UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 2, 1979

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125896.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125896.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125896-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125896-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125896-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125896-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125896-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125896-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125896-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125896.ris

Full Text

Array ■**■
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 10
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 2,1979
228-2301
UBC profs hit
CTV program
— glen sanford photo
PRACTICING FOR INEVITABLE MONSOONS, women's soccer goalie dances through Swan Lake in anticipation of playing in Thunderbird Bog. Stirring movements brought standing ovation from occupants of faculty and
staff nine-to-five lot in background, who saw no defect in Ludmilla Vlasova imitation. Team took advantage of fine
weather Monday to prepare for upcoming season.
By TOM HAWTHORN
and HEATHER CONN
UBC's academics reject an
allegation, presented by a national
public affairs television program,
that foreign students are overrunning Canadian universities.
CTV's W5, in a Sunday night
broadcast, said Canadian taxpayers
are footing a $1 billion bill for
educating "the elite of the Third
World," who come to Canada for a
cheap university education.
Titled The Campus Giveaway,
the program said properly qualified
Canadian students are currently
denied access to university because
more than 100,000 foreign students
are flooding campuses across
Canada.
"So many are foreign students,
that they don't have to mix with
Canadian students," W5 reporter
Helen Hutchinson said. "It is as if
there are two campuses . . . one
foreign and one domestic."
But academics contacted at UBC
unanimously said that foreign
students present absolutely no
threat to Canadian students, despite
what the program stated.
"It's certainly not a B.C. problem. In my opinion, we have too
few foreign students," said Erich
Vogt, vice-president for faculty and
student affairs. "Certainly we're
not displacing B.C. students for
foreign students."
Hutchinson also reported that
foreign students are "a particular
problem" in professional faculties
like engineering, commerce, pharmaceutical sciences and dentistry.
"As far as my faculty is concerned, we don't really have any kind of
problem at all," pharmaceutical
sciences dean Bernard Riedal said
yesterday. "No one is denying a
properly qualified Canadian student from being admitted."
Dentistry dean George Beagrie
also said no foreign student "problem" exists and added that
"education demands input from
areas beyond one's locale."
While W5 stated that 10 per cent
of all B.C. university students are
foreign, UBC figures show that only
one per cent of undergraduate
students are from outside Canada.
Godin blasts PC
mortgage plan
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Prime minister Joe Clark's proposed mortgage deductibility plan
will force Quebec to subsidize new
home buyers in English Canada,
Parti Quebecois MNA Gerald
Godin said yesterday.
Godin told 50 people in SUB
auditorium that most French-
speaking Quebecers rent their housing and will not benefit from the
plan.
"In this case, the federal government cannot be sensitive to the
needs of Quebecers, they must
satisfy the majority of Canadians,"
he said.
Godin said provinces other than
See page 2: PEQUISTE
GODIN
PQ vs. the West
PetroCan deserves
to live, says Lalonde
By RORY MUNRO
The federal Conservative government is making a monumental
blunder by dismantling
PetroCanada, Liberal energy critic
Marc Lalonde said Monday.
The Clark government's plan to
turn half of PetroCan over to the
private sector would be disastrous,
he told 150 people in Buch. 106.
"If the Clark government plan
goes into effect it would create two
medium sized companies," he said.
"The high risk non-profit half (ex
ploration) would stay in the government and the profitable part would
be in the private sector."
"I'm convinced if the government reaches the conclusion to disband PetroCanada, it would create
a difficult system," he said. "The
Canadian taxpayers and energy
users will be losers."
He said the sudden paranoia
about a national oil company competing with foreign multinationals is
ridiculous. He added that PetroCan
See page 2: LALONDE
UBC Johnny-on-the-spot for cash
By PETER MENYASZ
The English Bay Cafe, the
Stanley Park Pavilion and
Mulvaney's are popular places
among Vancouver's wealthier
residents.
And the Liquor Control Board
offers services that many people
can enjoy.
And there are those who occasionally go slumming and order
party supplies from the Varsity
Grill and Dial-A-Bottle.
And after a great deal of dining
and imbibing, Johnny on the Spot
Toilet    Rentals   might    seem   a
reasonable expenditure.
But the B.C. Artificial Insemination Centre?
UBC's administrators may have
difficulty explaining that line item
in last year's financial statement.
Who says door-to-door
salesmen have a hard time? One
of them knocked on UBC's door
and sold us about $8,000 in Fuller
Brush products.
And an energetic Ideas
Unlimited representative sold a
campus of brilliant creators ideas
worth $67,022.
And $28,092 to Max's Donuts
could take care of a lot of coffee
breaks at the faculty club.
There must be someone on
campus who enjoyed $1,100
worth of Playhouse Magazine. It
might even be the same person
that spent the money with Hartz
Mountain Pet Supplies.
A number of people must have
embarked on personality self-
improvement programs during the
past year. Cheques went out to the
Outward Bound Mountain School
and Cold Mountain Institute.
Mountain gear was provided by
the Mountain Equipment Co-op.
Hotels played a large part in last
year's expenditures, too. The
university's classy guests stayed at
the Bayshore Inn, the Hyatt
Regency, or the Harrison Hotel.
The not-so-privileged took rooms
at the St. Regis and Sylvia hotels.
No one was fortunate enough
to be treated to waterbeds and
blue movies at the El Cid Hotel,
though.
But someone must have enjoyed the services procured from
Bliss Industries. You can buy a lot
of bliss in Vancouver for $925. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 2, 1979
Dead teeth tell tales
Dental records prove conclusively
that Adolph Hitler and Martin Bor-
mann are dead, a world famous
forensic dentist said Friday.
"I was responsible for the ante-
mortem dental work done on Bor-
mann," said Reidar Sognnaes,
former dentistry dean at the University of California at Los Angeles. "I
got permission to examine some
skeletal remains in 1972, and I compared these remains with
Bormann's medical records."
He said the examination convinced him the remains were those of
Bormann. "While for positive identification by fingerprints only 12
concordant (matching) points are
required, I found 16 concordant
points when I made the dental examination on Bormann's remains."
"I have also made dental inden-
tification of Hitler's remains,"
Sognnaes said. "There I found 26
concordant points."
He dismissed the many reported
sightings of Bormann in Argentina,
alive and well. "Recognition is not
identification," Sognnaes said. "I
have been to Argentina myself, and
I have seen several men who very
closely resemble Bormann. We need
reliable evidence to make an identification, and in absence of fingerprints dental records provide fine
evidence."
Sognnaes expressed interest in the
Free
coupon*
That's right! This coupon
is absolutely free! Yours
to keep for life. Think about
it - at P. J. Burger & Sons.
15 classic burgers and other
great stuff. 11:30 on-7 days
a week, it's yummy. 2966
W. 4th Ave. and Bayswater.
case of Theodore Bundy, recently
convicted of the murder of two
Florida women largely on the basis
of dental evidence.
Pequiste says
Canada better
without Quebec
From page 1
Quebec could more easily push
through effective constitutional
change if Quebec opted out of confederation.
He said in past constitutional
conferences Quebec has blocked all
moderate changes, many of which
could have positively benefitted
other provinces.
"Quebec has traditionally been in
the way of constitutional change
beneficial for the English Canadian
partners."
He said the upcoming referendum on sovereignty association will
provide Quebecers with ■ political
power.
Godin said the wording on the
referendum ballot will be strong
enough to give the PQ a mandate
for the establishment of sovereignty
association.
Godin defeated then Quebec
premier Robert Bourassa in the
1976 provincial election that saw
the PQ sweep into power.
minium
laliMSpjonA
(five
See t6e
JOGGER RUNS  THROUGH HAILSTONES AS BIG AS SOCCER BALLS
Lalonde hits PetroCan demolition plan
From page 1
is doing well, and after four years is
large enough to compete on the
world market.
"The Conservatives have taken a
negative view," he said. "What
they call a $4 billion dud cost us $2
billion. A month ago they wouldn't
scrap it or keep it. Now they're just
castrating it."
Lalonde said it was the Liberals
and not the NDP who created
Petro-Canada.
"We wanted to insure we would
have a window in the oil and gas in
dustry and a corporation to
negotiate worldwide," he said.
"We were losing control, we had
fiscal measures and an energy board
but we relied on the industry for information. They weren't telling us
the truth or allowing us to know
what was going on in the field."
Illllllllllll
Careers
nee
kterhouse
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
J
Representatives of the Vancouver office will be V
available on campus on November 7, 8 and 9 at the f
Canada   Employment   Centre   to   interview   1980
graduates who will be eligible for student registra- ;
tion with the Institute of Chartered Accountants of -
British Columbia.
Arrangements for an interview should  be made
through the Canada Employment Centre,  Room -
214, Brock Hall by October 5, 1979.
Additional information is availble at the Canada
Employment Centre.
Interested in CA Employment?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1980
graduates for Vancouver and all other offices of ne
Firm. Submit an original or photocopy of yojr
personal, resume (UCPA form is suitable) Dy
October 5, 1979 to the Canada Employment Centre
on Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be
contacted on or about October 26th regarding
campus interviews which will take place during the
period November 6-15th. Additional information is
available at the U.B.C. Canada Employment Office.
louche Ross &Go.
Chartered Accountants
We are an international firm of chartered accountants seeking
persons to article as chartered accountants in our British Columbia offices.
If you are currently on a Faculty of Commerce
undergraduate, licentiate, or graduate program, have a
sincere desire to become a chartered accountant, and will
graduate in 1980, we would like to meet you.
We will be recruiting on campus from October 29 to
November 1. Persons desiring to meet our representatives
must apply for an interview in writing and forward their
resumes to the Campus Placement Center by October 5, 1979.
These applications will be pre-screened. Students selected for
interviews will be contacted as quickly as possible to make appointments through the Campus Placement Center.
C.A. STUDENTS - VICTORIA
THORNE RIDDELL & CO.
Considering a career in Chartered Accountancy? Many
U.B.C. graduates have made successful careers as Chartered
Accountants with the Victoria office of our firm.-The office
has a complement of more than 45 professional staff and a
diversified practice.
A representative of our Victoria office will be on campus
November 5 and 6 to interview students.
If you are interested in arranging for an interview please
complete an application form available from the Canada
Employment Centre on Campus, attach a transcript of your
marks, and leave it with the Employment Centre by October 5
marked to our attention.
THORNE RIDDELL & CO.
305-645 Fort Street
Victoria, British Columbia
'With offices across Canada including
the following in British Columbia
Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminster, Cranbrook, Vernon,
Kamloops and Kelowna Tuesday, October 2,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Discovery Park Inc.
By Geof Wheelwright
Selling prime campus parkland
at rates too low for industry
throughout B.C. to ignore
Plans for the establishment of
five industrial research parks in
B.C. are going full steam ahead,
despite objections to the lack of
public input on the project.
Education, science and
technology minister Pat McGeer
announced Friday the creation of
the Discovery Foundation to
oversee the construction and
realization of the "discovery"
parks and donated $3 million in
provincial government funds to
get the project started.
But NDP MLAs Emery Barnes
and Alex MacDonald say the project was never discussed in the
provincial legislature, and the
public had no chance to state their
views on the plan.
"This is cabinet government.
Bennett doesn't believe in the
legislature. It's typical of their
contempt for democratic procedure," said MacDonald.
He said the government never
introduced the plan to the
legislature and "railroaded" it
through the cabinet.
And Barnes said he had not
heard of the plan, nor realized its
scope or cost until the Science Day
last Friday when McGeer released
the names of the Discovery Foundation trustees and unveiled the
details of the research park
scheme.
"This is a major departure. It
isn't a regular method for furthering high technology. It may be an
excellent idea, but we haven't had
any input yet."
But Don Larsen, managing
director of Discovery Parks Inc.,
said the $3 million grant for the
project came out of a $5 million
surplus which the legislature
slated for use by science and
technology earlier this year.
Larsen confirmed that the
money for the plan was only approved at the cabinet level and
said the government had just "not
considered" getting any public or
legislative input on the proposal.
Larsen says he would consider
having meetings with both student
groups and members of the
public, but says the university
should actually take the responsibility for student input.
And McGeer says student opinion is entirely a private matter
between the universities and the
students. And university administrations should settle it
themselves, he added.
Both UBC's Alma Mater Society and the Simon Fraser Student
Society have passed motions condemning the lack of student input
into the establishment of the
parks, currently slated for SFU,
UBC, the British Columbia Institute of Technology and the Institute of Ocean Sciences on Vancouver Island.
In a leaflet distributed at Friday's ceremony at Robson square,
the SFSS stated: "This project is
being implemented during a
period when SFU is suffering
severe and mounting cutbacks as a
result of decline in funding. At the
same time, this money saved
through decreased funding is going directly into the subsidization
of corporate and research profits.
"There has been no consultation with the university community or the public with any of the
proposals surrounding this
development. On Sept. 20 a
'forum' was held on campus on
this topic — the research park was
presented as a fait accompli, none
of the concerns expressed by
students were properly addressed
or dealt with."
AMS external affairs officer
Valgeet Johl says she hopes to
discuss the issue with the university administration and has already
written a letter to them expressing
student dissatisfaction with current research park plans.
But UBC vice-president Erich
Vogt said he thinks students had
their say on the research park at a
senate meeting two weeks ago
when plans for the UBC park were
unexpectedly announced.
"I'm not at all sure student input is appropriate. We've heard
the students' viewpoint — senate
discussed the issue," said Vogt.
But Vogt said he did not rule
out student input at the board of
governors level, and Johl said student board members Bruce Armstrong and Glenn Wong will
discuss the student viewpoint at
today's board meeting.
Johl added she was unhappy
with the board of trustees named
to the Discovery foundation.
They include McGeer, the
presidents of UBC, Simon Fraser,
University of Victoria, the dean of
continuing education at the B.C.
Institute of Technology and five
representatives from private industry.
The industry representatives,
some of whose companies are expected to make use of the research
park, include Anatek Electronics
president and UBC board member
Allan Crawford, Cominco Ltd.
president Gerald Hobbs, Crown
Zellerback president Tom Rust,
Teck Corporation president Norman Keevil Jr. and John MacDonald, president of MacDonald,
Dettwiler and Associates Ltd.
"Quite clearly, it's clear that as
a trustee I'll declare my interests
and refrain from voting on that. If
you find yourself in a conflict of
interest situation, you refrain
from voting on that," he said.
But Johl said she is not totally
convinced of Crawford's motives
for being on the board and questions whether his abstentions will
make it objective.
Vogt said
student input on
the research park
is now inappropriate
Anatek manager Doug Smeaton
told The Ubyssey last week his
company will be interested in
entering the UBC research park if
it can get favorable terms.
At that time, Anatek president
Crawford was caught in a possible
conflict of interest situation between his position on UBC's board
and his Anatek ownership.
Now Crawford will have input
in the affairs of all five research
parks. But he said Friday he will
abstain from voting on all issues
pertaining to Anatek's presence at
UBC or elsewhere.
"Everything seems to be taking
place in the backrooms, so
whether or not he abstains doesn't
matter — he still has influence,"
she said.
And Discovery Parks Inc.,
director Larsen said although
other industrial members of the
board of trustees have not yet expressed an interest in putting their
companies in the park, there is
nothing preventing them from doing so.
"If an individual has a conflict
on a particular issue, then they
will abstain. They're not in there
for their own benefit — there's a
potential conflict in anything you
do."
McGeer said industrial
members of the board are all
business entrepreneurs, whom he
hopes can turn a profit for the
Discovery Foundation preparing
park sites and buildings.
He said any profits made by the
foundation will be distributed
among the institutions who own
the research parks and the Science
Council of B.C.
McGeer said research work at
the parks will offer students an
eventually unlimited opportunity
to work in their research field.
"Employment growth has been
nine times as fast (as regular industry) in high technology because
there is no upper limit to human
ingenuity."
McGeer said the availability of
industrial research will result in
higher academic programs and increase the interaction between
students and commercial firms.
He said most of the university's
benefits will not come from leasing the land the park stands on,
but from whatever donations the
companies make and hidden
"non-financial benefits."
"Universities won't get their
benefits from the leases — the
terms of the lease will be the least
important part if they're a success. They get the overwhelming
majority of benefits from industries who want to share their
success," said McGeer.
McGEER AND COMPANY . . . dream come true could be nightmare for others
GEOF WHEELWRIGHT/UBYSSEY PHOTO Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 2,1979
'I now proclaim'
Education minister Pat McGeer handed down
a provincial proclamation Friday.
A proclamation that tells universities they
must operate for the profit of industry in hopes
that companies will take pity on them and throw
a crumb of corporate cake their way.
A proclamation that tells universities that
money made from the development of their land
as a industrial research site will be handled by
McGeer's latest brainchild, the Discovery Foundation — who in their kindness and wisdom will
give some of the profits to the peasant university.
And a proclamation which puts the barons of
B.C. industry in the position to find cheap
research sites for their own companies in the
name of national high technology development.
What does he take us for?
Students were given no input whatsoever into
plans for the establishment of the park, while
nearby Point Grey residents — who elected
McGeer — were not even asked how the park
would affect them.
And after the plans are made, the architectural
models built, and the grand unveiling over.
Discovery Parks Inc.'s Don Larsen coyly asks the
public if they have anything to say about it,
although he thinks students should talk to their
administration.
And yesterday Larsen revealed that the multi-
million dollar plan has not even been discussed at
the highest level of government in the province
because the money to start it had been approved
in a blanket $5 million grant to science and
technology from a Socred "surplus".
This surplus, carved out of the education and
health care cutbacks wrought on the province by
the Bill Bennett brigade, was ordered by the
Socred cabinet to fund McGeer's dream plan for
B.C.'s universities.
Unfortunately, McGeer's dream has turned
out to be a nightmare for students, the public
and the university.
Sweet dreams.
They eat, they drink
For those of us who wonder what the university does with its multi-million-dollar budget, the
annual financial report is quite an eyeopener.
You would think local businesses would look
on students in a kindly way after the amount of
money the university pumps into their tills.
But just try going to the Bayshore Inn and telling them you're a UBC student.
"But the university's honored guests stay
here," you say. "Aren't I entitled to some kind of
deal?"
Guess again.
Even Johnny on the Spot toilet rentals would
probably ask you for a deposit of some sort
before letting you drive the potty off the lot.
And if bills from B.C. Artificial Insemination
Centre, Ideas Unlimited and Bliss Industries arrived in your mailbox at the same time, your
landlord would likely fix you with a stony gaze.
But the university is its own landlord and these
bills are simply paid without question and forgotten. After all, what those professors do in their
spare time is their own business, right?
There are likely simple and logical explanations
for all of the line items in the university's financial
statement. Dial-A-Bottle was likely called in to
cater a late-night poker party. Playhouse
Magazine is probably an incorrect reference to
Playboard, the magazine published by the Vancouver Playhouse.
And who could live without Fuller brushes?
The university's guests who stayed at the Harrison Hotel must have had a long walk to the
campus each morning to conduct their business.
But let's not nit-pick.
The university administrators are just like
everybody else. They eat, drink and shit just like
us common folk.
Letters
THE UBYSSEY
>v
v:
October 2, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
"Roll out the welcome Matt! Long Live the King!" The cry echoed and reverbrated through the printers
as the dashing grey eminence strolled in. Peter Menyasz discussed old bosses with him and Heather
Conn talked of old times, but Kevin Finnegan had nothing to offer but a beer Glen Sanford took
photos of the motley crew, but they fortunately didn't turn out. Joan Marklund, having heard that grey
eminences know all, asked him if the floor was concrete or rubber. Gary Brookfield tried to edit one letter from his first name, but five years on The Ubyssey had taught him how to dodge both telephone
books and blue pencils. Geof Wheelwright proudly pointed out he wouldn't have to be next to his sister
in the masthead, while Bill Romaine jawed with the former staffer about the good life m Argentina.
Dave Francis looked up from his beer long enough to ask Rory Munro where the shorter editor had gotten to, but the eastern refugee was nowhere to be found. Disconsolate over the fate of the Expos, Tom
Hawthorn had locked himself in the bottom drawer and refused to come out until the Canadiens
started winning.
'Bank is bullying AMS for blood money'
According to the report "AMS
Morality worth $2,000" in your
Sept. 28 issue a proposal will be
made at a meeting of the student
representative assembly Oct. 3 to
reverse the decision taken by the
Alma Mater Society last year to
close its short-term loans account at
the Bank of Montreal as a protest
against the policy of Canadian
banks making loans to South
Africa.
The decision to close the account
was made in response to a call by
the   National   Campaign   to   Stop
Bank Loans to South Africa launched by CUSO, Oxfam, the Canadian Labor Congress, the Task
force of the Churches and Corporate Responsibility representing
all major Canadian Churches,
Southern Africa support groups
and others. The bank campaign was
in part a reaction to the shooting
down of hundreds of unarmed
African students by South African
police at Soweto in June 1976.
Among the organizations that
withdrew accounts from the five
major   Canadian   banks   making
loans to the South African government and its various state-
controlled agencies, (such as its national airline and broadcasting corporation), were: the Canadian
Union of Public Employees, Oxfam, CUSO ($10 million), Dawson
College, Montreal ($25 million), the
United Nations Association (Vancouver Branch), SAAC, individuals
and union locals.
In the U.S., university students
are waging a campaign for total
disinvestment from companies
operating in or dealing with South
Africa, on the grounds that they are
supporting a racist government.
The University of Massachusetts
has sold $700,000 worth of such investments, the Oregon State board
of education voted to divest itself of
stock valued at $6 million and the
Cookies, juice
and a bottle of...
Interested in finding out your
blood type? Do you like cookies
and orange juice? Have the time of
your life in SUB this week.
Seriously, due to an inadequate
supply of blood, surgery is currently being postponed. Your blood is
needed now. The Red Cross is on
campus this week and you can find
them upstairs in SUB 207 from 10
a.m. 'til 4 p.m.
To all those faint-hearted individuals, there is the added incentive of a draw for dinners at The
Keg.
Please help.
Danette Tidball
blood drive coordinator
University of Wisconsin was advised by the State attorney-general to
sell $9 million worth of holdings in
companies with South African subsidiaries. The movement continues
to grow.
The Bank of Montreal has been
particularly adamant in maintaining
its policy of loans to South Africa
and the bank's president, Fred H.
McNeil, at the bank's annual
general meeting in 1978 advised
Church representatives that to stop
the loans "would not be morally
defensible or morally consistent."
According to Corporate Date Exchange Inc. (Nov. 27/78) the Bank
of Montreal has extended credit to
the value of $50 million to the
South African government from
1972 to 1977 and $35 million to
South Africa's Electricity Supply
Commission (ESCOM) from 1974
to 1982.
The tactics used by the bank's
Robin Hood rides
pool to research
Today, after spending some time
away from UBC, I had my first
chance to use the new pool. During
its construction this structure bore
the brunt of your editorials and
criticism. We can be thankful that
the forces of goodness triumphed
leaving us with this very positive addition to the campus.
Let's hope the research park fight
is of a similar nature.
Andrew W.F. Metten
grad studies
local manager to compel the AMS
to restore its short-term loans account amount to nothing but intimidation and those who support
the move are meekly submitting to
blatant pressure tactics. For the
enormously wealthy Bank of
Montreal to complain that it does
not make a profit from AMS accounts is ridiculous. Perhaps Mr.
Clark, the manager, will show AMS
the bank's books to prove his
allegations.
There was a time when university
students were in the forefront of
movements to redress injustice or
oppose oppression. It augurs poorly
for their future leadership if they
are now willing to go back on their
fine stand on the South African
bank-loan issue.
To reinstate the AMS account
would be a most retrogressive step
and one which can only be interpreted as giving comfort and support to the apartheid regime in its
policy of total denial of political
rights to South Africa's overwhelming black majority. It will surely be
so regarded by Africans and black
people in Canada. It is to be hoped
that African students at UBC will
oppose this move.
As for the Botha/Vorster regime,
which has an unfailing way of getting to know such news, it will be
hailed as yet another defeat by
"right-thinking people" ovei
"hostile, anti-South African
forces."
Z. Gamiet
chairman
Southern Africa Action
Coalition Tuesday, October 2,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Quasi lunchbreak
bites into cars
Is your car safe from breaking
and entry? I thought mine was.
Whether he/she knows it or not,
one of the staff and faculty
members had his/her car broken into on Sept. 20 at lunch hour.
I was sitting outside McMillan
lounge when a campus cowboy pulled over and took out his pen and
pad. This was no unusual sight, for
officer Brown (his signature on the
ticket) must give out dozens of
tickets a day. But, he took
something out of his pocket and
unlocked the driver's side door with
it. Needless to say, this shocked me.
He   then   opened   the   door   and
Letters
scraped off a parking sticker from
the windshield, (probably last
year's). He was nice enough to lock
the door again, so the car won't be
looted, then left a violation ticket
under the windshield wiper before
leaving.
Do the campus cowboys have the
authority to enter any car they want
at any time? They could have been
in your and my cars at anytime
without our knowing it. Do you feel
safe about leaving your car out
there? I don't.
Yo Lim
agricultural sciences 2
Green keyed off
at Brown bullshit
Early Sept. 20 while behind
McMillan, I happened to notice one
of our local cowboys writing some
citizen a ticket. Not a strange sight,
but, after writing the ticket, he then
proceeded to whip out some keys
and gained entry to the car in question, seemingly to remove some
sticker.
Now, does patrol officer Brown
(the name on the ticket, his 23rd
written that day) have, through the
security department, the legal
authorization to gain entry to a
private automobile without the
owner's permission?
P. Green
applied science 1
Frunch
lessons.
Frunch-as in Friday
lunch. 15 classic burgers,
tons of other great stuff.
Intriguing starts, fabulous
desserts. 11:30 on-7 days a
week. Yum. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bayswater.
ARTS
STUDENTS
Nominations are now open fori
1. S.R.A. Representative
2. Secretary
3. Social Coordinator
4. Editor, Arts Newsletter
NOMINATIONS CLOSE OCT.5;
ELECTIONS ARE OCT. 10
Advice, information and nomination forms available at the\
Arts Office I Buch.  107)
THEATRE DEPARTMENT
AUDITIONS-AUDITIONS-AUDITIONS
for
A MIDSUMMER
NIGHT'S DREAM
by William Shakespeare
Directed by Klaus Strassman
OPEN TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
Tuesday, October 2 - 12:00-2:00 p.m.
Wednesday, October 3 - 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Thursday, October 4 - 12:00-3:00 p.m.
All Auditions In Room 112, Frederic Wood Theatre
(Selected Audition Materia/ Will Be Available in Room 207)
AUDITIONS-AUDITIONS-AUDITIONS
CITR 95.9 FM CABLE
POINTED
AMS (UBC) CONCERTS
STICKS  ...£
SUB-BALLROOM UBC OCT 5 - 8:30 p.m. TICKETS: $3.00
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE, QUINTESSENCE RECORDS Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 2, 1979
Tween classes
TODAY
RUSSIAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. 1256.
WUSC
Slide show and general meeting, noon, Buch.
205.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Bible study and discussion,  noon,  St.  Mark's
College, Fr. Paul Rennick's room.
KARATE CLUB
Practice,   beginners   welcome,   7   to   9   p.m.,
Thunderbird Winter Sports Complex gym E.
AQUASOC
Sign-up for CPR course, SUB basement cages.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Humphries speaks on medical practise and
research, noon, IRC 1.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper,   study   and   evening   prayer,   6   p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
CO-ORDINATING COMMITTEE FOR
SLAVONIC AREA STUDIES
Seminar by Vladimir Bukovsky on Growing Up in
the U.S.S.R., 2:30 p m. Buch. 2230.
GRAPHICS SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB conversation pit.
BALLET CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
IL CAFFE
lleana Bertelli Parsons will speak about her BCTV
program, noon, Buch. 352.
AIKIDO CLUB
Practice for new members, 7:30 p.m., Armouries
203.
TM PROGRAM
Weekly meeting with videotape,  noon, Buch.
217.
NDP CLUB
Former NDP candidate Ron Johnson speaks on
Why Save PetroCan?, noon, SUB 125.
INTRAMURALS
Last   registration   for   Intramural   Flag   Football
Tourney, 4 p.m., War Memorial gym room 210.
INTRAMURALS
Frisbee football, noon, Mclnnes Field.
THURSDAY
AQUASOC
Party with pizza, films, slides and music, 7 p.m.,
SUB 205.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Dr. Wiesenthal speaks on Approaching a resolution, noon, Buch. 212.
NIHONKAIWA KURABU
Weekly meeting, noon, Asian Studies lounge.
Hot flashes
Type tasting
can be fun
&*■*&
It's a hell of a way to find out if
someone is your type. The Red
Cross people are on campus taking
blood from your tired bodies at
SUB 207 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. all
week.
But it's not as bad as it sounds.
They're also having a draw for dinners at The Keg restaurant.
But seriously folks, it's quite important that you give blood.
Surgery at some hospitals is being
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
IF THE BUTLER DIDN'T
DO IT, WHO DID?
the MUSICAL
WHODUNIT
FOR THE ENTIRE
FAMILY
Held Over
OCTOBER 2-6
METRO THEATRE
Student Tickets: $3.00
Reservations: 266-7191
Switch
blades.
That's right. After the
strenuous job of switching the blades on your ice
skates, you'll probably need
a monstrous, tasty burger.
15 super varieties. Plus other
great stuff. 11:30 on-7 davs
a week. 2966 W. 4th Ave."
and Bavswater.
delayed until blood supplies are
built up. So show that you too can
be a bleeding heart.
Dissident talks
Vladimir Bukovsky, former
Soviet dissident and political
prisoner, will speak on the
U.S.S.R.'s efforts to silence
political dissension. If you are interested in the basic workings of
Soviet philosophy on free thought,
go to the SUB auditorium today at
noon.
NDP CLUB
General meeting and elections, noon, SUB 205.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
French party, 8 p.m., International House.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr. Johnson lectures, IRC 1.
FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT
Illustrated   lecture   by   David   Craven,    noon,
Lasserre 104.
EAST INDIAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
AIKIDO CLUB
New members' practice, 7 p.m.. Armouries 203.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Dr.   Wiesenthal   lectures   on   Approaching   a
resolution, noon, Buch. 212.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Discussion of A Lutheran view of the born again
movement, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
IVCF
Gene   Thomas   speaks  on   Christian   lifestyles,
noon, Chem. 250.
CCF
Dr.   Jim  Packer speaks on  Revelation,   noon,
SUB 205.
FRIDAY
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
INTRAMURALS
Turkey Trot for men and women, noon, Mclnnes
Field.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Denise Lenson and friends in concert, and danc-
ng, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., International House mam
hall.
Cinema West presents
"REBEL
WITHOUT
A CAUSE"
Starring James Dean
|Thurs.,October 4th j
12:30 noon $1.00
SUB Theatre
SCIENCE
GENERAL MEETING
There    will    be    a    Science    General
Meeting on
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10
at 12:30 p.m. in Hebb Theatre
to discuss the S.U.S. Constitution and
S.U.S. Fee Levy
r
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
TUESDAY: Israel Day, Fala Jel Lunch
Meet Rami Raz, Vancouver's New Shaliakh
12:30 Hillel House
WEDNESDAY: Vegetarian Lunch Bar
Menu:  Spiced Lentil Soup, Tuna Fish and Egg
Sandwiches, Fresh Garden Salad
12:30 Hillel House
THURSDAY: Beginners and Intermediate
Hebrew
Seminar on the Holocaust
12:30 Hillel House
I
""~~~ ATTENTION ~~~~
4th YEAR
SCIENCE STUDENTS
The Science Grad Council is holding a
GENERAL MEETING
THURSDAY AT 12:30 P.M.
in Hebb Theatre
This meeting will discuss Grad Photos/
Functions/etc.
YOUR VIEWS ARE WANTED, SO
PLEASE ATTEND
1st YEAR
S.U.B. PARTY ROOM
Wednesday, Oct. 3rd
at 4:30 p.m.
ALL FIRST YEAR SCIENCE STUDENTS
COME OUT AND MEET YOUR PROFS
AND STUDENT HACKS.
Refreshments Available
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.75 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is 17:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B,, &&C. Van, B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
Knowledge and Experience
VEDANTA
PRESENTING SEQUENTIAL
TALKS IN
UPANISHADIC TRADITION
Vancouver Community College.
Langara Campus
100 West 49th Ave.. Vancouver
Fifth floor - Library
Oct. 7th thru 14th
7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
     Admission Free
11
- For Sale —
Private
15
- Found
20
- Housing
3RD. YEAR FEMALE has large suite to share
with another female. Available immediately. Eves. 734-0763.
25
- Instruction
30
- Jobs
35
- Lost
REWARD. Lost blue duffle coat in room HA
310 on 20/9/79. Phone Stan 325-0054.
40
— Messages
10— For Sale—Com'l
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and
racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
PHOTOLAB—
October Special
Prints from Slides
reg. 59c
Now only
SINCERE, REFINED grad student, of Scottish origin, 24, 5'10", wishes to meet
mature, attractive, single female student
20-25, preferbly in Arts, Commerce or
Education who is a good conversationalist
and a non-smoker, for outings and companionship, 988-3408.
50 — Rentals
60 - Rides
39c
ex	
py We use Kodak paper
for the good look
CX
CX
CX
CX
CX
#3-4480 West 10th
10th Avenue at
Sasamat
224-4215
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander
graduate of Juilliard School of Music.
Member of B.C. Registered Music
Teachers Ass'n. 731-0601.
ACADEMY of Ballet. Children, adults.
2195 West 45th Ave., Kerrisdale. Jo-Anna
Paulson-Snider exercise now. 681-3855.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accu-
ate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING: Essays, Thesis, Manuscripts,
Reports, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy 324-9414.
EXPERT TYPING. Term, papers, theses,
whatever, Kits area. Fast, neat and
reasonable. Call Irene 734-3170.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
To Sell -
Buy -
Inform
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
PHOTOS
Sameras ltd.i
4538 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858 Tuesday, October 2,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Letters
Socialism isn't creepy
When I first read Bill Bertram's
"PetroCan is for Pinkos" letter in
the Sept. 28 Ubyssey, I honestly
suspected it to be a joke. A very bad
joke. But just in case Bertram's
comments were intended to be of a
serious nature I feel compelled to
set this poor man straight.
Bertram is upset with the Canadian government's role (via
PetroCan) in this nation's
petroleum industry. "The function
of the state," he bleats plaintively,
"is to govern, to preserve order and
to guarantee our liberties." Does
freedom from the yoke of economic
oppression not fall within these
boundaries? Is it not the duty of our
government to guarantee us the
right to own and prosper from the
wealth of our own land? Surely,
any reasonable citizen or legislator
would agree.
Canada is fortunate to be endowed with a veritable horn of plenty of
petroleum wealth. The decisions
concerning its extraction and
allocation should be made only by
Canadians and in such a way that
every single citizen will have an
equal chance to enjoy any resulting
prosperity. It is true that the shares
of a private company may be
bought on the open market, the
buyer then owning a portion of the
company, but unless every citizen is
of equal economic means, there can
be no assurance of equality in this
endeavor. Public ownership of
PetroCan grants us equality of
ownership.
Bertram seems to display a
mechanistic fascination with "efficiency," and yea, implies that it
contains innate goodness and light.
Is it solely upon its efficiency that
one should judge a nation's policy?
If this be so, then one must rest
assured that a parliamentary
democracy is entirely out of place as
the Canadian system of government. By such a rationale, an absolute dictatorship would surely be
the best  form of rule.  We must
KORRES
** MOVING AND T
EO TRANSFER LTD.
•STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs'
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th~
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages. Basements, Yards
CLEANUPS
Chicken
out*
More than just classic
, burgers (15 varieties)
we've got super barbecued
chicken (cheap, too!).
P.J. Burger & Sons. Lots of
great food. Lots of great fun.
11:30 on-7 days a week. 2966
W. 4th Ave. and Bayswater.
'<tiu/ekfe$ori&
realize that a parliamentary
democracy is. by nature a slow and
innefficient system, and may we be
thankful that raw efficiency is not
our yardstick of success.
There are numerous threats to
democracies the world over, and
not the littlest of them is the
mushrooming power and influence
of the multinational corporation.
Already, the "Seven Sisters" (the
world's seven largest oil
companies), wield such economic
power that they infringe upon and
threaten to transcend the workings
of the state. The PetroCan issue is
not one of government meddling in
the affairs of industry, but of industry attempting to usurp the duty
of the state. While (by definition)
the state is composed of, and
(through the medium of elected
representation) answerable to the
citizenry, the corporation's sole
reason for existence is to make a
profit for its shareholders.
It is obvious, then, that a
government-run corporation
achieves the attainable best of both
worlds.
Furthermore, it is amusing that
Bertram criticizes this concept as a
"doctrinaire and ideological solution . . .," for his own literary style
reeks of the dogmatic pedanticism
of the most fervent of idealogues. Indeed, his babble about the ". . .
great driving forces of the economic
process," laughably smacks of an
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
equally monotonous tract entitled,
(dare I say it) The Communist Manifesto. Yes, dated and irrational
opinion gushed with equal ferocity
from the far right as well as from
the far left.
Government involvement in the
economy is a political fact of life in
virtually every Western democracy.
Canada is by no means an exception
to this, and PetroCan stands as one
of the many living examples. The
creation of PetroCan was a
deliberate and concerted step taken
by far sighted Canadian legislators.
A move in the general direction of
socialism this may well be, but it is
by no means a "creeping" motion,
or sliding, or crawling, or running,
for that matter. Such terminology
evokes the notion of an unclean,
slithering or otherwise thoroughly
distasteful monster that is
relentlessly devouring the righteous
armies of Free Enterprise. These
lies are the stuff of demagogues.
Unless Bertram is willing to
discuss his opinions in the sober and
objective manner that a debate of
this gravity surely demands, then let
them remain the same as my first
impression on his letter. A joke.
Jeremy Thornburg
arts 4
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Grey
lor the last 20 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals,
at Reasonable Prices.
WE ACCEPT CHARGEX
Open Mon. to Sat.
7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sun. & Public Holidays
4556 W. 10th Ave.—224-1912
*we^
TURKEY TROT
Friday, Oct. 5 12:30 Mclnnes Field
3km - women 5km - men
Prizes for 1st, 2nd, 3rd & random draw or just "Surprise Prizes"
TREASURER'S
MEETING
"How to live with the
AMS Business Office"
A   Meeting  for  all  treasurers  of  all   clubs,
undergrad societies and other AMS Groups
TUES., OCT. 2,
THURS., OCT. 4
SUB Room 206
at 12:30
LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $35.00 additional to all other fees will be assessed if payment of the first instalment is not made on or before
September 21. Refund of this fee will be considered only on the basis
of a medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of domestic
affliction. If fees are not paid in full by October 5, 1979, registration
will be cancelled and the student concerned excluded from classes.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for non-payment
of fees applies for reinstatement and the application is approved by
the Registrar, the student will be required to pay a reinstatement fee
of $35.00, the late fee of $35.00, and all other outstanding fees before
being permitted to resume classes.
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th AVENUE
224-4144
ALL GRADUATE STUDENTS
GRADUATE CENTRE
THANKSGIVING DINNER
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5th, 1979
5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Main Dining Room
MENU: Vegetable Soup
Roast Turkey, Dressing, Gravy, Cranberry
Sauce, Mashed Potatoes, Vegetables
Fruit Cup, Coffee, Tea.
COST: $3.00
ALSO: 8:00-12:00 Entertainment in the Lounge
featuring SUE CLAYTON
(PLEASE NOTE THAT THE FREE DINNER IS CANCELLED)
A.M.S.
1979-80
Student   Administrative    Commission
(S.A.C);    Student    Representative
Assembly (S.R.A.) Commissioners, and
A.M.S. Ombudsperson.
Applications will be received for the positions of:
Commissioners of S.A.C.
(2 Positions)
Commissioner for Programs
Committee (SRA)
A.M.S. Ombudsperson
at the AMS business office Rm. 266, SUB.
Applications close 4:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1979
Applications may be picked up at Room 238 and
266 SUB.
GLENN WONG
Secretary-Treasurer Page 8
THE.  UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 2,1979
Thunderettes fit to be tied
— kevin finnegan photo
"THEY GIVE YOU an oversized ball and bent putter, and then have the nerve to chase you around the green
while you're lining up your putt," mutters Sally Sherwood as she tries to avoid violent greenskeeper disguised as
University of Alberta field hockey player. Distractions worked for Edmonton team as they edged UBC 2-1 in
Canada West action.
Balls bounce against 'Birds
By DAVE FRANCIS
The UBC women's field hockey team won
one game, tied two and lost one in the Canada
West University Athletic Association tourney
held on campus over the weekend.
On Saturday, the Thunderettes tied the
University   of   Calgary   1-1,   but   were   later
Nesta Home, in her first season
as varsity goalie, said she was
uneasy at the start of the tourney,
but gained confidence later.
"It's nice to have full-backs like
Kathy Thom and Lee Clare around.
Their defence was superb," she
said.
Home played goal for Victoria
for three years.
The tourney was the first of three
to decide a western representative at
the Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union championships to be
held in Victoria in November. UBC
is defending national champion.
The three tournaments will be
played under an' accelerating point
system, with a win worth one-half
point more in subsequent tourneys.
UVic leads after the weekend action
with 10 points.
The Thunderettes now have a
two week break before they visit
Saskatoon for the second Canada
West tourney Oct. 13-14.
The game against Victoria will be
screened in the Pit tonight at 7:15.
This race
no turkey
It's enough to make you cry fowl.
It's the annual intramural turkey
trot, which takes place this Friday.
The runners will have a choice of a
three kilometre or a five kilometre
course, and various poultry prizes
will be given to individual winners
on each course.
defeated 2-1 by the University of
Alberta.
In Sunday's action, the
Thunderettes fared better as they
shut out the University of Saskatchewan 2-0 and played the University of Victoria to a scoreless draw.
Victoria dominated throughout
Sunday's game, controlling play
with short passes and precision forward strategy. The Thunderettes
relied heavily on long up-field
passes to forward the ball, centering
their efforts on defence rather than
attack.
UBC coach Gail Wilson said the
tie with Victoria will be a boost for
UBC's morale.
"Victoria might.have been overconfident since they were coming
off a three-game winning streak,"
she said.
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Women's field hockey
Tournament standings
W L T Pts.
Victoria
Alberta
UBC
Calgary
Saskatchewan
3
2 2
1 1
1 1
0 3
0    1
0
2
2
1
10
6
5
5
1
The Thunderbird rugby team got
help in the form of returning
players this weekend, but it came
too late to help them against Rowing Club.
The 'Birds dropped a 4-3 decision
to the Rowers Saturday at Brockton
Oval, but were joined Sunday by
Robin Russell, Graham Taylor and
Andrew Bibby who were returning
from the national team tour of
Europe.
The national team is the first side
representing Canada to post a winning record on a European tour. The
team finished with three wins, two
losses and a tie, including a 34-15
loss to France Saturday. Canada
earlier defeated France "B" 14-4.
The Thunderbirds will play in the
annual Abbotsford tournament this
weekend while many of their
players will be in Edmonton with
the B.C. team for the western Canadian championships.
The Western Intercollegiate
Football Conference is even tighter
than its professional counterpart
following action on the weekend.
WESTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
Standings
W
more confused this weekend, as
UBC plays Saskatchewan and
Calgary meets Alberta.
The Thunderbirds' game is at 2
p.m. Saturday in the stadium.
"UBC proved to be tougher than
they expected."
The Thunderettes improved consistently throughout the tourney,
said Wilson. But the team has problems peculiar to a team made up
mostly of new players, she added.
"For most of the players, this is
their first season as a team and it
takes time to co-ordinate and refine
strategy," she said.
"UBC is not a strong attacking
team yet. We are concentrating on
defence first and then on forwards
and attack."
Wilson singled out defender
Kathy Thom and right-inner Sandy
McKay for their outstanding performances during the tourney.
"Kathy Thom is the anchor of
our defence. She saved goal after
goal for the Thunderettes, despite
the fact she is new to the position,"
Wilson said.
In addition, chickens will be
awarded to finishers on a random
basis.
The race starts on Mclnnes field
behind SUB at noon Friday and
finishes in the same place.
In the co-rec intramural tennis
tournament over the weekend,
Gayle Dobson and Andy Girling
defeated Mike de Hullu and Colleen
Hoops 6-2, 6-3 in the finals.
Alberta 'Bears
UBC  Birds
Calgary D'Saurs
Manitoba Bisons
Sask. Huskies
3
3
3
2
1
L
1
2
2
3
4
Pts.
6
6
6
4
2
While UBC was losing 23-9 to
Manitoba in Winnipeg, Calgary
defeated Saskatchewan twice last
week to move into a first place tie
with Alberta and the Thunderbirds.
But unlike the C.F.L., even
Manitoba and Saskatchewan are
still in the race for playoff spots.
Although in last place, the Huskies
are the winningest football team in
Saskatchewan.
The issue is likely to get even
THURSDAY
Women's field hockey
Men's soccer
Sask. 2 Calgary 2
UBC 0 Victoria 3
Alberta 1 Victoria 3
SATURDAY
Men's football
UBC 9 Manitoba 23
UBC 1 Calgary 1
Victoria 3 Sask. 1
UBC 1 Alberta 2
SUNDAY
Men's soccer
Women's field hockey
UBC 2 Sask. 0
UBC 2 Alumni 2
Alberta 3 Calgary 4
Men's rugby
UBC 3 Rowing Club 2
Victoria 6 Calgary 0
Alberta 3 Sask. 0
UBC 0 Victoria 0
— kevin finnegan photo
ALL QUIET on eastern front until UBC women's field hockey team puts ball into play on short corner against
Alberta. Thunderettes scored on one such corner after working ball to Sue Kelly on right wing, but had tough time
throughout weekend with Canada West opposition. Next tourney is in Saskatoon in two weeks.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125896/manifest

Comment

Related Items