of the
directors of all 70,000 B.C. companies be Canadians,
resident in Canada.
With this type of government policy it is naturally
understandable that much of what the CIC has stood
for is rapidly becoming a part of the fundamental
thinking of the society at large. As such, the role of
the organization  as  a   'cause  celebre'  is  much
diminished.
* * *
The net effect of the provincial government's
additional 1,000 civil service jobs is a good chunk of
them will go to university graduates including a
large number of people with MA's and Ph.D's.
Included among these positions will be a number
of economists.
As you might well expect, the labor department
will get the largest proportion of the new recruits
but, it's this reporter's guess that the education
department will get a substantial portion too.
Surely due for replacement is the four-man subsection for post-secondary education whose staff
under the Socred government were purposely never
involved in the university sector. By comparison,
Ontario's post-secondary department contains well
over 2,000 individuals.
One very interesting thing that happened over the
weekend at the Harrison Hot Springs B.C.  Bar
meeting was the discussion of a "Legalcare" system
whereby individuals will pay a monthly premium in
return for legal coverage.
Unlike the provincial medicare scheme it will be
privately run and will probably be here within a
year.
Prime users of the service are expected to be union
members who will get the benefits as part of a union
negotiated contract (a number of which are going to
come up for renewal in B.C. this summer).
The major question being asked is: Why
won't the government take the initiative in such a
scheme?
According to Sholto Hebenton, downtown lawyer
and chairman of the committee setting-up the prepaid legal care program, there is no way the
government is going for the practice of corporate
law. As such, most of B.C.'s 2,300 Bar members will
not be involved in it.
But he does see it is a progressive step and, in the
words of law professor Dave Huberman, it means
lawyers will be, "going from primarily servicing the
money classes to helping other people in society." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1973
Elections
Well, it's whoop-de-doo and let's hear it for good ol'
democracy time again. Another Alma Mater Society
election is upon us.
Mussoc marked the occasion by opening a musical
called Promises, Promises.
Twenty thousand students noted the event by
yawning in unison.
And The Ubyssey decided once again to write its
annual who-to-vote-for-in-the AMS-elections editorial.
So here goes.
The people now in power belong to the Students'
Coalition. What they coalesced from (perhaps coagulate
would be a better word) hasn't been determined but
they're still around and apparently want a second term.
Then there is the Democratic Students' Caucus,
otherwise known as Sons and Daughters of the Grand
Imperial Order of Human Government.
Last and in some cases least are the three independent
candidates, all of whom for some reason want to be AMS
president.
Now we know who's running, let's look at the
platforms.
The SC and DSC platforms appear to pose good
services and good politics against good politics and good
services. The result is one of the greatest balancing acts
since the Vancouver Canucks tried on skates.
Independent presidential candidate Tony Formby
wants increased student representation and an end to slate
voting.
Independent candidate Stu Foster wants a new
religion.
Independent candidate Doug Tuck seems interested
in apathy.
Now that the platforms are disposed of, let's look at
how much experience the candidates have.
The three independent candidates seem to have little
if any experience with student government. This basically
means you have to judge them on their platforms.
Both the SC and DSC slates include candidates with
previous experience in student government. We refer in
particular to SC candidate Bob Angus and DSC candidates
Stan Persky and Brian Loomes.
Now let's look at the records of the two slates, both
of which have been contending forces of sorts for the past
year.
The services aspect of the SC you should judge for
yourselves as they have been in power for the past year.
We're not particularly impressed but then services are not
the sort of thing we get jumping-up-and-down excited
about.
The SC claim to be for increased student
representation. It is this aspect of their program we are
extremely dubious about. Members of the SC have not
been noted for their leadership during the recent and
continuing negotiations for greater student representation.
They seem to have added the trendy catchphrase "student
representation" as an afterthought in order to get votes. If
these people were really interested in getting greater
student representation they would have showed it before
election time.
The DSC have promised good services. Although only
a promise, this is an improvement over previous years in
which the left couldn't be bothered noticing that students
like to drink beer and eat in comfortable surroundings.
The DSC candidates have also been active in the
struggle for student representation and it is in large part
due to their efforts that people are becoming aware of the
need for student reps.
Because the DSC has shown a greater tendency to get
involved with progressive student activities, The Ubyssey
staff urges you to vote for them.
THE WYSSEY
FEBRUARY 6, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
Roger McNeill, Richard Kranabetter, Mark Hamilton, Mike Sasges,
Ken Dodd, Simon Truelove, John Andersen, Lesley Krueger, Gary Coull,
Steve Morris, Vaughn Palmer, Forrest Nelson, Len Johnson, Kini
McDonald, Art Smolensky, Jan O'Brien, Kent Spencer. Sorry but the
masthead editoreloped with the Slider.
Debauch
Re: the letter from "Greg" in
the Jan. 23 Ubyssey.
Your reference to "...
pornographic showmanship as a
'release' from ... 'heavy' course
loads" by science faculty students
(wrongly including those in medicine) completely baffles me. I
must be naive, or walking around
with my eyes closed or something.
As far as I know, in medicine the
only "pornographic showmanship" is the annual beer and skits
night, which, to Greg's mind, we
probably await with eager anticipation for our Annual Night Off
to Get Release in Wild Sexist
Debauchery. And then, when it's
over, we must spend another hard
year studying to be technicians
until the next beer and skits night.
The truth is, many science,
medical and other students do
acquire something besides technical knowledge while at university, including social concern, the
desire to work for change, and the
wisdom not to make stupid
generalizations about groups of
people.
Bruce McNeely
medicine 3
Godiva
In reaction to Lawrence
Milne's flippant letter in the Jan.
30 Ubyssey regarding what I
would consider the rightful indignation raised by Ms. Penny
Newman in reaction to her being
propositioned by the engineering
undergraduate society to participate in the Lady Godiva ride, I
would like to ask some questions.
First of all, Mr. Milne, in your
letter you called the women's
liberation movement a sorority. I
take your use of the term sorority
to signify that you do not regard
the movement as having any
serious basis to it or that its
complaints are not legitimate.
Certainly on occasion a complaint
lodged by them may seen to be
merely nit-picking but what movement (including the EUS) or
individual has not in his/her day
done the same? We are not
infallible. Would you regard the
civil rights movement, the Panthers or the Red Power movement
Letters
as simple fraternities? Perhaps one
may use the term fraternity in
describing them but most definitely not in the context to which
you have applied the term sorority.
You also ask what is wrong
with a woman earning $50 to
$100 an hour riding nude on a
horse? First of all this implies that
for performance of such acts and
other acts of prostitution (which I
consider the Lady Godiva farce to
be) enormous amounts of money
are paid. I think that your pay
scale is unrealistic to begin with.
The important question involved
here is: if the person (male or
female) does not find this opportunity of employment (which you
seem to regard it as) decent or if
people at large are supposed to see
nothing degrading in it may I ask
why in hell the pay is so
exhorbitant anyway? Is it really
nothing more than a bribe? If the
woman on the horse must earn
money by nurturing your fantasies and cannot earn a decent
Wage in some other more rewarding or fulfilling job, I suggest that
she is not free as you suggest. The
people (women are not alone)
who condemn this travesty of
human dignity are not unendowed, jealous malcontents but
people who care for one another's
feelings.
As Roberta Flack once said in
her song Go Up Moses in its
introduction at a concert; if you
sell heroin to the kids in the
ghetto so that you can get enough
money to free yourself from the
ghetto, are you really free? Your
admiration for the well-endowed
(it seems the popular phrase)
woman is no better than the EUS
Red Rag and its glorification of
the male as stud as the admirable
quality for manhood.
Ralph Christie
arts 4
WAG
With reference to the meeting
called between the engineering
undergraduate society and the
women's action group, we would
like to make clear that, like any
other organization on the campus,
we will respond to invitations to
participate in meetings. However,
we would like also to make clear
that we respond at our discretion.
The meeting mentioned above was
called, advertised and scheduled
without informing us. We can see
no reason, in any case, why a
discussion of "sexism" at UBC
could not have taken place among
those who were present and who
were interested in calling the
meeting.
women's action group
Bias
I was impressed by Gary
Coull's coverage of the political
platforms of the two candidates
for president of the Alma Mater
Society. It's nice to see the
student newspaper present a fair
and unbiased view of both sides of
the executive coin. It does strike
me as odd, however, that the
three other presidential candidates
have not yet received their front
page coverage, snapshot included.
I feel that The Ubyssey is abusing
compulsory patronage of the
students. Such partisanship on
behalf of the paper demonstrates
the lack of responsibility of The
Ubyssey staff in representing the
students as a whole. I feel, and I
hope others agree with me, that
such biases should remain on the
editorial page.
Jay Munsie
student senator
arts 4
Douglas MacKay
ombudsman
We decided last press day to
divide coverage between the
slate candidates and the
independents. This is why
there is little mention of the
slate candidates in today's
issue.
As far as any lack of
responsibility on our part in
"representing students as a
whole," we have never
accepted any such
responsibility. The Ubyssey
exists to represent the people
who work on it — i.e. anyone
who bothers to show up in the
office on a press day.
Red
The letters of two nameless
engineers, both headlined Disgusted,    have    very    interesting
See page 6 Tuesday,   February  6,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Candidate's statements
Bob Angus
(president)
The duties of the president of the
Alma Mater Socity include
communication between students, the
university administration, other
universities, and sometimes
government. The tactics I favour are
those of sound, reasoned argument and
negotiation, not those of confrontation
and sloganism.
This year, as SUB co-ordinator, I
believe I have been successful in
having achieved administration
support for the SUB liquor license, the
SUB maintenance agreement, total cooperation in investigation of SUB food
services, and a commitment for $1
million for the swimming pool to
mention only a few major items. Next
year, implementation of student
representation, public board of
governors meetings, and continuation
of present programs will all be
priorities.
Communication only begins in the
above areas. The most important
function of the Alma Mater Society
should be discovering what students
expect from it and making sure that
students know what the AMS is and
what it can do for them. Surveys,
public discussion of issues, video-taped
council meetings could be a start in this
direction.
Regardless of who you vote for,
please get out and vote. The AMS can
We've decided to put our individual
150-word statements together into one
hopefully coherent platform.
The Democratic Students' Caucus is
running because:
0 We believe in democratizing the
university through student
representation. Only when students
have a real say will the university
change. We promise to meet with every
group on campus to take steps in this
direction.
• We want to implement the
recommendations of the UBC Status of
Women report. It has now been
documented that women students,
workers and teachers are
discriminated against. That
discrimination must end.
• We will carry out a program to
improve understanding of the
"relationship between the university
and society. Through speakers and
cultural events, by investigating the
increasingly desperate job situation for
students, and by participation in the
struggles of the majority of people in
our society, an understanding of the
nature of the university will emerge.
• We can provide good politics and
good administration. There will be no
financial cutbacks on sports, clubs, or
undergraduate societies. We recognize
and fully accept the responsibility for
efficient and economic management of
only be as strong as those who get out
and support it.
John Keating
(co-ordinator )
During the 1972-73 session, my
involvement in student affairs as
chairman of open house and president
of aqua soc has enabled me to critically
assess the programs advocated by the
Students' Coalition and our 'worthy'
opposition. Frankly, the DSC has
neglected services to the students in
SUB — the prime area of concern for
the Co-ordinator.
What can be done for the students
with the right government?
* Pit Development: Almost ready
for construction, the only facts lacking
mmmmm
wm-
Toni| Formby
(president)
In recent years "slate campaigns"
have been common in AMS elections;
so common that no one analyzes their
faults. Slates have become deceitful
methods of electing a group of people
who would otherwise stand a poor
chance of being elected on their own.
These groups mislead the student body
into thinking that the executive group
has special powers. It does not. Any
promises the slates make they cannot
guarantee.
I feel very strongly that student
representation is necessary at all
levels of the university. This has been
achieved in many faculties already but
there are some, such as the faculty of
arts, which seem to have problems in
this respect. The Democratic Students'
Caucus has emerged from a particular
and not an overall concern for the
whole university.
The Students' Coalition is seeking its
second term in office, hopefully not on
* SUB Revenue: Without infringing
on student events, it is possible to
develop revenue in other areas. Let's
look into this.
Pemme Muir
(secretary)
During my three years on this
campus, I have become aware of many
issues which concern me, especially in
the academic area. As internal affairs
officer, I would set up an academic
council to increase communication
between the different undergraduate
societies. I believe that student
progress towards representation on the
different committees can only be truly
effective at the individual department
levels. Student participation and co-
Students9  Coalition
are student opinion regarding decor;
scheduled for use in September 1973.
* SUB Food Service Purchase:
Consultants report has been received
and purchase could, if approved, be
made in June 1973.
* Student Grocery Store: Already
studied and could provide students with
convenience and cheaper food costs.
* Campus Ticket Centre: For all
Vancouver functions; easier for
students who can't get downtown.
* Expand Crafts Room: To include
not only pottery and ceramics but also
metal and woodwork.
student funds, and will carry out
projects students have indicated their
support for, such as building the pool
and a new pub.
Each of us is serious about the office
we're running for, and capable of
carrying out its tasks:
• Brian Loomes (for president) has
had successful experience as arts
undergraduate society president and
will take up the responsibility of
providing leadership and direction for
the AMS.
• Diane Latta (for internal affairs)
is active in the women's movement at
UBC. She will work directly with
undergraduate societies to implement
student representation as well as coordinate AMS-sponsored cultural
activities and develop educational
policies.
operation are vitally important for the
success of academic reform in all
areas; we have to work together.
After three years of living in
different residences, I realize some of
the problems that students encounter
in finding adequate housing both on and
off campus. If elected, I will work
closely with the external affairs officer
in order to promote the interests of the
students in this area.
Apathy has existed too long on this
campus. Please vote on February 6 and
7.
• Joanne Lindsay (for co-ordinator)
has worked both with women's groups
and the AUS. She will make sure that
SUB is available to all student groups,
that it becomes a more human place to
be in, and that services and
recreational facilities are extended to
meet student demand.
• Stan Persky (for secretary) has
been a student senator and active
among graduate students. As secretary
he has all the required skills; extensive
experience in office organization, the
ability to take minutes, compose
business letters, prepare reports, type,
operate office equipment, and
knowledge of parliamentary
procedure.
Finally we ought to say something
about our opponents and their slogan —
'balanced approach'. Our criticism of
Democratic Students9 Caucus
Brian Loomes
(president)
Joanne Lindsay
(co-ordinator )
the merits of its first term. They do not
offer anything new; only another uneventful year.
An AMS presidential candidate can
guarantee little. I offer sound
leadership, awareness, honesty and
promise to inform the student body of
events occurring "upstairs" in a biweekly, open letter in The Ubyssey,
from myself to the student body. I urge
you to Break the Slates and elect a
realistic president. Tony Formby.
Stan Per shy
(secretary)
Diane Latta
(internal affairs
I am particularly fond of morons of
all makes, models and descriptions,
blackguards of every grade and hue,
Philistines, thieves, liars, fools,
imposters, and offensive people in
general.
I am fond of Brian Loomes.
I am fond of the thunderous kicks
which set him up.
I am fond of Stan Persky's
Hungarian climbing boots with the
steel toes.
Independent
Stuart Foster
(president)
Seated in his den, in the chill gloom of
winter, comforting his lungs with a
budgy cigar, presidential candidate
Stuart Foster entertains thoughts as
follows:
To smoke cigars on a beautiful
winter's afternoon is to confess that one
has very little taste.
If every hypocrite at UBC were to
break his leg at noon today, the
university might be successfully
invaded, at one o'clock, by the war-like
hypocrites of SFU.
It is hard to discuss a man who is dull
to the point of death.
It is hard to discuss Bob Angus.
Except to say that he gives Stan
Persky's DSC some credibility.
There are two things to be avoided;
the deadly upas trees and soft drinks.
The latter makes you puffy and poddy.
Debbie Rota
(internal affairs)
After observing the Alma Mater
Society office of secretary closely
during the past year, I feel that there is
much potential for expansion. I do not
feel that only the mundane jobs of
taking minutes, sending/receiving
letters and running elections, etc.
should constitute the position.
Some areas of expansion I would like
to institute as secretary are:
. * acting as a liaison between the
decentralized undergraduate societies
and clubs and the centralized AMS
including going out to the different
societies when they don't come to us. I
feel that in this way, the AMS can be
more effective as the co-ordinating
body;
* a resource centre to find out about
general campus activities — helping
the students working on projects find
other people who have previously done
work in this field and channelling the
information, in this way preventing
duplication of work.
Working closely with the internal
affairs office I would like to set up an
academic council which, working as a
unit, could effectively press for
reasonable implementation of student
representation on faculty committees
at all levels. I would like to urge all
students to go out on February 6 and 7
and vote for the candidate of your
choice, but please VOTE!
them is not intended as a personal attack; they're students like ourselves.
However, concerning on-campus
questions like representation, rights of
women, and the nature of the
university, they have failed. They've
neither given these problems serious
thought nor have they taken action.
The student victory in the senate (Jan.
17) was the result of intelligent political
work. It occurred, partially, because of
the hard workwe had previously done
in the faculty of arts. These gains will
be lost if the work doesn't continue.
During the three-month struggle,
Student Coalition was almost totally
silent. The S.C.-dominated council had
to be pushed and cajoled into providing
even minimal financial support for the
work being done to end discrimination
against women at UBC. Thus, their
'balanced approach' slogan is both
misleading and disturbing. It covers up
their past record over the last year and
a half which hasn't been balanced but
deficient. As a promise, it only means
'don't rock the boat', and indicates that
they will continue to meekly accept the
dictates of the present administration.
The AMS must be positive, not a
neutral element in student affairs.
We ask you to give us the chance to
communicate our ideas and carry out a
program to improve the student
conditions at UBC.
% a "f>m& >*     S.-V ,"*?« -Xk: .->? -
I enjoy a person who finds a heartless
oppressor in the predatory oyster.
Anthony Formby is an enjoyable
person even if he doesn't exist.
It was never intended that men
should be saints in heaven until they
are dead and good for little else. On
earth they are mostly fools.
I, presidential candidate Foster,
have arranged these primal truths in
the order of their importance, in the
hope that some patient investigator
may amplify and codify them into a
coherent body of doctrine, and so
establish a new religion.
Doug Tuch
(president)
I am surprised to be the only
representative of apathy on a campus
famous for its lack of interest in voting,
non-attendance at general meetings,
and disinterest with involvement. I feel
,that   my  personal   indifference   and
See page 6: CANDIDATES Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1973
Letters
from page 4
similarities and differences. One
enjoys the material but finds it
embarrassing to admit being an
engineer. The other is proud of
being an engineer but dislikes his
red connoting "asshole." Both are
too gutless to have their names
attached to their beliefs.
What sort of retaliation do you
expect from your comrades upon
publication of your letter? .. .
DISSENTER DISMEMBERED
BY ENGINEERS- EUS PRES.
LOOKS ON!
Who are the engineers? They
are not a massive red blotch. They
are people who think like you!
How widely is your dissension
supported? About six and a half
feet. What kind of force can this
size of support administer? About
150 kips. And that, baby, is a
lotta weight! Those students you
neurotically assumed would condemn your "radical" ideas probably subscribe to a similar
philosophy.
Much of the poor reputation of
the engineer is a result of the
inability of faculty, staff and
students to laugh at themselves. I
refer to the modern sculpture
caper of a few years back. Legal
action was threatened against the
engineering undergraduate society
for destroying a masterpiece of
modern sculpture during a campus
display. Red was quite prominent
around campus, especially in fine
arts when they discovered the
engineers had sculpted this mas-
terwork.
I refer also to last year's beard
shaving commando. Engineers
marched into the SUB cafeteria
and, claiming an abhorrence for
facial hair, shaved some violent
young men. I dare you to find one
that was truly dissatisfied with his
shave - or taken by surprise. In
order to bring us the best in
frivolity, The Ubyssey published
letters which said, in essence, "If
the guys that were shaven were
innocent, the engineers are, without a doubt, assholes. If the
shavees were planted ... well...
the engineers are assholes anyway."
But where does that put you?
That leaves you in engineering,
with all its problems and pitfalls.
Assuming you are not one of the
many apathetic cut-throats, of
which applied science has its
share, I ask you ... "and as he
exited from the men's washroom,
she asked him 'What kind of
shortening does your lover use'?
"... yes, I ask you, what have
you done to improve matters? I
suggest you have been ostracizing
yourselves since your first engineering class.
I've been trying, as much as my
time and ability will allow, to get
things going Tn a new direction —
and I'll tell you, it's a lot of;
fucking work! But minds and
ideas are changing. Take, for
example, the attempt by the
clique members of the EUS to
obtain more of a cross-sectional
viewpoint by setting aside a
section in the weekly Neusletter
solely for student opinion. Have
you written to the Box? Or the
consideration of the senate to
giving the engineering undergraduate more credits to show for his
90 hours of weekly labours. As
you (should) know, their decision
is awaiting feed-back from the
students. Have you written to the
Box, yet?
What are you doing for the
congress of Canadian engineering
students, which is being held for
the first time in the west? What
will be discussed at the congress?
Social responsibility. Unionism.
Education. Now questions. What's
that? You want us to put a word
in for you, too?
If I could look back at my five
university years and have no
memories except academic toil, I
would be a failure. I urge you to
take the initiative of doing what
must be done. Engineering students realize that many problems
are facing mankind for the first
time. Mass and dimension become
one. What's more, they realize
that these problems are the
problems of the engineer.
More responsible representation in the EUS is the basic step.
The beginning of a gigantic force.
A force that can only work up,
because the one that it's working
against is going down. Are you
going to oblivion with it?
Gord Low
applied science 2
EUS social co-ordinator
In the past month or so I have
been somewhat disappointed in
the style of reporting shown by
The Ubyssey in your ongoing feud
with the engineering undergraduate society.
I agree with some of the
statements made in recent papers,
specifically, I do side with the
women (and men) who opposed
the Lady Godiva ride. However,
the purpose of my letter is not to
put down or justify the EUS
activities, but to ask a few simple
questions of the editors of The
Ubyssey.
Sensationalism has always been
a sure road to recognition in
media, because society buys sensationalism. It doesn't ask at
whose expense; who will be hurt.
Aren't we supposedly in a 'liberal'
era, in which class discrimination
and stereotyping are looked upon
with distain? Does your opinion
that the EUS promotes socially
undesirable events and actions
require you to act as counter-
bigots? The university calendar
quotes an undergraduate enrolment in engineering of over 1,000.
students, but you talk of "gears"
as if all were identical. I refer to
"engineers and people", "gears
and silly grins", and some of your
artwork and articles. It's easy for
The Ubyssey to criticize the EUS,
and it would be equally easy to
recognize some of their other
activities, such as selling of poppies prior to Remembrance Day,
but I guess that's not too exciting.
In my opinion, a campus
newspaper has some responsibility
to the students of the university;
to cover events, to print letters
and to express ideas editorially. I
don't think that the childish petty
warfare seen on the pages of The
Ubyssey over the last month
could legitimately be called the
work of responsible editing.
There are a lot of people at
UBC, and a lot of engineering
students; all Ubyssey readers
deserve better.
Bob Russel
We realize there are a number
of enlightened engineers who look
with distaste upon the activities of
their fellows. We have attempted
to recognize this in our editorials
by referring to the neanderthal
element as "a group of engineers"
or "some engineers" rather than
just "the engineers." But as far as
headlines and cartoons and whatnot are concerned, it's too much
trouble to make the distinction.
Hopefully, engineers will themselves solve the problem by
removing the gang that presently
controls the engineering undergraduate society.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be addressed to:
Letters, The Ubyssey, Room
241K, Student Union Building,
UBC.
Dr. Eric H. N. Chen is pleased to
announce his association with
Dr. J. W. James
for the practice of general dentistry
at 2288 Elgin St., Port Coquitlam,
Telephone   941-2211,
Hours 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
UNIVERSITY OF OSLO
INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL
June 25 to August 4,1973
UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE COURSES IN:
Art, History, International Relations, Norwegian, and others.
GRADUATE COURSES IN:
Peace Research, Norwegian Educational System, Urban and  Regional
Planning, Physical  Education in Scandinavia, Medical System of Norway.
For information write: Two years college required.
OSLO SUMMER SCHOOL ADMISSIONS
e/o St. Olaf College   Northfield, Minnesota 55057
People come from many nations!
CRIME
is one of society's major social problems
— are you one of those who can accept
the challenge of trying to solve it?
THE B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
is looking for graduates, both men and women,
with a background in the social sciences
to train as
PROBATION OFFICERS
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for further details.
UBC's Musical Theatre Society Mussoc
presents
PROMISES,
PROMISES
NOW PLAYING- To Feb. IOHi
CURTAIN: 8:30 p.m.
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM
STUDENT PERFORMANCES TONIGHT at 8:30
and FEB. 8 at 12:30 p.m.
TICKETS 1.00/1.50 - THUNDERBIRD SHOP (SUB)
Candidates9  statements
From page 5
unwillingness to do anything is well enough understood, and
instead I wish to express my appreciation to The Ubyssey for
continually furthering my cause.
Being apolitical is not easy for a paper, but The Ubyssey
shows a definite lack of concern with campus politics. The list of
candidates for tomorrow's election appears for the first time
today, and though I was interviewed last week, my name did not
appear in this paper. The Ubyssey understands apathy.
The Ubyssey is humorless, and condescends to print wit
only when necesssry, in the letters to the editor. It is decidedly
against humor and tries to make it obsolete by destroying
naturally humorous situations. This assures non-readership and
a mass disinterest.
I Your statement continued with a lot of boring stuff saying how
boring The Ubyssey is. We decided to cut it, not wanting to
make the paper any more boring than you say it already is. This
is not necessarily meant to be taken as a gesture of editorial
support, just a way of letting you know your statement was far
too long (and boring). Eds.]
I could continue heaping laurels on this paper, but imposed
limits must be met. In closing, I urge you to forget me, Doug
Tuck, and not waste your time voting. Better scrap paper than
dirty paper.
MAKES A COLD
EASIER TO LIVE WITH
CONTACC
12
HOUR REUEF
10
CAPSULES
Each capsule gives 12 hours of relief from the symptoms of a cold. Tuesday,  February 6,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
I OFFICE
S INTRY
3 MECHANICAL   RM.
a BAR
B FOOD
S COOLER
7 STAFF   LAV.
B MINI   LAV.
B WOMENS   LAV.
The New "PIT"
PLAN- STUDENT  PLACE
The floorplan above is the plan for the new "PIT". It represents input over the past year
from the Alma Mater Society Executive and Council, the S.U.B. Management Committee
and the general student body.    Details of the plans are now nearing completion.
Preliminary plans of the interior design are indicated in the two photographs above. These are photos of the architect's model. They represent the
spacial relationships but not the furnishings and finishings in their final form. What is needed at this time is an indication of how you or your group
will use the "PIT" to guide us in selection of interior appointments.
Construction of the "PIT" will commence within two months and it will be completed by September. We need your ideas now. Comment from
social coordinators of clubs and undergraduate societies particularly appreciated. If you have comments, suggestions or ideas on what the "PIT"
should look like or what atmosphere to create, please let us know.
COME TO A
GENERAL MEETING; Thurs., Feb. 8
12:30 SUB PARTYROOM
or contact
AAAS CO-ORDINATOR, BOB ANGUS
Rm. 262 SUB, Anytime
— ADVERTISEMENT Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1973
UWO enrolment drop chops 82 profs
LONDON (CUP) — Eighty-
two faculty members will be
leaving the University of
Western Ontario at the end of
this academic year and most of
the positions will remain
vacant, university president D.
C. Williams announced
Wednesday.
This is the first time since
Williams became president in
1967 that the total complement
of faculty will decrease.
There are roughly 1,200
faculty members at Western.
Of the 82, 61 have not been
offered contracts for next year
after having served a short-
term or probationary contract.
The rest of those leaving are
either retiring or resigning.
The announcement was
made at a hastily-assembled
press conference in the
president's office Wednesday
afternoon, following a London
Free Press story on dismissals
in the sociology department
Wednesday morning.
"Most of these people didn't
expect renewals," Williams
said, referring to the 61 without
contracts.
He emphasized that only six
positions were cut due to the
enrolment shortfall and
resulting budget cuts.
Williams and university
vice-president R. J. Rossiter,
were careful not to say that all
of these faculty members are
being released because of the
shortfall in enrolment.
However, Williams did
admit that of the 82 vacancies
that have occurred, few will be
filled. He was not able to give
BINGO
EVERY TUESDAY
at 7:45 p.m.
Prizes in Excess of $2300.
At 10th Ave. & Camosun
Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
Fully accredited, 20-y«ar UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Guadalajara
Summer School offers July 2-August
11, anthropology, art, education,
folklore, geography, history, government, language and literature.
Tuition $165; board and room $211.
Write: International Programs, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721.
TODAY-1230
SUB Auditorium
"Status of Minorities
in Israel"
Ziedan Atashi, Druze
ABORTION
KILLS BABIES
IF    YOU    ARE    AGAINST
ABORTION, COME   FEB.   7
TO SUB 105B   WED.   12:30
JOIN THE
RIGHT TO LIFE
ACTION COMMITTEE
Stan Kazun - 266-8676
Bernice Gerard - 266-9275
an accurate figure but did
admit that a "large number
will certainly not be replaced."
Williams explained the
necessity of cutbacks in faculty
by saying: "We engaged
faculty for an enrolment we do
not have."
Actual student enrolment at
Western this year was roughly
1,000 less than predicted.
The teacher/student ratio,
however, is projected to stay
below the provincial average.
Williams quoted the weighted
average as Western as one
faculty member for every 22
students, the provincial
average as 1 to 24.
Williams refused to
hypothesize on future steps
that may have to be taken as a
result of this year's contract
negotiations with faculty.
"Most of the faculty have
recognized that the heyday is
over," Williams said, and may
not make high salary
demands.
"The government has set its
priorities on other things. It
looks like we're in for a
prolonged period of belt-
tightening."
Rossiter had stated in Jan.
26's senate meeting that no
faculty members would be
dismissed due to budget
cutbacks.
He did however, warn that,
as occurs every year, some
members of faculty on limited
term appointments or on
probation may not be offered
teaching positions.
Asked whether the granting
of tenure will be affected,
Williams replied: "We are still
granting tenure but the hurdle
is a little higher.
Many of the contracts not
renewed  were   for   graduate
students    maintaining
themselves by teaching.
Williams conceded that by
reducing the number of these
positions, graduate students
would go elsewhere, possibly to
the United States, where
graduate teaching positions
were easier to obtain, and
would possibly stay there.
Asked whether the decrease
in these opportunities wouldn't
then contribute to a decrease in
new Canadian faculty,
Williams replied: "Well, you
can't.milk the cow at both
ends."
SOMETHING for EVERYBODY
RECORDS "classical" - -popular- RECORDS
PRICES IN THE DIRECTION OF DOWN!
mmmgmm
-*\
CAS450-YOUDO SOMETHING TO ME — Mario
Lanza
CAS 623—STRAUSS WALT-
ZES — Fjeldstod, Oslo
Philharmonic
CAS 686—COUNTRY SIDE OF
JIM REEVES — Jim
Reeves
CAS 784-GOOD 'N' COUNTRY — Jim Reeves
CAS 823—THE MAX ERIC
TRIO — Wunderbar
CAS 825—YAKIN' SAX MAN
— B. Randolph
CAS 842—HAVE I TOLD YOU
LATELY THAT I LOVE
— Jim Reeves
CAS 917-22 ALL-TIME
ORGAN FAVORITES —
Bob Ralston
CAS 2133—MUSIC FROM DR.
ZHIVAGO AND OTHERS — Living Strings
CAS 2237-BAVARIAN BEER
GARDEN — Die Munch-
ner*Bierbuben
CAS 2257-MY NOVA SCOTIA
HOME — Honk Snow
CAS 2267—ONE AND ONLY
GLENN MILLER—Glenn
Miller
CAS 2286—THE BEST OF WILF
CARTER — Wilf Carter
CAS 2287—THE BEST OF NED
LANDRY-Ned Land y
CAS2291-EBB TIDE AND
OTHER FAVORITES —
Living Strings
CAS 2303—PLAY BERT KEMP-
BERTHITS — Living
Strings plus Trumpet
CAS 2304— SINGS  FLAMING
STAR — Elvis Presley
CAS     2373-HAWAIIAN
MEMORIES    —    Living
Strings
Sugg. List
$1.98
g>   sound
SALE PRICE
PSR RECORD $1.4»
■LP's'
for
.99)
CAS 2398-SWITCHED-ON-
COUNTRY — Rick Powell at the Moog
CAS 2400—RAINDROPS KEEP
FALLING ON MY HEAD
■   — Living Marimbas
CAS 2408-LET'S BE FREINDS
— Elvis Presley
CAS 2425-LET IT BE AND
OTHER HITS — Living
Guitar
CAS 2427—IS ANYBODY
GOING TO SAN ANTON E — Living Strings
CAS 2440—ALMOST IN LOVE
— Elvis Presley
CAS2477-THEME FROM
LOVE STORY — Living
Strings plus Two Pianos
CAS 2483-THE BEST OF THE
CARLTON SHOWBAND
— The   Carlton  Show-
band
CAS 2484—THE BEST OF THE
L. BRASS AND L. MARIMBA MEXICO —
Living Brass-Living
Marimbas
CAS 2485-THE BEST OF THE
L. BRASS-L. MARIMBA
MEXICO LIVING BRASS
— Living Morimbas
CAS 2504—AMAZING GRACE
— The Blackwood Brs.
CAS 2506-HAWAII'S GREAT-
EST HITS — Leo Addeo.
and His orch.
CAS 2513—LONESOME WHISTLE — Hank Snow
CAS 2532—YOUNG AND
COUNTRY — Jim
Reeves
ISC   32M-THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
GRAND OPERA
LSC   32»5—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
SYMPHONIES        BEETHOVEN,
SCHUBERT
LSC   32*4—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
SYMPHONIES TCHAIKOVSKY'S
"PATHETIQUE"
LSC   3297—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
RHAPSODIES
LSC   329B-THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE j
MARCHES
LSC   3299-THE   WORLD'S  FAVORITE |
REVERIES
LSC   3300-THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
DANCES
LSC   3301—THE   WORLDS   FAVORITE
TCHAIKOVSKY
LSC   3302—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
SHOWPIECES — FMandia, Tht
Moldou
LSC   3303—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
SHOWPIECES — Grand Canyon
Suitt
Sugg. List
$6.29
soun<
SALE PRICE
.49
LSC  3304—THE  WORLD'S FAVORITE
CONCERTOS —Htirctz
LSC  3305—THE  WORLD'S FAVORITE
CONCERTOS - Rubin.lein
LSC  3307-THE  WORLD'S FAVORITE
BEETHOVEN SONATAS
LSC   330S—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
BALLETS
LSC   3309—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
WALTZES
LSC   3310—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
OVERTURES
LSC   3311—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
FILM THEMES
LSC   3319—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
GERSHWIN
LSC   3320-THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
BALLETS   -  Suite,   from   Tht
Nutcracker and Swan Lake
LSC   3321—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
CHORUSES
LSC   3322—THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
CHOPIN
LSC   3323— THE   WORLD'S   FAVORITE
PIANO MUSIC
sound
32   16  0023—MOZART -  SYMPH. 41   JUPITER/SYMPH.  38
PRAGUE - Beecham/Royol Phil.
32 16 0026-MAHLER - SYMPH., 4/ WALTER - N.Y. Phil.
32 16 0027—SCHUMAN-CONC. A MINOR FOR CELLO - Casols
32 16 0029—BEETHOVEN-Conc. 5 FOR PIANO — Gieseking
32 16 0058—CHOPIN WALTZES — Dinu Lapotti
32 16 0141-GRIEG/SCHUMANN PIANO CONCERTOS — Dinu
Lapotti
32 16 0145—WAGNER/TRISTAN & ISOLDE HIGHLIGHTS —
Troubel/Melchier
32 16 0171—AN EVENING OF ELIZABETH VERSE & IT'S MUSIC
—New York Pro Musica
32 16 006 —SYMPH, OF HAYDN VOL 1 — Geberman/Vienna
State
32 16 0010—SCHUBERT-SYMPH. 8 — Gobermon/Vienna New
Symph.
3216 0012-VIVALDI - Cone, for Woodwinds & Orch.
32 16 0034-SYMPH. OF HAYDN VOL. 2 - GOBERMAN — Vienno
State
32 16 0052-SYMPH. of HAYDN vol. 3 - Gobermon/Vienna State I
32 16 0056—BEETHOVEN — Cone. 1 & 4 for Piano Cosadesus        '
32 16 0138—VIVALDI - FIVE CONC. - Goberman
3216 0304—BERLIOZ-SYMPH.   FANTASTIQUE—Mitropoulos
N;Y. Phil.
32160216-TCHAIKOVSKY-PATHETIQUESYMPH-Mitropou-
los/N.Y. Phil.
32 16 0270-A LILY PONS GALA — Lily Pons
32 16 0314-BEETHOVEN-APASSIONATA/WALDSTEIN SONATAS — Gieseking
3216 0322—BEETHOVEN-SYMPH. 9-Walter/N.Y. Phil.
32 16 0335-MOZART-OPERATIC ARIAS - Eiio Pinza
32 16 0377—VILLA-LOBOS/BACHIANAS BRASILEIRAS
Sayao
Y30042—BEETHOVEN-CONC. IN D MAJOR FOR VIOLIN - Fron-
cescatti
Y30043—MAHLER-DAS LIED VON DER ERDE — Miller/Bruno.
Walter
Y30044—TCHAIKOVSKY-CAPRICCIO ITAUEN — Siell/Cteve-
land Orch.
Y30048—MOZART - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik-Walter
Y30053-BLUE DANUBE — Sxell/Cleveland Orch.
Y30311 -BRAHMS - SYMPH, I - Bruno Walter
Y30667-BRUNO WALTER'S WAGNER
Y30669-SCHUBERT-SYMPH. 9 - Siell/Cleveland Orch.
Y30851-BRUNO WALTERS BRAHM'S
Y31149—VERDI HEROINES — Eleanor Steber
Y31150—ROSA PONSELLE SINGS VERDI
Y31735-OPERA ARIAS - Helen Traubel
Y31739-OPERA ARIAS - Eileen Farrell
PLUS MANY TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION
• Bidu
Sugg. List
$3.98
sound
SALE PRICE
99,
[Mail Orderi Promptly Filled: Just tick off the records you woni; enclose your list I
with remittance, plus 5% tax ond postage, ond we'll get your order away promptly. I
First record 50c eoch, additional record 25c postage ar>d handling charge. I
556 Seymour St.     682-6144
OPEN THURS. and FRI. UNTIL 9 P.M. Tuesday,  February 6,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
FOUR SEASONS
General Manager TERRY KELLY SAYS:
EVERYTHING
sttcu$it>m&!
fWiCEsZ
Page 9
Mm
SKI BAGS
(SnURRYMCiOkSIS)
SKfMWN
fynolio.
STEP-IN BINDINGS
Delon 900/2000
Reg. 49 JO SKM-THON
$38M
Kbit iy« 90/100
hj, 37.50 SH-A-WON
$2g88
San GIORGIO
MADE IN ITALY
PLASTIC 5-BUCKLE
SUPER HIGH SHELL BOOT
WITH SELF MOLDING LINING
Manufacturer's Sugg. List
$175.00
SKIATHOM
HUBER
SKI POLES
list $10.00 910^(1
SKMrTMN
SKI
GOGGLES
NLS«L»
SKMTMN
MADE IN AUSTRIA
PANZL Fierglass Ski
Magic 1500   si^T
VIP STARRS     250.00 219.881
RACING TEAM RS 225.00 199.88
WHITE STAR C   215.00 189.88
WHITE STARRS 215$ 189.88
REDSTARRS     185.00 159.88
CUPSTARRS     150.00 128.881
1973 jfczr*-
Reg. value SKI-A-THON I
I KINGS ROOK 130.00 ""
PAWN 150.00 11188
I KNIGHT 200.00 154.88
iCOMPETN. 240.00 179.881
NO DOWN  PAYMENT
CHARGEX
NO INTEREST LAYAWAY
KOFLACH
CLUB RED FOAM MODEL
REG. $110.00
SKMTMN
.11
AUSTRIAN MADE
RACING SKI-PANTS
2 wqr SMdl tabic. TSfft
eirl kmrtmi ilm, Mart t
Utn-.KU.«$4M0
SKMTMN
AUSTRIAN MADE
FLARE
SKI-PANTS
2 wiy slran MnL AuiftM
UmlUlmt.llm.lMmM
«ux»$sioo
SKMTMN
LADIES'
NANCY GREENE
SKI JACKETS
lb. 17020m. Mar ahn.HU4.
46100
SUPER SAVINGS ON SKI CLOTHING!
GUY PERILLAT MODEL
MANUFACTURER'S SUGG.
LIST TO $125.00
SKMrTMN
SKI JACKET
SALE
2000 to select from.
All styles & sizes |
SKIATHOM '
priced from
100% WOOL
SKI SWEATERS
Wide assortment of
colours & styles.
SKIATHoM
priced from
OPEN 9-9 WEEKDAYS and SATURDAYS 9-6
FOUR SEASONS LEISURE WORLD
1503 KINGSWAY, VANCOUVER        "DEAL WITH US AND BANK THE DIFFERENCE"        8 73-2481 Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1973
Hot flashes
Poppy
delayed
Due to an injury to Terry Jacks
the Poppy Family concert scheduled for Friday has been postponed until Feb. 28, 8:30 p.m., in
the War Memorial gym.
All tickets already sold will be
honored at the door.
Jock reporf
The president's athletic committee report will be the subject
of discussion in SUB 111 noon
today.
The report took two years to
compile and recommends all
athletic activities be consolidated
under a single committee.
The committee's chairman
Byron Hender will outline and
defend the report. Critics will be
led by The Ubyssey's own Kent
Spencer.
OCT muzak
Jean-Pierre Rampal and Robert
Veyron-Lacroix will be performing at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre at 8:30 p.m. Thursday.
Music for the harpsichord and
flute of the 18th century will be
featured,   with    selections   from
Bach, Couperin and Mozart. This
international duo has won international acclaim, and accolades
and kudos reign supreme.
Energy
Jack Sexton, consultant to
Montreal Engineering Corp.,
will discuss potential energy
resources to the year 1990, 3 p.m.
Friday, in Woodward centre
lecture hall 1.
Montreal Engineering was contracted to do the energy study in
1970.
Admission to the lecture, the
ninth in the Westwater water
resources series, is free.
w;  <5~J V?"!. 5
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC
Study   on   late   great   planet earth,
noon, SUB 115,
GERMAN CLUB
Polka party, noon, I.H. 404.
CANOE, KAYAK CLUB
Meet, noon, SUB 125.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Panel     discussion:     Strategy     and
tactics of women's liberation, 7:30
p.m., SUB ballroom.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist,   noon,   Lutheran   centre.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Movie:   The  elusive  enemy,   noon,
IRC 1.
WEDNESDAY
RIGHT TO LIFE
Future action, noon, SUB 105B.
ONTOLOGY
Ron Polack on true and false values,
noon, Buch. 216.
THURSDAY
VCF
Ward Gask on the reliability of the
new testament, noon. Gage towers
lounge.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Meeting, 7:30 p.m., 1962 Acadia
Rd.
CHARISMATIC
Free film, Nicky Cruz film, refreshments, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran centre.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square dancing, noon-2:30 p.m.,
SUB club's lounge.
L'ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Film: Chiens perdus sans collier,
noon, Buch 100.
CVC
Meeting about open house, noon,
SUB 224.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Liberation theology, 8 p.m., Lutheran centre.
Alan Jackson on theology, 4:30
p.m., Lutheran centre.
POETRY
E. Vinaver on medieval poetry and-
the moderns, noon, Buch. 104.
CCF
Practical christian, noon, SUB 211.
FRIDAY
GRAD CLASS
Council meeting, noon, SUB council
chambers.
SLM-NORML
Meeting, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., SUB      SKYDIVERS
2ii Meeting, noon, SUB 213
FREE
Dr. Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine Show, free, noon, SUB movie
theatre.
TODAY, NOON —
SUB AUDITORIUM
Ziedan Atashi
NEW YORK ISRAELI CONSUL
Speaks on
THE  STATUS OF MINORITY
GROUPS IN ISRAEL
FREE FREE FREE
Sponsored by Speakers & Education Committee
You'd better hurry.
Feb. 28th A
last day.  v>
The last day
J to save
onyour 1972
income tax.
You can save on income tax now
while you save for your retirement.
Up to $4,000 can be deducted from
your taxable income when deposited
in any of our Registered Retirement
Savings Plans.
Stop by and see us for complete
information.
Registered Retirement Savings Plans.
Royal Trust (§)
OFFICES IN VANCOUVER
Royal Trust Tower; Bentali Centre, 555 Burrard St. Vancouver, B.C. 685-2471
Hollyburn Plaza, 1760 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C. 922-3276
Other offices in Kelowna and Victoria.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c
Classified ads ore not accepted by telephone and are payable in .
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication,
Pubticatton*Office, Room241 S.U.B.. UBC, Van. 8,B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
VALENTINE DANCE AT ST.
Mark's Sat. 9-1, Continental Cavalier's Band, $1.50, refreshment
food,  fun. .	
POLKA PARTY, LIVELY GERMAN
Band, Friday, Feb. 9, Internationa]
House, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Refreshments.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: AT PHOENIX, A BLUE
duffel coat and glasses. Please
contact Terry at 738-0238.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
THE CBC RELUCTANTLY PRE-
sents more live radio comedy. Dr.
Bundolo and his Pandemonium
Show sneak back on campus this
Friday, Feb. 9, in SUB Theatre at
12:30.  It's  FREEH!	
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB CON-
stitutional amendment posted in
club room 14.
SKI AT WHISTLER. STAY AT
Garibaldi, 20 minutes from lifts.
$3.50 overnight. Call 932-5256 Andy.
CATAIN VANCOUVER CLUB —
Two for the price of one books
distributed by Assoc. Room 100B,
SUB.	
LARRY: MET YOU ON THE TRAIN
to Jasper in Aug. 72. Please contact—Celeste—6210 Curtis St., Burnaby  2, B.C.
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/Wk. Ph. 732-
0174 eves, or before 8 A.M.
SKI  TODD
Mid-Term   Break:   Transportation,
Motel,   Three   days   skiing  —  $53.
Phone   Deedee,   987-4807,	
BREAK THE CIGARETTE HABIT
comfortably — No weight gain or
nervousness. Smoke Watchers, 688-
5821.
Special Events
15A
$75 FOR 75c;
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY  YOURS  TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
•GOOD BUY MY '63 ACADIAN
S/Wagon. Good condn. Autom.
radio.   Offers,   733-3315.
1372 PEUGEOT 30T PERFECT
condition. Still on warranty. Front
wheel, delight to drive. 9,000 miles.
$2,495.   684-0749.
'65 SPRITE 98,000 MILES, NEEDS
some work, $350. L. S. Gormely.
engineering.
Rm.   227,   Chemical
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
Hen* anbgutter
Camm*.
THANKS
To   Your  Support
WE ARE EXTENDING -
WE NOW HAVE A BIGGER
FLOOR SPACE TO
SERVE  YOU   BETTER!
Watch-for our In-Store
Expansion Specials!
3010  W.   Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
MMl
37
"IS NOTHING SACRED?" COME
to Doctor Bundolo's Pandemonium
Medicine Show this Friday, Feb.
9. 12:30, in the SUB Movie Theatre.
It's FREE!!!
Typing
40
ESSAYS TYPED — NEAT ACCUR-
ate work. 35c per typed page. 325-
9976, if I'm out leave your phone
number.	
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reason-
able Rates.  Mrs.  Ellis,  321-3838.
TYPING: ESSAYS, THESES. CALL
Donna, 266-4929, Kerrisdale area.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF Essays and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235
weekends   and   evenings   263-4023.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
ESTABLISHED DIAMOND IMPOR-
ting firm requires 12 senior student
sales representatives for the UBC
Campus. Clean, Neat Dresser.
Good Sales Ability. 3rd or 4th Tear
students with pleasant personality
and some sales experience. Fluent
in English. Excellent commission
structure. Include in your application a recent photograph of yourself. Mr. Mel Battensby, General
Delivery, Vancouver Postal Station
A, Hastings & Granville, Vancouver,  B.C.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FENDER STRATOCASTER GUI-
tar $195. Lansing D130 15" speaker,
DeYong cabinet, $125; pair $310.
Chris,  266-2662.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM FOR MAN ONLY. BSMT.
Warm, quiet, private entr., nea^
gate—ready now—224-7623.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity
house, 5765 Agronomy Rd. Reasonable rates. Colour TV, laundry
facilities. Ph. 224-9691 after 5:00
for  details.
Furnished Apts.
83
MATURE, INDEPENDENT FE-
male wants roommate, same. February-April, West End apartment.
Partial transportation provided,
684-3770.
Unf. Apts.
84
Communal Housing
85
TWO FINE ROOMS AVAILABLE
in enormous fully equipped home.
Call at 4446 W. 13th or leave message for Ian at 224-3814.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday,  February 6,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
Losing streak out by TKO
The Birds kayoed a four
■game losing streak Monday
night with a 77-53 win over the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies.
For the first time in several
games the Birds were able to
shoot consistently on shots
from inside the foul line.
Darryl Gjernes was the top
player in this regard, hitting
Score card
SCORE CARD
BASKETBALL
Weekend games
UBC 64, Lethbridge 86
UBC 66, Lethbridge 92
Victoria 85, Saskatchewan 67
Victoria 66, Saskatchewan 70
Alberta 72, Calgary 60
Alberta 69, Calgary 60
CWUAA basketball standings
up to Feb. 5
W
13
12
7
5
4
3
L
3
4
7
11
10
9
Alberta
Lethbridge
UBC
Calgary
Victoria
Saskatchewan
ICE HOCKEY
Weekend games
UBC 12, Victoria 2
UBC 4, Victoria 3 (over-time)
Calgary 6, Saskatchewan 2
Alberta 16, Saskatchewan 2
CWUAA hockey standings
up to Feb. 5
GTP
4
4
6
4
6
Alberta
Calgary
UBC
Saskatchewan
Victoria
INTRAMURALS
W
14
13
12
6
0
L
3
6
7
10
19
Unit
GTP
7
5
5
8
5
managers
meeting   tonight 7  p.m. SUB  council
chamber.
Pacific Coast League
soccer standings
P    W   T    L    GFGA PTS
Vic West 9 7
Vic Gorge 11 6
New West . 9 6
North Shore!  8 4
UBC 7 3
Inter Italia 112
Pauls 7 1
23 10
18 11
23 12
11 7
12 9
8 28
7 20
14
14
12
9
7
5
2
>«►.-
»*"-
•     .j»BMi"i|^»ir  ;
S"
FIRST YEAR med. student Bill
Mackie didn't do too badly
against the University of Washington /■,
Mackie
leads UBC
to victory
UBC gymnasts outlasted
.Washington State University
Saturday at War Memorial
gym and won 135-126.
UBC's Bill Mackie won the
all-around high-bar, parallel
bars, pommel horse, and floor
exercises.
He tied Bob Dickmeyer of
Washington in the vaulting
while Washington's Jim Holt
took the rings.
In previous dual meets UBC
had lost to Washington but had
wins against the Universities
of Calgary and Alberta.
The team will compete in the
Canada West University
Athletic Association
Championships on the weekend
in Victoria.
The team goal is to better
last year's second place finish
in the National Collegiates,
which will be held March 3 and
4 in Winnipeg.
SPOR TS
for 21 points on lay-ups and
close-in jump shots. Teammate Rod Matheson netted 17
points also, mostly on layups.
But the Birds play improved
as the game progressed and
the fast break clicked a few
times. Shortly after the half-
time break the Birds had built
themselves a comfortable 15
point lead.
Saskatchewan then started
to close the gap with some good
outside shooting by guard
Dean Faris.
At this point the Birds went
into their stall. They  would
The Thunderbird basketball
team lost two games and yet
another player on the weekend.
The Birds were bombed
twice by the University of
Lethbridge, 86-64 Friday night
and 92-66 Saturday.
They were plagued both
nights by extremely poor
inside shooting.
For example, John Mills shot
5 for 17 from the field im
Friday's game and 1 for 20
Saturday.
In the meantime his check,
big Phil Tollestrup, was
scoring 38 points Friday and 39
Saturday. Tollestrup, the
former Brigham Young star
was shooting phenomenaly
from the outside, hitting from
well outside the foul line.
There is little defence that
pass the ball constantly in and
out and around the outside,
killing time while in the other
team's end.
The tactic was successful as
the Birds were able to use up as
much as two minutes each
time they were on offense and
then score on an easy lay-up.
As a result, UBC had coasted
to 24 point lead by the end
game.
The game was a great
contrast to the highly
competitive series the two
teams played in last season's
play-offs. This season both of
the teams have been
eliminated from the play-offs
and thus took a casual attitude
towards the game.
For example Peter Herd
casually took a couple of
minutes off in the second half
to tie up his shoe lace while the
ball was being passed back and
forth over his head.
At least the Birds seem to
play better when they are
relaxed as they utilized a fairly
consistent team effort to win
the game.
The Birds play again tonight
at 8:30 p.m.
UBC — Darryl Gjernes 21, Rod
Matheson 17, Brent Francis 14, John
Mills 13, Peter Herd 12.
Saskatchewan — Dean Faris 13, Paul,
Jacoby 12, Ken Traynor 10, Jim
Merbison 6, Mark Hopkins 4, Bob
Thompson 4, Doug Forsythe 2, Mike
Harrington 2.
Bird castle crumbling
can stop a tall man that can
shoot from the outside.
Mills described his own poor
play as simply an inability to
1 make the easy shots. He
described Tollestrup's defence
(who was checking Mills) as
only "adequate".
Jack Hoy, the Bird's only
remaining outside scoring
threat suffered a severely
sprained ankle in the first haif
of Saturday's game and will be
out for at least two games.
Thus the Birds are left with
three starters, Bob Dickson,
t Stan Callegari, and Hoy out of
the lineup. And, Mills has
certainly not played up to his
usual standards since his
recent bout with the flu.
With no outside shooting
Coach Peter Mullins has had
his team employ a strategy of
working the ball in deep for
lay-ups and close jump shots.
This strategy was carried to
the extreme in the recent SFU
game as the Birds were
instructed not to take a shot
from outside the foul-line. In
the two weekend games the
Birds got plenty of deep shots
—mark Hamilton photo
FIGHTING FOR the ball are Bob
Thompson (44) and John Mills of
UBC
but just couldn't put the ball in
the hoop.
Mullins' comment on the
games was "we did everything
okay that we were supposed to
but just lacked the finishing
touch."
With so many of the players
injured, many of the Birds
have been playing the full 60
minutes in recent games.
For this reason Mullins has
not employed the zone press
that was so successful in
earlier games. Mullins felt that
it would take too much out of
the players to put on the press
while playing the whole game.
High scorers for the Birds
were Rod Matheson with 14
points Friday and Darryl
Gjernes with 18 points
Saturday.
Victoria humiliated, as usual
By RICHARD.
KRANABETTER
The University of Victoria
Vikings humiliated themselves
losing 12-2 to the hockey
Thunderbirds in a lacklustre
game Friday night.
The Vikings quit playing
when they got a penalty at the
15 minute mark. The Birds
complete domination during
the penalty seemed to
demoralize the Vikings.
Despite six great chances, the
Birds never scored during the
penalty, but when it ended they
started to pour in the goals.
Most of the UBC goals were
scored from in front of the net,
as the Viking defence seemed
unconcerned about checking
the man in front.
Some of the Viking players
were quite annoyed when body-
checked. It seemed to be an
attitude of I'm minding my
own business, not bothering
ianyone; why hit me?
Alex Dick and Bob Murray
paced UBC with three goals
apiece, while Bill Cartwright
with two and Rich Longpre,
Bruce Brill, Jim Lawrence,
and Brian DeBiasio added
singles.
In  Victoria  Sunday,   Craig
Thomas scored at the five
minute mark of the second
overtime period to allow the
Birds a 4-3 win.
Coach Bob Hindmarch said:
"They (Victoria) played well
and we played poorly."
The Birds were behind 3-1
after the first period. Chuck
Carignan, Arinie Pederson,
Jim Lawrence and Craig
Thomas scored markers for
the Birds.
—mark hamilton photo
BILL GASTON protects the
UBC goal
In soccer
An impressive loss
UBC put on an impressive start to the soccer game at
Thunderbird Stadium Saturday in their game against the more
experienced New Westminster Blues, but lost 2-0.
The Blues Robin Davies recorded his fourth shutout of the
campaign, robbing the Thunderbirds on numerous breakaways.
The finish in front of the Blue's goal was not applied, and
this cost UBC the game, as both teams had equal scoring
opportunities.
Gary Thompson netted the first of his two goals nine
minutes into the first half. Collecting a long through ball in the
far outside corner, he took it toward the UBC net and a hesitant
Greg Weber.
His hard shot made the score 1-0.
Late in the game, Thompson made it 2-0 as he pushed the
ball through a knot of players for a slow motion score.
The weak shot barely crossed the goal line.
The game scheduled for February 15 against Simon Fraser
University has been postponed to mid-March, probably at
Empire Stadium.
The UBC players are looking forward to the confrontation
as SFU presently leads the Inter-city Soccer League.
YOU
CAN READ
FASTER  and BETTER
ATTEND A FREE DEMONSTRATION
AND FIND OUT HOW!
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 - 12:45 P.M.
S.U.B. Room 205 U.B.C.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 - 7:30 P.M.
Institute, 556 W. Broadway
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11 -3:00 P.M.
Hotel Grosvenor, 840 Howe
CLASSES STARTING FEBRUARY 15,19 & 22
Phone 872-8201
For Times, Locations and Reservation of Space in the Class of
your choice.
0
Evelyn Wood Beading Dynamics
Soonsored by Dynamic Learning Centre (B.C.)
556 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.      Call 872-820X Page   12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 6, 1973
No merger with Bennett— Warren
THOUSANDS OF LOGS for Vancouver mills are boomed every year,
especially during winter, below Musqueam cliffs off Southwest Marine
Drive. Melancholy picture of booms under heavy overcast, backed by
Gulf Islands was caught by Mark Hamilton.
East End culture house opens
By STEVE MORRIS
The Vancouver East Cultural Centre,
a local initiatives project established to
promote community culture in the east
end will be holding open house at the old
Grandview church which they plan to
renovate into a cultural centre-theatre.
The open house, set for Saturday at the
church, 1895 Venables, is designed to
give the East End community an
opportunity to air its views regarding
the project.
The VECC wants to renovate the
church into a year-round centre for
theatre, dance and music, and to provide
facilities for community and educational
meetings.
Joyce Ozier, spokeswoman for the
group, said the church to be called the
soaring palace of fine art, is badly
needed.
"The centre will.be a community
activity in which everyone will have a
chance to be involved," Ozier said.
"The open house on Saturday is a pre-
renovation meeting. The project will be
outlined, but what we want is feedback.
We want to hear what the community
really needs."
She said the project will foster local
Vancouver cultural groups. The actors
workshop, the new play centre, Ann
Wyman dance troupe are only a few who
will now have a permanent
establishment from which to present
their work, she said.
Ozier said renovations began Jan. 15,
and the opening of the centre is
projected for mid-March. It will function
on a non-profit basis through funds from
admissions (which will be 50 cents or
less), donations, rent and support from
city and provincial governments. The
building was provided rent free by the
United Church.
"This project will embrace all of
Vancouver. The city needs it, and we
need the support of the community,"
Ozier said.
ByKENDODD
There will not be any merger
between the provincial
Progressive Conservative and
Social Credit parties as long as
W. A. C. Bennett remains
leader of the Socreds,
provincial Conservative leader
Derril Warren said Friday.
Speaking before a
predominately male audience
of about 35 in SUB 207-209
Warren offered a general
analysis of the present and
future political climate in B.C.,
especially as pertaining to his
party.
He said the biggest problem
in developing the Conservative
party in B.C. is "to overcome
its historical image as the
defender of the status quo."
However Warren said there
are more small "c"
conservative votes in the
province than any other group.
It is simply a matter of picking
up the waning Socred strength,
he said.
"Our strength is in rural
areas and the south end of
Vancouver Island — areas
where the NDP is weak."
These have traditionally been
areas of Social Credit electoral
support, he said.
Warren said: "It will be
more difficult for the
Conservatives to dent the
virtual NDP monopoly in
Greater Vancouver".
Warren predicted good times
ahead for the Conservatives in
B.C. and said he foresees party
membership increasing from
7,500 to 50,000. He compared
this support to the 4,000
members of the Socreds and
12,000 of the NDP.
Not surprisingly he sees the
Conservatives as the most
likely successor to the NDP
government and said Premier
Dave Barrett has told him this
as well. Warren did not predict
the date of his ascension.
Analyzing Barrett, he said:
"Mr. Barrett is very likeable,
witty and honest in a political
sense but very political. He will
do anything to keep his party in
power. In this way I think he is
very much like Mr. Bennett."
He said the NDP is very
cohesive now but "will
eventually break into three
wings; a labor wing, an
aoademic socialist wing, and
the Alex Macdonald — free-
enterprise wing.
Promises:   good form, lousy content
Mussoe's spring offering. Promises, Promises, is
«i polished vivacious production which, for many,
Hill be an exhilarating evening of musical comedy.
Directed by James Johnston, it is fast-paced,'lively
.ind amusing - ]ust the thing to keep one's spirits
warm on a dreary February night.
However, my "enjoyment of the production was
seriously curtailed by the content of the story itself.
Promises, Promises is a lousy musical. It is a
tasteless hollow comedy which is worth seeing only
because ol the \igor which the cast brings to it. Tn
other words, il is a fine production of an inferior play
Chuck >"CC") Baxter, the "hem' of Promises,
Promises, is a creep A nobody among the thousands
oi employees in the Consolidated Life Insurance Co .
.imhitious Chuck is anxious to start his climb up the
executive ladder Me is also anxious to gain the
..ttciilinn of Mis;- Fr.in Kuhclik, a hostess in Ihe
executive dining mum. hut she can't e\en remember
his name So Chuck concentrates on improving his
i iii (er b\ lcmlinii out hm apartment to horn\ iniddlc-
.iiied executive* who need a place to lay various toy
fifiriit  jflfih.    Ipfllil   I'imil filirl-ilrirl   I   iffi
>iLl.lklUII\.l     llV/llft     \.l/ll.11flLUUI.1. VA     LJLll. .
II all this sounds familiar, it's because Promises.
Promises is based on the popular Shirley MacLaine'
Jack Lemmon movie, The Apartment, which most of
us have no doubt seen on the late show. If it also
sounds a bit sordid, you're right It is. The story is
also blatantly and disgustingly sexist, but then it
seems virtually impossible to hnd a musical comedy
that isn't. While I realize that this genre docs not
purport to be great art and is to be enjoyed basically
as entertainment and spectacle, it seems a shame
that the level of many of the plays is so insulting.
Tn spite oi' these drawbacks. Promises, Promises
comes across with considerable charm Because of
the enthusiasm and freshness of the cast, we can
usually manage to ignore the content and enjoy the
lorm  This is" no small leal for Mussoc because
Page Tuesday
Promises, Promises, un spite oi Hurt Racharach's
reputation' has only two memorable songs out or 15
I'll \ever Fall "in Love Again" and "Pionuses.
Pi onuses' The music is also \cry poorly
intem iiied into the sloiy line so that it is difficult to
make the songs seem a n.itm al part ol the play
line ni;i|or reason tor this production s appeal is
\l-irnlr  Yurm in    lie* lirimii. In lhi> ili-m jtiHinc}  rnlfi nt
Chuck a good singing voice, limitless energy, and a
disarming boyishness. His talents support the play
even during its weakest moments. Victor A. Young
follows his fine  performance  in  the  rock-opera
Macbeth with a strong, if somewhat too sympathetic
portrayal of Sheldrake. Chuck's adulterous boss. A
highlight ot the production was Wanda Wilkinson's
lusty portrayal of Marge, a blow/y 'widow' who picks
Chuck up in a bar. Wilkinson gives earthiness and
charm to a character who might otherwise have been
just another cliche.
Gilian Lucas, in the lead role of Fran Kubelik. was
somewhat hland in the opening scenes but got better
as the play progressed. Her rendition of "I'll Never
Kail In Love Again" with Chuck is verv appealing
and is one of the few musical highlights of the
production Sam Mancuso is appropriately wry as
Ilr Dreyfuss. and Lynette Caler gives a forceful
performance ol Sheldrake's sadder but wiser
secretary.
Most other aspects of the production are cntireiv
satisfactory The set is colorful function.il. and
allows lor smooth seem- chances The orchestra is
excellent, and ihe dance iuiiiiIh-is. although lacking
in technical polish and imagination jre spirited and
fun to watch
Promises. Promises, nins until S.iturday at the
vJjU auuiiuiiuiii. liukels are $i-.>i.iiu lor student
performances tonight at 8:30 p m and Thursday at
noon. It is definitely a" worthwhile two hours of
entertainment.
—Adrienne Glen

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125914/manifest

Comment

Related Items