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The Ubyssey Sep 22, 1964

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Array Twelve
weeks
VOL. XLVII, No. 2
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1964
'til
exams
CA 4-3916
photo by ted rose
MASS OF MORE THAN 500 students waits to shell out up to $100 cost of textbooks. Line-up
on first day of classes Monday backed up entire length of Fieldhouse where bookstore had
temporarily set up shop.
Scholarship student lost
in barren mountain area
Big deficit
cuts AMS
surplus
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
was a financial disaster for the Alma Mater
By DAN STOFFMAN
Ubyssey Staff Reporter
INVERMERE—A UBC forestry student, about to enter
his final year with scholarships
totalling $600, is the object of
a widespread search in a
snowy, mountainous area 40
miles east of here.
RCMP, B.C. Forest Service,
and a volunteer team of UBC
student-foresters are scouring
the crevace-ridden area for 21-
year-old Ted Johnstone, a resident student from Battleford,
Sask.
Heavy snow and fog are
hampering the search, which
includes helicopters.
Johnstone, on a hunting trip
with three friends, was reported lost August 14 when he failed to meet his companions at a
scheduled rendezvous.
Search parties sent in immediately found Johnstone's
napsack and jacket.
They found goat tracks leading to the edge of the crevace
where his camping equipment
was found.
The search, which includes
RCMP helicopters, has been
hampered by snow and fog.
RCMP believe Johnstone fell
in a crevice after dropping his
jacket and napsack to go after
a goat.
The veteran hunter is believed carrying only a gun and
matches. He has no food.
Johnstone has been a keen
hunter since his early childhood.
Johnstone's relatives say
they are not giving up hope.
"We won't stop hoping until
he is pronounced dead," his
cousin, Joan Godsell, Arts III,
said Monday.
Search and Rescue officials
said the hunt will be called
off at the end of the week if
no sign of the student is found.
Johnstone had spent the summer near Hinton.
Last year
Society.
Drastic steps have been
taken to ensure it does not
happen again this year, said
Treasurer Kyle Mitchell.
Finances under last year's
regime of President Malcolm
Scott, now Canadian Union of
Students Vict-President, plunged $21,000 below the breakeven point, he said. A surplus
of $49,000 (which took 20
years to build up) has been sliced to just more than half that.
Mitchell says ballooning operational costs and two unfor-
seen special expenditures by
the AMS accounted for the
deficit.
"Publications alone went
$14,500 over budget because of
decreases in advertising revenue and increases in operational costs," he said.
"The costs of maintaining
the student government bureaucracy also went over the
top," he admitted.
"Unforeseen expenses of
$2,500 each for academic activities, the student means survey, French-Canada week, and
Higher Education Promotion
Committee advertising as well
as $2,300 Homecoming loss,
were other reasons."
Mitchell said the over-budget
expenditures which occurred
were principally due to the fact
that students serying as AMS
officials could not spend as
much time as needed on student government affairs and
still pass, so checks on the affairs diminished and they got
slightly out of hand.
Mitchell outlined the policy
he hopes will alleviate this situation this year:
• Summer Work. "This has
been the biggest single factor—
the president has been able to
spend his full time and energy
preparing in detail for this
year, and I have brought down
my budget in record time."
• Publications Manager.
"He will be able to keep close
check on day-to-day financial
troubles, keeping down any
build-ups that occur, as well as
increasing advertising revenue."
• Assistant Business Mana
ger. "He will keep close checks
on seemingly-routine finances
in other departments, looking
for the same things as the Publications Manager."
CO-ORDINATOR FRISBY
. . . publications overspent
"Close record-keeping will
decide which events need to
be dropped from the year's
program, and will also show
future officials where corners
have and can be cut," added
Mitchell.
"This year, we must pay
attention to detail."
CUS tests
Fed loans
TORONTO (CUP) — The
Canadian Union of Students
(CUS) will move Jo determine
the constitutionality of the
Canadian Student Loan Act.
The 28th CUS Congress will
mandate two yet to be named
member universities to investigate the feasibility of initiating
a test case on the student loan
fund.
Under the recently-enacted
federal legislation, students
may borrow up to $1,000 interest-free per year over a period
of five years.
Students in Quebec have
charged the plan is a violation
of provincial jurisdiction in the
field of education.
Theres room at the top;
The Ubyssey wants YOU
The Ubyssey has decided to over-recruit this year.
That means there's room for all you lucky kids as reporters et al. The office is normally the home of one of the
best college papers in Canada and it wants you, you, you.
If there's printer's ink in your veins, or if you'd like a
crack at being a hack, then wander down to the north basement of Brock and see friendly City Editor Tom Wayman.
He has work for you. Page 2
,   .T.H.E   , .UBYSSEY
Tuesday, .September 22,  1964
L^ 1
SUS engineers
—photo by don hume
MUSA LINCKE ... to Oklahoma City
Blonde Musa goes after
U.S. Miss Football title
Frosh Queen Musa Lincke
City to represent UBC in
Contest.
The contest is held annually
to select the ideal American
co-ed.
•    •    •
Musa flew to a Dallas airport
reception, then on to Oklahoma
City to meet the press, civic
dignitaries and the sponsoring
Norman Jaycees.
She wore a name banner in
UBC colours until she reached
Oklahoma City. The girls were
then given ,. .common colours
for the week|^ig pageant.
, .'X^lent contest is a major fea-
Jin^eSbf the competition. Musa's
specialty is Highland dancing.
Two years ago homecoming
Queen Lynn Gaibraith won
the Miss Football title for UBC.
left Saturday for Oklahoma
the   Miss   Football,   U.S.A.,
Parking up
Student auto registrations
are up 500 and faculty up 200
over last year's record 7,400
cars.
Traffic sources predicted the
traffic load will be heavier and
nastier than ever.
"There's plenty fun to be had
if you can find the lots," an
official said cheerfully.
Parking lots remain unpaved
and inadequate, official sources
reported, however.
More $$ for
buildings
UBC president John Macdonald says the university will receive $29.8 million for building funds in the next five years,
almost exactly the amount
called for in the university's
Challenge for Growth pamphlet issued this spring.
In a letter to the faculty
Macdonald said the money will
come partly from the provincial government's outright
grant of $40.7 million to UBC,
Simon Fraser Academy and
Victoria College, of which
UBC's share is $18 million.
The rest of the money will
come from subscriptions.
SUS engineers
English hoax
By AL DONALD
The  engineers   were   out-engineered
ing registration week.
And as a result they got
credit for a hoax they did not
(for once) perpetrate.
On Tuesday and Wednesday
of registration week 2,100
Freddie Freshmen received an
essay assignment from three
austere upper classmen seated
behind a table in the Armory.
• •    •
"All English 100 students
must report here," read the
sign beside the table, and most
did.
They received a sheet of
paper which stated the English
department had decided to evaluate their essay writing ability.
There were four essay copies
on the sheet. Frosh were to
write on one and turn it in at
their first English lecture.
• •    •
"The first year it comes out,
and I'm nailed with it," sighed
one Frosh, still haggard from
registering.
But the disillusionment of
Frosh was short-lived.
The essay assignment was a
joke.
And on Wednesday the English department found out
about the joke.
"Some woman from the English department came down,"
one of the pranksters told the
Ubyssey Wednesday. "She tore
down our sign and stole our
stack of papers."
• •    •
Then UBC registrar J. E. A.
Parnall came down to the Armory and had the table taken
away.
He warned Frosh at a new
students meeting on Thursday
to be on guard for "Engineer
pranks such as false essay assignments."
Vancouver radio stations and
newspapers, stated "the Engineers . . . staged the whole
thing."
"We've been slandered," said
EUS president Steve Whitelaw,
when he saw the story.
He said that he thought the
stunt was a good one, but the
EUS did not want any credit
for it.
• •    •
"We didn't do it, but we wish
we had," he said.
He admitted that the mimeographed sheets had been run
off in the EUS office for some
students wearing Science
sweaters.
And the three students handing out the assignments in the
Armory Tuesday told the Ubyssey they were sciencemen.
A note sent Thursday to the
by   sciencemen   dur-
Ubyssey office from the SUS
stated that "it was Sciencemen
not Engineers who pulled the
stunt."
Dr. Jan de Bruyn, head of
English 100, said the hoax was
a nice trick, but the English
department was not going to
accept any of the essays.
"We'd have to find somebody
to collect them' and mark
them," he said.
•    •    •
But most of the frosh had
found out about the hoax by
Monday. In one English 100
class of 30 students only six
had prepared the essay.
UBC president, Dr. John B.
Macdonald, declined to comment officially on the prank.
Night classes
to run all day
UBC's     Extension     department   is  giving   a  series   of
classes this year both for the
public and for students with
(gasp) spare time.
Classes will be held in the
day time as well as evening
and will be given on campus,
downtown and on the North
Shore.
Subject matter ranges
from biochemistry to art
appreciation, from psychology to elementary Japanese.
Not inefficient
AMS president Roger McAfee denied Thursday that he
was inefficient.
PRESCRIPTION
EYEGLASSES
Includes
Frames
and Lent
16
95
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville MU 3-8921
Money-Back Guarantee
GSA NEWS
Vice-President needed! Applications for the position
should be in writing and in the hands of the Secretary
of the G.S.C. by Monday, 28 September, by 5 o'clock.
Interested unclassified students who are planning to
do graduate work may be granted membership in the
Centre if they meet membership requirements. A
letter of application should be sent to the Secretary
of the G.S.A., along with a letter from the head of
your   Department.
All contributions for this column should be given in
at the G-S.C. office. No news items, no column.
Thanks.
THE   FREDERIC   WOOD  THEATRE
Final Auditions
for
"THE VISIT"
Internationally acclaimed sinister comedy
BY   FRIEDRICH   DURRENMATT
DIRECTED   BY   KLAUS   STRASSAAANN
OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS
Men Needed In Particular
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 7:00 • 9:30 P.M.
'    FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
COPIES OF THE PLAY -
Information  Available  in  Room  207,
Frederic Wood Theatre
University Pharmacy
LTD.
FREE CAMPUS DELIVERY
from 4:00 p.m.  to 9:00 p.m.
DELIVERY   PHONE  224-3202
STUDENTS
Engineering,  Forestry,  Commerce,
Geology (mining and/or oil)
Who are in their junior or senior years;
own a car; and need financial assistance, may solve their economic problems
and make contacts of inestimable value
through a connection with the Biographical Division of THE BUSINESS & FINANCIAL CHRONICLE.
If interested call
682-6277
for an appointment with Mr.  Ruttan Tuesday, September 22, 1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
IDEAS
at
LARGE
By LORRAINE SHORE
To Phil, our beloved highway minister: We're delighted
to hear you're all set to pave
the Alaska Highway, all 1,212
miles of it.
But we've got a slight problem down here — at a place
called UBC. You know, it's
that institute of higher education stuck out on Point
Grey.
The problem is most of us
don't live on the end of the
Point and we have to get out
here some way every day.
That way turns out to be
one of three roads—Chancellor Boulevard, University
Boulevard or Marine Drive.
And though the roads are
paved they just can't handle
all 15,500 of us at 8 a.m.
• •    •
It takes a long time.
Like this morning—it took
me an hour to drive 15 miles.
I was only 20 minutes late
for the first class of the year.
But it didn't really matter; the
prof came even later—he got
snarled up in traffic too.
It was clear sailing along
Marine until Forty-ninth Ave.
then came the lineup.
I crawled the rest of the
way to C-lot (the section beyond Agronomy Road, of
course). In between stops I
travelled at seven m.p.h.
A few times I got out of
first gear, and once I even hit
25 m.p.h. — where there is a
40 m.p.h. speed limit.
• •    •
In the time that I, in my
Volkswagen, and 3,675 other
cars crawled towards the university, eight cars passed going in the opposite direction.
The situation on other roads
was the same. A friend, who
lives what is ordinarily six
minutes from UBC, left at
7:55 and arrived 40 minutes
later.
Why then, Phil, don't you
do something about our roads
—after all UBC, as an unincorporated area, has only a
provincial authority to look
after us.
• •    •
Why not widen Marine
Drive. The area on both sides
of the road has been cleared
for the last six months but
nothing else has been done.
Then, since very few cars
are leaving the university by
either Marine or Chancellor
.at this time of the morning,
why not open both sides of
the road to incoming traffic.
The traffic heading towards
Vancouver could use University Boulevard, which it usually does  now anyway.
• •    •
So Phil, please, please, help
us out a little. We don't ask
for the Port Mann Freeway—
just the same as the Alaska
Highway.
And it wouldn't cost $300
million either.
'Sweet substitute
■9
Bittersweet Kent
starts new movie
By DON HULL
For those who missed The Bitter Ash,  try a  Sweet
Substitute.
That's UBC film-maker
Larry Kent's latest movie.
A summer and $10,000 went
to deal with the problems
which arise from a young
man's sex drives.
The film shows how a boy,
contemplating a university career, reconciles his sexual
drives with the moral and social pressures exerted upon
him.
Kent, who makes movies
about sex because he is interested in it, said his latest one
could refer to every adolescent
boy — "a virgin acting as if
he isn't one, wanting sex but
as scared as hell of it."
In other words, "it could
apply to ninety per cent of
first and second year students,"
he added.
Sweet Substitute will be
shown in the auditorium for
the full week beginning October 5, both at noon and in the
evenings.
The film will be viewed by
the provincial censor beforehand and, if approved for general release, will be open to
the public. If not approved, it
will be for students only, but
Kent hopes it will pass.
Last year Kent's first movie,
Bitter Ash, which contained a
scene showing a nude couple
engaged in the sex act, was
temporarily banned from the
auditorium, but later released
for student showings.
Kent used a novel method
for producing the dialogue in
his new show. Using a plot
blocked out by Kent, the actors
improvised their own dialogue
over   a    series   of   rehearsals,
Hot air on gases
flies Wednesday
On Friday, September 18,
the Universities of South-
a m p t o n and Cambridge,
England, will be represented
at a chemistry department
symposium on Aspects of
Gas Phase Kinetics.
The 2 p.m. program in
Chem 250 will feature Dr.
H. M. Frey of Southampton
on the topic of The Pyroly-
sis Of Cyclopropates. At 3
p.m. Dr. A. B. Callear of
Cambridge will discuss Some
Spectoscopic Observations of
Energy Transfer Processes in
Gases.
the speech all being taped. The
tapes were then edited and a
final product resulted, in which
the actors speak their own
thoughts and words. Using
"sync" sound and improved
technical equipment, Kent
doubled his production costs
on Sweet Substitute over the
Bitter Ash, but the result
should be a better movie.
About 40 people, 20 of them
actors — mostly UBC students
— worked on the movie during the summer, with shooting
taking place in various locations around Vancouver.
Following the UBC showings
of the movie, Kent plans to
exhibit it across Canada, as he
did with Bitter Ash. Sweet
Substitute may appear in the
Vancouver Film  Festival.
Haar hopeful
students in
by November
John Haar, head of UBC's
housing administration, is still
hopeful.
Haar said in an interview
Monday he hopes the new
Totem Residences will be finished by the end of October.
"The girls should be in by
the middle of October and the
fellows by the end of October,"
he said.
But he was not sure.
"The East Wing of the women's block and the East Wing
of the men's block and other
facilities in the Common Block
have to be completed," he said.
Haar met with the contractors, Bennett and White Construction Co., Tuesday to discuss the completion date.
At present only 350 of the
800 students who should be
occupying the residences are
accommodated there. The rest
are staying in Acadia camp or
off campus.
DON McCRAE
. . . didn't know
Failure held
to French
Alma Mater Society president Roger McAfee Monday
blamed French Canadian students for the financial failure
last year of Campus Canada.
He said the national student
magazine will drop its French
content and Quebec distribution this year as a result of
what he called French attempts
to ensure "a complete ball-up."
"Last year the French-Canadian universities returned unopened their allotments of the
magazine — and returned them
collect,"   McAfee fumed.
The magazine is wholly-financed by the UBC Alma Mater
Society, but McAfee is confident it will not be a financial
burden as it has been in the
past.
Loophole
left in
AMS ID
The administration left a
loophole for underage students
who want to prove they are 21
when it handed out the AMS
cards during registration week.
The birth year of the student
was supposed to be printed in
by the IBM machine which
processed the  cards.
But most senior students
found they were able to fill in
their own, or a fictitious, date
of birth.
Don MacRae, who prepared
the cards, said he was not
aware that the computer had
not put in the birthdate.
"In the odd case it could
happen," he said, "Our record
shows only the date of birth
for senior students/'
Most Frosh found their birth-
dates printed in on the card.
This year is the first the administration has cooperated
with the AMS in preparing the
card which also serves as a
library card.
AMS president Roger McAfee, said that he did not know
how the omission occurred.
"There is going to be trouble
about it," he said.
Read AMS Bylaws
Copies of the Alma Mater
Society Constitution are available to students at the AMS
office in Brock.
The 29-page document contains the complete text of the
AMS by-laws.
Western Canada's Largest
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Federal  bursary
awarded grad
A two-year federal study
bursary covering fees plus $200
a month has been awarded to
Miss Ruth Bewell, North
Battleford, Sask.
Miss Bewell, specializing in
psychiatric social work, says
she intends to return to Saskatchewan's Psychiatric Services
after she completes her university course in social work
here.
Antique fair
continues
The University Women's
Club of Vancouver is holding
an antique fair this week in
the building they hope to restore.
Antiques of fifteen Greater
Vancouver antique dealers will
be on sale at Hycroft house,
1489 McRae, a longtime
Shaughnessy landmark.
A UWC spokesman said that
the group hopes to raise over
$10,000 on $1 admissions.
The fair, already underway,
will continue through September 26 from 11 a.m. to 9:30
p.m. daily.
Full  Name or  Initials
GOLD    STAMPED
ON   BRIEF   CASES.   WALLETS,   ETC.
WHILE  YOU WAIT
Percy   Tutte
Engraving Systems
319 West Pender Street
near  Victory   Square
9 a.m. - 5 p.m. MU  5-9614
MEN
• •
The Time For
Fall Rush
Is NOW
Register in the AMS  Office,
South   Brock,   for
FRATERNITY FALL RUSH
SEPT. 14-26 THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University, Press. Authorized as second-class
mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1964
Frosh arise!
Every year Freshmen at UBC are offered an easy
chance to absolve previous Froslh failures at the noble
experiment of democracy.
Every year they fall flat on their youthful faces.
Last year's Freshmen fell flatter than ever in striking a blow for apathy: only 400 of an eligible 3,000-plus
voted to elect a Frosh president and council.
This dismal tournout sparked an attempt to have
the Frosh president — and the voice of almost one-
quarter of UBC's students — removed from student
council.
The attempt failed, but another flop by Freshmen at
the polls this year would lend momentum to a successful
try.
In fairness to last year's Freshmen, it must be admitted they were handicapped by inadequate election
administration—not to mention the grand Canadian heritage of voting as little as possible.
This year, election officials are promising more polling booths and more advertising to attract voters.
But no one is offering a cure for apathy.
Freshman, heal thyself. Nominate your candidate
this week, and then get on his campaign.
Then, on election day, get out and VOTE. Tell your
friends to do the same.
If your president is removed from council this year
it won't be entirely your fault.
But it will be entirely your loss.
As the motto goes: It's up to you.
Computerization
Computers are taking over. The results of the last
U.S. and Canadian elections were predicted after the
first polls reported in. The giant computers employed by
the press have taken the fun out of waiting to see who
won what where.
Just to take a little fun out of your year at UBC
The Ubyssey shoved first day results into its special
007 computer and came out with:
RAIN—Lots more of it for the rest of the year and
dollars and dollars worth of dry cleaning bills caused by
long walks from distant parking lots.
GREATNESS—will fall upon student president Roger
McAfee. By the year 2201 he will be acclaimed the
greatest leader UBC students have ever had. In the
meantime, of course, he will have been expelled from
the university, tarred and feathered by angry students
and kicked out of B.C.
BOOKS—will cost up to 30 per cent less after the
great 1964 student-led riots in front of the bookstore.
The student co-op set up in place of the bookstore will
be able to declare a rebate of $76,000 to students at the
end of the year.
The rigors of registration
Yes, section four
You don't have any?
But
"»&_
You see, I have a Saturday job.
Now smile!
$105.65 for books?
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Residences?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Your Dwelling as outlined
on the editorial page of the
Frosh edition is structurally
impossible. The back door
forms part of the roof and the
chimney doesn't fit. You must
have an engineer on your
staff.
JAMES KALMAKOFF,
Science IV.
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I didn't like the handy-
dandy do-it-yourself residence
in your paper of Sept. 15. It
was too small for myself and
my 33 kids.
PROMETHEUS.
And  more
Editor, The Ubyssey:
May I request the publication of this letter in The
Ubyssey in order to correct
an erroneous report on page
one of the Sept. 15 issue of
my comment on the delay of
the Totem Park Residences.
I did tell your reporter that
the administration is most
concerned about the delay
because the welfare of students is involved, but in no
way did I blame the housing
administration.
The housing administration
has no control of the residences until they are completed by the contractor and
turned over to the university.
I told your reporter that the
Working teach
By Jack Ornstein
AND HOW WAS YOUR SUMMER JOB?
Remember how teacher asked each of us in turn the
above question? And we answered such things as "at the
the farm", "at camp", "at
home" and "too quickly". I
wonder how the typical frosh
at UBC would answer this
question. Hmmmmm	
"Well, I rested for 3V_ days
between my last exam and the
start of my summer job. See I
worked in this plant where I
had to stand for eight hours
in front of a large megapha-
.sizer and make sure that the
glipnaps fit the snerbs.
I  found it  highly  intellec
tually stimulating because
once in a while I'd get a faulty
glipnap and I'd get to punch
the red button on the mega-
phasizer. That happened three
times last summer. It's a good
job. I'm doing it again NEXT
summer too!
Well, I worked from eight
till five and then rushed
home, showered, ate and rested for 27 minutes. Then I called my girl and in 12 minutes
we were smoking pot, cranking up and downing pills to
get ready for the party. Then
at 11:30 we went to the party
but we were too early—most
summer parties start at 1 or
2—except on the weekends
when they start anywhere between 2 and 4 a.m. The NEXT
day (already).
Anyway, we go to the party,
and we're high as kites, and
so's everyone else, teacher, so
we just sit around (in the
present tense now) telling ourselves that the whole damn
world's gone to pot. I mean
it's shot to hell . . . not hooked
on 'pot'!. Then we kick out
anyone who smiled during the
last week and we go higher—
till we find lost lagoon. (Did
you ever sit at Lost Lagoon at
midnight in the summer—and
hear the 9 o'clock gun?) Then
I take the chick home by 3:30
and it's to bed. So I get home
by 6, shoot 10 oz. of barbitu-
ate, and go into a deep catatonic 'state so's to be rested
for work at 8.
Then, teacher, I took 2 days
off before I registered at UBC
after which I needed 6 days
rest in the hospital. I saved
73c from my 4V_ months work
and I get a loan of $1,500 to
cover the rest of my tuition
and then I . . . hey . . . teacher
. . look! . . . she's going to
jump out the window .....
contract required completion
by Sept. 1. I said on that basis,
Mr. Haar, the Administrator
of Housing, had every right
to believe that the residences
would be ready, so he went
ahead as usual receiving applications from students to
occupy them.
However, knowing that in
a project of this size delays
might occur, Mr. Haar also
had a plan -which he put into
effect in early July to have
alternative temporary housing available. I said this is
what I would expect any prudent administrator to do. In
short, I had no fault to find
at all with the performance
of the" housing administrator
The penalty clause was inserted in contracts for the
Lower Mall housing project
some years ago because the
residences involved the welfare of the students, and delay would be a serious inconvenience to them, which the
administration seeks to prevent.
W. WHITE,
Bursar  and  Treasurer.
EDITOR: Mike Horsey
Editors:
News              Tim Padmore
Managing     Janet Matheson
City  Tom Wayman
Art      Don Hume
Sports       George Reamsbottom
CUP         Lorraine Shore
Associate       Mike Hunter
Associate    ..      Ron Riter
Magazine        _  Dave Ablett
*      *      *
Reporters and Desk . . . The city
editor is half crazed and can't remember all the faces to fit the names
of the mob who turned up. He says
thanks, and come again, it was
charming having you or something
Vike that. Tuesday, September 22, 1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
CASH COMES AND GOES
Statement of Estimated Gross R evenue and Proposed Expenditure
for the
YEAR  ENDING  MAY  31,  1965
REVENUE:
Direct to AMS:
Alma Mater Society Fees  $ 435,000
Rental Income  2,300
Interest Income  15,000
Sundry Income     3,000
Revenue from Subsidiary Organizations:
AMS Charter Flight	
Campus Activities and Events	
College Shop	
Publicaions Advertising 	
Publications Sales	
Undergraduate Societies, etc	
University Clubs Commmittee	
Revenue of Associated Organizations:
Grad Class	
Men's Athletics
Women's Athletics-.
49,050
52,988
22,100
32,150
16,288
66,317
28,968
14,000
33,700
4,400
$ 455,300
Total Revenue
267,861
52,100
$ 775,261
ALLLOCATTON OF FEES COLLECTED:
Non-Discretionary:
Student Union Building	
Accident Benefit Fund	
Brock Art Fund	
Brock Management Fund-
Canadian Union of Students.
Men's Athletic Committee
Women's Athletic Committee	
World University Service Committee-
Discretionary:
Undergraduate Societies, etc.
Intramural Fund
Open House Reserve..
EXPENDITURE:
AMS and Subsidiary Organizations:
AMS Charter Flight	
Campus Activities and Events	
College Shop	
Publications  	
Registration Photographs	
University Clubs Committee	
Administrative and General Expenses-
Associated Organizations:
Grad Class-
Men's Athletics	
Women's Athletics.
$ 225,000
3,000
1,500
7,500
6,025
63,000
12,000
15,000
76,206
1,500
1,000
49,050
69,263
20,000
71,438
4,200
34,318
43,150
14,000
33,700
4,400
333,025
78,706
*   MARGIN
Total Allocation and Expenditure
291,419
52,100
1
755.250
20,011
$ 775,261
...TO THESE GROUPS, THINGS
Statement of Estimated Net Revenue and Proposed Expenditure for
Year ending May 31, 1965
REVENUE
Proposed 1965
Alma Mater Society Fees  $ 435,000
Profit from College Shop  2,100
Rental Income  2,300
Interest Income.
Sundry Income..
 ,       15,000
  3,000
Total Revenue..
$ 457,400
ALLOCATION OF FEES COLLECTED:
Non Discretionary:
Winter Sports Centre..
^
8
Student Union Building	
Accident Benefit Fund	
Brock Art Fund 	
Brock Management Fund	
Canadan Union of Students...
Men's Athletic Commitee	
Women's Athlete Committee. 	
World University Servce Committee-
Discretionary:
Undergraduate Societies-
Academic Symposium	
Grad Students Ass'n.
Rado Society	
Intramural Fund	
Open House Reserve	
Men's Athletic Committee.	
Women's Athletic Committee..
225,000
3,000
1,500
7,500
6,025
63,000
12,000
15,000
333,025
8,839
400
400
250
1,500
1,000
Pet. of Budget
95.10%
0.46
0.50
3.28
0.66
100.00%
49.19%
0.66
0.33
1.64
1.31
13.77
2.62
3.28
12,389
72.80
1.93
0.09
0.09
0.05
0.33
0.22
2.71
1964 Total
$ 339,985
1,999
2,042
4,785
50
$ 348,861
65,135
72,335
2,749
1,500
6,874
5,586
57,737
10,998
13,747
236,661
10,469
404
350
1,392
1,400
1,375
2,400
EXPENDITURE:
Campus Activities and Events.
Publications..
Regstration Photographs	
University Clubs Committee	
Administrative and General Expenses..
16,275
3.56
23,000
5.03
4,200
0.92
5,350
1.17
43,150
9.43
91,975
MARGIN
Total Allocation and Expenditure      437,389
20,011
$ 457,400
20.11
95.62
4.38
100.00%
* Excess of Expenditure over Revenue
l&Mfe-iM&v&'W?
17,790
25,199
30,196
5,428
5,873
43,362
110,058
364,509
*(15,648)
$ 348,861
gj^j^gg-^^g
After bad year
Kyle tightens
the AMS belt
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey council reporter
Hold the line is the theme of the 1964-65 Alma Mater
Society budget,  as unveiled  by  treasurer  Kyle Mitchell.
Mitchell, in an attempt to
prevent a recurrence of last
year's financial disaster when
the AMS overspent its budget
by some $15,500, plans to keep
a tight fist around the money
he has and tie as many strings
as possible on that which gets
away.
But still,  new wrinkles are
being added to the AMS's program for Joe Student.
INTRAMURALS
The major wrinkle occurs on
the athletic fields, where AMS
has taken over control of intramural sports.
Mitchell is setting aside
$1,500 for a special AMS department, headed by former P.
E. undergrad president Norm
Olenick, in an attempt to expand the scope of campus intra-
murals as well as its efficiency.
Dropped from the Athletic
budget along with intramurals
is an AMS discretionary grant
(last year amounting to $3,700
total for men and women).
However, with the increase in
enrollment this year, the 64-65
non-discretionary Athletic
grant will more than match
last year's overall total.
More on budge.
Poge 6
Coming under special scrutiny from treasurer Mitchell
will be the undergraduate societies, especially those in debt.
(Some undergraduate societies,
particularly engineering and
science, are nearly $1,000 in
the hole.)
The hiring of an assistant
business manager will enable
the AMS to keep tabs, more
closely on where subsiduary
organizations are spending
their money, says Mitchell.
EFFICIENCY
"Efficiency will be the keyword this year."
The budget, though largest
in the history of the AMS, will
also be the tightest. The margin (traditionally a cushion
fund from which unforeseen
expenses are met) is being reduced from a constitutionally
fixed 5 per cent to 4.3 per cent
of the total budget.
"The constitution demands
that 5 per cent be set aside for
margin, but it does not say 5
per cent of what," jokes Mitchell.
"We are taking it to mean,
this year, five per cent of the
discretionary allocations. This
year's margin is well over
that."
Joking aside, Mitchell says
he is going to sit hard on his
margin this year, to try to
build up the surplus that was
slashed by last year's disaster.
If the interest on the $200,-
000 of the Bank of MoMntreal's
35-year rental of facilities in
SUB is applied to the AMS expenditures for this year, it
could save the day by bringing
an extra $10,000 into the fold.
But no matter how far-sighted Mitchell has been, it will
still be a slim year for fances—
at least through the eyes of the
AMS  subsidiaries.
Shirts &
Sweaters
for School!
Styles
Designed  for  the
College Man
41st at Yew
Young Men's
traditional clothing
in  Kerrisdale
INTRAMURALS  MANAGERS'
COMMITTEE MEETING
Monday, September 28, at 12:30 p.m.
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
Room 211
All managers or group  representatives  are
urged   to   attend    this   important   meeting.
Norman F. B. Olenick   '
Asst.  Director Intramurals Page 6
THI      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 22, 1964
To groups
Here's
dough
the way
» doled
4
Student explosion
forces overtime
Overcrowding has forced
North America's largest undergraduate geography faculty into overtime.
The honour of the above
title has put noon-hour classes
into UBC's Geography 101.
The only available lecture
hall is full at all other times
except 4:30 p.m. and maps necessary to the course cannot be
moved from room to room. The
2,200 gegraphers make their
building the most crowded in
North America.
Relief will come two years
from now when forestry, now
using the lecture hall part-time,
moves out.
Here are other facts and figures from the student Alma
Mater Society's proposed budget:
Academic activities $ 5 5 0
(446); CUS committee 500 (3,-
128); CUSO 175 (219); Conference expense 6,000 (7,542); Debating union 500 (431); Frosh
orientation 900 (919); Frosh retreat 750 (985); Homecoming
0 (2,346); Leadership conference 750 (782); Mamooks 0
(-545); NFCUS charter flight 0
(216); Open house 0 (1,327);
Special Events 6,150 (5,447).
Totals: $16,257 ($25,199).
• •    •
PUBLICATIONS
Student directory $-1,400
(-314); Sundry publications 450
(166); Tuum Est 1,550 (1,958);
Totem 4,800 (9,305); Ubyssey
17,600 ($19,081).
Totals: $23,000 ($30,196).
• •    •
ADMINISTRATIVE
Office salaries $27,800 (22,-
709); Student Government expenses: Dinner meetings 1,200
(1,129); Entertaining 650 (1,-
323); Travel 700 (986); Elections and general meetings 650
(907); Higher education promotion 150 (2,652); Other expenses 800 (1,721); Stationery
and office expenses 600 (321);
Honoraria, gifts and donations
2,500 (2,880).
Insurance $400 (395); Telephone and telegrams 4,000 (3,-
915); postage 400 (359); audit
and legal 900 (825); bank
charges 0 (0); public relations
expense 500 (598); depreciation
expense 600 (655); repairs and
maintenance 300 (205); vice-
president's expense 0 (29);
housing co-ordinator's expense
1,00 (1,653).
Totals: $43,150 ($43,362).
• •    •
COMPUTATION OF
NON DISCRETIONARY
ALLOCATIONS
Winter Sports Centre $0 (65,-
135); Student Union Building
225,000 (75,865); Accident Benefit Fund 3,000 (2,820); Brock
Art Fund 1,500 (1,500); Brock
Management Fund 7,500 (7,-
050);   Canadian Union of Stu*
! deijts 6,025 (5,710); Men's Athletic Committee 63,000 (59,-
220); Women's Athletic Committee 12,000 (11,280); World
University Service Committee
15,000  (14,100).
v    Totals: $333,025 ($242,680).
s    CUS $6,025 ($5,710).
DOUGH doler Kyle Mitchell,
AMS treasurer, is man responsible for budget.
There too?
ALGIERS (UNS) — Three
engineers and four frosh were
injured last week in student
riots here.
The students were protesting
rising book prices at a university bookstore.
"It could never happen at
UBC," said an informed bookstore source.
UNDERGRAD BUDGETS
Prop. Est,
Alloc. Rev. Alloc.
1965 1965 1964
Agriculture    $   425 $5,194 $  360
Architecture            154 637 300
Arts              — 4,057 585
Associated Women Students ___         — — 25
B. Comm.—C.A. Students          — 129 129
Commerce           725 3,958 617
Education        1,100 7,514 850
Engineering        1,490 14,215 1,250
Forestry             300 8,964 250
Frosh             — 500 •*-
Home Economics         275 2,252 275
Law           900 3,006 675
Librar.              — — —
Medical         900 1,497 700
Music   , „       260 755 200
Nursing        265 857 200
Pharmacy    :        300 3,051 225
Phys. Ed.             235 1,413 200
Rehab. Med.        120 709 80
Science             840 3,637 675
Social Work          — — —
USC             — — 150
Margin             550 — 500
$8,839 $62,345 $8,246
Academic  Symposium    $   400 $ 2,282 $   500
Grad. Stud.  Assn.    $   400 $ 6,450 $   350
Radsoc    $   250 $ 5,129 $   200
NICKEL. ..its contribution is QUALITY
Alumni wanted
Did you attend the Royal
Conservatory of Music in Toronto? If you did, you're eligible
to join the Vancouver Alumni
Association. Further information is available from Miss
Winnifred Ney, RE 3-1456.
DAVIE' FULTON
Thursday,   6-8   p.m.
Lower Mall - Common Blk.
FRIDAY - 6-8 p.m.
Fort  Camp   Lounge
FREE COFFEE
Sponsored by
UBC Conservativa Club
HOW INCO HELPED MAKE GAS TURBINE ENGINES MORE EFFICIENT
On May 15, 1941, a new era was born as a Gloster aircraft streaked across the English countryside, powered by
Frank Whittle's invention, the gas turbine, or jet engine.
Since that memorable day, great strides have been made
in further development of the gas turbine. And Inco has
made its contribution, right from the beginning. Since that
time, International Nickel'sresearch laboratories have pro
duced improved materialsforturbine blades and combustion chamber parts. In 1962, a nickel-containing cast alloy
was developed that permitted gas turbines to operate at
even higher engine temperature, thus enhancing operating efficiency. These developments are examples of
Inco's continuing research contribution which, for some
sixty years, has led to improved techniques and products.
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
. 55 YONGE STREET. TORONTO Tuesday, September 22, 1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
-*.
•liim
•. *$
""*«-:_
MYSTERY PICKET
. . . 'science corrupts'
'Students
could lose
control'
'They're  atheists
Mystery picket
raps symposium
Like, help stamp out science.
Or at least, help stamp out
the science symposium.
An unidentified picketer invaded the Buchanan quad Monday noon carrying a sign which
read "Protect the young minds
of our youth. Boycott the
science symposium."
• •   •
The   picketer   charged   the
science symposium was organized by a "group of self .seeking atheists."
"It's not a learned gathering
of intelligent people, it is an
ignorant gathering of stupid
people," he said.
• • •
He protested against the lecture to be given by Dr. G. M.
Griffiths of the physics department on the topic The Universe
our Home: God Dethroned.
"Who does he think he is
with his miserable Van de
Graaf generator?" said the
picketer.
The lecture will be given
Wednesday noon in Buchanan
106.
• • •
After speaking for 15 minutes the picketer led a group
of interested students to the
Alma Mater Society office in
Brock Hall where he and a
helper announced the AMS was
at fault for sponsoring the
symposium.
After ten minutes in Brock
he left and went back to Buchanan where he walked up and
down the ground floor displaying his placard.
Science Symposum chairman Mouamed Yalpani told
The Ubyssey that Griffiths' lecture would not consider the
question of atheism.
• •   •
"The question of God is not
at stake," he said.
He explained that the purpose of the symposium would
be to see man, not only in the
perspective of the earth, but
also in the universe.
The picketer said that he
would picket the meeting Wednesday.
• •   •
Huts still
make up
10 percent
Ten per cent of UBC's three
million square feet of classroom space is still in army
huts.
President John Macdonald
made the statement in an address to the Friends of the University organization on his
new, five-year building program.
The $30 million program
will add close to one million
square feet to the present
three million.
The program includes buildings now under construction:
a multi-purpose Commerce-
Arts building costing $2.5 million, an Education building
costing $900,000, a Dentistry
building and Basic Sciences
building, costing $4.2 million,
and a Library addition, costing
$900,000.
In 1965-66, the program provides for a Forestry-Agriculture complex costing $3.4 million and a Music building costing $1.6 million.
Aggie college asks aid
from well-fed students
By JOAN GODSELL
UBC students will be asked
next week to help build an
agriculture school in Mysore,
India.
The school is being built
under the United Nations'
Freedom from Hunger program and will be attended by
students from 12 different
South-East Asian countries.
In support of this project,
Prime Minister Pearson has
declared next week National
Mysore Week and has authorized a nation-wide campaign to
raise the necessary $400,000.
Mike Coleman, chairman of
UBC's Mysore drive, said Monday a program is being planned
to tell people about the project and to urge them to contribute.
"We've scheduled several
movies and speakers," he said.
Printed bookmarks will be
distributed and printed menus
will appear in the cafeterias,
promoting the drive.
"The Aggies, UN Club,
CUSO and WUS will canvas
the campus with little tin cans
and will soapbox in front of
the library," said Coleman.
"We hope the undergraduate
societies will make a nominal
donation, too," he said.
Coleman emphasized the agricultural school at Mysore is
a step in the right direction
because it is a self-help project.
"The politically explosive
economic situation in India
cannot be solved by gifts of
wheat," he said.
'It's up to us to help these
countries to help themselves,"
said Coleman.
Actors wanted
for visit drama
Actors are still needed for
the Frederic Wood Theatre
production of Friedrich Dur-
renmatt's The Visit.
Many roles are still available. Men are especially needed
to complete the 42-member
cast.
Budding thespians will be
able to audition for these parts
from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Rehearsals
will be one to three times a
week until the show opens November 20.
NOTICE
Public showing of original collection of Student Newspaper signs—obtained across Canada at great risk and
expense—eg Mid-Victoria U of T and modern abstract
Martlet.
Roger McAfee, president of
the Alma Mater Society, fears
students will lose control of
the organization.
In a six-page brief on professionalism in the A.M.S. McAfee reported a budget increase of $686,000 from ten
years ago.
But, he added, only one new
staff member was hired.
As a result, the AJVf.S. has
been pushing for more employees which caused the concern
for professionalism.
To circumvent this, McAfee
suggests:
"The A.M.S. should be split
into two facets, the first being
policy making and the second
implementation of policy."
He also wants all employees
implementing financial policy
to keep in constant touch with
the Treasurers. He recommends
the AMS President should be
hired during the summer—as
McAfee was—to cope with an
ever-increasing load.
Attention! Engineers and Architects
"I don't know how much
effect my efforts had," he said,
"They are just the efforts of
one individual."
Our number's up
An estimated 20,000 persons
are on the UBC campus for the
first Week.
There are 15,000 day students, ^ 2,000 faculty and staff
and 3,000 from night school.
All Former
English 100
Students
Read This!
If you obtained a first
class in English 100 last year
and if your notes are legible
and reasonably well organized, you should get in touch
with us immediately by
phoning 738-6375 or 733-
3614 (evenings).
Several sets of notes are
wanted. Your prompt action upon reading this ad
ery very well result in
rd cash in your pocket.
:euffel^<essep:CO.
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS
FAVORITE
TRADS  MARK
N 9326 FAVORITE DRAWING SET, in  velvet lined cote.
Regular  Price $22.75 — Special  to  Students  $13.65
See this and other Values in
T-Squares - Slide Rules - Scales, etc.
at "British Columbia's Engineering Supply House
VANCAL REPRODUCTIONS LTD.
1170 ROBSON   STREET      -       PHONE  683-6684
Exclusive  Distributors for  K &  E rage o
Tuesday, September 22, 1964
Belated luxury
On one wall is a large brick
fireplace over which hang copper plagues bearing the names
of pioneer B.C. physicians.
An oak balcony which encircles the upper section of the
room will house—in glass cases
—the library's collection of
rare books.
The library, which has a
capacity for more than 100,000
volumes, now contains 55,000
volumes consisting of general
volumes, periodicals, and rare
books.
Library cool as
stewed cucumber
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
The Woodward Library will soon be one pf the better
buildings on campus. It's the first fully &r-conditioned
building at UBC . . . but the temperature inside last week
was a sweltering 80 degrees.
"Maybe it's not working
yet," one of the librarians replied when questioned by The
Ubyssey.
The humidity and temperature are regulated for the comfort of the volumes in the library, not for the comfort of the
faculty and students, she  said.
And other features of the
new building still aren't quite
right.
All the electric clocks say
9:00, no matter what time it is.
And there are no typewriters
in the typing room.
The path up to the main door
is wet cement so you have to
go in through the basement.
Very little of the new furniture is in yet. The study car-
rells have not yet been installed.
"Workmen are still finishing
off the inside and scraps litter
parts of the floors and stairs.
But when these problems are
cleaned up the new Woodward
library will be a beautiful addition to UBC.
The floor-to-ceiling windows,
recessed ceiling lighting and
basically white interior colour
scheme are expected to make
the new building bright and
cheerful.
The library has its own
photostating machine and elevator. White intercom phones
are located on every floor in
the stacks.
Feature spot of the new library is the two-story Charles
Woodward Memorial Room,
panelled in oak.
MALCOLM SCOn
. . . new office
Frogs' legs
PARIS (UNS)—A delegation
of French Canadian chefs will
visit this city later this month.
Observers say the French
Canadians are most interested
in frogs legs.
Scott squeezes bulk
into  roomier office
By STEVE BROWN
Former UBC student president Malcolm Scott, who inhabited a Brock Hall cubby-hole last year, is moving into
an Ottawa office bordering Parliament Hill.
Scott,
26, was recently ac-i
claimed vice-president of the
Canadian Union of Students. In
Ottawa he will be conveniently
close to CUS' prime lobbying
target: the federal government.
From CUS national headquarters in downtown Ottawa,
a concentrated lobby for a full-
scale federal scholarship program will be directed at Parliament, one short block north.
Scott's full-time position,
paying approximately $3,700
per year, is open to anyone
who has not been out of university longer than two years.
AMS president Roger McAfee said Monday CUS expects
implementation     within     two
years of some form of the 10,-
000 scholarship program promised in the Liberal's 1963 campaign.
He said the program proposed by the UBC delegation to
the national congress in Toronto last week was accepted in
total.
Besides the scholarship
drive, it includes:
A national student means
survey, with probable assistance from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and International Business Machines.
A brief to the federal Bladen
Commission on university financing. This will likely include
the means survey.
Money
raised
for fund
The Three University Capital Fund Project is trying to
raise $28 million for capital
construction at UBC, Victoria
University and a Simon Fraser
Academy.
Progress to date: $3.6 million.
McMillan, Bloedel and Powell River has donated $2 million; Crown Zellerbach Canada Ltd., $750,000; Rayonier
Canada, $350,000; B.C. Forest
Products, $400,00; and B.C.
Hydro, $100,000.
If the drive is successful
UBC will get $11,760,000; SFA,
$11,760,000 and Victoria University, $4,480,000.
Premier W. A. C. Bennett
has announced an outright
grant of $40.7 million to be
spread over the next five years,
$18 million to SFA, $18 million to UBC, and $4.7 million
to Victoria University.
Because of immediate need
for new construction SFA will
receive the first $4 million
raised by the capital fund.
This amount will be included
in their total share.
High Scoring
University Fashions
authenticated by
RICHARDS & FARISH LTD.
YOU will find your COMPLETE wardrobe here at the one stop shop that has EVERYTHING, the very
newest sweaters, true Traditional shirts, goodlookin g slacks, popular colors in natural shoulder Btazer*
and Sportscoats, Campus coats and Casualwear.
TWO  SHOPS  TO  SERVE  YOU   BETTER
Richard & Farish Men's Wear      The College Shop
Right next to the Royal Bank, Granville at Robson Street
786 Granville Street
Corner of Robson & Granville
786 Granville St. Tuesday, September 22, 1964
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 9
Frosh deflated
Freddie Frosh
goes missing
Freddy Frosh has disappeared.
But he should be quite easy
to recognize if you see him.
He is 25 feet high and looks
like Santa Claus.
The huge figure was to be
used by the Frosh Orientation
Committee to publicize the six-
week orientation program.
Committee pro, Dave Graham, told The Ubyssey Monday the figure, which had
been used by a department
store for a Christmas display,
had been left behind Brock
when it disappeared Friday.
"It must have been Buildings
and Grounds or the Engineers,"
he said.
But the program is going on
anyway, with or without
Freddy.
This weekend 150 Frosh and
upperclassmen go to Elphinstone for the two day Frosh
Retreat.
Guest speaker at the Cairn
ceremony and reception Sept.
30 will be Dean Blythe Eagles
of the Faculty of Agriculture,
one of the organizers of the
Great Trek
And on Oct. 3 the queens'
reception will be followed at
8:30 p.m. by the Frosh Reception Dance.
Entertainment will be provided by Brick Henderson and
his band and San Francisco
blues and folk singer, Don
Crawford.
Highlight of the evening will
be the selection and crowning
of the Frosh Queen from
among 27 candidates.
Graham predicted that the
dance would be successful.
"The frosh class have proved
themselves pretty well through
the mixers," he said, "We expect as big a turnout at the
frosh reception."
Frosh help
themselves
Orientation week is for the
Frosh but they don't know
about it.
Or if they do they couldn't
care less.
Orientation lectures are
given the first week of each
year to acquaint new students
with campus life.
The Ubyssey asked some
Frosh what they think of the
lectures.
"What orientation lectures?"
and "I've been told they're a
waste of time," were two typical answers.
The Frosh who did know
about the lectures either read
about them in The Ubyssey or
had friends who told them.
However this too can lead to
non-attendance as it did with
one   pretty   co-ed.   She   said,
CUS urges
dual school
for fair
TORONTO (CUP) — The
Canadian Union of Students
wants a bilingual university
for the 1967 World Exhibition
in Montreal.
CUS voted to ask Ottawa, the
Quebec government and the
Montreal municipal government to set up the university
at the 28th national congress
held here last week.
The resolution added that
the proposed university should
reflect the cultural duality of
Canada without creating a conflict between federal and provincial educational jurisdictions.
The resolution was drafted
by the University of B.C.
Opposition to an earlier, similar motion centred around
dictation of educational priorities to the Quebec government.
It was also criticized for
proposing modifications to
buildings which in some cases
are already under construction at the fair site.
The B.C. motion was limited
to an endorsation of the bilingual university proposal
now being considered by the
federal government in Ottawa.
"Yes, I heard about them but
I was advised not to go." It
turned out that the advisor was
her boyfriend.
The boys' answers standardized into "I can get along
without them."
The best reason for non-attendance was given by a first
year male. "I didn't have anyone to come out with and I
was afraid," he said.
Finally finding two Frosh
who did attend I asked their
opinions on the lectures. The
girl replied, "Useless, no one
asked any questions so I'm still
lost" — she was eating her
lunch outside the girl's washroom.
Her male counterpart said,
"They were good. I learned
some new jokes."
FATHER BAUER
. . . keynotes
Library
to close
at midnight
The main library will be
completely operational as of
today providing the contractors
complete the entrances to the
main stacks, said Robert Harris, Circulation Librarian.
If not the stacks will open
Wednesday. The rest of the
building is now keeping its
normal hours.
The College Library will be
open until midnight Monday to
Friday this year.
Harris said all study areas in
the Library, except the stacks,
are open to students for study.
100 Frosh cast off
for weekend retreat
Who undersells
bookstore? all
The booksore is undersold.
Again.
This time it's lab coats and
the College Shop.
A short lab coat at the College Shop sells for $3.95 and
a long one for $4.95, compared with $4.50 and $5.50 at
the bookstore. And the material is heavier.
Frosh! Cast off for a weekend at Elphinstone.
A hundred Frosh, the 15
Frosh Queen candidates, 30
upper classmen, and 10 to 15
professors will embark Friday
for Frosh Retreat at YMCA
Amp Elphinstone.
The Retreat, sponsored by
the Alma Mater Society, is for
Frosh interested in student activities.
• •    •
This year the theme of the
Retreat will be the question of
extracurricular activities in the
academic world. Main speaker
is Father Bauer, coach of last
year's Olympic hockey team.
The weekend will be filled
with discussions, a debate,
dances, skits, sports, and sing-
alongs.
The weekend will cost $6
per Frosh. Application forms
can be obtained at the residence or the AMS office and
should be turned in by Wednesday.
"Almost all the candidates
in the Frosh council elections
attend Frosh retreat," said
Gavin Hume, Frosh Retreat
committee chairman.
• •    •
'We have more applications
this year due to better publicity," he said, "but there are
still room for more."
"We hope to stimulate interest in the Frosh election," he
said.
Last year, due to lack of organization and interest, there
was almost no Frosh election.
• •    •
Because of lack of publicity
and two confusing sets of rules,
only 11 candidates were nominated for eight positions. Five
of these eight positions were
filled by acclamation. Only 400
of the 2,000 Frosh voted in
last year's election.
'Last year was a bit of a mix-
up,"   said   Jason   Leask,   last
Welcome Students!
Your Campus headquarters for
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RADIOS-ELECTRONIC REPAIRS
Best selection in the city of Classical, Baroque,
Concert, Medieval, and Renaissance recordings.
Many labels to choose from, including imported
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STUDENT   DISCOUNTS  AVAILABLE
on presentation of A.M.S. Card
ALEXANDER & AXELSON APPLIANCES LTD.
4558 W. 10th Ave. CA 4-6811
year's Frosh president and organizer of this year's election.
Nominations for Frosh offices open September 23. A
copy of the election rules and
procedures can be picked up
at the AMS office.
'Critics   shines
Why don't you?
The Ubyssey critics page
scintillates every Friday in
Paye Friday (Ubyssey Weekend  Magazine).
The standards are outrage-
ousy high; the material noxiously intellectual. If you are
outrageously noxious, consid-
Ubyssey offce in Brock Hall.
The critics page can accommodate painting and
graphics critics, one or two
drama crtics, odd bookre-
viewers, several music critics
and absolutely no movie
critics.
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SEE  BETTER
LOOK  BETTER
WITH
CONTACT LENSES
At a Reasonable Price
LAWRENCE CALVERT
Call: MU 3-1816
705   Birks  Bids-
9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.    -    Saturday till noon
Slacks for
School!
One  of  many  Back
to School features
at
V     * LTD
41st at Yew
Young Men's
traditional clothing
in  Kerrisdale Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 22, 1964
WATER, WATER everywhere ... in shoes, pant cuffs and
down  behind coat collars.   Damp  students wait in  line-up  in
—photo by don hume
front of bookstore cum-fieldhouse while dry commissionaire
inside controls flood of bookbuyers from swamping busy clerks.
Anti-Red Ensign
CUS backs flag,
lower vote age
TORONTO (CUP)—The Canadian Union of Students
has called for a distinctive Canadian flag and the right to
vote federally at age 18.
Meeting at York University,
the congress passed a motion
supporting the adoption of a
distinctive Canadian flag other
than the Union Jack and Red
Ensign.
The universities of New
Brunswick and Moncton presented the motion.
Some delegates expressed
opposition to the union, taking
a stand on a national issue on
which political parties have
already drawn battle lines.
A motion, which contained
a condemnation of the tactics
employed in the House of
Commons during the flag debate was earlier defeated.
The flag motion was the
fourth passed by a CUS congress in the past four years.
The motion endorsing the
18-year-old vote was presented
by the universities of Ottawa
and Saskatchewan, Regina
campus.
Regina said lowering the
voting age would make CUS
a political force in Canada.
Both motions were passed on
weighted votes. The weighted
vote distributes votes to each
CUS member according to the
size of its student enrolment.
It's all Greek
PRETORIA (CUP) — South
Africa's Radio Bantu serves
five language groups — Zulu,
3Chosa, North Sotho, South
Sotho and Tswana — with a
total coverage of about 63
hours a day.
There are over one million
listeners. About 30 per cent
own their sets.
CUS asks
hate mail
crackdown
TORONTO (CUP)—Canada's
postmaster - general will be
asked to halt the distribution
of hate literature.
The move was decided by
the Canadian Union of Students following reports that
students at nine member
campuses received hate literature during the past year.
The resolution also recommended local CUS committees
investigate the existence of
prejudice at universities.
McGill University, which
moved the resolution, told delegates most of the hate literature was mailed to students,
but some was left in bundles
in hallways at the universities.
Apparently students with
non-Jewish sounding names
listed in the school's student
directory were put on the
mailing list.
A University of Western
Ontario delegate said he received anti-semitic letters and
pamphlets through the mail in
February, March and April of
this year. Several letters
called distinguished visitors
and guest lecturers at Western
as Communists.
The McGill delegation reported hate literature was also
received by students of the
Universities of Toronto, Alberta, Waterloo, Loyola, Dalhousie, New Brunswick, York and
Western Ontario..
Laval plans protest
against Queens visit
TORONTO (CUP)—Students at Laval University will
demonstrate against the Queen when she visits Quebec
Oct. 11.
Student council president, Michel Letelier, said Laval
students will demonstrate no matter what steps are taken
by authorities.
He said students will ask city authorities for permission to organize a protest march as required by law.
If permission is refused, they will demonstrate on the
Laval campus, he said.
Letelier said the students do not want to cause trouble,
but they feel they must demonstrate because they do not
want any British ties.
NOTICE
Public showing of original collection of Student Newspaper signs—obtained across Canada at great risk and
expense—eg Mid-Victoria U of T and modern abstract
Martlet.
Last page
plug for
platypi
By AL  DONALD
Clubsters, take note: This
year the Ubyssey, public service-minded organ of the AMS,
will continue its 'Tween
Classes column.
In this column are found the
various announcements club
executives wish to communicate to their disciples. They
also use it to boost the membership of their club.
'Tween classes appears daily
on the last page of the paper.
Deadline is 12:30 p.m. the day
before publication. Notices go
in a little box just inside the
Ubyssey office in North Brock.
For example, the members
of the Duckbilled Platypi Pet
Owners Club might put in
this series of announcements
thru the  year:
"All students interested in
owning and breeding Duckbilled Platypi meet in Aggie
Barn, noon Wednesday."
Later, "Dr. Laurence T.
Fidget will speak to the Duckbilled Platypi Pet Owners
Club Wednesday noon. His
subject will be 'The Breeding
Habits of the Duckbilled Platypus.' "
And even: 'Duckbilled Platypi Pet Owners Club annual
dance, The Mammalian Mash,
Friday 8:30 p.m., Brock Hall.
Fifty cents a couple. Door
prizes galore. Three hundred
baby duckbilled platypi must
go!"
HEALTH PLAN BENEFITS
FOR ONLY
$8.00 PER YEAR
Until September 30, 1964, all students eligible for
care at the University Health Service may obtain the special
M-S-l plan which covers most kinds of medical and surgical care
not available on campus.
This is the fifth year of this popular plan — and dues
for single students are $8.00.
A Family Plan is also available for $21.00 a year, to
provide a plan of medical care for spouses and children under
21 years.
THIS WILL COVER YOU FROM OCTOBER  1,  1964,
TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1965
Closing Date is September 30,1964
Get the  Details  Now at the  Accounting  Office
in   the   Administration   Building
Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday - Friday
Sponsored by the Board of Governors
and Your Student Council Tuesday, September 22,, 1964
THE      UBYSSEY
-Page..11
IFOR THE BIRDS
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Several questions are looking eagerly for answers as
this column goes to press.
Where, when and how (like with whose money) is the
new varsity sports stadium going to be built? The old stadium stands where the new SUB building is going to be built,
and hence will be torn down by next fall.
This means the UBC football, soccer and rugby teams
will have to find alternative locations for home games until
the proposed new stadium is completed.
But what alternative locations are available? Empire
Stadium is too expensive. Callister Park is booked for soccer
games. Capilano Stadium has a tender turf which can take
only a fraction of the punishment UBC's teams give the old
varsity stadium. Brockton Oval is booked for city rugby
action. And so it goes down the list.
Yet Athletic officials have already set up a' partial schedule for next year including a full slate of home games. Maybe
they have a secret which makes them so confident. Or maybe
they're hoping for a miracle.
• •    •
Some pleasing developments on the Thunderbird hockey
scene have made this writer more optimistic about our puck-
sters chances of success in the coming season. By the next
edition of this paper it is hoped the reasons for the change
of heart can be revealed.
The most frustrated frowns on campus must belong to
members of our T'Bird football team. In the two games they
have played this year they have twice gone into the fourth
quarter leading their opposition, only to come out losers.
The reason for these collapses—as assistant coach Joe
Davies explains it—is sheer physical exhaustion. Not having
enough experienced ball players the Birds must play several
of their key players two ways. Against Montana and Western Washington who rotated two full teams against our one,
it is surprising the Birds were able to hang on so long.
In order to solve their experienced manpower shortage
Davies and head coach Frank Gnup have continued their
intense training program. They hope to develop some younger
players quick enough to start them this Saturday, thus relieving key players from double duty.
• •    *
When Joe Johnson's Thunderbird soccer club plays its
Pacific Coast League season opener this Saturday, against
North Shore United, it will mark the end of one great
struggle by Johnson and the beginning of another.
For three years Johnson has personally maintained an
intensive (and often behind the scenes) campaign to have his
Birds admitted into the PCL.
The Coast league clubs claimed his teams weren't good
enough but reconsidered after Johnsons led the Birds to the
Mainland first division championship the last two years in a
row. The Birds had a winning record in exhibition games
with PCL teams in this period and also managed to win the
highly prized Provincial Cup to boot.
• •    •
There were also difficulties ironing out schedule problems with the Athletic office as Coast League clubs are unable to play on weekdays because most of their players have-,
jobs. Also the next two years the Football and Rugby teams
have the stadium booked on weekends (next year these clubs
may, of course, be as homeless as the soccer team). This problem was solved by scheduling almost all of the soccer games
away from home.
But Johnson has achieved one of his fondest goals and is
just happy to be in the Coast league. His plans to finish no
less than first in Canada's top soccer league reveal his ever
optimistic nature.
The Birds lost captain Jim Jamieson and winger Moses
Luy from last year's regulars, but have come up with several
excellent replacements. Among these are John Wasylik—one
of the best half-backs to wear a Bird uniform—and forward
John Haar. Both were key men on UBC's championship team
of two years ago but were unable to play last year. Another
is Noel Cummings who played wing half for North Shore
United last season.
Trekkers relive memories
at 42nd Cairn ceremony
The forty-second anniversary of the Great Trek will
be commemorated at the annual Cairn Ceremony, 8 p.m.,
Wednesday, September 30.
The first annual Cairn dinner will be held at Brock
Hall on the evening of the event. David Brock, noted Television writer, will speak on "How to brainwash frosh."
A torchlight procession led by a pipe band and led by
parade marshall Dr. Malcolm McGregor will include the
university Senate, Board of Governors, and Student Council representatives.
At the Cairn, Aggie Dean Blythe Eagles will speak on,
"The history and significance of the Cairn."
After the dean's address there will be an open reception at the Brock.
Tickets to the Cairn dinner can be obtained at the
Alma Mater Society office.
Lose second game
Last period jinxes T-birds
If a football game was only
three-quarters long the Thunderbirds would have had their
first victory of the 1964 football season Saturday.
Unfortunately they had to
play final quarter and consequently lost to Western Washington 25 to 7 before 2,500
fans in Bellingham.
Western Washington exploded for three converted
touchdowns in the final 10 minutes to defeat the Thunderbirds
who also lost to Montana in the
dying minutes of the final
quarter Sept. 12.
Bob Ginder, a 195 pound
halfback, opened the scoring
for Western Washington on a
46-yard run in the first quarter.
The convert was missed.
Thunderbird q u a r t e rback
Roger Hardy teamed with end
Lance Fletcher on a 37 yard
pass to set up the 'Birds' first
touchdown scored by Vic Iwata
ROGER HARDY
. . . passes for TD
on a two-yard run in the second quarter.
Ken Danchuck's convert was
good and the Thunderbirds
maintained their 7-6 lead until
Western   Washington   quarter
back Tom Gugloma hit Steve
Richardson with a 13 yard pass
for the go ahead touchdown
followed by John Rae's touchdown a few minutes later.
Ralph Burba closed out the
scoring for Western Washington with a one-yard run on the
last play of the game.
Hardy had to go to the air
as the Thunderbirds were unable to penetrate the strong
Washington line and his long
bombs ranged over 50 yards.
The big gun for Western
Washington was halfback Bob
Ginder who picked up 146
yards on 20 carries.
The Thunderbirds next and
toughest game will be September 26 when they host the
strong Linfield team at UBC
stadium at 2:00 p.m.
Skiers caught
in snow motion
Ski photographer and lecturer Dick Barrymore will show
his new color film "Snow Motion", October 1, at 8:30 p.m.,
in the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
Highlight    of   the    film    is
Barrymore's coverage of the
1964 Winter Olympic Games in
Innsbruck, Austria, with over
twenty nations, including Canada, taking part.
The film concludes with a
travelogue of the Japanese and
European Alps and famous U.S.
resorts.
• •    •
A meeting of the Women's
Athletic Association will be
held Wednesday in Brock Hall
at 4:30.
• •    •
The UBC Thunderbird rugby
team will workout Tuesdays at
5:30 and Thursdays at 12:30 at
Wolfson Field. Anyone interested is asked to attend.
A meeting for the UBC
wrestling team will be held in
the wrestling room at UBC stadium on Thursday at 1 p.m. to
plan  the coming season.
No previous wrestling experience is necessary and all interested students are welcome
to attend.
• •    •
UBC bawling lanes have finally gone modern. New automatic pinsetting machines
which varsity bowling manager Gordon Allen calls the
most modern in North America, have been installed by the
Physical Education department.
• •    •
Prices for weekend bowlers
will be upped 10c to 30c per
game while league bowlers will
have a rate of 20c per game.
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
at His Brand New Shoe Store
2609 Granville
Here you will find a completely new stock of all
the popular makes of shoes for the college student, as
well as hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear for Fall, you'll find
it at Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles in their sparkling new location — and ask for the
10% discount.
Better Shoes for Less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT  10TH - RE 8-9833
For  1   Week Only
Wed., Sept. 23-Sun., Sept. 27
from 10:00 p.m.
Direct from the Monterey
Jazz Festival
JOHN HANDY III
One of the U.S.'s top alto sax
playets", formerly with
Charles Mingus.
Student prices in effect
Wednesday and Thursday
, 3623 WEST BROADWAY * REgent 8-6412
Suits for
School!
Featuring
Campus   Styles
by Cambridge
i4*W
*'•■
vrp
41st at Yew
Young Men's
traditional clothing
in  Kerrisdale rage
UD.TJJt
■ U-.auY,   oepieniMCi   _-,    i/ui
REGISTRAR JOHN PARNALL
. . . smooth job
Registration
smooth for
most of us
And how did registration day
go for you?
The guard at the door of the
Buchanan building said the
registration went smoothly.
He said people began lining
up ouside the Buchanan building at 7:30 a.m.
First year education students
were the biggest problem, he
said. They seemed lost, whereas other students familiar with
the campus had no problem.
A professor signing up students for Political Science
found the day simple and quiet.
But Dean Gage's office was
busier this year than last because of the Federal government student loans.
One of the janitors on afternoon shift, cleaning up the
rubble in the Buchanan building, offered his opinion.
"It was a madhouse, I
guess."
In a poll conducted by The
Ubyssey most students had the
same reaction:
"Same as last year, only
worsen"
"They had a method last
year."
"I dunno, I just came."
"Goddam frosh."
A pole painter in front of
Buchanan said:
"More people this year?
What are you trying to sell,
anyway?"
'tween classes
Are sex and art
good bedfellows?
Well-known artist Leroy Jensen will lecture on Creative Sex Wednesday noon in Bu. 221. Sponsored by the On-
tological Society
wvs
First meeting Tuesday noon
in council chambers, Brock
Hall. All welcome.
• •    •
COMMUNITY  PLANNING
First film of a new weekly
series on planning and urban-
ism, "Traffic in Towns". Wed-
esday noon Le. 102. Free.
• •    •
WRITERS' WORKSHOP
Organization meeting Thursday noon in Bu. 319.
• •    *
CLUBS DAY
All clubs which have not
arranged for booth space at
the Armouries apply at the
UCC Office or AMS Box 117
by Thursday.
• •    •
SQUARE DANCERS
Repeat of Hagen's Barn trip"
to Renton, Wash., on October
3. For details come to the
Campus Cavalier's meeting in
Hut L-6 Thursday 12:30-2:30
p.m.
• •    •
QUAKERS
Quaker meeting for worship,
Sunday at 11 a.m. in Buchanan
Penthouse. Visitors welcome.
• •    •
SUS
Science General Meeting at
noon Thursday, Hennings 200.
All Sciencemen and Science-
women please attend.
• •    •
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Creative   writing   open   ses
sions with discussions and
readings by students of their
own fiction, poetry and commentary. A new program each
Tuesday beginning today,
12:30-2:30 p.m. in room 402 International House.
• •    •
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Meeting for all interested
Thursday at noon in International House music room.
Membership fees now due.
• •    •
PEP   BAND
Tryouts are being held for
the UBC Pep Band, those interested please attend meeting
noon Thursday in Hut L-2.
• •    •
CHEERLEADERS
Those interested in cheerleading should attend tryouts
in the Education Gym at noon
all this week.
• •    •
ARTS US
The first meeting of the new
Arts Undergrad Society will
be held Wednesday noon in the
Council Chambers in South
Brock. Artsmen welcome.
In-depth fish
MONTREAL (CUP) — Technological Research Laboratory
of the Fisheries Research
Board of Canada at Halifax is
doing an in-depth study of the
habits of Pacific salmon and
lobsters.
IH club
abolished
International House has abolished International House
Club.
The club no longer evists,
said International House director John Thomas, because there
was no executive elected by
last year's membership.
"The club collapsed by default," he said
Thomas added: although he
has no plans for re-instating the
club he will not impede formation of a new club along similar lines. He said he would recommend the new club have a
different name.
In other International House
news, a general meeting Nov. 1
will vote on acceptance of extensive revisions to the constitution.
"We intend the revisions to
streamline our operatio n,"
Thomas said.
.♦,
ROYAL   CA HAD I AH AIR  FORCE
AUTO  INSURANCE  AT
SUBSTANTIAL   SAVINGS
For Drivers 24 yrs. & up
Call Bob Baker of A. R. Baker Ltd.
1327 Marine, W. Van.       922-6188
TRAIN WITH *109 UBC SQUADRON
UNDER THE
REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
(ROTP)
Regular Officer Training Plan: The federal government,
through the Department of National Defence, sponsors a
program of university education and leadership training
for selected numbers of young men who have the potential to become officers in Canada's Armed Forces.
The Department of National Defence provides for:
• tuition and other essential fees • $75 each year to
purchase books and instruments • $73 per month pay
throughout the year • $65 per  month  living allowance
• free medical and dental care • twenty evenings of
training during the academic year and formal training
during summers • annual leave (30 days plus travelling
time) with pay and allowances, usually following tht
summer training period • assured employment after
graduation, for three years at $5052 annual plus one
year at $5532 (single) or $6432 (married). (Aircrew
receive an additional $900 annual during flying training
and an additional $1500 annual as active aircrew.)
Qualifications: Single, physically fit, male, Canadian
citizen or landed British subject. Age limit varies according to the graduation year.
Flight Lieutenant R. B. Robinson, CA 4-1910
No. 109 UBC Snuadron, The Armoury,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Please mail, without obligation, details on the Regular
Officer Training Plan (ROTP).
NAME
ADDRESS
FACULTY
YEAR
._   AGE
.— CITY
TEL.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $ .75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publcations Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26  224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall., Local 26,
221-3242.
LADIES' WRIST WATCH in Buchanan. Phone CA 4-3164, ask for
Ken   Carrington   .evening,   please.
Meetings
12
FREE LOVE SOC-meeting in the
boondocks in back of C-lot Wednesday nite. New members welcome.
Special Notices
13
WILL STUDENT from Fraser Valley who was interested in accommodation on 2nd Avenue, please
call again or Ph., CA 4-4920.
BUDDHIST MEDITATION
conversation.  Ph.  224-5701.
Transportation
14
IF YOU NEED a ride or riders to
and from campus, use Ubyssey
Want Ads. Publications office,
Brock Hall,  tel.  224-3242,  Ext.  26.
FEMALE STUDENT recovering
from recent illness requires ride
from Totem Park residences on
N.W. Marine Drive to centre of
Campus on mornings in particular.
Telephone 224-9903, ask for Room
636.
3 GIRLS NETED RIDE from vicinity
Oak and 70th, about S a.m. Phone
224-4366, days; FA 5-8940 evenings.
RIDE WANTED at Victoria and 41st
Ave. for 8:30 classes. Phone FA
5-5231 after 6 p.m. 	
TWO RICHMOND STUDENTS require car-pool. Phone 278-6959 or
278-8760.
RETURN RIDE DEEP COVE with
staff or student required. Phone
929-3337 or UBC Local 516.
CAR - POOL WANTED for three
from Dunbar and 22nd Ave. for
8:30 lectures. Phone 228-8296.
RIDERS WANTED for car - pool
from 12th and Granville to UBC,
9:30 classes. RE 3-4071, ask for
Barrie.
RIDERS WANTED—Vicinity North
Vancouver Hospital, along 13th
and Marine, for 8:30 classes. Phone
YU 8-2572.
Wanted
15
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
PROBATION OFFICER, returning
to UBC, must sell 1963 Belair 6,
automatic, radio, P.S. elec. heater,
seat covers, perfect cond., $2,250.
Call   William,   321-3181.	
'54 FORD CUSTOMLINE, S300.00 or
offer. Contact Al Donald, Ubyssey
Editorial Office, or Ph. AM 1-2462.
1958 HILLMAN CONVERTIBLE,
radio, snow tires, $450.00. Phone
YU   8-0233.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Scandals
39A
PETER'S   EAR   IS   OPENING!
 big deal !	
Sewing—Alterations
40
Tailoring
41
42
Typewriters & Repairs
"STUDENT TYPEWRITERS, all
makes, all prices. Free delivery.
Modern Business Machine Corp.
Ltd. 461 E. Hastings. Phone 682-
4016.
Typing
43
Writing—Editing
44
WANTED — sign-painter — apply
the 'Varsity' offices, Old Observatory, U of T Campus, Toronto.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SEVERAL STUDENTS (not Frosh)
to sell advertising for Ubyssey.
Commission paid for part-time
work. Send note of application to
Manager of Publications, Brock
Hall.
Work Wanted
52
GUITARIST — Have fender equipment. Will play lead if asked nicely. Phone CA 8-8252, M. McKortoff.
Special  Classes
65
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited number. Order
during Registration from members
 of   the   Phrateres  Club.   Only  75c.
ATHLETIC DATE" CARDS admit
you and your date to over. 50
M.A.C.  athletic  events.   Buy now.
_ Don't miss out on this bargain.
SET DRAFTING" INSTRUMENTS^
tee and set squares, also some
Schaums Outline Texts. Telephone
581-6649.
LOOKING FOR A SOUND INVESTMENT? Stereo equipment at reasonable prices. Phone 736-4972, anytime. 	
SCUBA~GEAR for sale, near new,
complete outfit, $99. Tel. MU
1-0602.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
81
Rooms
TWO MEN, share double room, priv.
entrance, bathroom, $30.00 each.
Three blocks from Campus. 1911
Knox Road.  CA  4-6197.
Room  &  Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD for one girl,
sharing twin beds; home privileges,
$7P 00. RE 1-2363.
ROO.*  AND   BREAKFAST  for  two
_ UBC   students.   Share   very   large
room, $40.00 month each. 1993 West
44th. Phone 261-6863.	
WANTED—Room for hard-working
university student — if possible
within two blocks of Broadway
LCB.
Furn. Houses  & Apis.
83
Unfurn. Houses  & Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Real Estate
86
WANTED ONE OFFICE or reasonable facsimile thereof. Contact
S.U.S.   AMS  Mail  Box.
Auto Premium Reductions
FOR:
Single men  under 25 who have driven  4,  5, and  6
years without claims  or   convictions.
WINRAM INSURANCE LIMITED
RE  1-5328
1678 West Broadway, Vancouver 9,  B.C.
Special Student Rates
TIME
LIFE
SPORTS ILLUST.
1 Year $5.00 □
(lass than 9c a copy)
27Wks. $2.97 Q
2 Years $9.00 Q
1 Year $3.50 □
(less than 7c a copy)
29Wks.$1.99 □
2 Years $6.75 □
1 Year $5.00 Q
(less than 10c a copy)
2 Years $9.00 Q
Fortune
6 Mos. $6.25 □
To take advantage of these special  rates, simply check
the appropriate box, add your name and address and
mail.
PART-TIME   and   GRADUATE   STUDENTS   BOTH   ELIGIBLE
The  ordering  of  one  magazine  does   not  require   the
ordering of any other.
Under Grad. □
Grad. □
NAME                                                                 _                    ._
ADDRESS                -     _    _             .          _      ..        _         _
CITY                      _                    _    Zone         _         _ B.C.
Mail             STUDENT SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE
To:              6543 Elgin Ave., S. Burnaby, B.C.

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