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The Ubyssey Feb 28, 1984

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 UBC Archives Serial
UBC loses funds to UVic gears
Applied science administrators
and students say the provincial
government's creation of an
engineering school at the University
of Victoria means a decrease in the
quality of UBC's program.
"The UVic program is being added, while UBC's is being cut. We
should hold off on the UVic
engineering department until better
times," said Neil Smith, engineering undergraduate society vice-
president.
The government recently
allocated $1.5 million for expansion
of UVic's $15 million school, at the
same time reducing UBC's expansion money from $1 million to
$750,000 for 1984-85.
Axel Meisen, applied science
assistant dean, said the funding of
UVic's program should not be
undertaken at the expense of UBC's
school. "We are not trying to take a
parochial view, but funding should
not be cut from UBC."
Meisen said the quality of
UBC's engineering department is
on the decline because of the high
student to professor ratio. Record
enrolment this year decreased the
amount and quality of interaction
between students and faculty, he
said.
Staff and funding reductions impaired the department's ability to
attract top scholars, he added. "We
are finding it difficult to attract and
retain specialized people because of
the cuts."
In 1970, the department had a
total of 108 faculty members and
1,362 undergraduate and graduate
students. Now, it only has 103 lec
turers and 2,271 students. Many
labs and classes are overcrowded as
a result.
The department needs more
money for equipment, Meisen said.
"We have relatively little equipment. Obsolescence has been a major problem and we haven't been
able to cope with it."
The government allocated
$150,000 in 1983-84 for new equipment but the department needs five
times that amount, he said.
The University of Victoria will
open its engineering school this fall
for 70 first and 40 second year
students, with programs in electrical and computer engineering.
Lawrence Pitt, UVic engineering
school coordinator, said he does
not anticipate any enrolment or
resource problems. Although the
school is only accepting first and second year students, it will increase
the levels available as the students
advance.
Faculty members THE UBYSSEY
oppose restraint
By CHRIS WONG and PATTI FLATHER
Some UBC faculty members are going public with their concerns about
the provincial government's attitude towards higher education.
The committee of concerned academics is placing a half page advertisement in The Sun and The Province to outline its criticisms of the government's failure to fund education adequately.
Committee member Phillip Resnik said the committee gathered about
800 signatures to appear with the ad that will likely run March 10.
The ad attacks the Social Credit government for failing to pass on increases in education funding under the Established Programs Financing
agreement with the federal government.
"The B.C. government is refusing to pass on the tens of millions of
dollars in additional federal grants for post-secondary education made
available under EPF arrangements," the ad charges.
It suggests the federal government should impose sanctions against provincial governments diverting funds intended for education.
"I think this will be quite welcome to a fair amount of federal politicians," Resnik said.
The sanctions might be similar to ones inposed on provincial governments charging user fees for health care, he said. The Canada Health Act
gives the federal government a mandate to offset extra profits made by the
provinces with a decrease in health transfer payments.
Drawing an analogy with the health care system will bring attention to
the funding crisis in education, he said, adding a newspaper ad will increase
public awareness of the problem.
"The feeling is that the issue is sufficiently important that something
more public has to be done — what could be more public than a newspaper
ad with hundreds and hundreds of signatures?"
Resnik said he thinks the ad will be an effective means of communication. "I don't think we have an illusion of convincing the provincial
government. But (the ad) will not just go unnoticed," he said.
The committee collected more than $5,000 in one month to pay for the
ads, said committee member Donald Fisher.
"We took copies of the ad and went around through friends, colleagues
and any route that was open to us," he said.
Gears fight back
Vol. LXVI, No. 39
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, February 28,1984
228-2301
— stuart dee photo
UBC STAIRCLIMBING TEAM practises for upcoming competition against University of Pango Pango team.
Competition will feature such events as banister sliding, stair hopping and difficult one-legged backward stair
jump.
Slick liberal hack woos job seekers
By ROSS PINK
The engineering undergraduate
society is intensifying its letter
writing campaign to increase public
awareness of the declining quality
of UBC's engineering department.
The EUS encouraged students to
write letters of concern to professional engineers and the provincial
government in the hope of protecting the quality of engineering
education. EUS vice-president Neil
Smith said many students have supported the campaign so far.
The EUS is worried that continued underfunding of the department will threaten the accreditation
of UBC engineering graduates, who
are emerging from a school no
longer noted for its excellence.
"If your school is no longer accepted as an accredited school, then
you won't be able to get a professional degree."
The department is currently experiencing overcrowding and
limited resources, Smith added.
Dan Lambert, managing director
of the Association of Professional
Engineers in B.C., said the association is aware of the student
engineers' concerns but has not yet
tackled the problem publicly.
"If engineering departments in
B.C. are hurting from underfunding, ultimately they will have to
operate within the funds which they
have. I suspect there are too many
engineers graduating," he said.
Smith admitted the engineers'
concerns might be premature, but
said the department must react
quickly to the beginning signs of a
decline in its quality. "The roots of
the problem are showing."
Engineering students are also
complaining about UBC's program.
Steve Town, engineering 2, said
the department lacks adequate
facilities. "There are not enough
computer for engineers at UBC."
By PATTI FLATHER
A probable candidate for the
Liberal Party leadership tried to
woo UBC students Monday by calling for two years employment with
training for every young person in
Canada.
Jim Coutts, an unsuccessful
Liberal candidate for Spadina in
Toronto and former parliamentary
secretary to prime minister Pierre
Trudeau, told 40 people in
Buchanan 203: "Every young
Canadian   will  be  guaranteed  by
society, by government, two years
of work with training.
"As it is, we provide them with
U.I. or welfare already. Surely the
job experience and structure in their
lives would be better," Coutts said.
An Albertan rumoured to be
Liberal Party leadership hopeful,
Coutts estimated such a program
would cost an initial $6 billion. But
he predicted the cost would repay
itself after 18 months due to savings
in unemployment insurance and
welfare.
CFS survives referendum
OTTAWA (CUP) — In the tense 20 minutes
before referendum results were announced, Mark
lenihan thought the Canadian Federation of Students
was doomed at the University of Prince Edward
Island.
"I think we blew it," the federation's Atlantic
fieldworker confessed when polls closed Feb. 8. His
fears were based on last minute opposition by student
councilors who called the federation's political wing
ineffectual, non-representative of Atlantic interests
and lacking focus.
But UPEI students came through. One hundred
and eighty-two of the university's 1,700 students
voted to join CFS, while 140 voted no. About 19 per
cent of the eligible voters cast ballots.
The UPEI referendum followed a predictable pattern the federation will likely enjoy for the rest of the
term. The two-year-old organization has already won
four campuses this year — UPEI, Laurentian
University in Sudbury, the University of Regina and
the University of Alberta.
They will likely win at least five more by the end of
the term, putting their full membership at 33.
At first glance, it appears the federation is attrac
tive to Canadian students. Last year CFS was in a
very precarious position, with a $47,000 deficit, an
unhappy membership, and a radical image on campus. Students across the country dealt the federation
a series of disastrous losses, including the all-
important University of Toronto. Now CFS is financially solid, has a strong membership base and faces
little internal dissent. Right-wingers still oppose the
federation, but at most campuses they don't have
enough power to kill a referendum.
On the surface, the federation is operating
smoothly.
But Ann Travers of the University of Guelph says
the federation's recent, successes have come at the
price of its principles. Travers, vice president of the
left-leaning student council at Guelph, is urging
students to vote no in the March 12 membership
referendum
"They don't want to have policy," Travers said
after returning from a November general meeting.
She ran for federation chair on an activist platform,
but lost to Beth Olley, a self-proclaimed moderate
from the University of Saskatchewan.
See page 2: CFS
In his speech sponsored by the
UBC Young Liberals, Coutts
criticized the massive unemployment levels in Canada for 15 to 24
year olds.
"To me, the approach of saying
we can accept $1.5 million young
unemployed is simply not acceptable."
Coutts said the huge problem
deserves the attention of "progressive, small '1' liberals." He said
he supported current federal
government attempts at youth job
creation, such as the Youth Opportunity Fund and the creation of a
ministry of state for youth.
But Coutts said the Liberal party
must dramatically shift its policies
to place more emphasis on the issue
of youth unemployment.
"Where youth are concerned it is
just too destructive to have a society
where the first experience one has
when leaving school is searching
and searching for a job."
Coutts called well-trained, well-
motivated people the greatest
resource Canada has and claimed if
a job creation program is well
defined and explained the private
sector will support it.
Past federal job creation programs such as Canadian University
Service Overseas and tax incentive
programs have been very effective,
Coutts said.
"You don't see these programs
because they're invisible."
Coutts said he was uncertain
what caused high unemployment
but blamed the structure of the
labor market and resources industries. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28,1984
CFS avoids trouble
From page 1
"They don't want to discuss
other student movements, women's
rights of disarmament; they don't
want to challenge the status quo,"
she said. At that general meeting,
delegates voted down a motion to
condemn the U.S. invasion of
Grenada, withdrew official CFS
participation in the Peace Petition
Caravan, refused to support
teaching assistants having a contract dispute with UBC administration, and referred a motion to
abolish all CFS policy on "non student issues" to the federation's central committee.
In  a recent interview,  Travers
Oops
In the story Wolf kill profits
wealthy few (Feb. 24), Paul Watson
of Project Wolf was quoted incorrectly. The second to last sentence
should have read: "In 95 per cent of
the areas where wolves once lived,
they are now extinct.", not 15 per
cent.
said the federation's step away
from controversial issues is making
CFS more attractive to students.
She said she still supports the concept of a national student organization to defend the interests of
students, but CFS is politically
dead.
Guelph students are not the only
traditional CFS supporters who
have turned cold to the organization. University of Trent students
will likely to the polls this term, and
members of the student council executive say they will not take an official stand on the issue. Observers
say this would be tantamount to a
kiss of death for the federation at
that campus.
But even if CFS loses some of its
traditional supporters, the federation will at least remain stable. Its
finances are in order, its policies —
which focus on quality, accessible
education — do not offend
Canada's increasingly conservative
students, and its activities — mainly
lobbying — do not require participation.
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Tx>o*S eve* ^jm. Tuesday, February 28,1964
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 3
Socred budgets create new elite
By PATTI FLATHER
The B.C. government's July and January
budgets are not restraint budgets but attempts to create a new elite, a UBC sociology
professor said Friday.
"The main cuts are in areas of upward
mobility. Education channels for the wealthy
are being improved. The net effect has to be
creation of an elite," Patricia Marchak, an
NDP candidate in the May provincial election, told 200 people in Angus at UBC's
weekend B.C. Under Restraint Conference,
sponsored by the committee of concerned
academics.
In her speech concerning ideology and
restraint, Marchak said only ideology and incompetence can justify the Social Credit
budgets.
"We have been fighting ideology with fact.
We are missing the targets."
Marchak said government euphemisms
such as restraint, downsizing, and high
technology are used deceptively. But the
word "democracy" is no longer heard, she
said.
For example, a fiscal crisis requiring
"restraint" never existed, Marchak argued.
"A recession is not a fiscal crisis. Our
vulnerability to such a drop in demand is due
to our dependence on a single export product
(lumber) and a single market (the U.S.).
"The cause of more woes is a lack of industrial planning." She added the Socreds
are not trying to change B.C.'s economic
status.
Marchak said, to audience laughter, the
Socred definition of high technology is
"anything that's not made out of wood."
Another speaker on the panel, UBC
economics professor Robert Allen, charged
the government has failed to provide evidence
for the problems it claims prompted the
restraint program.
Allen said the budget presumes a lack of
investment in B.C. But the province has one
of the highest investment rates in the world
and 90 per cent of this is private, he said.
The Socreds also claim education absorbs
too much public money, he said, adding B.C.
spends less on education, relative to personal
income, than any other province.
And B.C. is not educating enough students
to meet the demand for university graduates,
he said. B.C. has one of the lowest educa
tional participation rates in Canada.
UBC education professor and panelist
John Andrews emphasized the disastrous effects of underfunding on young people, professors and educational institutions.
Andrews said the Socreds have discouraged people from getting an education at a time
when the public sees education as a way out
of the recession.
"Even if enrolment increases the budgets
do not."
Educators are also suffering from the
government's refusal to fund institutions
adequately, he said. "There's flatness that
takes over and kills the cutting edge of education."
Structural damage to educational institutions will inevitably result, he added.
Gov't ignorant
about B.C.'s rights
Human rights will not be protected in B.C. because the provincial government fails to understand
their importance, the former chair
of B.C.'s now defunct human rights
commission charged Saturday.
Charles Paris told 100 people attending UBC's weekend B.C.
Under Restraint conference that the
government killed the commission
July 7 to increase its control over
every aspect of human rights.
"The human rights commission
was destroyed not because it didn't
do its job, but because it did it very
well. It spoke out independently,"
he said.
Calling the government "crassly
ignorant" about human rights,
Paris said the existing rights code
will not ensure human rights will be
protected. Only a commission
similar to the one abolished could
help prevent violations, he added.
"A human rights code can be put
in place of the dead commission but
there is not enforcement of human
rights."
Paris praised the public for its
criticism of Bill 27 — the Human
Rights Act which originally abolished the commission. Although the
bill later died on the order paper
because of public pressure, the
government did not reinstate the
commission.
Fellow panelist Peter Cameron
said 70 per cent of human rights
violations occur in the workplace
and that access to a human rights
code was not even available to
workers now.
A member of the health sciences
association, Cameron said the
government fails to consider the interests and concerns of workers
when drafting legislation and formulating policy.
"The economic strategy of the
Socreds is that foreign investment is
essential and the budget is the wish
list of a high tech investor who
would be anti-labor, rent and
government legislative control-
fearing and a tad right wing," he
said amid hoots of laughter from
the crowd.
Restraint full of lies
— nail lucente photo
STUDENTS FLOCK TO TOUCH garment of potential Ubyssey editor reflecting recent staff trend towards
youth and naivite. Candidate promises position paper will be up promptly to explain a new approach to editing
newspapers (i.e. without reading or writing knowledge). Grill baby Walter and the others Wednesday at 11:30
p.m. in the office.
Trent kills office space for rape crisis centre
PETERBOROUGH, Ont. (CUP)—
The University of Trent administration eliminated office space for the
student-funded rape crisis centre
and the campus gay and lesbian
organization.
The university recently sold the
building which houses the centre,
the gay and lesbian group and the
student newspaper, Arthur. It only
offered alternative space to Arthur.
Vice president administration
John Earnshaw said while the
newspaper is "an integral part of
Trent," the other groups are of
"secondary" importance.
"They're pulling the rug right out
from under us," said centre collective member Pauline Duffett. "If
we lose office space it will totally
jeopardize our operations."
The centre was created by the
university administration in 1977,
after five women were raped on
campus. The centre is funded by the
Trent student union, colleges and
city hall. Until now the administration has provided space.
Centre representative Marilyn
McLean says instances of sexual
violence have increased since 1977.
"If there was a need in 1977, there
is more than one now; our crisis
calls are increasing all the time."
One collective member said calls
have quadrupled in two years,
following the recent upsurge in sexual assaults across Ontario.
Earnshaw suggested the groups
look more seriously at outside funding sources such as the United
Way to get money for rent. But centre representative Colleen Day said,
"We could never get money from
the United Way, unless we stopped
being political. If we don't have a
political function, we might as well
close down."
Students involved in the evicted
groups charge the administration
wants to get rid of them because
they are involved with contentious
issues.
Women involved with the rape
crisis centre point to a conflict in
views between themselves and a
university committee set up to study
sexual harassment on campus and
recommend grievance procedures.
While the centre insists harassment
is a labor issue seen in the context of
power between boss and employee,
the university prefers to deal with
harassment as an unfortunate
perversion to be dealt with when it
becomes too overt.
"What is the difference between
professor-secretary relations or
even   professor-student   relations
and employer-employee relations?"
said the centre's Margaret Johnson.
UBC does not have a rape crisis
centre on campus, although several
incidents of sexual assault have occurred in the University Endowment Lands. Off campus organizations such as Rape Relief and
Women Against Violence Against
Women provide services for women
who have been sexually assaulted.
The Social Credit government
employed false information to
justify cutting education budgets
this year, according to the B.C.
Teachers' Federation president.
Larry Kuehn said Saturday the
government sold its "restraint"
program to the public by using
marketing techniques based on the
myth that education absorbs enormous amounts of provincial money
and enrolment is on the decline.
"While there may be an
economic crisis, there is no fiscal
crisis that justifies cutbacks in social
services and education in
particular," Kuehn told 200 people
attending the UBC's weekend B.C.
Under Restraint conference.
Kuehn said taxpayers, especially
ItolKriNMPS Ihk§ McImhI Mhtow
Protesters to Henry Kissinger's recent Vancouver visit should keep
their placards close at hand, Kissinger's former boss might toe coming
to town. '
The UBC debating society has invited Richard Nixon to be the
"patron" of a Mar. 3 debate between university and college
students.
Debating society member Duncan Stewart said the invitation waa
sent for Nixon to oversee the event because of his skills as a debater:
"We fed that Nixon has as a politician in the '50», '60s and '70s, exemplified all that's best in debate.''
Nixon's "stonewaffiag" tactics during the Watergate trials is aa
example of his debating skill, he said.
Stewart said: the invitation is not an endorsement of Nixon's
political stance and is not designed to give him a platform. "The
overall aim of the debate is ia debate. The whole point ftbottt debate
is you don't care what you've saying, bat how y^u say h," he ssmL
But Stewart acknowledged people might protest if Nbron attends.
Security arrangement* have already been arranged with.the ROUP,
he added.
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commercial and residential property owners, now bear the financial
burden of education. Although increasing property taxes do not
reflect increasing education costs,
the provincial government has
shifted the burden from its general
revenues to individuals, he said.
The entire provincial education
funding in real dollars will decrease
by 25 per cent in the 1985-86 fiscal
year, he said. Some school boards
will lay off 110 teachers, even
though an estimated 1,200 more
students will enrol in the district's
schools in September 1984.
While the provincial government
decrease budgets for public schools,
it • is pumping more money into
those of private schools. Pauline
Weinstein, Vancouver school board
trustee, said the government wants
to increase voter support in this
area.
"Politically this is very clever,
and a very smart way to go."
She said the Vancouver school
board should refuse to implement
budget cuts becasue they will
destroy the current education
system. The cuts will total $42
million, she said.
"We're really moving back into
the dark ages."
Kigila Adam-Moodley, a member
of the school board's advisory committee on race relations, said the
"restraint" measures will affect the
education of minorities in language
instruction.
The loss of childcare workers,
race relations consultants and learning assistance centres will place additional pressure on teachers, she
said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28,1984
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News item: Headline hunter and Project Wolf leader Paul Watson says the Socreds' wolf kill is a political pork barrel.
Stifling silence
Next time your prof asks you if you give a damn about your work, ask if
they give a damn about theirs.
You might easily have missed it, but belatedly over the weekend a small
group of UBC academics began to publicly voice objections to the package
of social and economic vandalism which is laughingly known as the
"Socred restraint program."
The committee for concerned academics held a conference on the
weekend and is buying ads in The Sun and The Province at a cost of
$5,000.
What is remarkable about this action is not that it should have occurred
at all, but rather that it has taken so long and that it seems to be supported
by such a small minority of UBC's academic community.
One would think even the most apathetic fine arts professor, the most
objective physics researcher or the most conservative commerce lecturer
must have seen the effect of the government policies — denying a huge
chunk of the population access to higher education and substantially
reducing the quality of education for the remainder.
One would think the academic community would have some commitment to excellence in education, some faith in the credo that a university
education improves one's outlook on life and some confidence in their
jobs. But judging from the total lack of any action from the vast majority of
academics since the first "restraint budget," this isn't the case.
If these people don't care whether or not the university tumbles, they
must at least be bothered at the prospect of losing their jobs. And the
government has clearly indicated it dislikes the tenure system. Profs will
just have to join the line of people affected by legislation and take their turn
behind women, children, the poor, the sick, the unemployed, government
workers and, of course, students.
The question remains: why aren't the vast majority of academics doing
anything?
It might be they believe political action in unbecoming, but that would be
pretty stupid. And surely these people aren't stupid.
Simple put, if they don't stand up for their university and jobs, who will?
The second-hand car salespeople who control the government?
The problem is the academic community is not a community in any traditional sense. UBC academics are for the most part a group of selfish,
myopic, atomised and alienated individuals huddling up to the open plan
Kitsilano kitchen ranges and trying to pretend the political climate isn't
becoming cold.
Letters
GVRD worker urges second look at UEL use
By AUDREY PEARSON
Everyday, most UBC commuters
routinely pass by a large,
undeveloped forest land. Some,
especially in the natural sciences,
may have already ventured out
there to measure things in real life
instead of the laboratory. To a few,
it is already a special place, a breath
of green away from campus life.
But most probably do not have a
second thought as you pass by the
forest twice a day. It has always
been there in your experience. But
will it always be?
It, of course, is the University
Endowment Lands. It comprises
1,700 acres of forested land in the
midst of Canada's third largest city.
The area was originally set aside by
the provincial government in 1923
to provide a source of revenue for
the fledgling B.C. But the government could not anticipate world
events. The depression and the second world war intervened and the
anticipated demand for housing did
not materialize. Attempts to
develop the lands for profit resulted
in a net loss to the government of $1
million.
Since the end of the war various
proposals have been put forth as the
best  use  for  the  area,  including
housing and research centres. No
one proposal has been accepted or
acted upon and the area still remains crown land.
While the government planners
were creating visions on paper, the
land was not unused or neglected.
On the contrary, since 1930 the
Point Grey Riding Club maintained
old skid roads as bridle paths for its
members. Over the years, many
special interest groups, such as
scouts and naturalists have done
their own exploring. Today there
are 30 miles of trails, recently
upgraded by the endowment lands
regional park committee.
perspectives
The world in 1984 is a very different place from the one in 1923
when the land was first set aside.
Perhaps it is time to consider the
true endowment of these lands for
the people of greater Vancouver
and the university itself.
The Greater Vancouver Regional
District proposes that the endowment lands become a regional park
under their stewardship. The area
would cease to be a secret place,
known only to a few interest groups
and local residents. The opportuni-
THE UBYSSEY
February 28, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
The dregs of the staff lay in a pile and their clothes in another. Yaku pleaded with everyone to stay
still while he deftly drew another prize winning graphic. Peter Berlin began to giggle, as Monte Stewart
and Harry Hertscheg, those staffers who like to write about the squish of flesh against flesh, tickled his
toes. Muriel Draaisma lay with Patti Flather and Debbie Lo, proving she was not homophobic. Robert
Beynon, feeling a little lonely, snuggled up to Chris Wong. But nothing could stop the tearful jabs of
sadness piercing Chris' heart. Alas, the love of his life was leaving him soon, and no amount of comforting from Robert would smooth the goodbye. Wayne Chong tried not to appear embarrassed by the
loving scene around him, and vowed instead to write a position paper about it later. Ross Pink just
thought it was great. Everyone hugged each other a little harder because the conflicts had subsided
and a new era of collective loving was about to begin . . .
V.
ty would be there to create a special
place for all. The question at hand
for the provincial government and
therefore the public, is whether this
proposal is truly the best land use
for the area.
Many will undoubtedly feel that
the land should be preserved,
because it is natural, a forest in a,
city and preservation of nature is inherently good. This value judgement is often difficult to justify to
decision making bodies. It could
easily be said that there are trees in
other places, such as Stanley Park.
Land in the city is a rare and so
valuable commodity. Here is a
potential source of revenue for a
cash-starved university. Which is
more important after all, trees or
education?
The regional park proposal is
more than just the preservation of a
piece of forest. It is an opportunity
to create a link between UBC and
the rest of the community which is
vital to the university's future.
If the UEL were sold, they would
undoubtedly fetch a very large
price. However, the amount of
revenue generated would be very
small relative to the total university
budget. Studies back in the 1950's
recognized this situation. The sale
of the Endowment Lands provides
no solution to UBC's funding
shortfalls. The park concept is far
more valuable to UBC, although its
worth cannot be measured in
monetary terms.
Nowhere else in the lower
mainland does such a diverse, easily
accessible recreational opportunity
exist as in the UEL. Forest, beach
and ocean are right at hand,
whether one arrives by car, bicycle
or bus. The area has the potential to
attract a wide range of people from
all over the lower mainland. At present, this potential is not realized
because most people, except
perhaps west side residents, are
simply not aware of what the UEL
has to offer. A regional park would
create this awareness.
The endowment lands also offer
UBC a great research potential. It is
an easily accessible site for
undergraduate teaching as well as
basic research and has been extensively used in both capacities over
the years. The UBC technical committee on the endowment lands is
currently directing studies into the
vegetation communities and
restoration of camosun bog. It is
planned to continue these studies.
Such long term research is usually
rare because of the expense involved. Again there is a tremendous
potential to present to the public
what the university does with their
money especially in forest research.
UBC can no longer afford to be
an unknown ivory tower, isolated
on the Point Grey peninsula. If it is
to be supported by the community,
it must become part of that community. The endowment lands park
can provide that binding link.
So, next time you pass by the
forest on your way to campus,
perhaps take that second thought.
Its future as a park is by no means
certain. If it is already a special
place for you, maybe it is time to
write the premier and tell him so. If
you would like more information,
the GVRD invites you to its open
house on the endowment lands,
Thursday March 1, 2-10 p.m. at
2215 W. 10th (3rd floor). If you
have always been meaning to go for
a walk in the UEL, here is your opportunity. The GVRD is holding an
Endowment Lands Trek, a walk
across the entire area, on Sunday
March 4. Transportation to the
start along Marine Drive will be
provided free 10 am - 1 pm. Meet at
doggie park opposite the Spanish
Banks west concession stand. See
you there.
Audrey Pearson recently
graduated from UBC with a combined Biology-Forestry degree.
Trees . . . sprouting up everywhere Tuesday, February 28,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Wolf kill saves ungulates
Paul Watson apparently feels he
has a score to settle with northern
British Columbians (Wolf kill profits wealthy few, Feb. 24). Now, a
northern British Columbian is going to settle a score with Watson:
Watson bases his arguments on
several misconceptions. First of all,
his claim that the northern wolf kill
only benefits the wealthy is simply
designed to rouse his sympathizers
against an event about which they
know nothing. The fact is that the
wolf hunt, directly or indirectly,
benefits nearly everyone in the
North. I cannot speculate as to
why. Watson wants to deprive northerners of one of our larger
sources of income, the hunting industry.
While speaking at UBC this past
week, Watson cited the fact that
there are 77 foreign hunters each
season in the area where the wolves
are being shot. Also, there are approximately 12,000 ungulates in this
area. I put it to every British Columbian that 77 hunters cannot have
a large effect upon such an ungulate
population. However, as studies
have shown, and as northerners
have seen, a large number of wolves
can greatly lower an ungulate
population.
I would ask every person who is
not affected in any way by the wolf
hunt (i.e. almost every citizen outside of northern B.C., including
Watson) to look closely at the situation in Fort Nelson. With a few exceptions, nearly everyone in that
northern town did everything they
could to hinder and frustrate Project Wolf's efforts. Ask yourselves
why the citizens have taken such a
stand. They know the situation better than any Sea Shepherd Society
member.
Russ Brown
arts 1
BENTAX
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CENTRAL ENQUIRIES 251-2157
ALL QEFIMO PURCHASES SUBJECT TO APPROVA,
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
NOTICE
OF ELECTION
EXECUTIVE:
NOMINATIONS FOR THE W.A.A.
- PRESIDENT
- SECRETARY
- VICE-PRESIDENT
- MEMBER-AT-LARGE
OPEN: FEBRUARY 21, 1984. CLOSE: MARCH 1, 1984
Elections to be held at the annual general meeting on
Tuesday, March 13, 1984 at 12:30 p.m. in Room 211
War Memorial Gym.
MANAGERIAL POSITIONS OPEN FOR ALL SPORTS
BADMINTON FIELD HOCKEY SOCCER
BASKETBALL GYMNASTICS
CROSS COUNTRY ICE HOCKEY
CURLING ROWING
FENCING SKIING
APPLICATIONS ACCEPTED UNTIL MARCH 1, 1984
* All nomination forms and managerial applications are
available at the Athletic Office: Room 208 War Memorial
Gym.
SQUASH
SWIMMING 8- DIVING
TRACK Er FIELD
VOLLEYBALL
y/.Y//Y/A'S/SSSsYSS,'/SsY/A
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and the Americas.
CALLUS
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The travel company of CFS
TRAVEJ- CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC. Student Union Building
604 224-2344
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IS A PEER
COUNSELLING
CENTER
STAFFED BY EMPATHETIC
PEOPLE WHO ARE WILLING
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Mon - Fri: 9:30 AM to 7:30 PM
DROP IN: SUB COUNCOURSE
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  OOO'afcCa 1984  OR  WHILE  QTY.   LASTS
Intramurals Sports '84
Squash
Sport Club
>rOA
The first meeting of the new UBC sports
club will be held:
Wednesday February 29 '84
12:30 pm Room 211 WMGYM
The purpose of the club is to allow members
throughout the academic year to pursue their
recreational needs in squash in an informal manner.
There will be an outlet for competitive participation
for those interested.
1?*AEL ttf EEK
FEB. 27-MAR. 2
Tues., Feb. 28
"Religious Pluralism in Israel" — talk by Asher Sandler,
West Coast Shaliach to the union of American Hebrew
Congregations Buch. A202, 12:30 p.m.
Evening: — 6:00 p.m. — No host dinner at Hillel House.
7:00 p.m. — Screening of Amos Oz's "Reflections on
Israel and the Diaspora" followed by discussion with Asher
Sandler and Rabbi Daniel Siegel — at Hillel House (behind
Brock Hall).
Wed., Feb. 29
Falafel Lunch and Festival of Israeli Dancing, S.U.B.,
12:30 p.m.
Thurs., Mar. 1
"Cultural Diversity in Jerusalem" with Prof. Shlomo
Hasson, Canada-Israel Cultural Exchange. Buch. A202,
12:30 p.m.
Fri., Mar. 2
"Opportunities in Israel" with Yishai Knoll from the
Israel Aliyah Center — Hillel House, 12:30 p.m.
There will be an elaborate display on Kibbutz at S.U.B.
Mon., Tues., and Thurs. 10:30-2:00.
FACES OF A NATION
For further information 224-2512
(Sponsored by Jewish Students' Network B Hillel Foundation)
The Hairline's team of experts wants
to give students a break!
10% OFF
our regular prices
Monday - Thursday
(Student A.M.S. card required)
2529 Alma
224-2332
Mon.-Fri. 9:00-7:00
Sat. - 9:00 - 5:30
YES, YOU CAN LEARN
HOW TO LEAD
Attend this successful seminar and learn how to
lead others far more effectively
WHO SHOULD ATTEND? Any student involved in leadership, or aspiring to leadership.
SEMINAR LEADER: Your seminar will be personally conducted by Peter Lowe, recognized
successful president of Lifemasters Training Co., training leaders across Canada. Former UBC
student and member of the International Platform Association.
WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? The Precision Model for effective leadership . . . The single
greatest key to all leadership . . . How to persuade others to follow you . . . How to set goals
. . . How to be a goal-achiever instead of a tension-reliever . . . How to conquer fear of failure
and rejection . . . Break crippling attitude habits that hold you back as a leader . . . Gain self-
confidence and overcome feelings of inferiority . . . Learn the mental secrets that give you
energy, drive and motivation . . . The secret of charisma . . . and much more.
SEMINAR FEE: Special fee of $15.00 for UBC students (All others only $30.00) which includes
all written materials and coffee.
GUARANTEE: If you are not fully satisfied with this seminar, return the materials at the conclusion of the seminar and your money will be refunded in full.
SEMINAR DATE: Saturday, March 3, 1984 1:00 P.M. - 4:30 P.M. SUB 205
REGISTRATION: Phone 263-5710 or 278-0454
Specifically sponsored by AMS Club Campus Crusade for Christ	 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28,1964
Viffa
TUESDAY
ISRAEL WEEK
Religious pluralism in Israel with guest Asher
Sandler, West Coast Shaliach to Union of
American Hebrew Congregations, noon, Buch
A202. Dinner, video - Reflections on Israel and
the Diaspora, and discussion with Asher Sandler
ad Rabbit Daniel Siegel, dinner-6 p.m., video-7
p.m., Hillel House.
Elaborate display on kibbutz, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m.,
SUB Main Hall and Thurs.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Supermouth: DebSoc vs. Tories, noon, SUB
215.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Members are needed - you - general meeting and
voting for elections, noon-1:30 p.m., SUB 211.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Video tape and informational meeting on WUSC
overseas position, noon, Buch. A204.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, 4:30 p.m., SUB 239.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP AND
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rev. Stephen Barham, psychology and the bible
lecture series, noon, Buch. D238 and Wednesday and Thursday.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Vs. Canadian junior national team, under 21,
7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
WEDNESDAY
PACIFIC REFORESTATION WORKERS
ASSOCIATION
Slideshow and talk on what to expect in the upcoming treeplanting season, noon-2:30 p.m.,
SUB 205.
8AHAI CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
ISRAEL WEEK
Falaffel lunch and festival of Israel, dancing,
noon, SUB Ballroom
ANARCHIST CLUB
Subversive literature club, 11-2 p.m., SUB Concourse.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Supermouth: DebSoc vs. Liberals, are there any
Liberals in the West?, noon, SUB 212.
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Come out to one hell of a socialist book table
with literature and buttons to put a scare into any
well-heeled bureaucrat or boss, noon, SUB concourse.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Les amies des lounge, 4-6 p.m.. Gallery Lounge.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Seminar: defusing militarism, 8 p.m., Grad Student Centre.
UBC ADVENTURE TRAVEL CLUB
Talk and slide show: Nepal, trekking and culture,
noon, SUB Auditorium.
THURSDAY
ISRAEL WEEK
Cultural diversity in Jerusalem - Prof. Shlomo
Hasson, Canada-Israel academic exchange,
noon, Buch. A202.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Come and join our bible study group to study
Acts 2:1-14, noon, Scarfe 206.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Discussion on co-ops and social change, noon,
Buch D352.
CHESS CLUB
Annual general meeting and executive elections,
noon, SUB 205.
CUSO - UBC
1984 development education series - Education
-is a western model appropriate?, free, 7:30
p.m., International House.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meeting, 7:30 p.m., call 228-8554 or
224-4553.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, 1:30 p.m.. International House
Upper Lounge.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture: Kris Kristensen talks on psychology and
dentistry and people interested in next year's
exec positions may contact John or Leslie, noon,
IRC 1.
BIOLOGY GRAD COMMITTEE
All biology students graduating in 1984 please attend meeting to discuss the composite picture
and grad dinner, 1:30 p.m., IRC 4.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Footprint of the Buddha, part 3 of a series
on world religions, free, noon, Asian Centre
Auditorium.
UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
General meeting, open to all members and interested persons, noon. Brock 358.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker series, Fred Gilbertson speaking on
history of G/L UBC, noon, SUB 215.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT IN
SCRIPTURE
Discussion, noon, Scarfe 204.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Seminar: problems in literary translations by
prof. Giovanni Cacchetti from UCLA, 3:30 p.m.,
Buch. Penthouse.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Supermouth: Svend Robinson speaks on debate
in Ottawa, noon, SUB 212.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Contemplating a career in courtroom drama,
social work or crime, drop by Volunteer connections booth in SUB or Brock 200, noon, SUB
Concourse.
Screenings    (or   is   it
screamings?)
Screenings for editorial positions for next year's Ubyssey
will be held this Wednesday at
11:30 a.m. in SUB 241K. All
Ubyssey staffers are urged to
attend.
STUDENT
COUPON
HALF PRICE
on
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|     * HAIR *
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we are at 815 Hastings St. fat Howe)
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Resume photos as tow as 75c in
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3302 Cambie at 17th, Vancouver, B.C.
879-9494
PSYCHOLOGY AND THE BIBLE
LECTURE SERIES
Training in ... .
• Understanding the Bible in the light of modern psychology
and how to become more Christ-centered in your life.
• How to practice Christian meditation and answer occultism
• How to experience healing and relieve tension and anxiety
• Insights into creativity, dreams, intuition, visualization and
healing
THE SEMINAR LEADER IS          TheRt. Rev. Stephen Barham, Ph.D
Dr. Stephen Barham, a Christian psychologist and vice-president of the International Institute of Integral Human Sciences at Concordia University in Montreal. Dr. Barham has taught at major universities in Canada and United States.
He graduated from Central Bible College and has travelled around the world
ministering in historic churches and college campuses.
LOCATION: Feb. 28, 29, March 1, 2 at 12:30 in Buch D238
Also March 5 at 7:30 Buch A100
Topic — Is Bible relevant in the light of psychology today
SPONSORED BY: Charismatic Christian Fellowship
Maranatha Christian Club Box 62
Intramurals UBC
OUTDOOR ADVENTURE
V^-^A PROGRAM
LEARN TO SAIL
UBC sailing club instructors will provide
brief lesson, then off you go!
when: Saturday, March 3, 1984
where: Jericho Beach
time: 9:00-1:00 pm
cost: $8.00
Register by Wednesday, February 29/84
Organization Meeting:
Thursday, March 1
12:30 pm Room 211 WMGYM
•THE CLASSIFIEDS'
I RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 66c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
ONE MONTH ADVENTURE to a secluded
town in the Himalayas of India. Student
organized. Lv May '84. Total cost (incl airfare) $1989. Info: Pilar Brothers c/o Trent
Univ., Peterborough, Ont. (705) 743-4391.
70 - SERVICES
INCOME   TAX   PREPARATION   at   a
reasonable fee. Phone 266-6748.
80 - TUTORING
MARCH 14 THRU MARCH 16
NATIVE INDIAN
CULTURAL AWARENESS
DAYS
Guest speakers, food sampling,
films. Native Indian performers...
For Details Call:
324-3290 or 228-5240
(Location T.B.A.)
ARE YOU HAVING PROBLEMS writing
correctly? Are you losing marks because of
your English? Get your papers checked and
corrected. Phone Evenings: 6-9 p.m.
531-8157.
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written; grammar composition,
spelling, punctuation. 682-1043.
85 - TYPING
11 - FOR SALE - Private
71   SUPER   BEETLE  excellent  cond.   Radio
snows on rims $1750. See at UBC Z74-3303.
15 - FOUND
20 - HOUSING
BEDSITTING RM in house w f/p 6 kitchenette
facilities; share bathroom w mother &
daughter. Nr. Fraser & 37 on UBC bus rt.
female pref. $175/mo. can befum. avail, now.
327-3904 eves or weekends.
INSTRUCTION
LSAT. GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
WANTED: Childcare for 2 yr. old, two or
three afternoons a wk. at my house.
228-6285 or 224-0289.
OUTSTANDING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY. Hearth-fitness nutrition field.
P/T or Full time. 738-9691. Call today -
no obligations.
BIOLOGY INSTRUCTOR, for MCAT
preparation — $25/hr. - teaching experience essential 788-4618 leave message.
WANTED: Students to sell cosmetics for
B.C. based company. Earn 30-50%. No kit
purchase required. Call 888-9505 or
584-0417 between 6-7:30 p.m.
BABYSITTER WANTED - Mondays only,
9:30-4:30 my home near UBC, for 2 children
(21 mos & 4 yrs) 261-4576.	
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
U—TYPE Micom word processor available
for rent @ $5/hr. Jeeva @ 876-5333.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1206.
WORD PROCESSINGIMicom.) student
rates for theses typing $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Jeeva 876-5333
EXCELLENT TYPIST. IBM, AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
QUALITY TYPING on short notice. Reports,
essays, resumes, etc. Reasonable rates.
688-5884.
WORD PROCESSING, all jobs, tapes
transcribed, student rates. On King Edward
bus route, 879-5108.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Student rates
$1.25/pg Moneypenn/s Office Services.
876-7313.
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional result call Audrey. 228-0378.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: all phases, fast
reasonable. 25 yrs. exp. Electronic type
271-6755.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE. Special
students' rates; fast production; professional appearance - term papers, thesis,
essays, resumes. Rita 435-8251.
35 - LOST
SILVER WRIST BAND swimming pool/
S.U.B. on inside "Pete 1975" sentimental
value. Reward 733-9646 after 6 or 2284666
50 - RENTALS
65 - SCANDALS
THE U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD SHOP can
print ANYTHING you want to say on a personalized bumper sticker - One Day Service.
WORD PROCESSING
SERVICES
DAYSI NIGHTS I WEEKENDS/
Spelling & Grammar
Expertise
Marpole Area
Reasonable Rates.
NANCY
266-1768
90 - WANTED Tuesday, February 28,1984
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Birds in playoffs
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
UBC Thunderbirds hockey team
accomplished what they've been
trying to do all season this weekend
at the Thunderbird arena. They
swept a two game series over the
team they had to beat to make the
play-offs — Saskatchewan.
Though this past series had no
bearing on the standings, the
Thunderbirds closed out their
season with pride intact as they convincingly beat the defending national   champion    Saskatchewan
Huskies 5-3 Friday and 4-2 Saturday.
The Huskies had already clinched
the second and final play-off spot
the weekend before and will play
Alberta Golden Bears for the
Canada West championship this
weekend.
Renzo Berra, Rob Jacobson,
Mike Coflin, Daryl Coldwell and
Steve LaPointe scored for UBC Friday night.
Jacobson scored another Saturday night, while Kevin Argue netted
two  and  Graham  Kerr  added  a
single. Dennis Fenske, this year's
most outstanding player in the
Canada West conference, scored
Saskatchewan's only two goals on
Saturday.
e«sy flray gmy, that's »• eotof of this Rttl* otd sp*ca, snd that's how I'm fasting today «y ay, oh
wMt can I do, to stop teeing MM, I'm Ethiopian, yaah ah, what can I do, bacauM my life is through,
oh yeah ooh ooh or* ooh. (harmonica break) {Snd of ttmtf.
UBC's 11-13 finish is
their best
since 1978.
FINAL STANDINGS
Team                     W
L       Pts
Alberta*                   20
4       40
Saskatchewan*         14
10       28
UBC                         11
13       22
Calgary                      3
21         6
Hoopsters end bad season
By MONTE STEWART
Yogi Berra once said, "It's not
over 'til it's over." Unfortunately,
for the men's basketball team, "it"
never really began.
The hoopsters finished their
season last weekend with a pair of
road games. Prior to the final
weekend, coach Bill Edwards was
hoping the 'Birds would display
some pride in their two remaining
games; however, if there was any
pride displayed, it was of the blind
variety.
Thursday, the 'Birds went to Victoria and were thrashed, clubbed.a
nd dismembered as the Vikings rolled to a 101-49 triumph in the final
Canada West league contest for
both teams. Friday, UBC ventured
stateside to Bellingham where they
lost 81-62 to Western Washington
University in an exhibition encounter.
"We played very poorly," said
Edwards.
UBC gymnasts excel
The UBC gymnastics teams are
gearing up for the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union finals in
Edmonton at the weekend.
The results were particularly encouraging for the men because the
result gave the 'Birds four competitors ranked in the national top
Rugby team routed
The UBC rugby team returned to
McKechnie Cup action at Brockton
Oval Saturday and were defeated
12-9 by Vancouver Reps.
Stephen Rowell with a hat-trick
of penalties scored all UBC's
points.
The defeat drops UBC's Cup
record to one win in four tries and
leaves them out of contention for a
place in the final. They take on the
Vancouver Island Reps at Thunderbird stadium on Saturday in
another game in the same competition.
36. It is those 36 who are invited to
the championships. Furthermore
UBC gymnasts, Brian Kennedy and
Cam Bailey were 37th and 38th and
will travel as the top stand-bys in
case anybody drops out.
While the men have little chance
of toppling York or the University
of Toronto the UBC women are
defending champions and, led by
Muscat, will be hoping to be in contention.
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The two games constituted a
disappointing finale for the season
which began with great expectations.
Thursday, UVic jumped out to a
commanding 54-20 half-time lead.
Greg Wiltjer paced the four time
defending national champs with 27
points and 17 rebounds while Eli
Pasquale netted 23 points. Ken
Klassen led the 'Birds for the up-
teenth times this season, scoring 22
points.
The game against Western
Washington was a listless affair.
"Neither team played with any enthusiasm," said Edwards.
"Western was in a situation similar
to us (having not made the playoffs) and they didn't take the game
very seriously."
Western enjoyed a narrow 40-32
lead at half-time before putting the
game out of reach early in the second half. Once again, Klassen was
high scorer for UBC, contributing
16 points.
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UBC, Student Union Building
604 224-2344 Page 8
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 28,1964
'Birds off to Laval
And then there was one. The
UBC men's volleyball team will
travel alone to the Canadian collegiate championships at Laval
University next month.
While they were beating the
University of Victoria in a packed
War Memorial Gym on Friday and
Saturday, the women's volleyball
team was going down to the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon.
The men won both matches by
three games to one. But the similar
scores conceal two matches of very
different levels of intensity.
UBC skiers
unbeatable
The UBC men's ski team
defeated the top teams in the
Northwest quarter of the American
collegiate ski circuit over the
weekend. The women finished
fourth, in a contest at Mount Bat-
chelor, Oregon.
With the victory UBC advances
to the National Collegiate Ski
Association finals in Steamboat
Springs Colorado next month.
The UBC men dominated the
alpine events taking first in the
slalom and giant slalom. The
women were second in the giant
slalom and fourth in the slalom for
third overall in the alpine.
Stuart Gairns, John Hilland and
Ken Stevens were second, third and
fourth in the giant slalom, Hilland
was second, in the slalom and
Gairns third.
Friday UVic gave a very
lacklustre display and UBC did
enough to beat them. Even though
the 'Birds dropped the second
game, they were never in danger of
losing and took the next two handily. They won 15-12, 11-15, 15-5 and
15-11.
Saturday both teams played
much better as UVic fought all the
way to prolong their season. The
visitors leapt out to a 12-3 lead in
the first game and although the
'Birds fought back to within one
point, they couldn't save it.
The big effort drained the Vikings because they didn't mount
much opposition in the second and
third games. But the fourth was a
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real nail-biter. UVic served seven
times for the game before UBC
finally clinched the match and the
playoff 13-15, 15-8, 15-12, 19-17.
Throughout both games the
'Birds were spurred on by a
boisterous home crowd.
The leading power hitters for
UBC were Chris Frehlick who had
51 kills over the weekend and Paul
Thiessen with 34.
In Saskatoon the women lost
both matches three games to none.
But they could take some consolation from Erminia Russo's
unanimous selection to the West's
first all star team.
The finals start in Laval on Friday week and the 'Birds fly out
Wednesday to prepare.
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