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The Ubyssey Feb 17, 1987

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Array *(■
UBC Archives Sena*
THE UBYSSEY
V Vol. LXIX, No. 38
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday. February 17,1987
■ **$5*
228 2301
Marzari fears political interference
By JENNIFER LYALL
The Universities Council of B.C.
is being dismantled after thirteen
years, and NDP MLA Darlene
Marzari is angry about it.
"With the elimination of the
council the minister is returning to
the bad old days when university
funding and planning was susceptible to political interference," she
said.
The Universities Council was
created in 1974 by the NDP to act as
a buffer between government and
the universities, dispersing funds to
the universities and helping determine university budgets.
It was originally intended to prevent political interference in post-
secondary education by ensuring
that funding allocations were made
for "educational rather than
political reasons," said Marzari.
Marzari said the proposed appointment   of   Norman   Spector,
previously deputy minister to
premier Bill Bennett, to the position
of senior fellow at UBC is an exam
ple of education funds being spent
for political reasons.
"The elimination of the council
TV*
^"^"*\
STAN HAGEN . . . Works directly with universities.
sets the stage for the provincial
government to tinker with educational priorities and to fund projects which excite the private
sector," she said.
But minister of advanced education and job training Stan Hagen
said bringing government and
universities closer together will not
lead to political corruption.
"It makes it (political interference in educational goals) impossible because the three university
presidents are going to be fighting
for their rightful share of funds,"
said Hagen.
He believes his ministry can
operate more effectively by dealing
directly with post-secondary institutions.
"I didn't particularly want a buffer politically between myself and
the universities." he said.
Youth charged in police stabbing
By DAVID FERMAN
A police officer is the victim of
UBC's second violent crime of the
year.
On January 23 a UBC graduate
student was stabbed to death in the
Chemistry building. Shortly after
midnight Saturday RCMP constable Greg Barron was stabbed in
the forehead while pursuing a
suspected thief in B-lot.
Barron and his partner had been
staking out B-lot investigating a recent series of thefts from cars, when
they spotted four youths smashing a
car window.
Sgt. Don Schlecker said, "the
four (youths) then split up and fled
in all directions. Barron cornered
one youth who swung at his eyes
with a screwdriver.
"He (Barron) was very fortunate,
the bone of his skull was the only
thing that stopped it," said
Schlecker.
Barron was taken to UBC Health
Sciences hospital and released the
same day.
All four youths were apprehended and charged with theft, said
Schlecker. Barron's assailant was
also charged with aggravated
assault.
Schlecker said the youths are not
UBC students and that "they are
juveniles, about 17." He refused to
release the names of those charged.
Thefts from cars in B-lot have
become a serious problem, according to Schlecker, and the sheer
number of cars in the lot makes the
situation difficult to monitor.
In one weekend there were 16
break-ins.   And  three  weeks  ago
another group was caught breaking
into cars," said Schlecker.
Schlecker said one of Saturday's
suspects had a homemade version
of brass knuckles. "So far this has
been a violent year. But we take
precautions. All my guys wear
bullet proof vests. The guys learn to
accept it," he said.
The Universities Council, which
costs taxpayers $530,000 a year, is
no longer effective, said Hagen,
pointing out that the formula by
which allocation of funds is determined has not been reviewed for
five years.
Marzari agreed that the council
hasn't been serving its intended purpose.
"Although it was the best legislation (of its kind) in Canada it didn't
get a chance to thrive and
flourish," she said, attributing its
demise to ten years of Social Credit
government.
But despite the council's inadequacy its elimination must be
recognized as the "symbolic" end
of the separation of education and
politics in B.C., said Marzari.
The council will be replaced by a
less powerful, volunteer advisory
group which will investigate controversial issues and complaints,
reporting to the minister.
The group will include one
representative from each of the
universities, one from the colleges,
one from distance learning
(knowledge network) and four
ministry appointees.
UBC president David Strangway
said he supports the dismantling of
the Universities Council because he
thinks it will be "beneficial" to
negotiate more directly with the
government.
NDP MLA calls student poverty "tragic"
By EVELYN JACOB
Calling poverty a "cancer within
our social fabric," the NDP Social
Services and Housing critic said
students are among the hardest hit
group of poor in B.C.
John Cashore, NDP MLA for
Maillardville-Coquitlam told 15
people in SUB Monday it is tragic
that the increasing cost of tuition,
housing, and food is forcing
students into poverty, which he says
has become institutionalized in the
province.
"These circumstances are partly
of our own creation. It's poor
economics that millions of dollars
go to universities which we then
blow by losing students to other
provinces because of inadequate
student aid," said Cashore.
He told students to use their own
experiences of poverty to raise
society's awareness of the problem
because the Vander Zalm government has been idle on the issue.
"I don't think Vander Zalm has a
plan to improve the situation for
Welfare recipients treated like plague
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
Four and a half years ago, Julie
came to B.C. from Quebec, fresh
out of high school, looking for a
job.
Instead she received a welfare
cheque and the general prejudice of
a society that disdains welfare recipients .
' 'When you are on welfare people
look down on you as if you were the
plague", she said.
Julie, who did not wish to have
her last name revealed for reasons
of personal safety, is currently a
third year arts student at UBC. Her
story is part of "welfare week"
organized by the UBC NDP club,
to make students aware of the problems faced by people on welfare.
UBC NDP club president Freyja
Bergthorson said the club is holding
"welfare week" to raise awareness
and that the problem of people living off low income assistance exists.
"It is easy to forget people are in
a no hope situation", she said.
Julie found people's attitudes
toward welfare recipients the
hardest thing to deal with while she
collected welfare.
She said people considered her a
"princess on welfare," and could
not understand how healthy young
people could be collecting welfare.
"A lot of people don't know the
first thing about welfare. You have
to experience it to understand it,"
she said.
Julie said people should become
more caring and sympathetic
toward the issue of income
assistance, and that she was glad to
be out of it.
At the time Julie collected
welfare she felt extremely insecure
and, "everything seemed to be on
hold at an age when people are supposed to be optimistic about life."
Julie said there is a lot of stress in
trying to make ends meet while on
welfare, and the last week is always
the toughest.
"Sometimes you have three
bucks left and its not because you
throw your money around," she
said.
Jule said another problem for
welfare recipients is that many of
the jobs available are minimum
wage, stagnant jobs that go
nowhere.
"There is little reward in doing
repetitious work 40 hours a week to
make such a small amount of
money," she said.
Julie said it is difficult for people
to get out of the welfare trap as it is
a catch-22 situation in many cases.
"Most welfare people don't have
the money to buy a suit but without
a suit it is hard to find a job," she
said.
the poor in B.C. He's flown by the
seat of his pants in the past and apparently he's going to operate that
way as premier of the province."
He compared B.C.'s poor to a
"rolling snowball," which grew by
"leaps and bounds" under the Bill
Bennett governments restraint program.
Since then, individual welfare
rates have increased by a mere $6,
while at the same time the cost of
living has shot up by 20 per cent.
Cashore blamed the Social Credit
government for B.C.'s increasing
number of welfare recipients —
more than 218,000 today — which
prior to 1980 was less than 100,000.
"Our society really has to take a
look at the morality of this," he
said.
Cashore criticized Social Services
and Housing minister Claude Richmond's job search match plan for
welfare recipients — in which people who refuse to participate could
be denied welfare payments — saying it will only shift unemployment
in the province.
"It's a window dressing,
smokescreen approach that typifies
this government. The jobs just
aren't there."
At least 10 million jobs could be
created if income assistance was
raised to 75 per cent of the national
poverty line, which Statistics
Canada sets at $10,673, he said.
The additional cost to the taxpayer — approximately $200
million — would be matched by the
federal government and then be injected into the province to stimulate
the economy.
- david d. photo
THEATRES CLOSED BUT unplanned floor show plucks way to fame and fortune on front page of The Ubyssey. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
m-ty
Tuesday, February 17, 1987
Prof called "disruptive"
By ALLISON FELKER
Cariboo College instructor Allan
McKinnon deserved to be fired, the
college's lawyer said Monday as the
lengthy McKinnon arbitration hearing draws to a close.
The college suspended
psychology instructor McKinnon
for "willful insubordination" in
May 1985 for letters he wrote to the
Kamloops News, criticizing the
B.C. government's education policy
and calling the college "a second-
rate institution."
The college fired McKinnon after
he circulated a memorandum to the
faculty encouraging support for his
grievance with the college in
December 1985.
Vancouver lawyer Peter Csiszar
charged McKinnon's memorandum
attacked not only Cariboo College,
but former college principal Charles
Brewster and suspension arbitration
investigator Mervin Chertkow as
well.
"His (McKinnon's) conduct has
been disruptive and meddling,"
said college lawyer Peter Csiszar.
After his dismissal, McKinnon
published a bulletin for his students
which read: "fired as of now —
God knows what happens to your
grades."
Twenty-two  students  chose  to
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took at you.
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withhold their final assigments
from marking in protest of McKinnon's termination.
Csiszar said "both the bulletin
and the memorandum show McKinnon's attempt to incite other
employees and students to adopt his
own attitude." He added McKinnon had adequate warning of the
possible consequences of his actions
because he received a letter of reprimand for the college after his first
letter was published.
Vancouver lawyer Leo McGrady
will present McKinnon's case to arbitration hearing Thursday. Arbitrator Donald Munroe is expected
to reach a final decision on the
hearing sometime in March.
presents a
UBC COMEDY SPECIAL
starring
MARTY POLLIO
FROM L.A.
featured on Johnny Carson & David Letterman
with special guests
BARRY KENNEDY & DAVE CAMERON
THURSDAY, FEB. 26-8 P.M.
ADVANCE
SUB TIX: $3.50
BALLROOM AMS Box Office
Best
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&
GRADUATE
STUDENT
SOCIETY
Nominations are now open for the positions of:
House Director
Programmes Director
Finance Director
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Closing date February 27, 1 p.m.
Nomination forms and further information can be obtained
at the GSS Office 228-3203.
\\\ 1) Be as specific as possible;
? 2) Include the following informati
rjns
<-#
ams
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
<*#
THE GRAD GLASS COUNCIL
is now accepting Proposals for the
1987
GRAD CUSS GIR
Proposals must:
on:
name of group requesting funds
number of people working on project
name of a contact person (include telephone #)
who will benefit from the project
description of the project in detail
a   summarizing    paragraph    including   the   most
salient points
the amount of money requested
sources of other funds if applicable
•j: There is a limit of one proposal per particular group of ?
graduating students.
:| There is an upper limit of $3,000 of each proposal.
Each group must be prepared to give a short presentation of their idea to the members of Grad Class Council
held at the end of February.
if Th
e   deadline
February 24th,
for   proposals   is
1987 and is final.
4:00   p.m.   Tuesday,
No proposal will  be
: accepted after this date.
Proposals will be received at SUB Room 238.
Please contact Tom  Dallimore,  care of Val in
228-3971 if you have any questions.
SUB 238,
tsii&iiiiiiiii&&i9&&z****ri&&^2&t#se&
UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT Tuesday, February 17, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Secret film reveals violence
A child runs into the tall grass
nearby. Frantically trying to escape,
he seems more like a frightened rabbit than a young boy in shirtsleeves
on a hot day. A large adult male
soon catches the boy and begins to
beat him. Soon, another large man
runs into the scene and joins the
first. He adds a couple of well-
placed kicks to the boy's frail body,
now limp on the ground.
The scene cuts while the beating
continues. You wonder how such a
small boy could survive a beating
like that. It's a vision that grabs
you. The memory will linger on; it
will haunt you. Yet this is only one
of many images in Sharon Sopher's
internationally highly acclaimed
and illegally filmed documentary
Witness to Apartheid.
Thousands more of these horrific
images  remain  unfilmed.   "What
franchised reporting; I reported on
different issues having to do with
minorities. When I started in this
business (1969) in New York,
women and minorities were not
allowed into the unions," she said.
Sopher is also no stranger to controversy. In 1973, despite internal
opposition, Sopher hired NBC's
first all-female crew. She also produced the first series on the black
Muslims in the United States. At
one point, due to her award-
winning coverage of a Muslim
hostage crisis in Washington, D.C,
Sopher received such serious death
threats that NBC hired bodyguards
to protect her. An attempt was
made on her life.
While Sopher is proud of her
achievements at NBC, she eventually became so frustrated with the
limitations implicit in working for a
you see in the film is everywhere,"
says Sopher, an independent
American producer who visited
Toronto last month to promote the
first showing of her film in Canada
by the CBC.
Filmed secretly during the 1985
state of emergency in South Africa,
the documentary presents moving
accounts by victims and witnesses
of police violence against children
in the black South African
townships. Participants in Sopher's
vivid film include young black student activists from the banned Congress of South African Students
(COSAS), the friends and family
members of apartheid's many victims, along with the black and white
doctors who treat them, and Ar-
chbiship Desmond Tutu.
While Sopher's film is a startling
portrayal of South African police
brutality against children, hers is
not the only documentation. Last
April, the New York-based Lawyers
Committee for Human Rights
issued a 184-page report on the subject. According to the Committee,
"more than 200 children have been
killed in the past year and hundreds
more have been injured in police
operations in the townships in
which tear gas, birdshot, rubber
bullets, sjamboks (metal tipped
whips) and even live ammunition
used indiscriminately and excessively."
"At times," the report said,
"violence against children has been
the result of a deliberate strategy of
the security forces to suppress student organizations and protests. In
the frequent sweeps and patrols
through the townships, security
forces have singled out young people of school age for arrest, pursuing them with sjamboks . . . the
shooting at random any child who
runs away."
"It (violence and brutality) was
so easy to find that you really have
to ask why, when all the major networks have bureaus there, they
haven't done the story. I think it
has to do with the fact that they're
afraid of losing their visas," says
Sopher.
No stranger to network television, Sopher worked at NBC news
for 12 years. "Domestically, before
I started covering international
news, much of what I tried to do at
NBC is what we would call disen-
network that she felt compelled to
leave. "Networks are very
restricted," said Sopher. "If you're
writing a wire copy story in the
newsroom, you know, for instance,
that you do not refer to the 'contras' as anything but 'freedom
fighters.' There are very definite
restrictions, and that's why I left."
Sopher described her decision to
leave NBC as a type of evolutionary
process. "We live in a society where
'me' first comes first. We get an
education for 'me' and very few of
us are really trained to think to use
our education for other people.
And essentially that's the decision I
made. I have all these skills as a
communicator, but what am I using
them for? I'm using them for a network that makes $300 million profit
a year, and that's their objective —
to make money. Essentially, what I
gave up in order to do what I'm doing is a lot of money."
The more research Sopher did for
her South African article, the more
she felt compelled to produce the
film. "I went out and started doing
research for the article and began to
see just so much evidence about the
torture of children and such horrendous things. One of the first days I
was there a four-year-old child
playing in a front yard in one of the
townships was shot and killed by a
soldier's rubber bullet," she says.
Sopher figured out what was
missing   from   the   commercial
By JENNIFER GOULD
Reprinted from the Varsity
Canadian University Press
media's coverage of apartheid while
working for NBC. The network
gave Sopher insight into the way the
Western media, consciously or unconsciously, manipulates domestic
and international news.
"One of the jobs I had at NBC
was to take in the network library.
When I started thinking about what
that footage was I had seen over the
years, I realized I had never actually
seen South Africans speaking. So I
decided I really wanted to collect as
many interviews with the people
and no kind of the usual media
celebrities, but with the people who
are really the underbelly of apartheid — the ones who get kicked in
the gut."
What Sopher discovered shocked
and astonished her previous conventional Western assumptions.
"The debates we get into over here
are almost irrelveant to what those
people (South African blacks) were
saying when I met them," she says.
"I never heard any of them say
'God, I'm afraid of losing my job if
sanctions are passed.' What they
were all saying to me in one form or
another was 'I'm afraid of losing
my life: when my child walks out
the door in the morning, I don't
know if I'm ever going to see him
again."
Somehow Sopher managed to
smuggle the illegal film out of
South Africa — she is reluctant to
explain how — but not before she
and the crew Sopher has assembled
in the country were arrested and detained by the South African police.
They were held for some hours and
Sopher credits her American
citizenship for their- release.
However, since the international
showing of her film, many of its
participants have been tortured.
Some have ended up dead. Knowing this, Sopher says she cannot remain the purely detached objective
observer she says she would like to
be.
"I look at this film as a part of
the history. I think the proportions
of the brutality and the inhumanity
had just reached such a point that
this film was just a part of what had
to take place, as part of that history
that was unfolding. I think that's
why people were willing to take the
risks involved. They wanted to be
seen."
Sopher speaks of a black doctor,
who spoke of treating black victims
of apartheid violence in the film,
who was picked up by the South
African police when the 1986 state
of emergency was declared. He had
just recently been released and on
Dec. 1, he was shot and killed along
with his wife. I'm sure that being in
the film probably had something to
do with that," she said.
In the film, the doctor had explained typical torture procedures
used by the police. Permanent visi
ble wounds left on some victims
were also shown in the film. One
young victim was beaten so badly
he was left with a head permanently
soft as a melon. "I feel like dying,
no more living," said another victim, a 15-year-old boy named Johnnie. After two weeks in prison,
Johnnie was so badly beaten that he
is now barely able to speak. He has
suffered permanent brain damage.
"I keep in constant touch with
people in South Africa and there
has never been one instance when
any of them (participants in the
film) had expressed any reservation
about showing the film because of
the consequences it might have. The
reality is that the chances of
something happening over there are
so great anyway — for no reason —
that I think people figure at least
they'll be telling 'the story'."
When the film recently aired in
the U.S., Sopher added an update
to inform viewers of the deaths of
participants in the film since its making. One of the white doctors in the
film said he was concerned about
what he said in the film because of
its probable ramifications. "But,"
said Sopher, "as a doctor, all he
said was that detention is so bad for
one's health that when he sees what
it does to people, he has to do what
he can to expose it."
"Then I came on camera and said
the reason that people were willing
to expose themselves in order to expose apartheid is because they feel
it's so important for people outside
South Africa to understand that
apartheid does not just discriminate
— it kills."
". . . you see these mobs, which
look mindless and you've never
seen a single individual — it's as if
they don't exist individually, as people. "
Sopher is very critical of the way
most of her colleagues cover events
in South Africa. "I really feel a lot
of disgust and moral outrage
because I don't think they're carrying out what they're charged with. 1
think they're primary concern is
maintaining their bureaus rather
than covering the story, and I really
wonder," she says.
Journalists should operate inside
South Africa "the same way I did
— get a visa for one month, get the
story and then, get the hell out.
And if you get kicked out, if you get
arrested, it doesn't matter because
you shouldn't intend to go back
anyway," she says.
Sopher has two conclusions
about the way the mainstream
media covers events in South
Africa. "I sat down and thought
about all the images I had seen that
the networks use to tell you the
story. I realized, with all the
footage and all the time spend
covering South Africa, essentially
only two images were being used —
and they both kept the story on a
very abstract level."
Mass funerals and mass confrontations between the police and protesters are the two images, says
Sopher, which mislead the public
into believing that violence in South
Africa does not occur on any other
level. "They cover these mobs,
which are not images we can relate
to." It's hard to relate to seeing
40,000 people at a funeral, says
Sopher, because "40,000 people are
not going to come to my funeral."
While numerous mass funerals
have been covered in the mass
media, Sopher says she has never
seen an interview with a single black
family as part of that coverage.
"The media is telling us that the
loss of life there somehow isn't
quite the same, or as important, as
loss of life here," says Sopher.
"The human dimension is lost
somehow. So when the regime says
these people are under the control
of outside agitators, manipulators,
communists, it's fairly easy to
believe because you see these mobs,
which look mindless and you've
never seen a single individual — it's
as if they don't exist individually, as
people."
Sopher says coverage of confrontations between police and protestors leads people to think
violence only occurs during these
confrontations. "I think that's why
I was surprised when I began to see
this other layer of violence which is
the torture that takes place in
custody; the indiscriminate
shooting of people like the death of
that four-year-old girl (who was
shot in the head by the police officer's rubber bullet). Obviously
that four-year-old girl was not a
threat to anyone," she says.
While Sopher has covered two
wars in Africa, she said that
nothing has shocked her as much as
the evidence of the torturing of
children. Sopher says she's "read so
many affidavits where even doctors, psychiatrists, are telling the
police that if they continue torturing people, they'll end up
vegetables. And what they do is put
them (victims) in psychiatric
hospitals, treat them so that they
start responding and then they start
torturing them again."
Sopher says she's shocked by the
reaction of viewers to the South
African's president's wife, Mrs.
Botha, who spoke in the film of
desiring another "big wipeout" of
the black South African population, like that of the 1969
Sharpeville massacres to solve what
she calls "the problem."
Sopher says she can't understand
why viewers of the film are so
shocked considering the apartheid
regime has been re-elected since
1948. "It's not as if it was a dictatorship," she says. "People know
what they are re-electing because it
is the government that legislates
apartheid.
"That's what's so unique about
South Africa. It's all carefully laid
out, right there to read. That's why
I don't accept the myth that the
whites there don't really know
what's going on, when one-half of
all Afrikaaners (whites of Dutch
descent) are employed by the
government." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17, 1987
Protection
Society is a moderator. Society is the structure under which we are able to live with our many opposing views
and desires. A measure of the quality of society is its ability to absorb stress and perform with a level head under
pressure. Often members get caught up in emotion and then attempt to make decisions that affect the whole of
society. A highly developed society will moderate this emotion and ensure that fair decisions are made.
Traditionally, the death penalty has been called for in cases of extreme emotion: for witches, for war criminals.
To the rest of society the call for the death penalty only offers revenge. For the criminal, death simply offers oblivion.
How can the death penalty improve society? How can murder correct murder?
When society cannot deal with a person's actions it demands the death penalty. This is equally an indication of
the deficiency of society as of the corruption of a human being. For the state to kill a person is to discard a life with
the assumption that nothing can be made of it; nothing can be done to salvage it; that is is not worth saving.
The purpose of society is to allow the greatest number of people to live in unison. If people must be destroyed
to make society work there is something fundamentally wrong with society.
Society gains nothing from the death penalty. The death penalty does not deter. The death penalty only gives
the justice system more power than it needs or deserves.
The justice system was devised to protect members of society from themselves. With the House of Commons
beginning debate on the return of the "death penalty", society may once again find itself in the position of having
to be protected from its own justice system.
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Foster's fan feels referendum a failure
Including a referendum on banning Carling O'Keefe products with
the AMS elections was plain
nonsense.
The SFSA, although they ran
their campaign well, overlooked a
few key points. One, there is far
more student apathy than they
think. Most students are lazy and
feel it is not the purpose of a university student body to decide and
change a foreign country's national
policy.
Two, they overlooked the
"thirst" factor. For most students
who voted, their decision rested on
whether or not to allow the Pit to
serve Foster's, Extra Old Stock,
and Miller. Thirdly, a successful
referendum would've served no
more purpose than to piss people
off. I refer back to point two. I for
one enjoy Foster's, and if I went to
the Pit and found I couldn't get it
because (theoretically) the SFSA
got it banned, I'd be damned pissed
off.
I'm proud to say I voted no on
the referendum for the reasons I
mentioned. I'm glad it was
defeated. It it had been successful it
would've served no useful purpose
anyway. Banning the amount of
"evil" products consumed
would've made the producers stand
up and laugh. Imagine trying to
drain Lake Superior with a sponge.
The small amount removed is insignificant and is replaced by
evaporation anyway. If the SFSA
had gotten banned the production
of O'Keefe, Rothmans & Co., they
would've found another market to
replace us. It's an endless cycle.
Also, I question the morals of
SFSA. Don't get me wrong, I am
anti-apartheid; I think it's morally
wrong and disgusting. But I think
the SFSA is just riding the wave of
public opinion. If they are true in
their beliefs, why don't they go
beyond South Africa?
Why don't they try to ban
American products because of
places like Forsythe county,
Georgia? Just like South Africa,
this area is composed of both racists
and non-racists. Also, the majority
of people in this area violently oppose the desegregation of their
"homeland" and will do anything
to keep it "clean."
Will they, the SFSA, do it?
No.
Because they know they'd have
no chance; they'd be laughed off
campus. And therein lies the answer
to what I said earlier. It is silly to try
and change a country's national
Treaty promotes hatred
Recently, External Affairs
Minister Joe Clark signed an extradition treaty with the Indian
government of Ravjiv Gandhi. This
treaty is an attack by both states to
promote communal and race
hatred, chauvinism, and to repress
the democratic and progressive
forces in Canada. It deserves to be
condemned.
The treaty permits Indian police
to  produce prima  facie  evidence
(i.e. a convincing story) to a Canadian judge, who can then turn over
any Canadian to the Indian police
and courts. Gandhi says he wants to
use the treaty against "Sikh extremists" in Canada, while Clark
says he's interested in "tax
dodgers" in India.
It is the Rajiv Gandhi government which, besides being overtly
implicated in the communal
massacres of 1984, openly calls for
Sports group a waste
I am writing in response to
'Students Should Choose Priorities'
(Feb. 10). Dr. Srivastava, chair of
the new President's Review Committee on Athletics, says "We have
to make choices, that is the students
must make the choices."
If students are going to be making the choices, why are only two of
the eight members of the committee
students. There should be more
students on this committee, particularly more students who are involved in athletic programs. Both
the students chosen are from the
AMS. Intramural and varsity
athletes have no say in what is happening.
If Dr. Srivastava is sincere about
wanting students to decide important issues in athletics, he will add
student representation from
students involved in athletic programs. My guess is that he has
already decided what he is going to
do. His committee is a waste of
time.
Quentin McDonnell
arts 3
THE UBYSSEY
February 17, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
It was a dark and stormy robot. Jennifer Lyall, a friend of Stan, was brithly toed but smelt nice.
Michael Groberman destoryed Vancouver theatre. Allison Felker sprung a leak and as she shot around
the room was chased by Malcolm Pearson who was lusting after other new staff members. Evelyn
Jacob was planning an elopement with Chew Wong but little did she know that Louise Panziera had
already bought tickets. Svetozar Kontic was observed wearing the same shirt by the anonymous Jeffrey Swartz. Steve Chan in honor of his first anniversary at The Ubyssey took a photograph of a mid-air
collision between Dave Wilkinson, Steve Neufield, and Neil Philip. The great unknows P. Penner and
David Derosa dropped in submission to David Ferman. Dan Andrews observed and thought. "Reality
is the footprint of imagination."
the massacre of the Sikhs under the
hoax that they are extremists. The
Indian government is one of the
most repressive and brutal, blind to
the economic and political demands
of its people, a government which
has communalism as a state policy.
Joe Clark was in Delhi in
November 1984 when the terrible
massacre of people of the Sikh
religion took place in Delhi. He did
not speak a word to condemn it.
Although there is abundant
evidence that Rajiv Gandhi's Congress Party officials organized and
directed this massacre, there have
been no convictions for any of these
murders. Even the inquiry commission into Indira Gandhi's assassination has not brought out the full
facts behind that event. Now the
Canadian government is signing an
extradition treaty with the government whereby Canadians can be extradited on the basis of a prima
facie case.
Joe Clark's trip to India is being
paraded as a "good deal" for
Canada, and a foreign policy coup
of the federal government, leading
to new markets in India for goods
and capital. This further shows that
the ruling classes of India and
Canada are linked by 1,001 threads,
and have a common interest in the
exploitation of the people. They
also share a common racist and
communalist outlook, inherited
from the British colonialists. This
treaty marks a further stage of their
collaboration and poses a threat to
all Canadians. The Canadian people are one. This is an attack on us
all.
Racism and the promotion of
chauvinism go side by side. While
one people are racially attacked, the
others are chauvinistically incited so
that they do not see this as an attack
on themselves as well.
Dorothy-Jean O'Donnell
arts 4
policy from a campus thousands of
miles away. Politicians never listen
to students unless they riot, and I
think none of them, the SFSA"
would have the balls to do it. Instead, they should try to alter things
here on campus. If the SFSA would
put the same energy into stopping
the fee increase as they did the
referendum, then I think people
might not view them as mindless
yahoo's. Then I might not throw
away one of their pamphlets next
time the shove one in my face.
Rob McGowan
arts 1
P.S. "Amerika," the TV
miniseries, should be allowed to be
viewed. If you don't watch it, or if
you find it offensive, just exert
some energy by getting up, going
over to the TV, and turning it off.
Then get back in your closet and
come out in another fifteen years.
Artsies love love
It is truly a curiousity observing
the need that science students have
to attain a self-righteous niche on
campus and this offensive attitude
is most obvious in the Science
Undergrad Newsletter. I'm talking
about the constant and boorish attempts at offence that the staff
makes towards the Arts and Arts
students.
It appears to be a necessity to fit
in some slander, or some out of
context stab at anti-arts philosophy
inserted between boring and overused Bloom County Characters.
When you've run out of beer
stories, finished laughing at each
other's farting habits, and bemoaned the fact that you've spent so-o-o
many hours studying your Organic
Chemistry — you turn to guffawing
at what you believe is a bunch of
pansies wearing tights and skipping
about reciting Wordsworth's
"Tinter Abbey".
How childish. Why don't you put
your blinders back on and follow
that long, long, tunnel to med-
school. It'll only take another four
or five years after that.
And if there really is any antagonism between what is a majority of Arts students and a minority
of Science students; then it exists
only in the minds of those Science
students that can only justify
themselves by making fun of others
choices' of education.
David Nykl
arts 2
Athletics seeks input
Recently, the University Athletic
Council (U.A.C.) suggested increasing Student Activity Fee from
$32.00 to $37.50 (an increase of
$5.50). The student representatives
on UAC voted against the increase
and made the Administration aware
of its opposition. In light of this opposition and other problems in
Athletics, President Strangway announced the formation of a Task
Force on Athletics and Sport Services, and consequently the proposed Student Activity Fee increase is
now under review. Chaired by K.D.
Srivastava, Vice President of
Academic and Student Services, the
Task Force's mandate is to review
and report by March 31, 1987 on:
1. The administration and
management structures (of
Athletics).
2. The relationship between
Athletics and the School of Physical
Education and Recreation.
3. The interrelationship between
the various athletic and sports programs, including the procedures for
establishing priorities
4. The operation and role of
U.A.C. and the Men's and
Women's Athletic Committees.
The Task Force will be soliciting
information from a variety of people, both at UBC, and from the
community. As a student representative on the Task Force, I would
like to have input from students on
these four items, and on any other
things that "bug" you about
athletics.
If you would like to make a
presentation to the Task Force, put
your ideas on paper and submit
them, c/o Martin Cocking or
Rebecca Nevraumont to the Administrative Assistant's office, SUB
238, no later than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, February 27th, 1987.
Martin Cocking
Student Representative,
Presidential Task Force On
Athletics & Sport Services
Travel days
Are you still trying to plan your
summer vacation? Looking for
something wild and exciting to do
during the hot summer months? If
so, you are certain to find
something of interest at Travel
Days '87 in the SUB Concourse on
Wednesday, February 18th from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.
The event is being put on by
AIESEC and Travel Cuts. There
will be presentations, speeches and
films with a Grand Prize Draw of a
14 day tour of Europe from Contiki
tours along with many other prizes.
Also watch for Orestes' belly
dancer at 1:00 p.m.
Gordon Warren
Travel Days coordinator Tuesday, February 17, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Kurt drops his "er"
so others will drop pants?
Some of us may have wondered,
why UBC's aspiring philosopher
Kurt Preinsperger recently changed
his surname to Preinsperg. Last Friday's Ubyssey provided a clue. He
dropped the suffix "er", which, in
his   native   German   language   in
dicates maleness, because, as we
could read in his letter "Jolt out of
stupidity", he has "developed the
feminine side" in himself.
We can't help being amazed to
hear that about a man who used to
be a strong public advocate of the
Lady Godiva ride and who used to
complain in letters to the Ubyssey
that women on campus were not
sexually available enough. What
should have brought about such a
drastic change? Preinsperg tells us it
was  a  Women's   Studies  course.
Disabled students group forms
The Disabled Students' Association of UBC is now a reality. This is
an important step made by UBC's
disabled students. The group will
serve as the vehicle by which disabled students can voice their concerns
and needs on campus.
This is UBC's first association of
all disabled students. Whereas, in
the past groups such as the Visually
Impaired Students' Association
have operated  independently,  the
Disabled Students Association encourages all students interested in
making post-secondary education
more accessible to the disabled to
participate in the club.
The disabled students of B.C. are
taking a leadership role in advocacy
for greater accessibility to ecuca-
tion. One UBC and three Douglas
College students have been elected
to the twelve member Board of
Directors of the National Educa-
Pro-lifers help moms
I would like to address Raymond
Li's query in the Feb. 6 issue about
what "pro-lifers" are doing to help
single mothers. A Christian
response to the issue has been
undertaken by the Crisis Pregnancy
Centre of Vancouver. The address
is 103-1037 West Broadway, and
the telephone number is 731-1037.
At the Centre women are given
pregnancy testing, counselling and
support during the pregnancy in the
form of living accomodations or
whatever else is necessary. I hope
that this in some way answers Mr.
Li's question.
Peter Janzen
Regent College
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arts 3
However, initially he didn't take
that course out of concern for
women's issues, but for "evening
recreation". Now, what could he
possibly have meant by that?
Let's get at the heart of things
with some more questions: where
could a male chauvinist go to find
objects for his desire, if the Pit is
too much below his intellectual
level? Well, how about a Women's
effective method he could apply, in
order to get into their pants? Well,
tell them how much you agree with
them, how they have expanded your
mind, etc. And then write a letter to
the Ubyssey, in which you can let all
these women out there know what a
great guy you are.
Better    stick    with    the    old
Preinsperger, Kurt. It is much more
course? But since the
women there are probably all
feminists, what would be the most
appropriate.
Tom Mueller
graduate studies
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IMPACT
WOMEN IN CULTURE
LECTURE SERIES
Ms. SANDY WILSON
Writer-Director of "My American Cousin"
WILL DISCUSS
it
il
Grace Under Pressure
—women in the film industry
TUES., FEBRUARY 24th, 1987
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
 BUCHANAN A 102	
Dr. MARGARET FULTON
Former President, Mount Saint Vincent
University, Former Dean of Women, U.B.C.
WILL SPEAK ON
"A New Paradigm for
the Nineties"
—women in tomorrow's world
WED., MARCH 4th, 1987
12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
 BUCHANAN PENTHOUSE	
Dr. PAT MARCHAK
Sociologist and author of Green Gold
WILL DISCUSS
u\
Future Economic Trends
- Where Will Women Fit?"
—women in the economy of the future
TUES., MARCH 10th, 1987
12:30- 1:30 p.m.
 BUCHANAN PENTHOUSE	
Sponsored by the Office for Women Students with the support
of the Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
COALITION FOR ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Organizing meeting, noon, Grad Centre Garden
Room.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC TORY CLUB
Executive meeting, 11:30 or 12:30 p.m., your
choice, SUB 249D.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY
Executive election for 87-88, noon, Buch 320B.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m , Lutheran Campus Centre.
SUBFILMS
"The Great Gatsby," starring Alan ladd, 12:40,
7:00, and 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Content lecture: Professional ethics, Dr. Keith
Dobson, noon, Peter Swedfeid Lounge, Kenny
budding.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on "Dermatology." Guest speaker Dr.
Stewart, noon-1:20 p.m., Wood #1.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in practice. Everybody welcome, 7:00
p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
COALITION FOR ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Organizing meeting, discussion of petitions. All
welcome, noon, Graduate Student Centre,
garden room.
WEDNESDAY
AIESEC.
Travel Days '87 — come plan your holidays now.
10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., SUB concourse.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Bzzr garden and auction, 4:30-8:00 p.m., SUB
205. Also, speaker, Emery Barnes, MLA, on liv-
ing on welfare, noon-l:30 p.m., SUB 205.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Wednesday noon-hour concert — George
Evelyn, baritone, and Terence Dawson, piano,
noon, School of Music Recital Hall. Also, Faculty Recital — Camille Churchfield, flute and Kenneth Broadway, piano, 8:00 p.m., School of
Music Recital Hall.
Panhellenic
, UBC
SORORITIES OF UBC
Open    house,    4:30-6:30    p.m
Building.
CINEMA 16
"Kerouac, The Movie," 7:00 and 9:30 p m.,
SUB auditorium
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck   dinner   and   discussion,   6:00   p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery Lounge.
UBC'S WOMEN'S CENTRE
International Women's Week, March 2-8 planning session, noon, SUB rm. 130.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7:00 p.m , 1868 Knox
Rd.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Party, 7:00 p.m., Sneaky's I5th floor, 595 Hornby St I.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch 205D
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cupid's   flight-dance,   8:00-1:00   a.m..    Night
Flight Club.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Bzzr garden. 4:00-8:00 p.m, SUB 206.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Ski trip, 6:00 a.m.-4:00 p m., Blackcomb.
THURSDAY
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Join us! for an exciting time of fellowship as we
praise and worship our God, noon, SUB 205.
FRIDAY
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's Canada West playoff game v. Saskatchewan Huskies. First game best of three, 7:30
p.m., War Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Two wins against Saskatchewan Huskies will
clinch a playoff berth for the T-Birds, 7:30 p.m.,
Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
UBC hosts the Canada West championships
with some of Canada's best athletes competing,
preliminaries: all day. Finals 7:00 p.m., UBC
Aquatic Centre.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym night, 8:30-11:30 p.m., Osborne.
rams
CTmsi
NOTICE OF
AMS ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 18
12 NOON
Council Chambers
(SUB 206)
ALL STUDENTS
WELCOME
t
FREE MONEY
FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS &
THEIR UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
OR DEPARTMENTAL CLUB.
—Applications are now being taken by your
Undergraduate Society for $4.00 refund per
graduating student. All undergraduate
societies must hand in the applications they
receive by
FEBRUARY 24, 1987
For more information or to submit applications please contact your undergraduate
society or
DON MUSTARD
President, Grad Class Council
228-6101, SUB Box 118
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Second game ot the Men's Canada West, best
of three playoff series v. Saskatchewan Huskies,
7:30 p.m.. War Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Play host to Saskatchewan Huskies in last home
game ot the year, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Arena
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Two day Monte Carlo car rally, 9:00 am
(Sat. 1-7:00 p.m. (Sun.), start: Old Bus Loop
(outside new bookstore).
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
Second day of three day Canada West championship meet, prelims all day, finals at 5:30
p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
SAILING CLUB
Work party — refreshments will be seryed, 10:00
am, Jericho Sailing Centre.
SUNDAY
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Third game (if necessary) of the Canada West
playoff series v. Saskatchewan, War Memorial
Gym.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
Last day of Canada West championship meet,
prelims all day, finals at 3:00 p.m., UBC Aquatic
Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 12:00 p.m., 2490 W. 2nd Ave.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion service, 10:00 a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
SAILING CLUB
Iceberg Regatta, food and beverages will be
served, 10:00 a.m., Jericho Sailing Centre.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Two-day Monte Carlo format car rally, 9:00 a.m.
(Sat.)-7:00 p.m. (Sun.), start: old bus loop (outside new bookstore).
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Faculty Recital - Robert Jordan, guitar, 8:00
p.m., School of Music Recital Hall.
MONDAY
SUBFILMS
"Jail House Rock?' starring Elvis Presley, 7:00
and 9:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International Film Night: "Israel: Behind the
Walls." The Arab-Israeli conflict is placed
squarely in the confines of an overcrowded
Israeli prison in this award winning film of the
1984 Venice Film Festival, 7:30 p.m., Gate 4, International House.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN
AFRICA
Free film, Winnie and Nelson Mandela, noon,
SUB auditorium.
UBC STUDENTS FOR CHOICE ON ABORTION
Information  table,   12:00-2:00  p.m.,   SUB  concourse.
TUESDAY
PHRATERES AND SORORITIES OF UBC
Formal Fashion Show, 7:00 p.m., Cecil Green
Park.
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Amngrapt?
ftttftiOBlffil.
Phone now for your
COMPLIMENTARY SITTING
Choose from 18 previews I proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWAY
Resume photos es low es
75c in colour.
JERRY'S COVE
NKKJHBORHOOD PLB
Minutes away from UBC Campus
Remember "DAILY SPECIALS"
Hot & Cold Food from 11:30 a.m. until Midnight
3681 West 4th (4th & Aim.)      734-1205
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
40 - MESSAGES
ATTENTION ALL NEW
APPLICANTS TO
STUDENT HOUSING FOR
1987/88 WINTER SESSION
Application forms & brochures for
the Sept. '87 Winter Session for
Student Housing are available from
Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall. First return date is Mar. 2,
1987. Office hrs: 8:30 a.m.-4:00
p.m. weekdays.
NOTE: Current residents will receive
their reapplication forms & information sheets in their mailboxes.
WITNESS NEEDED. A Chinese lady was hit
by a car while riding a bike in the intersection of Wesbrook Mall University Boulevard
at about 8:15 a.m. on Jan. 28th, 1987. We
know that two gentlemen Imay be doctors
at UBC Hospital) were on the spot when
the accident happened. We warmly
acknowledge their help to the lady after the
incident. Now we still need you help in
order to settle what is involved afterwards.
Please contact Mr. Hu at 228-3260 or
736-6704.	
TO THE EXCEEDINGLY CUTE JEW who
was deprived of a valentine's msg. from the
terminally smitten dix.
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65 - SCANDALS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Feb. 21
MEDICAL GENETICS
AND YOUR FAMILY
Dr. Judith Hall, Medical
Genetics, UBC & Grace Hospital
Lecture Hall 2, UBC Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
THE  WILD  WEST  SHOW   is  on   the   roll!
Watch out, California — here we come.
ACE
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U Ef del.
9 am    10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding Et
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C Ef Visa accepted.
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm 56 228-5496
NUTRITIOUS GOODIES at Agora Food
CoOp! Fresh fruit, vegetables, bulk goods,
plus a full variety of grocery items. Check
us out at 17th & Dunbar or call 228-9115.
EXCELLENT   EDITING    SERVICES.    Pro
fessional editing for clarity, readability,
organization. Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547
or 327-4761.
20 - HOUSING
ROOM ONLY AND ROOM/BOARD avail
able for immediate occupation in the Single
Student Residences: Fairview Crescent,
Walter Gage, Place Vanier & Totem Park.
Contact Student Housing Office at 2071
West Mall, 228-2811, 8:30-4:00 p.m.
weekdays.
ROOMS   FOR   RENT   IMMEDIATELY   &
March  1,  $200 (no utilities).  224-2662 or
732-0529 John. Near campus.
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Time and Improve Your Grades!
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
H^213-477-8226E/9
Or. rush $2.00 to: Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave. #206-SN, Los Angeles. CA 90025
Custom research also available—all levels
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U-
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
JUDITH FILTNESS
Quality Typist
263-0351
AMS CUSTOMIZED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
Lower Level SUB Rm. 60 228-5640
WORD-PROCESSING $1.50 per page.
Theses my specialty. Letter-quality. Call
Cathalynn 324-5921.
WORDWEAVERS - Word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st, Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
reports, tech., equational, letters, resumes,
bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
75 - WANTED
PROFESSIONAL  TYPING  at  SI 50/page.
Dunbar area. 263-8857.
30 - JOBS
BABYSITTER required for 2 pre-schoolers
at my home near UBC. 4 hrs. on one wkday
(flexible). Occass. eves. $4.50/hr. 224-6535.
BABYSITTER - My place - Mon., Wed.,
&/or Fri. 224-6674. (Non-smoker).
35 - LOST
LOST AT ENGINEER'S BALL, Dk. blue
wool dress coat. If found please contact
Barb. 224-5994.
LOST: Wed., Feb. 11, IRC. White with blue
bell cycling helmet. Phone 228-9568
PENTAX CAMERA in the Pit Wed., Feb. 4.
Call Sandra 266-6524. Reward offered.
DESPERATELY SEEKING keys from pocket
of It. blue Levi jacket lost at E. 33rd party,
Feb. 6. If nothing else please return keys.
No questions asked. Call Kathy to arrange
drop off. 222-0150.
AQUA-MIST Undergrd. Sprinkler Systems.
Independent dealers req. Your own
business, $2500. Full start-up, invent.,
training. 581-4400. Proposals avail. Campus
Canada Employment Centre.
HAVE YOU OR A FRIEND experienced any
unwanted sexual contact while dating or in
a relationship with a boyfriend? We would
appreciate being able to talk with you. We
are researching this area, Et hope to create
resources for women in dating relationships. Please call the SFU Criminology
Research Centre at 291-4127 between
8:30-4:30 p.m. weekdays to set up a
TELEPHONE interview with either Karen or
Cindy. All interviews will be kept strictly
confidential.
FAST TYPIST on word processor. Reasonable rates. Located near UBC, 8th Ef Fir.
Maureen. 875-0064 or 736-4411.
WORD PROCESSING: Fast & accurate,
competitive student rates. Near City Hall.
875-0010.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. $10/hr.
PRECISION WORD PROCESSING
For   all   your   typing   needs,   $1.25/page.
Eves., wknds. Call Kathy 876-9366.
YEAR-ROUND expert essay, theses
typing from legible work. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
King Ed. bus ne.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
I
GET RESULTS
IN THE
UBYSSEY
86 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind Kinko's
Copies, 224-0763. Student rates.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378. Tuesday, February 17, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
M.F.A. art exhibit reveals a subtle maturity
By JEFFREY SWARTZ
The tight schedule of the AMS
Gallery, where shows only run for
a week, leaves little time for
rumination on any particular exhibit. The high demand by UBC
students for exhibition space clearly
necessitates this, unfortunately
reducing particular shows to an unfortunate state of obscurity and
anonymity.
This is particularly regrettable in
the case of the current offering of
recent work by four students from
the first year M.F.A. studio program, where the emerging maturity
of the artmaking makes for subtle
imagery of a markedly undidactic
character.
gallery
M.F.A., first year
studio program:
Bryden, Hogg, Logie, Muirhead
AMS Gallery
SUB
until February 21
Even Lucy Hogg's paintings, formally familiar with their even brush
strokes and clear figurative
elements, seem to use their most apparent parts to disguise their intent.
Consider Washroom Attendant,
where   a   silver-armoured   soldier
stands at the vortex of a labyrinth
of purple toilet stalls. A floor of
cool green flows like a slick stream
from the top of the canvas. Eerily,
almost peripherally, shadowy men'
linger naked in the stalls. As one
goes to leave, he becomes transparent, the floor visible through his
outline. What is being attended
here?
In three of Hogg's other paintings we find oblique reference to
human attempts to grasp or entrap
nature. But the point of contact is
elusive, as in Humber River Escape,
where a mythically large fish leaps
above a falls just beyond the reach
of the rods of wading fishermen.
Cool new Shrew's just a bore
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
Elizabethan dress isn't the only
thing Carousel Theatre's Elizabeth
Ball left out of her production of
Shakespeare's The Taming of the
Shrew. She also left out the conflict.
stage
The Taming of the Shrew
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Elizabeth Ball
Waterfront Theatre
until February 28
Shakespeare's Shrew is the story
of the angry, arrogant, dissatisfied
Kate, who is taught by her husband
Petruchio to behave and play the
role of the doting wife.
Sexist? Certainly, although Ball,
in an interview, said she considers
the play misunderstood, Kate's
eventual "taming" to be taken
ironically rather than literally.
Regardless of Ball's expressed interpretation, and of the appropriateness of its touring B.C.
high schools, this production is just
boring.
This is one of Shakespeare's least
complicated plots. Aside from the
violent, dramatic arguments between Petruchio and Kate, nothing
really happens. No gory sub-plots
where dad gets his eyes ripped out
here.
The centre and substance of
this play is the volatile relationship
of the leads, and here Ball fails
totally.
She has gleefully clad Petruchio
in leather, and given him numerous
"cool" poses. There's a real Honda
motorcycle that roars in from the
lobby for Petruchio's big entrance,
and Grumio arrives at the wedding
in a gorilla costume.
All this to make Shakespeare
more accessible to modern audiences. Does it work? Nope. This
is a purely visual cartoon, where the
lines just don't matter.
David Ley, as Petruchio, poses a
lot, and delivers his lines with a
monotonous condescension,
directed nowhere in particular,
especially not at Kate.
Barbara E. Russell, as Kate,
whines. All the time. It's not that
she is no match for her pretensious
Petruchio, she just does not react to
him at all. She complains and just
changes her mind at the end (inspiring Petruchio's famous, or infamous, response "Now, there's a
wench.").
Brian Mulligan's Grumio is very
funny, especially mugging in the
monkey suit, bananas in his gun
holster.
And Doug Welch's pink and grey
fake marble nightclub set is beautiful in colour and style.
The whole production is littered
with trappings of the eighties: electric guitars, skateboards,
nightclubs. But the drama suffers.
Of course Shakespeare can be set
in the eighties, but this sure isn't
how to do it.
Someone famous once wrote:
"The play's the thing." In this production, the set's the thing, and
that's the problem.
|JSai:gff
hm:
EINSTEIN
Gabriel Emanuel
,   ^^_ ,     _ "An engaging portrait of the man,
a^K*       "     f      J laced with humour"-TORONTO STAR
WW Mllflf FEB. 11-22   8:30 PM
rn-m    .W nrv TKTS. & INFO. 254-9578
VANCOUVER EAST CULTURAL CENTRE
JOIN THE 1987-88
INTRAMURAL MANAGEMENT TEAM
Applications are now being accepted for the following Senior Executive positions of Canada's largest Intramural Sports Program (information and application forms for all Intramural positions may be obtained from the Intramural
Office Rm. 66, Lower Sub Concourse)
Positions Available
Student Director (Co-Rec and Contract Programs)
Student Director (Runs/Cycle and Racquet Sports Programs)
Director of Finance
Director of Recognition
Director of Advertising and Promotions
Editor-in-chief, Sports Publications
Director of Computer Applications and Programming
Director of Video Taping and Filming
Director of Event Staging and Distributions
Director, Market Research
Director, Intramural Business Enterprises
Application deadline Friday, February 27
Interviews Saturday, February 28
Note: The junior administrative positions will be advertised Tuesday, February
24, with application deadline Friday, March 6 and interviews March 9-13.
UBC trihamwu2&.,.&yi aoed Mfttt
There is a certain congruity of effect in Worm Hunters, where two
persons dig at night by flashlight for
their squirmy prey, and in Birthday
Party, where an overly formal table
leaves uncomfortable a number of
workmen on a break from logging.
Along the centre of the gallery,
Paul Bryden's kinetic installation
The Clockmaker's Five Sons whirs
quietly, careful not to dominate the
space, almost reverent. Bryden has
adorned these five "trees" with
painted cardboard and black gauze,
adding red gauze for a streamer effect. Bryden provides a brief statement which explains that his father
was a clockmaker and had five
sons. Here then, Bryden has constructed a meditative memorial for
Father Time, evoked by the regular
cycle of a simple mechanism.
Bryden exhibited a particularly
compelling collection of earlier
work last term at the same gallery
under the title Paper Kimono, and
this piece reflects some of the same
values: an intimate connection with
simple materials; a desire for interaction with the light and air of
the gallery environment; a rejection
of an overly finished look.
Faye Logie's dense mixed media
pictures also function as a kind of
shrine, again to father and his
work. In a series of multi-panelled
polyptychs under the title Basement
Suite, Logie registers imprinted
memories of the dark cellar where
her father worked. These images,
where Logie has applied oil and oil
pastel and black and white photos
over charcoal — or sometimes
selects just one of these media —
are not so much representations of
her basement wrought from optical
sensations, but rather muddied
psychic imprints, ghostly high con-
strast tracings.
Basement Suite III, a photomontage of six pieces each framed
in black aluminum, carries no more
sense of true representation that the
other multi-framed juxtapositions.
In each case the black frames give a
filmstrip effect, allowing the eye to
"read" filmically the frames like a
movie's flicker.
The exhibit is rounded out by
Ross Muirhead's models for a
billboard project. Working on one
hand from notions of the
possibilities inherent in the three-
image rotating advertising billboard
(which, incidentally, was invented
in Vancouver), and from the other
hand with less direct photographic
progressions, Muirhead's project
has interesting possibilities.
The idea of using the billboard
for social or aesthetic or otherwise
non-commercial purposes is not
new. In England a recent project used billboards for social realist
statements relating to worker's and
tenant's rights, and certain
Americans have used billboards to
create incongruous environments,
like placing tropical images on
boards located in barren deserts.
0)
>
CD
CO
TUDIO
FREE
° GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
• For Grad Photography That Is Different •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1987
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
• UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1987 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
o
2111 West 16th Ave.     ?
TUDIO
VANCOUVER, B.C.
736 7281 or 731 1412.
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MID-TERM BREAK
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You need a vacation at MID-TERM BREAK,
and Fogg n' Suds Amber Wing Holidays will
take you on a Mexican Fiesta. You get UBC
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3293 W. 4th, Kitsilano
Phone 732-3377 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 17, 1987
Roundballers roll to play-offs
By CHEW WONG
At one time, as recently as last
year, the word "winner" and the
UBC men's varsity basketball team
were never mentioned in the same
sentence — but oh how times have
changed. This weekend at War
Memorial Gym the basketball boys
took another step on the road to the
CWUAA conference championship
by beating the former number one
and number four ranked teams in
the nation.
On Friday night the 'Birds downed the formerly top ranked University of Alberta Golden Bears 82-76.
The next evening the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies were the victims of a UBC second half burglary
binge that left the Huskies 96-68
losers.
Aaron Point was UBC's
statistical prodigy on Friday night
against the Golden Bears. He
scored 22 points behind an 83 per
cent field goal shooting, and his 23,
yes 23, rebounds accounted for 58
percent of UBC's team total of 39.
Paul Johansson was his usual
steady self contributing 21 points to
the UBC victory.
UBC got two breaks early in the
game. The first was Alberta starting
forward Mike Suderman's nose be
ing broken by a twisting Eric Kristiansen after grabbing a rebound.
"1 just wanted to create some
space," said Kristiansen. "It was
totally unintentional."
Shortly after Suderman left the
game another Alberta starter, Mike
Kornak, was assessed a technical
foul for arguing with a game official. Kornak was benched for the
rest of the game by Alberta head
coach Don Horwood for
disciplinary reasons.
Any thoughts about a fluke UBC
win on Friday night were erased
Saturday as the 'Birds crushed the
formerly fourth ranked University
of Saskatchewan 96-68.
There was a more balanced scoring attack Saturday than there was
the previous night. Five Thunderbirds reached double figures in
scoring: Johansson, Point, J.D.
Jackson, Alan Lalonde, and Mike
Clarke.
After UBC's trademark slow
start, where they trailed 26-15 at
one point, the 'Birds battled back
to take a 39-38 half time lead.
The guard trio of Jackson,
Lalonde, and Kevin Hanson exploded defensively in the second
half and stole the ball no fewer than
'Birds upset UVic
By LOUISE PANZIERA
It seems the end could be just the
beginning for the UBC women's
volleyball tam as they beat the
University of Victoria, the number
one Canada West team over the
weekend.
UBC defeated UVic in five games
15-4, 8-15, 15-9, 7-15 and 15-12. In
the fifth game it wasn't until UBC
was trailing 6-0 that they started
fighting hard. UBC pulled ahead
8-6 then 12-8 before both teams
were set at another tie with twelve
points apiece. Sheila Jones blasted a
few critical serves, and the UBC
team pulled off a deciding 15-12
victory.
What it came down to was
"(that) under pressure we didn't fid
— they did. We could have rolled
over and played dead, but we
didn't," said UBC's coach Donna
Baydock.
It was clear UBC had no intention of playing dead. With the first
serve of the game, UBC setter Vicki
Lalari planted an ace serve in front
of a UVic's player's feet. Each UBC
player kept up the momentum and
readiness    needed    to    carry
themselves through a five game
match.
UBC coach Donna Baydock felt
that her team had made that mental
change needed to win the five game
match, not just last through it. Added to the mental change, UBC
served aggressively and varied their
attack to throw the UVic team off
balance.
Heather Olafsson was named
player of the game and played
superbly for the UBC team making
16 kills, five blocks and one ace
serve. Heather continually used
UVic's big block wiping off her hits
from the middle and side blockers.
Trina Hewlett also blocked well for
UBC and displayed some great
defense. Rhonda Sampson added
15 kills to UBC's stats and Sheila
Jones contributed 13.
Christian Martin played some important one-on-one blocks that
ended with the ball on the opponent's floor.
In five games UBC made only
eight errors while UVic made 17.
The stats accurately describe what
the match consisted of — a UBC
team effort and victory.
Bobcats outskate 'Birds
By NEIL PHILIP
The Thunderbird ice hockey
team failed to clinch a playoff spot
when they lost two games in Brandon this weekend against the Brandon University Bobcats.
In spite of outshooting Brandon
21-19 on Friday night, the 'Birds
were behind thoughout the game,
eventually losing 6-3. On Saturday,
three Brandon goals, including an
empty-netter, in the last nine
minutes turned a 3-2 UBC lead into
a 5-3 loss.
"On Saturday we played well
enough to win," said UBC head
coach Terry O'Malley. "We were
over-anxious though and broke
down. We made two key errors late
in the third period that cost us the
game."
The 'Birds were outskated and
tightly checked by Brandon in both
the weekend games. Although the
shots on goal were close in both
games (21-19 in UBC's favour on
Friday, and 33-31 in Brandon's on
Saturday), the Bobcats were
sharper, and took advantage of
their breaks.
"We weren't as strong a team in
Brandon as we were last weekend in
Lethbridge where we won two
games," commented O'Malley.
"Brandon skated hard and didn't
give us a chance to open up."
In spite of the losses, Fred Ledlin
played well for UBC, as did Keith
Abbot who scored three goals and
one assist on the weekend.
With these two victories Brandon
has moved up from seventh place in
the Western Conference to a fifth
place, 20-point tie with UBC. With
Alberta opting out of the play-off
to participate in the World Student
Games, the fifth place team will
make  the  playoffs.
seven times. Several of the steals
were converted into Laker-like fast
break points.
With the two victories, UBC has
clinched second place in the
CWUAA and will host the University of Saskatchewan in this coming
weekend's best two-of-three semifinals.
Next weekend will mark the first
appearance of a UBC men's basketball team in post-season play n 11
years. The two wins also moved
UBC up six places to the number
four position in national rankings
this week.
The semi-finals will take place at
War Memorial Gym this coming
Friday (7:30 p.m.), Saturday (7:30
p.m.), and Sunday (2 p.m.), if
necessarv.
UBC FENCERS FOIL fazed photographer.
steve chan photo
UBC runners back on right track
By DAVE WILKINSON
Middle distance runner Jennifer
Mawby epitomized the outstanding
performances of the UBC track and
field team in this weekend's Canada
West Preview Meet in Edmonton.
Mawby, a high school sensation
last year and fully sponsored by
Tiger, had early season difficulties
negotiating the tight and frequent
turns associated with indoor tracks.
On Sunday, however, she
obliterated all her opponents and
the CIAU qualifying standard by
winning the 600 metre in 1:33.3,
fully two seconds below standard.
Only 45 minutes later she ran a
blistering anchor leg in the 4x400
metre relay that enabled her and her
team members Ann Leong, Lisa
Parish, and Chris Bjorndal to
achieve standard in that event with
a time of 4:02.3.
"I lived up to my shoes," said
Mawby. She competes in spikes that
retail at $200.
Dave Wilkinson didn't let nagging injuries prevent him from
achieving standard in the 60m
hurdles on Saturday. He lowered
his season's best to 8.34 seconds, a
time which should rank him third in
the nation. In the 60m sprint he only managed 7.14 seconds three
weeks ago. In Edmonton, his time
was 7.02, a significant improvement.
On Sunday Wilkinson teamed
with Ed Neeland, Steve Dong, and
impressive substitute runner Talino
Bruno to easily achieve standard in
the 4x200 metre relay. Their winning time of 1:30.4 beat standard by
over two seconds despite two sorry-
looking passes.
The UBC relay teams were impressive all around. As well as the
women's 4x400 metre and men'-s
4x200 metre achieving standard, the
women's 800 metre relay team of
Franca Luongo, Ann Leong, Kim
Berkeley, and Joanne Gaspard
qualified for CIAUs with a time of
1:47.2, while the men's 1600m relay
ran their fastest time of the year,
just slightly off standard.
The most encouraging event for
the women's team was the high
jump. Jeannie Cockcroft, former
CIAU champion, showed signs of
recovering her world class form by
jumping 1.81 metres while winning
the event. She was sidelined last
year by injury.
Meanwhile, Heather D'Oyley
cleared 1.69 metres and achieved
CIAU standard which had eluded
her so far this season.
"Now that the pressure (of getting standard) is off, I know I can
really go high," she said.
For two athletes, however, the
weekend was one of unanticipated
frustration. High jumper Jim
Gamlin, superb three weeks ago
when he cleared 2.13 metres, saw
his number one national ranking
slip away as his close friend John
Neufeld from the University of
Saskatchewan jumped 2.14 metres.
Gamlin's best was 2.01m.
"There are no excuses," he said.
"This was just garbage."-
Pole vaulter Boyd Mason, ranked
number two nationally didn't clear
a single height.
"I felt good, but I just couldn't
get up," said the fifth year
engineer.
LSAT/GMAT/GRE
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