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The Ubyssey Jan 29, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, IMo.,32   ^=*
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 29,1385
■.£•>-!   48 228-2301
Board denies crackdown claims
The B.C. Liquor Control Board
general manager denies RCMP and
Alma Mater Society allegations that
his office is behind a recent
crackdown on liquor licenses for
student clubs at UBC.
"There is certainly no directive
from this office to hassle UBC
clubs, either as a result of past experience or the sheer number of
special   liquor   permits   issued,"
claimed Allan Gould from his Victoria office Monday.
The RCMP has been denying liquor licenses to UBC clubs until
they prove they have donated
previous liquor profits to charity.
The RCMP would not allow the
Law Review to donate event proceeds to UBC scholarships,
although they have now reversed
this decision.  And the Gays and
Lesbians of UBC, a service
organization, were told they owed
hundreds of dollars to charity only
after two November events had
taken place.
Gould added he didn't know if
campus RCMP are being more
restrictive in applying the B.C. Li-
qour Act here and in effect harassing clubs, as AMS finance director
James Hollis charged earlier. Both
WEST SIDE STORY . . . Mussoc's new hit, see page 9
Student refugee support invisible
By BRIAN DENNISON
More than half the students randomly interviewed in SUB Monday
had never heard of this week's
referendum on UBC students pitching in 50 cents each to support
two refugee students here very year.
But a referendum organizer said
Monday he's optimistic, adding
UBC's World University Services of
Canada branch plans a final promotion blitz to inform students of
the vote.
Fourteen of 25 students interviewed said they didn't know about
the referendum coinciding with student elections this Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday while another
11 people said they did. Colette
Forristal, science 2, said she supports the idea.
"Fifty cents — that's what? One
pop," she said. Ralph Smith, applied science 2, said the vote was
fairly well publicized. But he said he
didn't think it will pass because
students are not concerned.
Dale Perry, arts 4, doubts 10 per
cent of students, approximately
2,800 people, will vote on the
deciding side as is required for
Alma Mater Society referendums.
But UBC WUSC president Chris
Friesen said the group has spent
eight months publicizing the idea,
and plans a last minute effort.
Friesen said he's optimistic about
student generosity because UBC
students raised more than other
Canadian university students in the
WUSC Ethiopia campaign.
"If nothing comes of it at least
there will be increased awareness of
the refugee problem," said Friesen.
WUSC is the only Canadian
organization which sponsors student refugees. There are 86 on other
Canadian campuses, said Friesen.
The theme of students helping
student refugees is only one aspect
of the international development
problem, said Friesen, adding the
50 cent levy per student will provide
a secure base for WUSC to tackle
other international relations problems.
WUSC has used posters,
classroom speeches, Monday night
films and lectures, and the local
media to raise awareness of refugee
problems.
Elfaroul Khaki, law 2 and
formerly of South Africa, said 50
cents is very little for true refugees.
"I think it should be more than 50
cents, fifty cents in negligible."
Bovey wants more tuition
TORONTO (CUP) — Entrepreneur Edmund Bovey is
spreading his user-funded educational gospel across the nation.
According to the Jan. 28 issue of
Maclean's magazine, Bovey is currently in Regina discussing a similar
approach for the future of Saskatchewan's university system and has
been contacted by several other provinces for advice.
The highlight of the $650,000
report is a call for a 50 per cent tuition fee increase and a six per cent
enrolment decrease.
Bovey's ultimate goal is to make
students pay 25 per cent of their
education costs. Tuition now accounts for 16 per cent of university
operating expenses in Ontario. Tuition would rise from the current
average of about $1,200 per year to
more than $2,000, with professional
programs such as medicine and
engineering pegged at  more than
$5000 annually.
"Higher tuition and limited
enrolment translate into a direct attack on accessibility," said Monika
Turner, Ontario Federation of
Students chair. She accused the
commission of catering to the
whims of business while ignoring
the needs and demands of the
university community and society at
large.
But Bovey — a former Burns
sausage salesperson who rose to
prominence in the business community as head of the billion dollar
Northern and Central Gas — called
his plan "a practical and moderate
strategy that would help improve
the quality of higher education."
Ontario Liberal leader David
Peterson disagreed, saying his party
could not support any report that
calls for constraints on the rights of
qualified students to attend university.
Hollis and UBC RCMP spokesperson sergeant Andy Lucko said
Monday the RCMP are acting on
directives issued from Gould's office.
Hollis said AMS lawyers found
the crackdown began in November
after an initiative from Gould's office. AMS lawyers are now trying to
reach an agreement with the liquor
board, he said.
Hollis said earlier the B.C. Liquor Act states functions held with
the prime purpose of making
money must donate profits to charity. Most AMS club functions are
social, not revenue-generating, he
said, adding that therefore the way
the act was interpreted at UBC
amounted to harassment.
Hollis said the liqour license
crackdown is happening now
"because a fair number of groups
have had functions in the past and
the general manager has determined
that this is not right."
The AMS has a unique structure
and undergraduate societies, many
more than any other Canadian
university, he said.
Gould said dealing with university licensing is difficult because so
many clubs are involved. He said
the board tolerates profits going into capital but not into operating expenses. But few campus groups can
afford capital investment, he added.,
Another problem is defining
charity, Gould said. He said here
local RCMP can use their own
judgement. "Holding a beer bash
to raise money for a future beer
bash would not be legitimate," he
said.
The liquor board's concern is
making sure clubs don't set
themselves up in the liquor
business, he said.
The liquor board was behind a
crackdown in student residences
last September, including a ban on
mid-week beer nights. Gage Towers
residents  regained these nights  in
which contains more than 200 clubs     November after protests.
Great Trek's new
wheels rolling
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
The organizational meeting for a
proposed 1985 Great Trek protesting education funding has been
called by the faculty association
president.
"The meeting is set for Wednesday morning to get support from
student groups. It is formally the
first step asking for support," said
Elmer Ogryzlo Monday. He added
if the meeting is successful other
universities and colleges will be contacted.
"The Alma Mater Society,
Graduate Student Society, and
Teaching Assistants Union, among
others, are invited to the initial
meeting called by Ogryzlo," said
political science professor Phil
Resnick. The organizational
meeting will elect a chair and steering committee, plan a course of action, and consider the motion passed by the faculty last week, he added.
Resnick's motion to organize a
Great Trek from UBC to the
government buildings downtown
passed 192 to 12 at a special Thursday faculty meeting.
"Given time constraints, it is apparent things will have to move very
quickly," said Resnick. The provincial government brings down its
budget in mid-February.
TAU president Horacio de la
Cueva said the TAU supports the
trek and will attend the organizational meeting. "We will encourage
our members to go and we will present the resolution to the TAU
general meeting at the end of
January," said de la Cueva.
He said the TAU will help the
Great Trek because it is time "for
the university community to go to
the public and denounce the attacks
of the Socred government on education." It is also time to force the
university administration to speak
against Socred policies, he added.
"The AMS is very excited about
the possibility of organizing a Great
Trek," said Nancy Bradshaw, AMS
external affairs coordinator. She
said the AMS is now talking to
students to measure interest since
the trek heeds a high participation
level to be effective.
"There won't be a Great Trek
without students and I hope enough
people take an interest," she said.
Bradshaw saiu council has not
met since faculty voted on the trek,
but the AMS will have representatives at the organizational
meeting. "As external affairs coordinator and incoming board of
governors representative, I support
the trek," said Bradshaw.
"Do you think the faculty would
get off their ass to protect their
jobs?" said ex-board of governors
member Dave Frank commenting
on the Great Trek idea.
Graduate Student Society
representatives were not available
for comment.
Apathy triumphs burger poll
Apathy tastes best. 1,000 UBC students can't be wrong.
As of 5 p.m. Monday 60.1 per cent of the 957 students who voted
in the Pit's burger poll voted for apathy. The other 39.9 per cent
voted for one of the four candidates in this week's Alma Mater
Society presidential race.
Pit head cook Greg Quinby said some sttidents are so confused
by the vote they pay the regular price for a cheese burger platter*
$2.15, rather than buying a pool burger for just $1.79.
"People don't know any of the candidates so they refuse to vote,"
Quinby said.
Pit shift supervisor Leslie Kool said the Pit started the poll out of
curiosity. "Patrick Chapman (the Pit's manager) thought it would
promote interest on campus," she said. Kool refused to admit Pit
patronizers are bizarre campus alcoholics who shouldn't be taken
seriously anyways though.
By the way, presidential hopeful Glenna Chestnutt led by 5.5 per
cent. She had 13.3 per cent of the popular burger-vote.
^V Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 29, 1985
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
McGeer wants five-year outlook
By PATTI FLATHER
Universities minister Pat McGeer
has asked B.C.'s three university
presidents and the Universities
Council of B.C. for a five-year
academic plan emphasizing consolidation to deal with declining
public school enrolment.
In a letter sent two weeks ago
McGeer asks universities to consider reducing the size of the university system.
The letter also stresses protecting
core university programs, allowing
new programs of high student demand and provincial need to
develop, phasing out low quality
programs and cutting low demand
programs.
UBC secretary Lee Southern said
Monday McGeer is asking universities to stop growing. "McGeer
believes because universities grew
very quickly (in the 1960's and 70's)
there may be more mediocrity than
they would like," said Southern.
The letter includes statistics attempting to show public school
enrolments will decline towards the
end of the century. Part of the letter
reads: "Every effort has been made
by the government to provide alternative opportunities for students to
participate in challenging post-
secondary programs through the
Open  Learning Institute and our
— rory a. photo
AMAZED AGGIES LEER at .blinding white buttocks hallucination. Pure non-Aggies who wisely stayed out of
Aggie Week manure cannot see those censored Aggie bums. Judging by these happy people, we're missing
something.
CFS conference elects reps
By GORDON CLARK
SQUAMISH — The B.C.
members of the Canadian Federation of Students met last weekend
amid rumors of pullout and conspiracies. The Simon Fraser University delegation arrived at the conference whith a motion for non-
congruency in the organization.
The SFU motion, pushing CFS
members of B.C. to form a regional
organization for the purposes of
organizing was tabled until next
August's regional conference.
The most concrete action coming
from the conference was the election of a new regional chair and national representative. The latter acts
as a liason with the national office,
Food trays radiate
MONTREAL (CUP) — Cafeteria
trays used in bacteria and radiation
research are back in circulation at
Concordia University, after the
cafeteria workers indiscriminately
swept the downtown campus for
wayward trays.
The workers took the trays from
areas marked "authorized personnel only" and from at least one
room with a radioactive warning
sticker on the door.
One university researcher, who
asked his name not be used, said the
trays, which students are now
eating off were being used for
"drug research, in labs where
radioactive chemicals were in use,
and biochemistry labs that were using them for mutating cultures on."
See page 11: LABS
travelling to Ottawa to discuss national CFS.
Barry Link from the University of
Victoria was elected to the position.
Link said he is committed to the national structure of the CFS because
he feels it gives students a stronger
voice.
Arguments about congruency are
related to what is the best way to
organize against cutbacks, Link
said.
"It is a debate on how to best use
our resources," he said.
Terry Hunt, communication
director at Cariboo College in
Kamloops, was elected Pacific
Region chair on the fifth ballot. He
took the office vacated when Tarn-
mi Roberts resigned in December,
and so will serve an extended term.
Hunt said the CFS has entered a
"consolidation period" where the
organization must make itself more
accessible to average students on individual campuses. He said he
wants to get more students involved
in the operations of the CFS..
"We have to get away from the
idea that the CFS is an external
body." he said. "The CFS should
be getting down to the individual
student level."
Hunt said the CFS has to present
the advantages of membership to
students if it is ever going to be an
effective organization. Students
must especially realize the need for a
unified voice to oppose cutbacks,
he said, Hunt added he endorses the
national organization because the
bulk of education funding comes
from the federal government.
"In the long term we need a
strong national voice," he said.
Hunt emphasized CFS is an
issues organization needing broad
based support to affect changes to
the education system. "The
organization is not left or right,"
said Hunt. "To make our
arguments heard we need a broad
base—we need 400,000 students
behind us."
The conference was held from
Wednesday to Sunday in Squamish.
other programs. By keeping these
principles in mind it will be possible
for the universities to adjust to a
more modest size and at the same
time significantly enhance their
quality and academic reputation."
Asked if current enrolment
quotes might be frozen or decreased, McGeer's assistant Jane Burnes
said "(Universities) have to take into account dropping enrolment"
and would not comment further.
Simon Fraser University president William Saywell said he has no
problems with the five year plan
idea. "The government is saying
'Aren't there concerns that go
across the system?' We said sure,
we should be looking at that."
But Saywell said he is unhappy
because B.C. has one of the lowest
participation rates in post-
secondary education nationally and
he would not want more enrolment
restrictions. "I would like to see us
remain as accessible as .possible,"
he said.
"Even though the population
may stabilize or decline that doesn't
mean university enrolments will do
the same," said Saywell. UBC
president George Pedersen
could not be reached Monday.
McGEER . . . wants plan
Harrassment
unreported
VICTORIA (CUP) — University
of Victoria women students are not
reporting incidents of sexual harassment and as a result suffer
academically, according to a report
by ihe B.C. Public Interest
Research Group.
The report recommends the
university establish a formal
grievance procedure on sexual
harassment allowing students to
identify and deal with the problem.
The report's conclusions are based on a survey of 480 UVic students
last summer. Seventy-two of the
148 completed surveys says a total
of 147 incidents of sexual harassment , 93 of them in an educational
setting, occurred. None were officially reported.
In five cases, professors lowered
or threatened to lower the woman's
grades. Eleven women were
threatened with sexual assault and
four were assaulted. None of these
incidents were reported to university authorities or the police.
More than 25 per cent of the
women surveyed say they avoided
certain professors on campus and
classes at night for fear of sexual
assault or harassment.
The report defines sexual harassment as "the manipulation of
power in an attempt to control or
alter a person's social, physical,
economic or academic status. This
form of abuse consists of any subtle
or overt behaviour with sexual implications."
/ \
Junta attacks schools
By PATTI FLATHER
The military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet set out to demolish
Chilean educational advances after it seized power in a 1973 coup,
said the ex-minister of education in the ousted government Monday.
Edgardo Enriquez, minister of education under Salvador Allende
from 1970 to 1973, told 50 people in Buch D 238 education was singled out in the planned destruction of democracy following the coup.
"In education all the professors, presidents and directors of schools
who had shown sympathy for the popular government were fired,"
Enriquez said in Spanish through a translator.
Many academics were assassinated, "disappeared", incarcerated,
tortured, raped and exiled the same way thousands of other left-wing
Chileans were, Enriquez said.
University councils and presidents, formerly elected by the entire
university community, were replaced by military personnel, who us-
cu special powers to change courses anu set research priorities, ue
said.
Enriquez said Chilean education was continually improving prior
to the coup, in terms of participation levels, literacy rates, student
aid, housing and daycare, and university autonomy. But Pinochet's
junta cut education funding and enrolment declined, he said,
although exact figures are made scarce by the government.
"Pinochet, in some instructions published by the ministry of
education, said secondary and university education is a privilege and
V See page 11: CAPITAL
The survey's replies show that
though women are the victims of
this behaviour, they did not consider it sexual harassment or report
incidents.
U of C faces
$5 million cut
CALGARY (CUP) — Faced with
a $5.1 million deficit next year, the
University of Calgary administration may give 78 faculty and 90 staff
members the pink slip.
"This is not something that can
go away by reducing the number of
pencils we order next year," said P.
J. Krueger, the university's vice-
president academic.
Alberta's education minister
Dick Johnston has said the provinces universities cannot increase
tuition fees to cope with any deficits
and the government has told the
universities to expect a freeze in
funding next year.
"I suppose there is a perception
that there are political advantages
to say to students and the people of
Alberta that tuition fees are being
kept at zero," Krueger said.
But freezing tuition fees and
university funding "will have an impact on the quality of the program
we can offer students," he said.
"You can't absorb a cut of $5
million and pretend it will have no
impact."
The university's board of governors approved a report outlining
the cuts in positions at a Dec. 20
meeting but Krueger said the
numbers should not be emphasized.
He said the numbers were used to
"give people an indication of the
seriousness of the situation."
University deans are now examining the potential effects of the cuts
on their programs. Krueger said the
university may also have to cut back
on the number of courses offered.
The administration must still
negotiate faculty and support staff
salaries for next year.
"It could be worse," Krueger
said.
Universities in B.C., Saskatchewan and Manitoba are in similar
situations. The provincial governments there have indicated they will
also freeze or decrease university
funding next year.
The Universities of B.C., Victoria, Simon Fraser University and
the University of Regina all face
massive deficits next year, unless
they drastically cut back on the
number of faculty and staff positions and dramatically increase tuition. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 29, 1985
Living dead
wear ties
The year of the living dead.
That's what we'll call next year's
council. They used to call the '50s
the decade of the bland, but today
'50s objects are in style.
Like ties. Look at the campaign
posters and our photos. A lot of
men are wearing ties. Why? Certainly not to keep themselves
warm. No, they're trying to make
sure they're no common bum,
they're a university student. Ties
are a sign of class distinction and
prejudice which have obviously
returned to the once egalitarian
campus. Or at least somewhat
egalitarian campus.
Who cares if single mothers, interior kids, poorer kids and foreign
students cannot attend UBC, are
getting sucked out the drain at the
bottom — I'm going to make it. It's
the new motto.
There are no left wing candidates
but one, this election. There are no
slates, a sign of somewhat complex
student political organization.
There are no outstanding leaders.
Remember it's the year of the living dead, or was that bland?. This
council is not going to shake the
legislature, nor the old administration building. It probably won't
even shake its council chambers
with ideas for a better campus and
global village.
Social justice has become a part-
time hobby at UBC, if you can find
time between calculus and
resumes.
Of course we all have our
favourite candidates for office, but
we're choosing the least harmful,
not the strong, exuberant and
energetic.
Of course, the new executive
may surprise us. They may arise
from this election like a new
pheonix. Probably not though. We
can always hope.
True color
If there's one good thing to say about the Socreds these days, it must be
that they are finally revealing their true colors. Not since the apple juice
soused days of Wacky Bennett have the provincial legislature halls been
filled with such obvious tyrants. Socred bashing has rightfully surpassed
beer drinking as the provincial sport.
Recently every major daily newspaper in Vancouver ran stories about the
latest Exploit '86 finances. And what do we read? We learn the government
has known for over a year and a half that the fair will cost taxpayers $126
million.
But what has our illustrious premier been telling us? He has been lying
through his slimy teeth that Expo will not cost taxpayers one cent.
What is this shit? If a private citizen walked into a bank to borrow money
for a project and lied about how it would be used, and then got caught
they would have that person locked up for fraud. It is a criminal offense.
Our government is the worst sort of crook because it has ripped off an entire corporation — the entire population of the province.
Student activists detained by thousands
By paul McCarthy
It has been said that if a Third
World government wishes to maintain its grip on power, it must ensure the happiness of two sectors of
the population: the soldiers and the
students.
Military coups are, of course,
dismayingly commonplace. Student
instigated rebellions have also led to
the overthrow of various Third
World regimes, as happened in
Thailand in the early 1970s.
Indeed, university campuses in
most developing nations have traditionally served as hotbeds of social
unrest. The comparatively complacent Canadian student populace
would no doubt be amazed at the
level of political activity which exists among students in the Third
World.
But the price which the academic
communities of the Third World
have paid for the political and
social awareness has been a high
one. As a precautionary first step,
many Third World governments
shut down all post-secondary institutions at the first indication of
any impending civil strife.
In some countries,  such as El
Salvador, universities and technical
institutes have been closed for
years. The consequences are much
more serious when a student body
shakes but cannot topple a regime,
as happened in Zaire in the late
1970s, and in Uganda.
Government retribution against
student activists who do not toe the
government line is typically swift
and merciless.
Amnesty International reports
that thousands of students and
faculty have been illegally detained
or imprisoned in Third World countries. Torture and murder are not
uncommon.
For those student activists who
are lucky enough to avoid imprisonment during government
crackdowns, the only path open to
them is self-imposed exile in a
neutral country.
Since they are fleeing from a well-
founded fear of persecution, these
students, once outside their
homeland, are bona fide refugees.
It is impossible to estimate how
many student refugees there are in
the world today. Indeed, no
statistics are kept. The sad fact of
the matter is: once a refugee, no
longer a student.
perspectives
THE UBYSSEY
January 25, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
An evening of intense religious experience as the faithful gathered to create yet another issue of The
Ubyssey. Brian Dennison preached a soporific sermon to those would listen, including Charlie
Fidelman, Denise Coutts, Gordon Clark and Monte Stewart. Just as all were nodding off, a wondrous
vision appeared: the radiant Patti Flather holding the mystery of mysteries in her open hands.
"Ecstasy," cried Rory Allen; "heavenly," gasped Stephen Wisenthal; "transplendent," murmured
Craig Brooks. Then Mike Perley, Bruce Cookson and Sarah Millin were transported to the astral plane
by a mystical essence known as printers' ink. Robert Benyon inhabited a parallel universe where he
meditated on the simple joys of blue sky and green grass. Yet, the light was not without the darkness.
James Young, sporting a hairshirt, was forced to do penance over the masthead, cruel punishment for
the unknown sins of former lives.
The international response to the
plight of student refugees has been
largely ineffective. While the
United Nations High Commission
for Refugees (UNHCR), has made
laudable attempts at helping student refugees continue their studies,
it cannot possibly hope to assist all
of those in need.
Until recently, all such efforts in
Canada have taken place on a strictly ad hoc basis. In 1979, the World
University Service of Canada
(WUSC), embarked upon the task
of trying to mobilize the resources
of the Canadian adademic community in an effective response to
the problems of student refugees.
WUSC is actively working to
open up educational opportunities
for student refugees at universities
and community colleges throughout
the country.
Once such opportunities do
become available, WUSC facilitates
the private sponsorship of qualified
student refugees thereby allowing
them to come to Canada as landed
immigrants and resume their
studies.
Working in close co-operation
with the ministry of immigration,
amongst the UNHCR and Canadian post-secondary institutions,
WUSC has been able to sponsor
and place 86 student refugees at
universities and colleges from
Halifax to Victoria.
WUSC considers its refugee support activities to be an essential part
of its international development
program.
In the long run, this kind of
refugee support work is not merely
a humanitarian effort — it is also a
potentially important factor in the
long term development prospects of
the developing countries involved.
On Jan. 30, 31, and Feb. 1,
students at UBC will be voting on a
campus-wide referendum. The issue
before students is whether or not to
increase the Alma Mater Society
fees by 50 cents in order to sponsor
two refugee students annually at
either the under- or post-graduate
level.
Wc need 2800 students to vote yes
in order to reach quorum and
establish an annual refugee fund on
campus.
I strongly urge students to vote
yes!
Letters
Staff want quality
How would indiscriminate firing
of support staff affect the quality of
education at UBC? How important
is it for the president of this university to maintain the quality of
education? What is he doing about
it?
With these and other questions in
mind we and other representatives
of the major campus unions met
with president K. G. Pedersen on
Jan. 15, 1984.
At this meeting president
Pedersen acknowledged the
situation at UBC is dismal.
As Pedersen has told the university community before, even a zero
per cent change in budget would
mean a cutback in the funds
available to the university, due to
inflation and other extraneous factors. As Pedersen sees the situation,
only when "academic programs"
are cut will the university feel some
relief.
As support staff of the university
we believe that the role of our work
in maintaining a high standard of
education and research in this
university is essential.
Pedersen was quoted in the Jan.
9, UBC Reports (Media invited to
meet the faculty) as saying that "It
is essential for the University to
receive the understanding and support of the general public . . .".
What is president Pedersen doing to
increase this understanding?
Will meetings between the university's administration or its faculty
and the press be enough to change
public attitude towards universities? Do we not need a stronger
campaign to defend an essential
resource of this province, its brainpower?
We think so! We are of the opinion that as a community UBC constituents should come together and
address the issues that determine
our future. Presently a forum of
this nature exists within the UBC
Campus Community Alliance.
If you are interested in expressing
your views please contact us by calling and leaving a message at
224-2118.
Fairleigh Wettig
president, A.U.C.E. Local 1
Horacio de la Cueva
president, T.A.U. Tuesday, January 29,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Grassroots effort provides aid
By GORDON CLARK
Every day for the past three months a group of dedicated people has
met in an old Vancouver City
warehouse - on the shores of the
Fraser River to pack medical supplies, guitars, tools, toys and a host
of other donated goods bound for
Nicaragua.
The warehouse is where the concrete work of the Coalition for Aid
to Nicaragua, which sponsors the
annual Tools for Peace project, is
carried out.
On a typical Saturday morning
one finds - a dozen or more
volunteers unloading trucks,
building wooden crates and
evaluating various articles collected
from accross Canada. In the
warehouse stacks of labelled cartons and row after row of
wheelchairs and hospital beds line
the walls.
Last year the project organizers
hoped to raise $500,000 worth of
goods. But when the final tongue
depressor had been loaded, the
coalition had collected more than
SI million worth of supplies.
This year CAN targeted $1
million to match last years' successful shipment. When the ship
leaves Vancouver Feb. 1 it will carry
nearly $1.5 million worth of supplies.
This year marks the boat
project's fourth anniversary. It
began in 1981 when a group of
trade unionists visited Nicaragua
with a delegation of CUSO workers
to observe worker organization in
the country, and to see if their were
ways Canadian unions could help
Nicaraguans rebuild their nation.
One delegation member, Victoria
fisher Scotty Neish, stayed in
Nicaragua after the planned three
week trip to help Nicaraguans
develop new fishing techniques. He
visited worker co-ops on both the
Atlantic and Pacific coasts and was
disturbed by the lack of useful
equipment.
"I visited the major equipment
warehouse in Managua to pick up
some hooks and lines, and was
shocked at how empty their
storeroom was," he said.
After a further few weeks in the
country, Neish realized he could be
more useful if he came home to
Canada to ship them obsolete
fishing gear he knew was not being
used here.
In November 1981, Neish helped
organize a shipment of fishing gear
valued at $20,000 which was sent on
the Nicaraguan freighter the
Monimbo.
With this first, relatively small
shipment, the boat project was
born.
From those early days the project
' 'To me the educational aspect of
the project is just as important as
the aid we provide. The
Nicaraguans agree with this. They
are constantly saying to visitors in
their country,  'Please tell people
last November when a housemate
told me about it. I'm attracted to it
because it is so grassroots — it has a
people-to-people aspect that is not
found in other 'aid'
organizations," she explained.
NICARAGUANS
celebrate revolution
grew in leaps and bounds. In 1982,
from B.C. alone more than
$125,000 worth of goods was sent.
And last year, when the coalition
tried to match their total, the first
national campaign yielded more
than $1 million in donated goods.
This year 15 containers, five
more than last year, will arrive, in
Nicaragua in mid-February. Some
of the donations include: a new
four wheel drive vehicle for the
Health Workers Union (FET-
SALUD), which was donated by
the United Auto Workers in Ontario, eight rolls of newsprint to
publish adult education books
donated by the Companeros Project in Winnipeg, a complete
darkroom, and $3,000 for school
supplies given by the British Columbia Teachers Federation.
The assortment of items in this
year's shipment contains a wide
variety of goods, including a few
proverbial kitchen sinks.
Tools for Peace has received
donations from almost every community across the country. Goods
have poured in from Happy Valley,
Labrador to Port Hardy in British
Columbia.
Although collecting supplies for
Nicaragua is the Tools for Peace
project's most visible work, they
also aim to educate Canadians
about the situation in Central
America, and in Nicaragua particularly.
what it's like here,' " said Sue Mitchell, Vancouver project coordinator.
People who work for Tools for
Peace realize that although the
goods they supply Nicaragua help
some people, ultimately the
shipments are only band-aid solutions.
Nicaragua's real problem is to
build its economy and enlarge its
trade. Tools for Peace educates
Canadians, and urges them to push
the federal government to
strengthen relations with Nicaragua.
The coalition also demands the
United States government stop its
interference in Nicaraguan affairs.
Tools for Peace actively campaigns the federal government to reexamine Canada's foreign policy
towards Nicaragua. The project
wants Canada to establish an embassy in Managua, to oppose U.S.
military intervention in the region,
and to support the Contadora
group's proposals for peace in Central America.
"This is ultimately our most important work," said Mitchell.
The impressive achievements of
the Coalition for Aid to Nicaragua
involves thousands of people-hours
a year. And apart from a few paid
people across the country, this work
is, done by an army of volunteers.
Hilary Maguire has worked for the
project since 1983.
"I got involved with the project
—deborah barndt photo
Diana Matheson, one of two
volunteer coordinators in Vancouver, said the project has grown
so quickly because people see in
concrete ways how they are helping
others.
"When someone puts a lid on a
crate in our warehouse, I think it's
exciting to think the next time that
crate   is   opened   it   will   be   in
, Nicaragua," said Matheson.
Even though the boat has not yet
left Vancouver, CAN has already
begun planning next year's
shipments. "We hope to get an
earlier start next year," says Mitchell, "Already some of the committees back east are meeting to
discuss the next boat.
To officially close this year's
campaign the Coalition organized a
ceremony of "Hope for Peace in
Central America" on Sunday.
More than 200 people including
Vancouver Mayor Mike Harcourt
and B.C. Federation of Labour
leader Art Kube met at St. Mark's
United Church in Kitsilano to
witness the performances of musicians and dancers. Harcourt says
the Tools for Peace project "shows
the basic greatness of Vancouver
and the reason it is the peace capital
of Canada."
UBC education graduate student
Peter Jailall was at the ceremony.
He says the Tools for Peace project
is an act of goodwill and solidarity
that shows that people in Canada
are concerned about their "brothers
and sisters" in the third world.
"It's aid on equal terms," he
says "It shows the world is just one
big place."
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[ Send a message to your sweetheart in the ^
'Ubyssey   VALENTINE'S   DAY  special
message issue Feb. 12th. $2.50 for 3 lines.
Deadline for ads Feb. 8th. SUB Rm 266.
IP
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Applications for a Position on the
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
Are Now Being Accepted
The Security Team works both Friday and Saturday nights in the Student Union Building. Briefly,
the Team is responsible for assisting the Proctor in
protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding security
teams hired for any function in SUB, and implementing SAC policy in the Games Room.
Application forms are now available in the AMS
Executive Secretary's office, SUB Room 238.
This position is open to both males and females.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED BY
7 p.m., Friday, February 1, 1985
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«_-(/. (.'tfur-.-nly ht/ />rr».s,> Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 29,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
^Uit ujnsn you tnougkt it <jua± ±ars to ±t&h, in±icU cz> LLlH. . .
The director of finance is perhaps the
society's most powerful executive position. As the saying goes, money is power,
and the finance director makes up the
budget for budget committee's approval.
The previous three-time incumbent James
Hollis held the position for three years,
before deciding to seek the upcoming
Liberal leadership.
Jamie COLLINS
Jamie Collins has worn a beige, pinstriped suit for the entire election campaign. Despite his credentials he figures he
has to drill his business interest into people's heads.
Maybe a director of finance candidate
has to do that.
But Collins has the experience — assistant director of finance last year, SUB
project administrator, English Composition seminar organizer.
Collins, economics 4, says, "I'd like the
AMS to be user friendly to its members."
He says the director of finance's job is to
"advise student council, to keep in touch
with the AMS' budget and see what's go-
See above
DOA
The director of administration is
responsible for chairing the student administrative commission, which is responsible for UBC clubs and SUB. SAC doles
out club grants, room bookings, office
space, manages the games room, etcetera.
Duties also include signing a lot of cheques.
Simon SESHADRI
Director of administration candidate
Simon Seshadri is a shy, conservative person.
Seshadri, who's only running against a
no vote, says the position is pretty straight
forward and requires no major changes.
He'll see that SUB is clean and clubs can
book rooms. With his experience as
secretary to the student administrative
council, he says he's perfectly prepared
for the job.
"The post will have a new dimension
when the SUB expansion is completed,"
Seshadri says, adding it will mean more
work. But he says it will not be that much
more work.
He adds he has worked closely with this
year's director of administration Glenna
Chestnutt, which should help him.
ing on, and to provide advisory services
for student groups and societies."
But he says his one priority if elected is
"to get undergraduate societies more involved with the Alma Mater Society."
He says he has no plans to change the
AMS' funding priorities in its $3.5 million
enterprise. He does say if the AMS' fee
base falls away due to reduced enrolment
at UBC in the next few years the problem
can be dealt with then.
Collins works part-time as financial
consultant.
Sylvia GADJICS
Sylvia Gajdics is sure she'll be able to
get the opinion of UBC's 25,000 students
if she's elected. "It will be student feedback that will direct me," she says of
budget decisions she'd make if she were
director of finance.
She says UBC's normally apathetic
students will be "knocking on my door."
"If you're sincere ... it shows. I've
never experienced a lack of feedback
before."
Gajdics has been both a president of the
Physical Education Students society and a
vice president. She organized a conference
for phys ed students from Western
Canada last year and is organizing an
Olympic association national academy at
UBC this year.
She says she's also taking business
courses at BCIT at night.
Gajdics adds she worked as a bank
teller before she came to university and
isn't afraid to ask students for their opinions if they don't express them.
As director of finance she will also work
closely with the other executive members
and the budget committee, she says.
She says she will begin her masters in
physical education next year. "I'm in no
hurry though," she says. "It (director of
finance) is a big job and I want to do it
well."
Barry MAH
Director of finance candidate Barry
Mah says he won't be able to "set any
priorities as a director of finance until he's
seen the Alma Mater Society's books.
"Currently I have to really examine the
books to see if any projects or priority
changes are appropriate," he says.
When asked where he'd cut if the AMS
faces a possible deficit, Mah comes up
blank again. "I'd have to really look at
the books and see if there is any -waste.*'
All aspects of the AMS must be considered before a decision is reached, he
says. The key to being a director of
finance, Mah says, is being fiscally
responsible and making carefully considered decisions.
"I think we shoud take a one step at a
time approach," says Mah. "Before we
undertake projects we have to make sure
we have the money."
He says he's prepared for the responsibility because he's currently a student
senator at large and because he has a good
attitude. He did not expand.
"The director of finance should represent more of a moderate point of view,"
he says.
Believe it or not, this is only the fifth set of student
elections in recent student political history.
The students of 1980 passed a new set of by-laws
that created the five AMS executive positions outlined
on these pages. The five executives have voting seats
on council, and most importantly run the day-to-day affairs of the society, and advise council on actions to
take. They are supposedly responsible to council, (who
can, by two-thirds vote, impeach them) but often their
decisions are "rubber-stamped".
Elections are this Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at
various campus locations. Remember to bring your
AMS/Library card with you, and to vote and vote often.
Ubyssey election coverage is by Gordon Clark,
Stephen Wisenthal and Robert Beynon. Photos are
either candidate supplied or by Kevin Hall or Gordon
Clark.
The Alma Mater Society president,
despite the fancy title is somewhat of a
figurehead position. He or she is responsible for chairing the madness called student council, and is council's liaison with
the society's general manager. Duties also
include buying donuts for council
meetings.
David BULMAN
VICE-PRESIDENT
The vice president is responsible for
chairing - the society's powerful budget
committee, which decides general
priorities for spending. That is their" only
formal duty, other than "assisting the
president," so the position is what the office holder makes it. Duties include signing a lot of cheques.
Doug DOSDALL
■SI
Doug Dosdall declined to be interviewed or photographed.
Doug LOW
Vice presidential incumbent Doug Low
says he has done a good job this year. -He
says Jonathon Mercer, who is hotly contesting his position, is being unfair in his
criticism.
Low says he may have alienated some
people in budget committee, for example,
but he claims that's because he stuck to
his principles. He denies allegations that
he acted improperly in this committee.
In reply to one complaint Low says, "I
keep my office hours and if a student
wants to meet me I make time."
He says if he's re-elected this year he's
going to organize a serious overhaul of the
society's by-laws and "re-evaluate the student court system in particular."
He says he has made a point of stopping
and regularly seeing the undergraduate
societies although Mercer denies this. And
he says he has tackled a wide variety of
problems this year including the Graduate
Student centre fiasco.
Low says if people complain about him
it's   because   he   maintained   his
Jonathan MERCER
Jonathan Mercer is a political animal.
He talks smooth. He and vice presidential
incumbent Doug Low are fighting the only real competition of the campaign and
they're circling warily.
Mercer says Low should be deposed for
a number of reasons. "He's never in his
office," Mercer says, adding he thinks
Low alienates people and has failed to
keep up contact with the undergraduate
societies.
Mercer says he observed these problems
in the past year as a council representative
for arts and as a Alma Mater Society
budget committee member.
Mercer says he himself has many
qualifications for the job. He was president of the first year students committee,
the new students retreat's chair; he is a
student representative on the arts facutly
committee.
If elected as vice president, Mercer says
he would work to better relations with the
various undergraduate societies. And he
says he would assist and support next
year's president which he says Low failed
to do this year.
He adds the vice presidential position is
largely what one makes of it and he has a
number of ideas.
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Bulman is his name and naughtiness is
his game (but he doesn't like gumbies).
Dave Bulman, comp sci and math 3, is
running on the Naughty Party ticket with
vice presidential candidate Doug Dosdall.
He ran for president last year with the Silly Party.
"The AMS is definitely not naughty
enough," he says adding "there aren't
enough scandals and they aren't wasting
enough money in the right areas."
He plans to be noisy and loud and to
make sure the Alma Mater Society makes
as much money as possible.
To ensure more profit the AMS should
open a chain of cabins at all the world's
best resorts, including the Riviera, Bermuda and Hawaii, he says.
"SUB should have a 10 storey
underground expansion with many more
bars, more restaurants and a casino," he
says.
The coordinator of external affairs is
responsible for keeping council and UBC
students informed about current federal
and provincial education policies, and for
liaison with the Canadian Federation of
Students and the governments. Given the
recent provincial funding circumstances,
and the overwhelming defeat of the CFS
referendum this year . . .
Patrick DOYLE
Patrick Doyle declined to be
photographed.
Patrick DOyle wants to step in and get
involved. That's what he said Monday. "I
want to step in and get involved."
Doyle, applied science 2, says he is "a
specific person who wants to get things
done" if he becomes external affairs coordinator.
His only related experience is organizing beer bashes but he says he has got
what it takes. Doyle says if he were coordinator he would take a cooperative approach into discussions with the provincial government.
And if elected, he says he will attempt
to make friends for students with all the
other groups in B.C. "I don't think,
there's a group we can afford not to approach."
He says the most important issue facing
students today is funding. "And we
should ge involved with the Great Trek,"
Doyle adds.
He says the university, UBC, cannot afford not to have students involved with its
politics and he would work to get students
involved.
He also thinks the RCMP's refusal to
give some campus clubs a liquor license is
a serious matter that he as external coordinator would deal with.
Kathy MARTIN
MPs and MLAs and discussing with them
the rationale behind what is happening,"
she adds.
But she says the AMS must stop just
talking about the issues.
"In the past the external affairs position could afford to be little more than
public relations," she says, "but now we
have to take the political side of its mandate in addition."
She claims she has experience with the
government and how funding works
through being a social work student.
Lonn MYRONUK
Kathy Martin's campaign poster says
she has something to say but doesn't say
what it is: she wants to make students, the
community and the provincial government more aware of what is happening to
the university.
Martin, social work 3, says students
aren't apathetic, despite appearances, but
the university is so large they lack information they need.
Martin says now is the time to get
students involved when they start to
realize what is happening to them.
She says she'll make people aware of
the university's budget problems by
reaching the community through radio
stations and newspapers.
"The     AMS     should     be     meeting     with
Lonn Myronuk says if he became coordinator of external affairs he would
become just that, a coordinator, and depend on the Alma Mater Society external
affairs committee for direction.
He adds, "Personally, I'd like to see an
information campaign launched to make
the general public, parents and alumni
See page 8:  IT'S
He feels strongly that the AMS has too
many gumbies.
"We're for gumbiless government, he
says, adding there should be a referendum
to make SUB a gumby free zone.
Gumbies are little green toys you can
twist around and these people are running
the AMS now, he says, adding "how can
you trust someone you can twist
around?"
He says he's running for personal profit
and glory and is qualified by being terribly
naughty.
Glenna CHESTNUTT
Presidential candidate Glenna
Chestnut, commerce 4, says the Alma
Mater Society should communicate with
students and "provide a positive image of
the university and students to the community."
"I want to show that students are really
concerned about the university," she says.
She wants to maintain the AMS.
"We've got to keep the (AMS) services
we have and we've got to expand the new
services like Joblink and the used
bookstore," she says.
Chestnut, this year's director of administration, wants to communicate with
constituencies on campus to make them
aware of what the AMS does and to coordinate action.
It would have been great if all the
groups who protested reduced library
hours worked together, she says, adding
the AMS can act as an information base
for that sort of effort.
The AMS should gather support for
education on campus and then in the
general community and then show that
support to the provincial government to
encourage them to provide more support
for higher education, she says.
With widespread support the university
can influence the provincial government,
she says, adding February's planned Great
Trek is a positive step in increasing
awareness of the university's plight.
She says her experience as AMS director of administration means she knows
people on clubs and undergraduate
societies and knows how the AMS runs.
She is on the grad class council and has
been on the student administrative commission, the Gage residence council and
other campus organizations.
Mark REDER
Fourth year political  science major
Mark Reder says he'll "make the AMS
work for students" if he's elected Alma
Mater Society president later this week.
Reder says the AMS has become a union
of "student leaders," and not a place
where average students' concerns are easily voiced.
Reder says the student union should
reassess its priorities without threatening
its financial stability. He thinks financial
success is not an end, but a means to provide students with services.
"I am not a radical," adds Reder.
Reder thinks the AMS president's main
role is to be an effective communicator,
especially during UBC's current financial
crisis.
"It is vital now to act as a paramount
communicator — to be a common speaker
for the students to the funding decisionmakers," he says.
Reder also says the AMS president
should speak to the community to make
them aware of the need for university funding. He says many people in the community are hostile to post-secondary
education and think students "sit on their
asses."
"We are going to have to show them
that we are putting something back for
their expense. They must see society is bettered if people can get a university education."
Although he says the government's
restraint program has some good points,
Reder says cuts to education are not in the
province's economic interest. He says the
"bread and butter" for the province's
universities has been withheld and the
overall quality of education has dropped.
As the current arts undergraduate society president, and as a past arts senator
Reder says he has enough experience for
the position.
Doug WARKENTIN
Doug Warkentin, applied science,
thinks students get "kicked around a lot"
and he's not going to take it any more. He
is running for Alma Mater Society president to ensure students get more say in
university operations.
Although Warkentin has not worked
with the AMS, he thinks his experience in
provincial and federal politics give him the
necessary skills to be the AMS's president.
He ran as a federal Liberal in Fraser
Valley South and was on the student
council at Fraser Valley College. Lots of
experience.
Warkentin says restraint is the most important issue affecting students. Although
he believes people should stand up to the
government, Warkentin says students
must create credible ways to fund UBC.
He suggests that tied federal funding, and
more private donations might be the
answer to the university's financial woes.
"Protests are not constructive," he
claims. "The Socreds are only encouraged
by them."
Another issue that concerns Warkentin
is the way the AMS has been run in the
past.   Me   says   many AMS   activities   have
not been beneficial to the majority of
students.
"The AMS is not a business — its a student government that should be providing
services to as many people as possible,"
he said. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 29,1985
£)t ± Election timz again
From page 7
aware of the situation UBC is facing."
But he says he's not yet sure of
the particulars of this information
campaign. He adds it might de-.
mand an increased budget for the
coordinator of external affairs position.
Myronuk, science 3 and a former
Science Undergraduate Society
president and vice president, says
the AMS should try to improve
relations with UBC's alumni in particular.
And when, and if, he dealt with
the provincial government he would
be confrontational or cooperative
depending on the situation. "Confrontation has its place but I think
more often than not a cooperative
approach can accomplish more,"
Myronuk says.
He says his campaign manager
says one way to increase public
awareness of the university's problem might be to show the future
quality of UBC if its quality continues to decline into the future.
Duncan STEWART
Duncan Stewart knows the job.
After assisting both the two
previous external affairs coordinators and running for the position last year he says he knows the
ropes inside out.
He lounges on the couch when he
answers the questions. "My first
priority now is getting high student
involvement in the Great Trek,"
Stewart says, "and I'll help achieve
this by speaking to classes and in
public, and by seeking student
council support for the trek."
He also wants to approach the
federal government for special
grants for the handicapped. "In
1967 there was a Rubella epidemic
in Vancouver and numerous blind
JITTERS
Classic and modern
hair cutting for
men and women
Cut, Wash, Blowdry
$15
With Luigi &
Martha Only
561 W. Broadway
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and deaf students are now entering
the system as a result of that."
And he wants to "go to Brian
Mulroney's government and lobby
them to create support for the
CAUT (Canadian Association of
Universty Teachers) proposal regarding federal fundings for post-
secondary education." The bill
would tie federal funding to provincial funding and encourage provinces to put money into post-
secondary education.
Stewart says we should both protest and approach the provincial
government with real alternatives
for university funding. "The way I
see it you put the government in a
corner and they you offer them a
way out."
Barbara WALDERN
Yippie meets Yuppie
By JOAN SULLIVAN
for Canadian University Press
HALIFAX — "You may
remember me. I used to be the cause
of arguments around the dinner
table. Fights started when my name
was mentioned. Then, one day I
shaved off my beard and no one
recognized me. That's why I carry
this — an American Express card.
"That's a joke — sort of."
Jerry Rubin, author of Do It, co-
founder of the Youth International
Party (Yippies), a proponent
behind guerilla theatre against the
establishment, stands before a
standing-room only audience at
Dalhousie University wearing a suit
and tie, drinking Perrier water.
He's gone from a radical's radical
to a political Brooke Shields, and
his message is: Look after yourself,
make money and stay away from
drugs.
Rubin is debating Abbie Hoffman in a Yippie versus Yuppie
debate. They glance at each other
from their separate sides of the
stage. Though they repeatedly say
they respect each other, their
glances seem to say — There but for
the grace of God go I.
Hoffman wears corduroys,
sweaters and open shirt, and drinks
plain water from a jug. The first
thing he does is hold up some tags
he tore from his hotel room furniture — the ones that say "Do Not
Remove Under Penalty of Law."
Rubin opens with a definition of
Yippies and Yuppies.
"If you hear the initials IRA and
you think Irish Republican Army,
then you're a Yippie. If you think
of an Individual Retirement Account, then you're a Yuppie," he
says.
"In the next presidential election,
or the one after that, a Yuppie
president will be elected," he says.
Yuppie oriented politicians will be
in power until the third decade of
the 21st century. "We haven't sold
out, we're taking over."
Hoffman, contrasting Rubin's
slick, pretty presentation, is funny,
vulgar and at one point starts to undress on stage.
Notorious for the same reasons
as Rubin, Hoffman has not changed his ideas, politics or appearance
"since I was four" and is proud of
his police record — 41 arrests so
far.
HELP YOURSELF
Free Workshops
to Enhance Your Skills
STUDY SKILLS WORKSHOP
A program to assist students in developing more effective study methods.
HOW TO TAKE LECTURE NOTES
A workshop to help you take better lecure notes.
HOW TO READ A TEXTBOOK
A workshop to help you gain more from your textbook reading.
TIME MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP
An introduction to methods of improving your use of
time.
CAREER EXPLORATIONS
Designed to aid you in career exploration and planning.
All programs are free. Interested student should sign up
now at:
STUDENT COUNSELLING AND
RESOURCES CENTRE
Room 200, Brock Hall
Barbara Waldern is running for
Alma Mater Society, external affairs coordinator because the AMS
needs an activist in the position.
"It's the most political position
in the student union," she says.
Waldern, arts 5, says student
governments were founded to defend student interests and the external affairs coordinator particularly
must identify issues and help
students organize around them.
Waldern opposes any funding
cuts at UBC because the "government has a responsibility to keep
education accessible to people in
B.C. The rich in B.C. should be
funding education through taxation, she adds.
While Waldern feels education
issues are of primary importance,
she says the AMS must "comment
and take action" on other issues
that affect students. She is par--
ticularily concerned about the
danger of world war, and the lack
of human rights.
"These cannot be passed off as
non-student issues," says Waldern.
"Canada's participation in the
superpower's war plans must be opposed."
Currently Waldern is an arts rep
on the AMS council. She was also
an organizer for the fee hike strike
and has been involved with the People's Front and various groups that
formed because of education issues.
"I have been going about trying
to defend education since I arrived
on campus over a year ago," she
says.
Sam, please close the window it's cold outside.
Nu, and if I close the window will it be warm
xl?   outside
TUESDAY
12:30
"Over Coffee"
News from
Israel in
Hebrew. Lunch
Available.
WEDNESDAY
11:30
Torah Study
Portion of
the week.
Falafel Lunch
First year
students free
THURSDAY
12:30
Middle East
Mini-Seminar
continues with
Dr. S. Sandler.
Jordanian Rule and the
Re-emergence of the
All these events
take place at
HILLEL
HOUSE
Behind Brock
Hall
Tel. 224-4748
See You There
DUTHIE
BOOKS
ANNUAL
«? SALE m
JAN. 31, FEB. 1,2,3
20% OFF ALL STOCK
AND
SELECTED SPECIALS
• Selected Bestsellers
& 1984 hardcovers: 30% off
• The Dollar Trolley
• Poetry: 30% off
• Penguin Hurts:
50% off
• Computer Books:
40% off
Ken Danby: Reg. $50.00/Sale: $32.95
Morrice: Reg. $50.00/Sale: $32.95
A Day In The Life of Canada: Reg. $39.95/Sale: $27.95
919 Robson Street, 4444 W. 10th Avenue
Arbutus Village Square
Sunday Feb. 3 at Robson St. and W. 10th only
12 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Note: Special orders and reservations
at regular prices. Tuesday, January 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Dancing exudes energy
By ROSEANNE MORAN
West Side Story opened to a full
house Friday. The lights went
down, and there was a commotion
in the aisles, people running back
and forth and shouting between the
floor and the stage . . . The Jets
and the Sharks are out in the streets
and they're not running, they're
dancing. The show has begun.
Westside Story
by MUSSOC
Until Feb. 2
UBC Old Auditorium
The story is set on the West side
of New York City, during the last
days of summer, 1957. The Jets (the
white boys) are fighting to retain
control over a piece of the street,
but the Sharks (the Puerto Ricans)
are moving in.
The lines of allegiance become
blurred, however, when Tony,-who
is a Jet, falls in love with Maria, the
sister of the head Shark.
As a love story, West Side Story
is just okay. This has as much, if
not more to do with the content of
the show as it does with the performances of Maria and Tony.
The real drive behind this production is found in the dancing
scenes, where the Jets and their
"girls" meet the Sharks and their
"girls" and battle it out with fancy
footwork on the dancefloor and in
the alleys.
The dancing is high quality and
high energy and the dancers play
off each other really well.
There is a large cast of characters
to co-ordinate and pull together,
LSAT
PREPARATION TRAINING
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414-1200 Burrard St.
Vancouver, B.C.
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(604) 684-4411
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(416) 968-9696
Centers across Canada
and the U.S.A.
Classes Forming Now For
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Sat. and Sun.) 1984, Sept. 14-16;
Nov. 16-18; Feb. 15-17, 1985.
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(403) 278-6070 (604) 684-4411
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Lower Level Hours: Mon.-Fri.
Student Union       8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Building, U.B.C.   Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa & Mastercharge
Accepted
and the show is at its best when they
are all out there.
The individual performances are
not as convincing. This is partly due
to a lack of strong singers on stage.
The basic set is simple and effective. The audience can see the New
York skyline through a high wire
fence, but the action stays inside the
fenced-in area.
The orchestra is good, especially
on the more jazz-oriented numbers
and the scene changes flow together
smoothly without awkward disruptions.
Given that West Side Story is a
hard piece to pull together, requiring singing, dancing, acting and a
lot of "typecasting", MUSSOC has
done a good job, and it is a production well worth seeing.
6
95
basic-
cut
'Til February 28/85
00
off any hair
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(one coupon per customer)
3621 W. 4th Avenue, Van., 733-3831
Notice of A.M.S. Executive Election
Evening Polls: Wed., Jan. 30—4-7 p.m.
Totem Park — Common Block
Place Vanier — Common Block
Walter H. Gage — Common Block
Sedgewick Library
Day Polls: Wed., Jan. 30th to Fri., Feb. 1st-10 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
S.U.B. Hebb Theatre
Law Computer Science
C.E.M.E. Sdgewick Library
Scarfe Woodward Library
Angus War Memorial Gym
Buchanan MacMillan
Poll locations and times are subject to the availability of poll clerks
BALLOT:
A.M.S. PRESIDENT
BULMAN, David
CHESTNUTT, Glenna
REDER, Mark
WARKENTIN, Doug
A.M.S. DIRECTOR OF
ADMINISTRATION
SESHADRI, Simon    □ Yes
□  No
A.M.S. VICE-PRESIDENT
DOSDALL, Doug
LOW, Doug
MERCER, Jonathan
A.M.S. COORDINATOR OF
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
DOYLE, Patrick
MARTIN, Kathy
MYRONUK, Lonn
STEWART, Duncan
WALDERN, Barbara
A.M.S. DIRECTOR OF FINANCE
COLLINS, Jamie GAJDICS, Sylvia MAH, Barry
STUDENTS REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S. CARDS TO VOTE
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
"I support the proposal to establish an annual Alma Mater Society (A.M.S.) fee
of 50 cents per student to allow two refugee students to attend U.B.C. for a
period of one year."
□ Yes
□ No
(Referendum poll locations and times same as A.M.S. Executive
Election.) Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 29, 1985
Wg&ti
TODAY
JEWISH MESSIANIC BIBLE STUDY
Bible study, noon, BUCH D202.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Readings of student prose and poetry, 7 p.m..
Museum of Anthropology theatre gallery room.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
George Egerton speaks on "Scandal, Sex and International Politics: The Crawford-Stuart
Affair," noon, BUCH B221.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Dr. Fitzpatrick speaks on plastic surgery, noon,
Woodward 1.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Organizational meeting, noon, BUCH A202.
HILLEL HOUSE
Newa from Israel in Hebrew, noon, Hitlel House.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Films: Revitalization of a National Culture and
5,000 Years of Korean Art, noon, Asian centre
604.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
AMS ART GALLERY
Atkinson-Eklund-Hodgson,    pencil,    print    and
paint show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., AMS art gallery.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
DANCE HORIZON
Rehearsal with  Renald  Rabu,  6:X p.m.-8:00
p.m., SUB Partyroom.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, everyone welcome, all equipment, provided, 7 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Open meeting, newcomers welcome, noon, conference room, Lutheran Campus centre.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
'Time out',  newcomers to meet in SUB 237A,
4:30 p.m., Gallery lounge.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bake sale featuring international baked goods,
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., SUB concourse
TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION
The  present  situation  in  South  Africa,   noon,
Angus 316.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Badminton, 4:30 p.m , Osborne gym A.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT AND
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR
DISARMAMENT
Prof. John Dower speaks on "Hellfire: Japanese
artists and the atomic bomb experience, noon,
BUCH A100.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Info,   booth on  volunteer  opportunities,   noon,
SUB concourse.
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE
TRAVEL CLUB IUBCI
Slide and lecture on Peru, everyone welcome,
noon, SUB 206.
UBC CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Speaker    from    Birthright,    4:30    pm.,     SUB
207-209.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
DANCE HORIZONS
Dancers   to   pick   up   posters  for   distribution,
noon, SUB 216E,
HILLEL HOUSE
Falafel lunch, free for first year students, noon,
Hillel House.
THURSDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB. SOCIALIST EDUCATION
SOCIETY, LATIN AMERICA SUPPORT
COMMITTEE
Film: Breaking the Nuclear Chain, with Jim
Bohlen from Greenpeace, noon, BUCH A100.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Weekly meeting, noon, Brock 302.
JEWISH STUDENTS NETWORK
Part two of "Issues in Israeli-Palestinian Relations" with Schmuel Sandler, noon, Hillel
House.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting with n ovies and sailing tips, 1
p.m., SUB 119.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Speaker Kathy Fox from Spec talks on recycling,
noon, Geography 212,
GERMANIC STUDIES
German movie. Die Brucke, noon, BUCH A106,
CUSO-UBC
Development education series, multinationals,
7:30 p.m., International House, upper lounge.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY AND
BEN GURION UNIVERSITY
Isabella Leitner speaks on being an Auschwitz
survivor, 8 p.m., IRC 2.
CFS TRAVEL CUTS
David Smith of London SWAP centre speaks
about the student work abroad program, noon,
SUB 207-209.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Meeting, noon, Scarfe 206.
PHILOSOPHY STUOENTS ASSOCIATION
Philosophy  and  Politics   —   Ronald  Dworkin,
noon, BUCH B214.
DIETETIC STUDENTS OF UBC
East Indian dinner, 4:X p.m., SUB Cafeteria.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
AMS ART GALLERY
Atkinson-Eklund-Hodgson,   pencil,   paint,   print
show, 10-4 p.m., Art gallery.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting,  1:30 p.m.. International
House.
UBC CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Speaker on abortion question, 4:30 p.m., SUB
211.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Religious lecture on Bandgi, noon, Woodward 1.
AMS CYCLING CLUB
Meeting to discuss election and ordering of club
jerseys, noon, Hennings 302.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsals for Savannah's piece, 5 p.m., SUB
207/209.
STUDENTS FOR A
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Public forum — faculty of education, the university and cutbacks, noon, Law 101.
UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, Brock extension 358.
FRIDAY
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND POLI
SCI. STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Pizza, music and bzzr garden, 3:30 p.m.-9 p.m.,
International house.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Lecture by Dr. Rita Steblin, "Death as a fiddler in
the  19th century, an interdisciplinary study,"
3:30 p.m., Music 113.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Thunderbird women and men take on University
of  Lethbridge,  6  p.m.,   8 p.m., War Memorial
gym.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
DISARMAMENT AND EDUCATORS
FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Speaker Vicky Martin  on the  militarisation  of
space, noon, SUB 205.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation    meeting,    noon,    International
House,
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 215E.
DANCE HORIZONS
Advanced tickets on  sale for 'Equinox',  noon,
SUB 216E.
AN INFORMATION
SESSION ON THE
MBA at UBC
• Date: Wed., Jan. 30th
• Time: 12:30-2:30
• Place: Henry Angus 226
A BRIEF FORMAL PRESENTATION WILL BE
FOLLOWED BY A QUESTION & ANSWER SESSION
SPEAKER
•  PROFESSOR BERNHARD SCHWAB
•  DIRECTOR OF UBC'S MBA PROGRAM
TRAVEL CUTS Going Your Way!
STUDENT WORK ABROAD PROGRAMME
MAKE YOUR HOLIDAY WORK!
CFS has a way to help you
cut travel costs and earn
valuable work experience in
Britain, Ireland, Belgium or
New Zealand. You owe it to
yourself to find out about:
SWAP
1-800-972-4004
Name
Address
Mail completed coupon to:
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
604 224-2344
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
Granville island    1516 Duranleau St
604 687-6033
The travel company of CFS
THE TAMING
OF THE SHREW
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Beth French
JANUARY 29-
FEBRUARY 2
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $4
I Box Office—Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre)
DOROTHY
SOMERSET
STUDIO
University of British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
mTCH YOUR
RRSP GROW AT
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Invest in a TCI'
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Subject to change Interest on term RRSPs compounded annually
HELPING GOOD IDEAS GROW
UBC CAMPUS BRANCH
108   6138 S I'.B. Boulevard, Vancouver, B.C. V6T Z\5   Telephone 22+ 11SS
H(.  It'iclicrs Cjtxlil t'nion
PUNCHLINES
IS BACK!!!
Tomorrow—Wednesday
January 30
12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS-*
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines. .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payabl ■ in advance   Deadline  .s  10:30 a.m.  the
day before publication.
Publications Room 2b'n, SUB., UBC.  Van., B.C.  V6T 2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
SUMMER COURSE
IN POLAND
May 29 to June 25, 1985
Four weeks of guided tours and lectures in English and French on
Polish art, history, literature, film,
music, organized by the University
of Warsaw. Cost: Can. $1050 plus
U.S. $500, includes tuition, return
airfare between Montreal and Warsaw (ticket valid one year), hotel accommodation, all meals. Contact
Dr. Andrew Stogg in Montreal:
(514) 483-2976 after 6:00 p.m. or
George Tacik in Vancouver:
689-4739.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
NAKAMICHI TRI TRACER 700 3 head,
professional cassette tape deck. Tested
20-20, khz± 2 db. Pristine condition. New
$1200. Now $500 O.B.O. 874-9581 eves.
73 VW VAN, new engine, clutch, brakes,
am/fm, good running condition, $1800
OBO. 682-7978.
15 - FOUND
LADIES WATCH found near Scarfe Building
(Education). Jan. 25. Claim 261-4565.
20 - HOUSING
ROOM IN shared house, 41st & Holland,
$240/month, near UBC. Very large house,
phone 266-0769.
TAKES TWO — one of Canada's most professional, selective roommate matching
agencies. Call 9 to 9 for details. 685-5681.
Small fee.        	
2 B.R. SUITE to share with female grad. stu.
$235 mo. includes util. Phone 738-7398.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
Let Us Prepare You For The
March 2, 1985 LSAT
on Feb. 1. 2, 3/1985
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT
PREPARATION COURSES
112-800-387-3742
30 - JOBS
AMS FOOD & BEVERAGE Dept. is now
accepting applications for part-time student
employment in our new restaurant & snack
bar. Fast food & cash exp. an asset. Please
submit application forms & resumes to the
AMS Business Office.
40 - MESSAGES
WHAT DO MACHINE GUN KELLY, Elvis
Presley and Laura Secord have in common?
Nothing as far as we know, but they may
have volunteered and you can too. Come to
Volunteer Connections, No. 200 Brock Hall
or call 228-3811.
CONGRATULATIONS to the initiates -
Keep the drive alive in A.D. Five. Sprout.
THE CHOIR at West Point Grey Presbyterian
Church, West 12th Ave. & Trimble, is seeking new members in all voice parts. Come &
join us. 733-1797.
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
60 - RIDES
RIDE NEEDED Mon.-Fri. from New West,
to & from UBC. Willing to share gas costs.
Contact Lila, Dept. of Soil Science,
228-2783.
65 - SCANDALS
SKI TRIP to Silverstar, Feb. 21-24. $175
includes transp., condo with cook facil,, 4
lift passes &- other extras. More info. Dre
Erdely, 734-8470, 224-9866.
WE MET AT AMOGRAPH on Sat. 110:00).
You're in Ed. & asked me for the time —
Now I'd like to ask you for the time — for a
cup of coffee or . . .? Try Wed. or Thurs. at
9:00 in Ponderosa Cafe of slip a note in
locker No. 53, Old Home Ec. Bldg. - Tim.
85 - TYPING
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U Etdel.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
theses, reports, letters, resumes. Days,
evgs/wknds. Quick turnaround, student
rates. 731-1252.
WORDPOWER - Editing & word processing professionals. Thesis, term paper,
resume h form letter specialists. Student
rates. 3737 W. 10th (at Alma). 222-2661.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs/wkends. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, mscpts., resumes, theses.
IBM Selec. II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857.
TYPING AND/OR EDITING: Reports, es=
says, letters, manuscripts, etc. IBM Selectric II. Phone 261-3345.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Math, sciences,
languages, fine arts, literature. Will correct
grammar it spelling. 872-7934.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed - to
go. Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351 (24 hrs.) Fast and reliable.
TYPING: Essays, thesis, term papers, mscps.
$1/page. Call 228-8827 aft. 4 p.m.
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WORDPOWER-
222-2661 Tuesday, January 29, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Labs contaminate trays
From page 3
"They use them not only for
radioactive things but they could
also be used for carcinogens . . .
and a lot of plastic soluble
substances . . . that become part of
the tray," the reseacher said.
Robert Roy, Concordia's acting
vice-rector academic, says the
cafeteria's dishwashers can make
the contaminated trays safe for
regular use.
Roy said the situation "disturbed" him. "No one should be eating
off things that have been used in the
lab," he said.
"It's conceivable that some
things that get into the plastic were
used.    But    something   that's   in
plastic is probably going to stay
there. The truth of the matter is
we're exposed to many things in the
packaging and processing of food,"
he said.
The trays found their way into
the labs when researchers used them
to bring in food. Roy said he tried
to provide dining facilities to
discourage graduate students from
eating in labs, but was not successful.
Bill Tageau, Saga foods manager
at Concordia's downtown campus,
blamed the problem on the researchers.
"It's unprofessional on their
part," Tageau said. "If we went into their labs and took their stuff
Capital aids junta
From page 3
students should pay for it." Explaining the dictatorship's education policies, Enriguez said:
"Tyrants love the ignorance of the
masses."
And Enriguez said foreign capital
is helping the dictatorship continue.
Chile had a $4 billion foreign debt
when the democratically elected
government of Allende was overthrown and Allende was killed.
Now Chile's debt is $20 billion, said
Ubyssey
Staff Meeting,
Wed., Noon
SUB Rm. 241k
Come on, you turkeys. We needed you Monday night!
Enriguez, and dehors must know
Chile cannot even pay the interest.
"When Chile recovers its
democracy its going to be so ruined
and in debt that a great sacrifice of
future generations will be needed to
put Chile back to 1973."
After the coup Enriquez, a
former member of the centre-left
Radical Party, was himself interned
for 20 months in Anarctica forced
labor camp. His speech was sponsored by the Latin America Support
Committee.
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they'd come down here and raise
hell."
Tray search tactics at Concordia
are draconian. The search which
put the radioactive trays into circulation happened early one Sunday morning, and there have been
skirmishes over Saga staff going into research labs at other times.
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INTRAMURAL
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A Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 29, 1985
Thunderbirds dump Dinosaurs
By MONTE STEWART
Convenience.
That's the ultimate purpose of
the Canada West Universities
Athletic    Association    scheduling
But a head-to-head confrontation is looming for the T'Birds.
They are trying to win a Canada
West championship for the first
time since 1974-75 and their first na-
SPORTS
practice which plans two hockey
games on consecutive nights. Done
primarily as a cost cutting effort,
the schedule not does not help attendance increases or rivalries and
does not usually anticipate possible
showdowns.
tional title since 1971-72.
Last weekend UBC easily swept
aside the Calgary Dinosaurs in a
pair of games at Thunderbird
Arena. Friday the 'Birds trounced
the Dino's 7-1 before recording a
4-2 victory Saturday.
The Saskatchewan Huskies,
meanwhile, split with the Alberta
Golden Bears in Saskatoon. The second place Huskies edged Alberta
2-1 Friday. Saskatchewan's 4-2 loss
to the Golden Bears Saturday night
may have cut off the Huskies' playoff hopes.
Rick Amann and Daryl Coldwell
the 'Birds leading scorers against
the Dino's, each scoring three goals
in all.
Friday, Coldwell notched a pair
including a shorthanded tally, UBC
led 4-0 after the first period and 7-1
after the second. Graham Kerr also
scored twice while Graham Abott,
taking a precise pass from Amann,
Bobby Hull and Bill Holowaty
scored the other UBC goals. Steve
Mounkes scored for Calgary.
"I think we played our best game
of the year Friday", said Masuch.
Saturday the 'Birds started slowly
but maintained control of the game
throughout. UBC led 1-0 after a
goal by Amann. The defender then
opened the scoring in the middle
frame by blasting a shot past Mark
Frank at 6:43. Coldwell increased
UBC's lead before Calgary's Scott
Hunt scored with only 25 seconds
left in the period.
Calgary's Terry Jones and Kerr
exchanged third period markers.
The 'Birds now trail basKat-
chewan by two points in the Canada
West standings, meaning a season
closing series here of Feb. 22 and 23
will probably be a do or die situation for both teams.
The   Huskies   have   a   bve   this
weekend before meeting the
Dinosaurs in Calgary the following
weekend. After facing the Bears
this weekend, the 'Birds travel to
Lethbridge for a series with the absolutely dismal Pronghorns. Feb.
15 and 16, the 'Horns will be the
Huskies' opponents while the 'Birds
get a bye from conference play.
the odds suggest both teams will
be exactly where they are now—two
points away from each other—or at
least tied when the Huskies get here
for the final weekend of the season.
"Everything is starting to come
together for us," noted Masuch,
adding that forward Dave Brownlie
(separated shoulder) and defence
Jay Soleway (knee ligaments) could
be ready for the season finale
against the Huskies.
Hoopsters splurge on Whales' goodwill
DARYL COLDWELL SHOOTS ... He scores! Mark Frank is the helpless Dinosaur goaltender while Graham
Kerr (8) and Bill Holowaty (10) watch first UBC goal scored in 7-1 romp over Calgary Friday night at Thunderbird
Arena.
Ski 'Birds triumph in Washington
By MONTE STEWART
Last Sunday's confrontation between the UBC and University of
Alaska-Juneau men's basketball
teams was a typical example of the
friendly nature of exhibition games.
Both extolled so much goodwill thai
either team was equally willing to
give the game away.
The 'Birds downed the Whales
100-90 in the exhibition encounter
played before six photographers,
two radio crews, two newspaper
reporters, and 20 fans — a sharp
decline for the Whales who, despite
UAJ's limited enrolment of 2.000,
regularly attract about 1,500 spectators at War Memorial Gym.
Every Thunderbird who dressed
saw playing time. Aaron Point,
most valuable player at last year's
B.C. high school championships,
started in place of Dale Olson while
guards Don Young and Jamie
Stewart were the substitutes who
received the most playing time.
Guard Kevin Danes, giving his
chronic knees a rest, Rob Bartel,
and Ken Klassen did not suit up.
"Kenny's out for the season,"
said UBC head coach Bill Edwards,
adding Klassen would like to appeal
his eligibility. Afer undergoing
ankle surgery in the summer, the
'Birds leading scorer of a year ago
played a total of six exhibition
games this season before taking a
rest. Under Canadian Interuniversi-
[y Athletic Union rules, carded
athletes may play only five seasons.
The Whales led for most of the
first half, primarily during the time
that Olson was on the bench. The
Delta native sank a shot to give
UBC a 35-33 lead near the^ 15
minute mark. The 'Birds subsequently stretched that lead to 49-44
at half-time.
"! don't think we played very
well defensively," said Whales'
coach Clair Markey, echoing Edwards' comments.
In the second half, the Whales
never retained the lead, coming
within two points, 82-80 with three
minutes left in the game.
Pat West led the~T-Birds with 28
points while Olson contributed 26.
Russell Jordan, one of only three
Whales who is not an Alaska
native, paced UAJ with 28 points.
The exhibition victory was minor
consolation for the 'Birds' 72-53
loss to the Vikings in Victoria Friday.
"We just didn't play well," Edwards said, adding "That's not to
say that (the Vikings) played well
because they didn't play well
either."
With a conference record of 1-2,
the T-Birds play in Lethbridge Friday before moving on to Calgary
for a Saturday night contest.
''Mixed results for UBC ^
Crystal Mountain proved a clear
indication of the 'Birds consistency
last weekend in a Northwest Collegiate Ski Conference meet.
For the fourth straight meet,
UBC captured the alpine-nordic
combined title in the men's division
while the women glided to yet
another alpine championship.
Stu Gairns was top skier in the
men's division of the giant slalom
for the fourth consecutive competition. But Gairns was unable to
record his fourth straight skimeister
award as the overall individual winner. (Tom Stewart of UBC was the
men's winner while Caroline Johns-
tion was women's champ.) Gairns
came second in the giant slalom but
34th in the slalom event.
Two other T-Birds finished in the
top 10 slalom finishers — Sean
Jaegli was fourth while Tom
Stewart came seventh.
T-Bird Wendy Morrison won the
women's portion of the giant
slalom, finishing in a time of
110.41. Caroline Johnstone was
third in a time of 113.73 as the
Thunderbird women recorded a
combined time of 345.27.
Simon Fraser University finished
behind UBC in the men's alpine-
nordic combined. Washington was
third.
UBC recorded a third place
showing in the women's alpine
combined.
SFU won the event, followed by
Pacific Lutheran University.
Another ranking rip
What do the hockey 'Birds have
to do to make the national top 10?
Despite a sweep over Calgary last
weekend, the 'Birds again failed to
hit the CIAU rankings, released late
Monday.
War Memorial gym was the
site of varsity volleyball action
last weekend as both the men's
and women's teams hosted a
€inada^We*meet.   '"''''>■
Some of the top teams in the
nation showed up. Saskatchewan Huskies, the number
two team inthe country, proved
they were the team to beat,
finishing on stop> with nine wins
and only one loss in the required
four match card.
The Thunderbird men started
the tournament strongly by
\defeating    the    unranked
Lethbridge Pronghorns in four
games.
The men went on to defeat
Alberta but lost to number five
ranked University of Calgary
Dinosaurs.
The women fared a little better than the men, finishing third
in the six team meet.
Next weekend the 'Birds
resume Canada West play. Friday night both the men and
women host Calgary. Saturday
Lethbridge provides the opposition. The women play at 6:00
and the men at 8:00.
Gymnasts spring to victory; record broken
The UBC men's gymnastics team
vaulted to victory Friday night at
Osborne Centre, winning a three
team exhibition meet.
UBC wound up with 182.2 points
with the University of Washington
Huskies finished second with
179.05 and by the University of
Alberta third with 159.05.
Tom Carlson was the individual
winner with 50.80 points. Carlson
won the vault, horse, rings, and
high bar events. The next highest
Thunderbird, third overall, was
Cam Bailey with 46.10 points.
Bailey finished first in the horse and
high bar competitions.
Mark Byrne, the T-Birds' top
gymnast, did not finish after suffering a slightly sprained ankle.
UBC is hosting the Canada West
championships and the Canadian
Interuniversity Athletic Union
finals in February.
The women's gymnastics team
spran to prominence last weekend
at a meet in Spokane when only five
points separated the T-Birds from
the first place Spokane Community
College.
SCC recorded 159.25 points
while UBC scored 154.2. UBC's
Jennifer Dong, a first year science
student,  was  the  overall winner,
finishing first in the bars and beam.
Naomi Buckingham, education
5, recorded a personal best of 30.5
points while competing in four
events.
* » *
The UBC men's relay team has
set a record for the second year in a
row. The team of Simon Hooge-
werf, Ken Lucks, Scott Kent, and
Ian Newhouse established a new
Canadian record for the event at the
Millrose Games in New York City.
The Thunderabirds finished second to Arizona State. The 'Birds
recorded a time of 7:32.10, surpass
ing the previous record of 7:33.54
set at the same competition last
year.
The second place victory was extremely significant, considering the
Millrose Games are among the most
prestigious track events in North
America and feature top United
States athletes.
Four time Olympic gold medals
Carl Lewis was one of the high
jump competitors while Mary
Decker competed in one long
distance event.
* * .
The UBC women's basketball
team    finds   themselves    in    the
dubious position of having only one
win in their five Conference starts
after being overwhelmed by the Victoria Vikettes Saturday night.
Playing on the road is no easy
feat especially against the number
one-ranked Vikettes. UBC lost to
them 74-43.
Anything can happen in the remaining games between the five
other teams in the league. The
University of Alberta has already
qualified for the playoffs as host. '
UBC must win all four road games
for a playoff chance.

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