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The Ubyssey Oct 13, 1982

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 Grants decision coming by Friday
Students should expect a decision
on B.C. student assistance program
grants by the end of the week, education minister Bill Vander Zalm
told Canadian Federation of Students representatives Friday.
"He (Vander Zalm) said we
could expect an announcement on
Thursday or Friday on student
aid," CFS campaign coordinator
Stephen Learey said Tuesday.
Even with Vander Zalm's announcement there are still problems, Learey said. "I don't think
students can expect their money for
two weeks to a month after that
(Friday)," Learey said.
"He (Vander Zalm) knows absolutely nothing about grants and
how they work," Learey charged.
CFS representatives told Vander
Zalm that students need the grant
money soon, Learey said. "Some
students are expecting their money
right now," Learey said. "We impressed upon him that there are
some students who are expecting to
receive their money this week."
The provincial government says
the program is short from $4 to $5
million in funds because of excessive applications and reduced summer earnings by students.
B.C. is not the only province experiencing higher applications for
student grants. In Manitoba, the
NDP government recently announced it will increase student aid
by 37 per cent this year to meet
shortfalls, caused by a 44 per cent
increase in student aid applications.
Politics OK after
all at Trek parade
By KELLEY JO BURKE
The Great Trek organizing committee is prepared to tolerate political activism during their $20,000
celebration.
The Arts Undergraduate Society
has allocated $200 for the purchase
of material for placards. They will
be made available to students who
wish to protest education cuts during the Oct. 23 Great Trek parade.
The parade will be the end of a
week of events commemorating the
sixtieth anniversary of the original
Great Trek. In 1922 more than
1,000 students marched through the
streets of Vancouver, demanding
the promised relocation of their
university to Point Grey.
"We certainly weren't looking
for a political perspective," said
Joan Pilcher of the Great Trek organizing committee. "I suppose we
can't avoid it. We'll have to allow
it, this is after all a democracy. . .
We would prefer not to have it however."
Pilcher said the Great Trek activities are simply the celebration of an
historical event. The culminating
parade will follow the same route as
the original Great Trek. A modern
addition will be the parade's climax
at the university, where it will become a half-time display for the
UBC/University of Saskatchewan
football game.
Stephen Leary, former organizing committee member and Canadian Federation of Students pacific
region deputy chair, said the Great
Trek celebrations without political
perspective will fail.
"People come out to protest,
they don't come out to party," he
said. He is also concerned by the
way the proposed activities will be
treated by the local media.
"I'm really afraid the students of
this university will be perceived by
the media as decadent, ivory tower
residents, oblivious to the state of
the educational system and society
as a whole," he said.
The AUS hopes to dispel this image to some extent.
"While we don't want to turn the
Great Trek into some kind of militant student protest, we do want to
give students an opportunity to say
something in the midst of the celebration," AUS vice president Renee
Comesetti said.
"In a time of educational crisis
students shouldn't let this chance go
by," senator Lisa Hebert said.
New SFU food services pact
cans manystrikingworkers
Canadian University Press
An administration decision to
change food contractors for Simon
Fraser University's four cafeterias
has left striking food service
employees out of work.
Beaver Foods was awarded the
contract to operate the cafeterias
September 26 by SFU's board of
governors. The cafeteria workers
went on strike in July after negotiations broke down with the former
contractor, ICL White Spot. ICL
terminated its contract with the
university in August.
Beaver Foods, a non-union
employer, has offered to hire at
least 25 per cent of the former ICL
employees, although it is not clear if
they will receive their pre-strike
wage package.
However, administration officials said Tuesday an estimated 70
percent of striking workers have
already been rehired.
SFU student society spokesperson Jeff Berg said the decision to.
hire a non-union contractor was a
futile   attempt   to   avoid   this
summer's labour problems.
"A decision to hire a non-union
company is likely to create more
problems than it's worth," Berg
warned board members at the
board meeting.
"The board today has an opportunity to either affirm or deny its
commitment to loyal employees
that will reverberate throughout the
campus," he said.
Some of the workers have been
employed for up to 17 years at the
university.
SFU Chancellor Paul Cote said
"people are tilting at wind mills
that don't exist. I don't think
unionism is an'issue."
Cote said Beaver was hired
because its proposal was competitive and beneficial to the university. *He added that in addition to
hiring former ICL employees,
Beaver will also hire students.
Berg said that although the decision to hire students was admirable,
long term workers should not be
replaced.
"We're all in favour of hiring
students but you can't have that off
the backs of people who've spent
many years at the university."
None of the six companies that
applied for the food services contract were union companies,
although VS Foods said they were
prepared to deal with the union.
Berg is urging students to send
letters of support for the workers in
care of the student society.
In B.C. government officials say
grants will either be decreased
across the board or taken from university budgets.
"Every Canadian province has
experienced a dramatic rise in student aid applications," said Manitoba education minister Maureen
Hemphill. "This is related to the
economy and the fact that more and
more adults from all walks of life
are taking advantage of post-secondary opportunities," she said.
"We're naturally grateful because it certainly is a positive reaction to the tough economic times
students face," said University of
Manitoba student union vice president Jim Jones.
Students applying for student aid
are eligible for a loan of up to
$1,860 and a $2,860 bursary.
The maximum bursary available
last year was $1,860, Jones said.
The Manitoba government has added an additional $1,000 emergency
bursary for needy students, he said.
There have been 3,400 applications for student aid at the University of Manitoba this year, according to the Manitoba department of
education — an increase of 843 over
last year.
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■PHU
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 9
Vancouver. B.C. Wednesday, October 13,1982
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228-2301     .
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-alison hoens photo
UBC president 'probably outsider'
A possible candidate for UBC's
administration president seems to
be no longer in the running.
"I'm quite confident it's not going to be me," said grad studies
dean Peter Larkin, who is resigning
'from his position as of June 30,
1983.
There is no connection between
the fact he is resigning as dean on
the same day as UBC administration president Doug Kenny's position becomes vacant, he added.
"It's just a coincidence."
He said he has two jobs at the
moment and they are too much
work for one person. After he
resigns, he will continue his job of
associate vice president of research.
"The university has been given
$45 million in research grants and
contracts. It takes quite an effort to
administer that sum of money," he
said.
UBC's chaplain and former
board of governors member George
Hermanson said the presidential
selections committee was considering Larkin. He said Larkin's
resignation is a definite confirmation that he's not in the running.
"If he were in the running, he
wouldn't resign because he would
not want to let go of the grad
studies dean's power. In jobs like
this, people tend to hold onto
power," he said.
It would be an opportune time to
resign if it was evident he was no
longer a candidate, said Herman-
son,  adding Larkin would resign
rather than work under a new president.
Larkin would be one of the better
internal candidates because he is
well respected, a good scholar and
knows the university well, said Hermanson.
He was considered as a possible
See page 2: PEDERSEN
Dead on arrivalf Oct. 14
What if they held an election and no one voted?
UBC students have the chance to vote Thursday and Friday on a
new administration director for the Alma Mater Society. The position, since its creation-three years ago, has seen only one person complete their term of office.
Running for the position vacated by Terry Cox in April, are Scott
Ando, Chris Fulker and Alan Pinkney.
This is Ando's first attempt at an AMS executive position, while
Pinkney ran unsuccessfully for finance director in January. Fulker
has run in every AMS or university election, plus Vancouver city
council, in the last four years.
Balloting is Thursday and Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., plus
night polls Thursday from 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the three single student residences and Woodward library. Your student card is needed.
A report on Thursday's all-candidates debate appeared in Friday's
Ubyssey. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 13,1982
Pedersen 'possible' pres.
From page 1
replacement for president Norman
Mackenzie when he stepped down
in 1962.
But Doug Kenny's successor is
not likely to be from within the
university community. Someone
outside of UBC will probably be appointed because the university
needs a "fresh perspective," according to a former student board of
governors member.
"I   was   under   the   impression
from board discussions last year
that the committee was looking for
somebody outside the university,"
said Chris Niwinski.
The board favored the idea of
having a new administrator not
previously involved in UBC's
politics, and the committee picked
up on this, he said.
Simon Fraser University's president George Pedersen is a probable
candidate, sources reported Tuesday.
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Hillel Highlights
Wednesday, Oct. 13th
12-2:00 — Shefa Vegetarian Lunch with
Bagels, Cream Cheese, Egg Salad
and Vegetable Salad
6:00 — Another Kenee and Sue Special
Dinner With Guest David Berson and a
discussion of PEACE NOW
Thursday, Oct. 14th
12-12:00 — Shefa Vegetarian Lunch
Also: Guest Yishai Knoll
The New Aliyah Center Shaliach
If you're planning a trip to Israel,
    he's the man to talk to.	
Phone 224-5615
CHARLIE'S
GIRL
Innovative Hair
Services for Men
and Women
30% OFF
to all Students
Expires December 1/82
3615 W. 4th Ave.
734-3841
NOTICE OF
ELECTION
— A.M.S. Director of Administration
Polls: Thursday, Oct. 14th and Friday, Oct. 15th,
9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
C.E.M.E.
Computer Science
Sedgewick Library
MacMillan
War Memorial Gym
S.U.B.
Angus
Law
Buchanan
Scarfe
Woodward
Evening Polls: Thursday, Oct. 14th,
3:30-7:30 p.m.
Totem Park Commons Block
Place Vanier Commons Block
Walter H. Gage Commons Block
Woodward Library
(Poll locations and times are subject to change.)
BALLOT: A.M.S. DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION
ANDO, Scott      FULKER, Chris
PINKNEY, Alan
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O Wednesday, October 13,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
tII   I
'Enough f<
exists'— Grit
World food production is 10 per
cent higher than is required to feed
the global population, a former
Liberal cabinet minister said Tuesday.
"That's a statistic we rarely
hear," Iona Campagnola told 55
people in MacMillan 166. Chronic
undernourishment affects 429
million people, she said.
Campagnola's speech was part of
World Food Day, an international
event which seeks to raise public
awareness about inequities in world
food distribution.
"Each year 15 to 20 million people, most of them children, starve
to death," Art Perret, B.C. chair
for the event, said last week.
Campagnola said the problem
may lie with the world's value
system.
But people are more important
than countries, she said.
Canada currently spends about
half of one per cent of its gross national product on foreign aid.
Eighty per cent of that goes to
countries that accept Canadian
foreign investment.
"Only 20 per cent of Canada's
aid is altruistic giving," she said.
Campagnola said public reeducation in Canada is needed and
that "a public ground swell of support (for the Third World) could
change the tide."
Third World countries
themselves must be free to priorize
how aid is used but political intervention by long distance decision
makers often prevents this resulting
in misused funds, Campagnola
said.
However, a Canadian international development agency publication charges these poor priority
decisions are sometimes a result of
internal government mismanagement, she said.
World Food Day will conclude
on Oct. 16, with a seminar on
Food for All at the YMCA,
followed by a 30 hour fast, intended
to call attention to the realities of
hunger. These events are sponsored
by the YMCA, the Red Cross,
CARE, and others, who hope to
raise money to aid in the fight
against starvation.
There will be information
displays set up through the week in
the Lansdowne, Park Royal, and
Guildford shopping centres.
CFS week weak
—alison hoens photo
CAMPUS STROLLERS so intensely watch strange person with camera they walk into each other. "Is that 'Wow'
it's a Nikon XL-9,' " says camera buff. "No, it's a Ricoh B700," says other photo buff. Pair later confiscated Ubyssey reporter camera knowing silly cutline would have eventually appeared.
OTTAWA (CUP)—Organizers are
scrambling to pull things together at
the last minute, but the Canadian
Federation of Students National
Week of Information is definitely
on.
The week was given the go-ahead
in May, and focuses on five key
• issues   affecting   students:   federal
education funding, student rights,
the federal national skills training
'Employment future still uncertain'
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Students have little indication of
employment opportunities in the
next decade, a Harvard economist
said Tuesday.
"It's not clear how the structure
of the economy will appear after we
come out of the current gloomy
economic situation," Wendy Dobson told about 35 people in Buchanan 205.
"Traditional industries — including textiles and the more labor intensive ones — will be phased out,"
she said, though how that can be
done remains unclear.
Dobson said students looking for
employment opportunities or guidelines should look at the service oriented industries, including public
transportation and government
agencies.
While governments are cutting
back on social services, they will
have to "get into public investment,
as unemployment becomes a massive and political problem," she
said.
Discovering a new economic order involves "changing our global
economic perspectives," she said,
adding Canadians will have to
change their attitudes and expectations about jobs.
"A dropping standard of living;
may be the wave of the future," she
said.
"But there is something to be
said about keeping life simple."
"Nothing is certain, fixed," she
said. "Models are changing, models
of how government functions, of
how nations relate to one another."
Models of employment expectations must change too, she said.
The "employment for all" assump
tion many people have may not be
correct or true, Dobson said.
One way of improving Canada's
global perspectives will be increased
trade relations with other nations,
she said, citing the B.C.-Japan coal
deal as an example.
Dobson said "a wave of the fu
ture" may be cottage industries,
with invividuals working out of
their own homes. Cottage industries
involve contracts and do not include traditional benefits for the
worker.
Dobson attributed Canada's economic problems to a general world
depression and government policies
that go back a decade.
"We seem to have gone through
a phase (that had notions about)
bringing about a just society- because we were relatively wealthy
and would probably remain that
way."
Roth man's uses cash bribery
EDMONTON (CUP) — The
University of Alberta student union
business manager accused
Rothman's of using bribery to get a
product boycott lifted.
The South African based tobacco
company offered to make renova
tions in the UASU building costing
$25,000 soon after the student
council imposed the boycott, said
Tom Wright.
"Under no circumstances would
I personally take the money," said
Wright.
Canada ta' top ton
MONTREAL (CUP) — Canada is maintaining its pacifist image
despite being one of the ten biggest exporters of military equipment in the
world, according to Montreal journalist Gilles Provost.
Speaking recently at a conference sponsored by a Montreal peace lobby group, Provost said little attention is paid to Canadian military sales to
countries such as South Africa, Israel, Iran and various Latin American
dictatorships.
In the last ten years Canada has exported about $20 billion worth of
military equipment.
Provost said there is a close link between advances in high technology
and military production, The link is at a point where governments know
that "the more one encourages technological development, the more one
helps the military."
By exporting arms components rather than completed weapons,
Canada maintains a pacifist image in the global community, he said.
Provost said that military production in Canada is more integrated into American industry than automobile production. Because of this relationship, Canada has access to U.S. technological secrets.
He said the most advanced American weapons systems have components manufactured in Canada, including the Cruise and Trident
missiles.
Wright said that the offer was intended to change the council's position.
But Joe Popeil, Rothman's
regional sales manager said his company is not trying to buy its way
back onto campus.
"My personal feeling is that you
people are losing more than we
are," he said. However, Rothman's
still wants to send a representative
to speak to council on boycotts,
Popeil said.
In September, the student federation at the University of Ottawa
refused an offer of $3,000 from
Rothman's to sponsor its welcoming week.
The South African Rembrandt
Tobacco Corporation is the parent
company of both Rothman's and
Carling-O'Keefe. The company
pays black workers 75 per cent less
than white workers. South African
corporations trading internationally
usually operate through subsidiaries
with different names, a response to
growing criticism of that nation's
racist policies.
Rembrandt Tobacco is the largest
Afrikaner corporation in South
Africa.
program, employment and student
aid.
But for students in B.C., information this week will not be focused at them. Instead CFS-Pacific is
concentrating on informing student
councils about student issues,
Stephen Learey, CFS-Pacific campaign coordinator said.
"Because many councils are just
elected there is no province wide
campaign, said Learey.
CFS-Pacific plans to concentrate
on getting councils to push for student representation on college
governing boards, Learey said.
Education minister Bill Vander
Zalm told CFS Friday the ministry
is not opposed to student representation but councils will have to ask
for it, said Learey.
Plans for the Oct. 12 to 15 week
in other parts of the country are
also sketchy.
"Some campuses are late in getting going, but I'm not sure why,"
said Yvette Diepenbrock, CFS information officer. She said it isn't
crucial that events occur during the
week because they're all part of
CFS's 'ongoing campaign' on
education issues.
Highlights include:
• A tuition fee lottery at the
University of Western Ontario.
Tickets are $1, and first prize is a
year's tuition fees, worth about
$1,100. Smaller prizes are also offered, and profits go to the UWO
bursary fund.
• More University Nights at the
Universities of Alberta and
Calgary, where local MLAs will be
wined, dined and lobbied.
• A mock student wedding at
Dalhousie University to protest student aid rules that organizers say
force some students to get married
if they want to receive adequate aid.
• A debate on education among
federal and provincial politicians at
the University of Waterloo,
• A rapid series of meetings between CFS staff and executives and
employment minister Lloyd Axworthy, NDP leader Ed Broadbent,
Pauline Jewett, NDP women's
critic, and Serge Joyal, new
secretary of state. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 13, 1982
Hard to st<
• J I I
ch
When they need seeds, they get bullets. Or worse, bureaucracy.
When they need tractors, they get tanks. Or worse, foreign
thinktanks.
Who are "they"? Countless unknown faces and names who are
starving to death everyday. Millions are denied a basic human
right, the right to a fair share of food.
They are the millions who aren't listened to by their governments. Or by ours, which pretends to offer help and spends less
than .5 per cent of the country's gross national product on foreign
aid.
The implications for their society are disasterous, and rather obvious. People in Third World countries are denied guaranteed
health care, which we in Canada take for granted. They are denied
education, which we, not surprisingly, take for granted. And they
are denied food.
Even with our best intentions and proclamations, it is a sad fact
that most of Canada's foreign aid never filters down to the people
who need it most. While some continue to debate the effectiveness
of any foreign aid during these economically depressed times, no
real effort is being made to alleviate problems which have existed
for generations.
The problem is simply one of priorities.
Our government places a higher value on its world image than its
actual accomplishments in helping Third World peoples.
And Third World governments are more concerned with maintaining their own powers and priviledges than with helping their
own people.
But when all is said and (not) done, the issue is not one of "us"
and "them".
Governments are simply no longer the effective intermediaries
between citizens of the world that we have presumed them to be.
Try acknowledging starving people as citizens of the world not
defined by stringent geographical boundaries.
Governments have never understood empty stomachs. On
World Food Day Friday, make an effort to understand what
governments refuse to.
LiGTyX^SrS
mm*m
Remember world's hungry on food fast Friday
World Food Day was initiated by
the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. The
condition of food shortage to a
large portion of our global population is a matter of concern to national leaders around the world.
Some points I ask ybu to consider
are:
• In enlightened self interest how
much does it cost us to allow hunger
to persist as a crippler and a killer of
a large fraction of our human
potential?
• Could a healthier population be
more educated, more productive
and more of a contributing force on
our planet, rather than being a constant cost and source of guilt for
each and every nation?
• If a population had a healthy
standard of living, would they be
able to reduce their own birth rate
voluntarily, educate themselves and
maintain their own self sufficiency?
• Would a self-sufficient nation be
a friendlier international neighbor
and a more rewarding partner for
international trade?
If  someone   told   you   that   25
billion dollars per year were needed
to eliminate immediate hunger and
to maintain all the necessary programs for self-sufficiency that
would end hunger as a world issue
on a sustained basis, would you
consider it worth trying?
Would you consider it worth trying if we could compare that 25
billion annually to: one-fourth of
the planetary gross national product; four days worth of the
U.S.A.'s G.N.P.; 17 days worth of
annual world military expenditures;
less than half the amount spent annually on tobacco and alcohol in
North America; less than $6 per
person per year in the world; less
than $11 per person in the non-
ihungry world.
Last year the world produced
enough food to feed seven billion
people and our world population is
about 4.5 billion. So we do have the
capability and resources to produce
enough food,
"Each major cause of hunger
could be averted or overcome if the
human community were to act cooperatively   and   decisively.   Con
versely, the persistence of hunger
reflects the lack of sufficient
political will to eliminate its
causes." - U.S. Presidential Commission on World Hunger 1980
"If there is the political will in
this country and abroad, it should
be possible to overcome the worst
aspects of widespread hunger and
malnutrition within one
generation." - National Academy
of Sciences (U.S.A.) 1977
"Mankind has never before had
such ample and technical and financial   resources   for   coping   with
hunger and poverty. The immense
task can be tackled once the
necessary collective will is mobilized. What is necessary can be done,
and must be done." - Brandt Commission 1980
"Persistent and widespread
manifestations of hunger are entirely incompatible with the level of
development attained by the world
economy and, in particular, with
existing food production capacity.
Within as brief a period as possible,
hunger must be eradicated."
-Statement of 22 world leaders at
Cancun Mexico 1981 (Canada was
represented at Cancun)
In consideration of the concern
for the world food situation I invite
you to join me in making a statement of support to acknowledge
World Food Day Oct. 16. Will you
join in fasting from 12 noon Friday
Oct. 15 to 6 p.m. Saturday Oct. 16?
[Thirty hours of consuming liquids
only (non-alcoholic recommended)] .
Alistair Winter
president, agriculture undergraduate soceity and 17 others.
'Time to remember the forgotten'
Questions need answers
Thank you for bringing the student loan mess to the attention of
readers.
First the provincial government
holds up the $31.9 million allocated
by the federal government by the
end of July.
Then they underestimate the
amount they'll need for their matching grants. Their estimates were
for $16.8 million. To arrive at that,
they used exactly the same informa-'
tion as was available to the federal
government.
But having already underestimated, they sit on even the $16.8
million. Students in B.C. are the
only ones in Canada to have received no information about their provincial grants.
As well, the provincial government has reneged on its health
science bursaries for students in
medical faculties. Students who applied well in advance and were
assured they would have enough to
get through both terms are now
discovering that very few will
receive bursaries.
Can anyone figure out what
Robert Stewart, the Deputy
Minister for Higher Education, was
talking about when he vaguely
referred to a missing $5 million in
his talk at UBC on October 5th? If
the government invested the $16.8
million, they'd get back $5,652 per
day at 13% - they shouldn't have
much trouble finding $5 million.
But $5 million isn't going to
cover the needs of B.C. students. If
the federal government estimated
B.C.'s needs for this year at the
$31.9 million line of credit they extended in July, it makes no sense
for the provincial government in
October to be still wondering how
much students will need (as Mr.
Vander Zalm explained the delay
last week) or to be talking in terms
of $5 million as the provincial
share. Patricia Marchak
Anthropology department
Well over 90 governments today
are holding their own citizens in
prison either on political, religious
or racial grounds, or else without
trial or charge. In dozens of the
countries, the torture of political
prisoners has become a routine instrument of social control, used to
intimidate or liquidate dissenters.
It is almost impossible to
calculate how many such victims exist throughout the world — partly
because hundreds are held in
remote prison camps or have been
secretly executed, and partly
because smuggling information
about them to the outside world is a
perilous task.
Conservative estimates of the
number of political prisoners held
in detention throughout the world
place the total at hundreds of
thousands. Some are well known in
the outside world — leaders of
political parties, or trade unions, or
those who have forcefully and
outspokenly dissented from official
views.
But this is only the famous handful. There is a much wider population of unknown men and women
who find themselves detained
because they formerly belonged to
legal political associations which
have since been banned; or because
they are members of a religious sect
which opposes military service on
ethical grounds; or because they
speak the "wrong language," have
the "wrong colour of skin," or
have written the "wrong words."
Guilt by association also goes far
in the eyes of the secret police in
numerous countries; grand parents,
cousins, and small children are held
hostage in prison — the innocent
relatives of people who have been
labelled political 'undesirables.'
Traditionally, the second week of
October is set aside as Prisoner of
Conscience Week. It is a time for
Amnesty International groups all
over the world to pay tribute to the
hundreds of thousands of "forgotten prisoners," and a time to
awaken public awareness to this
enormous and widespread injustice.
Amnesty International at UBC is no
exception.
During the week of Oct. 11-17 information booths will be set up at
various locations across campus for
interested students and staff to approach.
Other events that will be open to
the public this week include a folk
night and bake sale at International •
House at 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 15;
a prison cell vigil at Robson Square
from 9 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 16 to
9 a.m. on Sunday, Oct. 17; a province wide vigil, also at Robson
Square, from 7 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 16; and finally, a
walkathon, starting at 10 a.m. at
Cepperly Park in Stanley Park. All
are encouraged to come out and
show support for the "forgotten
prisoner." Mary Potter
Amnesty International
THE UBYSSEY
October 13. 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office next door. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
It was something out of a nightmare. Silence, cold white fluorescent silence filled the room,
inactivity reached to every corner, filling every crack in the walls. Where the hell was
everybody? Muriel Draaisma, epistlery wizard, was thought to be up in East Van, inciting the
people to revolt, aided and abetted by the Vanguard Gang, Brian Jones (of the left), Charles
Campbell (of the right) and Doug Schmidt (of the Twilight Zone). I'd sent Sarah Cox to look
for them, but she never came back. Word reached me that she and Arnold Hedstrom had met
up with Glen Sanford and Craig Brooks, enroute to Nepal to cover the Albertan ascent of
Everest, and had gone along as support staff. They really weren't to be blamed, I said to
Shaffin Hsariff, the mountains are lovely this time of the year, but even as the words fell from
my lips, Shaffin had vanished, leaving nothing but a Cheshire grin and a few theatre ticket Wednesday, October 13, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
A peace movement, truly?
By SARAH COX
and BRIAN JONES
Our portable Sony lies awkwardly on the speaker's table, surrounded by a dozen fancy microphones
and wires. The pro's thrive on the
importance of the occasion, rushing
to set up cameras, lights, and other
electronic gadgetry. We put our
knapsacks on the best four seats
right at the front.
Reporters scramble for seats as
seven of the main speakers from the
Target Seattle finale enter the
room, ready to meet the press for
an afternoon question and answer
session. Helen Caldicott, a Harvard
medical professor and founder of
the anti-nuclear group Physicians
for Social Responsibility, sits quiety
at the end of the table. She knows
that her fame as a leader of the
peace movement makes her the
main attraction of the week's disarmament activities.
Four of the six other notables are
actors. Not 10 feet from the tips of
our pens is Lois Lane, emotionally
telling us that nukes are a danger to
our future. And here are three
familiar TV faces, names unknown,
saying the arms race is not a good
idea. Three and a half hours on the
bus and what does this press conference offer? — Hollywood
radicalism.
We sit through these inanities
with much disgust, waiting for the
well-trained mouths to close so
Helen can speak. It is, after all,
Caldicott who we have come to
hear.
(towsW)
She speaks, and our pens hover
above our notebooks. Students are
apathetic, she says. University campuses are no longer active, students
are ignorant, young people choose
to ignore the potential annihilation
of cities, countries, the earth.
Students make no contribution to
the disarmament movement; it's
happening without their help.
Stunned by this insightful
knowledge, our pens remain still,
our pages blank. They said 30
minutes, and they meant 30
minutes. Run with the cold efficiency of the Pentagon, the press conference ends exactly at 3:30 p.m. "I
see no one is taking notes, so I'll
call this briefing to a close," says
the chair. Sure buddy, get your
puppets to say something new or intelligent and then we'll take notes.
We head straight for Caldicott. But
she has no time for students or
amateur journalists who want more
than drivel from famous actors and
celebrities, and brushes quickly by
in search of bigger and better
cameras.
Not easily discouraged, we follow
her until the commercial biggies
have had their fill, and swoop in,
identifying ourselves as Canadian
student journalists. Having succeeded getting her face on television
again, Caldicott deems to spare a
few moments for those of us in the
print world who are judged to be of
lesser importance.
Helen, you say students are
apathetic — how do we get students
to be concerned about the arms
race? "Make them want to cry."
But how do we get them involved?
"Touch their souls." How can we
get them to act in large enough
numbers? "Be motivated. Be
leaders."
Thanks a lot, Helen. Why don't
you seek out some more big
cameras? (She did). As she left, she
turned to us and said, "Do it,
okay?" Sure, Helen, sure.
"Kingdome, please." The taxi-
driver takes a closer look at us.
"Going to the anti-nuclear rally,
huh?"
"Yup. Do you get off work in
time to make it?"
"I'll tell ya — when they
demonstrate over in Russia, then
I'll come to your rallies." Jesus, a
little bit of quasi-political activity
by American suburbanites was too
much for this man. We should have
told him about the movie stars.
A lineup a hundred yards long.
We show our press cards, and two
minutes later we're in the Kingdome
press gallery. We even get to sign
the list with The Biggies — Seattle
Times, Post-Intelligencer, Canadian Press, Ubyssey. . .
Finally, an hour and a half later,
13,000 people fill a portion of the
gigantic stadium, and the wishy
washy peace movement once again
limps into action.
Nukes are bad for your health.
They hurt the economy. They can
kill your husband, your wife, your
children, your dog. They contaminate the air, the water, the
earth. Civilization as we know it is
threatened. Together, we can make
the world safe — just convince the
governments of the world to stop
being greedy and sit down to some
friendly negotiating.
And why not? If the movie stars
say it, why not believe it? After all,
aren't they famous?
Amused, we laugh when
Caldicott tells the masses that
America, the greatest democracy on
earth, must lead the world to peace.
Right. Tell it to the people in El
Salvador, Helen.
After two hours of boredom and
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
bullshit, our frustration mounts.
We dig into our knapsacks for the
large Soviet and American flags we
just happen to have for the occasion, and droop them upside down
from the press balcony. Long live
advocacy journalism.
Three hours after they opened,
the famous mouths are still going
strong. The ex-vice president of AT
and T asks the crowd to cough up
money for the cause. Great — a
business person asks for money so
we can buy peace.
We aren't buying. The so-called
disarmament movement no longer
has anything original or inspiring to
say. It isn't questioning, it isn't
challenging, it isn't making any
progress. It won't either, until it
starts challenging people's
preconceptions and starts being
(horrors!) radical.
Brian Jones and Sarah Cox are
two Ubyssey staff members who,
although not pleased with the actions of Ron and Leonid, have
grave reservations about the growing peace movement.
Cox and Jones are also the first
Ubyssey staff members to penetrate
the confines of the Kingdome press
box. It didn't work at the Stones
concert.
HiTech Rec
Video Fair '82
microcomputers
software and services
video games
super video arcade
video equipment
Hi-Tech Rec
Video Fair '82
At Robson Square
Media Cvntre
Octob-ar 13-17
11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily
*3 adults *2 Youth
$1.S0 Children and Seniors
Hi-Tech Rec
Video Fair '82
• satellite systems
• robotics
• electronic wizardy
• competitions
• demonstrations
SPECIAL
*y
PUNCH LINES
COMEDY SHOW
Starring Richard E/wood
SUB Auditorium, Wed., Oct. 13th - 12:30 p.m.
FIRST 400 PEOPLE ADMISSION FREE -
NEXT 40 - $1.00
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
CENTRE FOR FRENCH STUDIES
Fall Program:
All Levels — Professional
French Tutors
MORE CLASSES START ON OCT. 19th
Information:
Registration:
327-0201     6161 Cambie St.
FRENCH CONVERSATION
Ssso
CLOSING DATE FOR APPLICATIONS TO
Esso Resources / Imperial Oil Limited
is:    OCTOBER 1-4
at U.B.C.    Campus Placement Office
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TODAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem. 150.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 206.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance languages, 7:30 p.m., licensed. International House.
BHAKTI YOGA CLUB
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 212.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
Nutrition booth, Nike runners booth, free suit
raffle, noon-1 :X p.m., SUB concourse.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB lT7.
Movie outing to see Word is Out, and Making
Love. See office for time. Ridge theatre.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CO-OPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
If you love this dinner followed by if you love this
planet followed by Kathleen Wallace Deering, 6
p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 10 p.m., Aquatic centre.
THURSDAY
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
General meeting. Paul Stevens: Who Do You
Think You Are Charlie Brown? A Christian view
of self-image, noon, Chem. 250.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch, 7:30 p.m., licensed. International
House.
PAULA ROSS DANCE COMPANY
Selections performed from their full repertoire,
free admission, noon, SUB ballroom.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY CLUB
Semi annual general meeting, election of 7 executive positions, 5 members-at-large, 2 vice
presidents, noon, SUB 205.
MUSSOC
Committee and organizational meeting for Guys
and Dolls, noon and 1:30 p.m., clubroom. Old
Auditorium basement.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Dr. Hannah Newcombe, president of World Federation of Canada.
Alternative international security systems, noon
Computer Science 200.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
Runners symposium. Dr. Lloyd-Smith, SUB
ballroom. Fitness testing and counselling. Adidas runners booth, SUB concourse, noon-1:30.
NOON CLUB
Meeting to change noon at UBC to noon, not
12:30, 12:15, SUB 256.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
UBC INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Wet Earth, Warm People, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch, Never Wein und Zwiebelkuchen,
7:30 p.m., International House.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Christian life seminar, guest speaker: Nadine
Mandeville, noon. Brock Hall 302.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Events committee meeting, noon, SUB 212.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker series meeting, the body politic case,
noon, SUB 125.
HISTORY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Discussion, great issue of history, wyne and
cheese party, 3:30 p.m., Buchanan penthouse.
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL
EDUCATION AND RECREATION
Lecture: Physical activity and sport for the disabled person, guest speakers: Rick Hansen, Marshall Smith, Doug Mowat, noon, IRC 6.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Caring and sharing meeting, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran
campus centre.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 2 p.m., UBC Aquatic centre.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE
Literature table, come by and visit for Marxist literature and discussion, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, scheduling of training program
for racers, noon, Bilogical Science 2449.
FRIDAY
STUDENTS FOB PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Video tape: the last epidemic, all welcorpe,
noon, SUB 205.
REMEMBER:
1. If you have to ask
youre not entitled to
know.
2. If you don't like the
answer, you shouldn't
have asked the question.
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 13,1982
INTRAMURALS
Peripheral road-run (3.8 km), noon, SUB plaza.
UBC CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
Lecture, Jonathan Kozol: can public schools
create a compassionate society? 8 p.m., IRC 2.
CANADIAN FEDERATION OF STUDENTS
Brenda Cote, national chairperson of CFS speaking on the national student movement, noon,
SUB 207/209.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Folk dance, 8:30 p.m.. Graduate Student centre
ballroom.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Film, assignment life, newcomers welcome,
noon, SUB 212.
UBC CANOE CLUB
Pool sessions for kayakers, 10 p.m., UBC indoor
pool.
UBC ASTRONOMY AND
AEROSPACE CLUB
Film: build by Lockheed, 5:30 p.m., Geophysics
and Astronomy 142-
PHYSICAL EDUCATION UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
B.C. Lions/UBC cheerleaders competition,
noon, SUB auditorium, P.E. week dance after
the football game, 8:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m., armories.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Squash night, 8-10 p.m.. Winter sports centre.
UBC DANCE CLUB
General meeting and elections, noon, party 8
p.m., SUB party room.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Safety seminar and film by B.C. safety council,
noon, SUB 111.
THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL
Football game vs. Alberta Golden Bears, 7:30
p.m., Thunderbird stadium.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Alumni varsity game, 8 p.m., Thunderbird arena.
VOLLEYBALL
Women's high school invitational volleyball tournament, all day today and tomorrow, War Memorial gym, Osborne centre.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY
Game vs. Jokers, 2:30 p.m., McGregor field.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Host UBC old boys, 2:30 p.m., UBC rugby fields.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Car rally, food provided afterwards, 6 p.m.,
Beaver gas station at Oakridge.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Oktoberfest, licensed, food served, admission
free, 8 p.m., International House upper and
tower lounges.
INTRAMURALS
Horseback riding, intermediate and advanced,
$36, all day, Alpine riding academy.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Federal policy conference, register in SUB 226
before Oct. 16, 9:30 a.m. SUB 206.
Dance and UBC political boat race championships, cheap bzzr, 7:30 p.m., SUB 207/209.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 5 p.m., (women only), UBC Aquatic
SUNDAY
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday ride and picnic to Chuckanut Drive, Bellingham, meet in SUB cafeteria, 10:30 a.m.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Touring ride everybody welcome, 9 a.m.,  met
between SUB and the Aquatic centre.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
First novice winter series slalom, registration at
10 a.m., B-lot by the barn.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice and clinic, 10 p.m., UBC Aquatic centre.
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, 5 p.m. (men only), UBC Aquatic cen-
MONDAY
INTRAMURALS
Inner tube water polo, 8 p.m., UBC Aquatic centre, $20 per team.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
English language evening,  7:30 p.m.,  International House, licensed.
ROCKER CO-OP
Meeting,  paid members may pick up their directory, noon, SUB 119.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE
Seminar: casual reasoning in organizations, 1:30
p.m., Angus penthouse.
CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
TUESDAY
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series, 7:30 p.m.. International House.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton, noon, Osborne centre gym A.
Those   astounding,   astonishing,
and awesomely amiable people from
Amnesty International are running an
information booth in SUB and other locations on campus all this week.
A folk night and bake sale will be held
Friday at 8 p.m. at International House.
A vigil will be held from 9 a.m. Saturday
to 9 a.m. Sunday at Robson Square.
There's more folks. A walkathon will be
held Sunday at 10 a.m. at Cepperley
Park in Stanley Park. Forget your books
and come on out.
Students of Canada, unite! The
Canadian Federation of Students is
sponsoring a talk by Brenda Cote, national chairperson of CFS. She will be
speaking at noon Friday in SUB 207/209
on the national student movement. Find
out what students across our beautiful
nation are doing in the defence of student's rights, liberties, and other fun
things.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Necrophiles in this tiny island
kingdom engaged in prolonged
festivities and an anachronistic rock
concert in honor of the untimely
demise of the hairy puce blorg
videotape star who became a real
life autocrat after taking a course
with a U.S. beer company.
The Grace-fell-dead concert occupied the limited attention spans
of the blorgs far longer than the recent wakes for Naturally Wood-
not-float and William (Couldn't)
Hold'em. More celebrations are being planned, said blorg spokesthing
Snarling Headstrong, in the fervent
hope semi-comedian Bob Hopeless
would die soon.
USED COMPUTER
Buy-Sell-Trade-Consignment
Call 738-3641
KEY COMPUTER
Sale and Service Ltd.
2391 Burrard St.
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Grey
for the last 24 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices - including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8.00 a.m. to 8.30 p.m.
Closed Sundays & Public Holidays
For the early ones,  we start serving
breakfast from 8:00 a. m.
4556 W. 10th Ave. - 224-1912
We jc.cept Chargex
P.E. WEEK DANCE
FRIDAY, OCT. 15
8:30 ARMORIES
TICKETS $5.00 IN SUB
OR WAR MEM. GYM
OCT. 12-15, 12:30-1:30
FEA TURING MERCEDES
COME AND GET PHYSICAL
SKYSAVER
TRAVEL INC.
Travel Aid Save $$$
—Xmas Special Fare to Toronto from Vancouver
(R.T.)    $389
—Vancouver-Toronto (R.T.)   $249-$299
—Special Low Fare to London from Vancouver
(R.T.)    $688
—Standby Fare from Seattle to London
One Way,    $U.S.339-$450
—Vancouver to Dublin (R.T.)    $952
—Vancouver to Tokyo (R.T.)   $960
—Vancouver to Hong Kong (R.T.)    $1050
—Special Low Fare to Asia:
Hong Kong, Taipei, Singapore, Manila,
Penang, Bangkok, Jakarta, Columbo
e.g.: Vancouver-Kuala Lumpur(R.T.)    $1260
—Vancouver to San Francisco (R.T.)    $149 to $208
—Vancouver to Tokyo (Air, sea, ferry, rail,
includes 7 nights hotel)   $1350
—Special  Group  Fare  to  Many Oriental  Cities  for
Education Programme
1719 Davie Street Phone
Vancouver, B.C. (604)682-7212
SUBFILMS presents
From a place you never heard of.
a story you'll never forget.
Thurs.-Sun., 7:00 & 9:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 linos, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines. 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2AS
11
For Sale — Private
VW STN. WG., 4 spd., 1973, tape deck,
lady driver, excellent condition. 224-9269.
BRUNING DRAFTING machine, model
2699, 1 set 12" blades, 1 18" blade, $95
obo. 682-1527.
PLANE TICKET for sale. Round trip
Vancouver-Toronto $350. Dec. 16-28. Call
Lori 228-2292. (8-4:30) or 732-0477 after 6
p.m.
TR 6 $3,100. 1972 fair cond. Refinished interior. Blaupunkt stereo. Serious inquiries
922-4201.
TIRES FOR SALE. 3 H78-15, 2 G78-15.
980-6351.
40 — Messages
THE   STAR   and   crescent   a   force   to   be
revered. Schlong.
ATTN:  Eckists. We need you!  Ph.: V.E.C.
732-5514.
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
FLOWERS BY WENDY have wedding designs done in fresh or silk flowers. Professional freelancer. 261-3573 or 943-1873.
80 — Tutoring
15 — Found
WANT TO LEARN FRENCH - I want to help
you. Conversation Francaise et grammaire.
After 6 p.m. 738-4639. $7.50/h.
FOUND: Lady's prescription glasses on
Thurs., 7th 2:00 p.m. behind Wesbrook
bldg. Call 738-0858.
85 — Typing
20 — Housing
COMFORTABLE CHINESE home can ac
commodate Taiwan, Hong Kong,
Singapore students. Furnished, convenient. Mandarin/Cantonese only. Please
phone 324-1477 evenings or 255-6001 mornings.
25 — Instruction
CAN.  INSTITUTE OF Tai Chi Chuan class
is starting this fall.  Call Steve, 731-3021
731 8036.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,, theses.
IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates. Rose,
731 9857.
"WORD PROCESSING specialists for
theses, term papers, resumes, reports, correspondence, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
FRANCINE'S TYPING SERVICES, papers,
thesis, etc. W/electronic typewriter. Rate:
$1.25/dble-spaced page. 732-3647.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST: IBM Selectric my
home. Phone: Janett 327-4853 or 325-1805.
NEED A TYPIST? Look no further. Resumes,
reports, theses, letters. Professional
results. Reas. rates. Audrey 228-0378.    ' Wednesday, October 13,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
(Men's) field hockey also a winner
By ALISON HOENS
They exist. The UBC men's field
hockey team lurks in the shadows
cast by the limelight of their female
counterparts.
UBC tied Vancouver league rivals, the Panthers, 1-1 in a Thanksgiving match Saturday. UBC's
league record now stands at 1-3-1.
One of the four spectators at the
match was Dr. Warren who founded the UBC men's field hockey club
in 1923. "We started the first sea
son with only two players on the
team who had ever seen a stick before," Warren said.
Sixty years later the club continues to survive even though it receives little financial support, players are ineligible for Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union
scholarships, and practice facilities
are limited.
Two weeks ago UBC captured
the first place trophy at the Harvest Classic in Washington. It was
an exciting tournament with the
highlight being a 4-0 decimation of
the University of Washington.
Talent is not a problem. The
team is led by ex-national coach
John McBride, junior national
player Gordie Plottel and junior
and senior national player Fred Mil-
som. Rob Smith, Peter Ward and
Bruce McPherson also compete at
the junior or senior national level.
These players will lead the team
in their annual bid for the Berkeley
Cup in February. This tournament,
which they won in 1980, is the highlight of their season. Competition
includes teams from Stanford,
Yale, Harvard, and the Universities
of California and Washington.
And what does the team think of
the coverage received by their fe
male counterparts?
Co-captain Gordie Plottel sums it
up: "I think women's varsity
hockey is a high profile sport and
they are certainly one of the better
teams on campus, consequently
they deserve good coverage. However, as an equally competent team,
I feel they should receive equal
coverage."
Water polo sinks (sports)
^ i ii i       i ^—~mamm*mmm~mmmmmm*^
Unable to adapt easily to the
NCAA jungleball water polo rules,
the UBC team managed only two
ties and three defeats in the North
West regional qualifying tournament at Eugene, Oregon Friday.
With Washington State and
Simon Fraser University dropping
out, UBC found itself playing a
non-tournament match against the
University of Ontario Friday night.
It was their first serious match of
the season and, unused to playing in
a pool with a shallow end and being
under the far more permissive National Collegiate Athletic Association (U.S.) rules, they lost badly.
On Saturday they played the U of
O Ducks A team in the morning and
narrowly lost 11-8. In the afternoon
they blew a fourth quarter three
goal lead and allowed the Portland
state team to gain a 9-9 tie in the last
15 seconds. And in the evening they
played very tiredly to allow the
Lewis and Clark team their only
win, 11-6.
UBC played another weak team
on Sunday morning but were
unable to turn offensive play into
goals and could only tie 5-5.
UBC's standout players were
John Montgomery in the centre of
the offense who grabbed 10 of the
team's tournament goals, Larry
Ellenwood, the skipper who scored
7 and goalie Chris Kellman who had
a lot to do.
Coach Paul Sullivan said he
thought that his team would have
learnt a lot from this tournament
and said they would surprise a lot of
people when they played the other
four qualifying games in a tournament in Tacoma in two weeks. He
said he was sure they'd make the
finals and that they'd do very well
in the Canada west tournament
played under International Swimming Federation (FINA) rules at UBC
over the weekend of November
19th.
I   "Bird Droppings
RUGBY
UBC men's rugby team surged
from behind Sunday to take a late
win in the final of the Abbotsford
tournament.
Behind 9-8 at half-time and trailing 13-12 with less than 20 minutes
to go, the team ran in three late tries
to beat Langley 30-15. The win
meant UBC carried off the live turkey prize for the fifth year in six.
UBC won two and tied one of
their three group matches to qualify
for the final. They started early Saturday morning thrashing a sleepy
Richmond team 57-0. Coach Donn
Spence said this particularly fine
performance showed how well the
team had prepared themselves.
On Saturday afternoon UBC
could only tie 15-15 with a Burnaby
all-stars team. They went into their
last group match on Sunday morning needing to defeat unbeaten Pocomo from New Westminster and
did so, 23-12.
Flanker Charlie Foster, who scored two tries in the final, and winger
Pat Palmer, who went over three
times in the win against Richmond,
were the two top try scorers.
Spence said the tournament was
not as strong as it had been in previous years but that it was good to
win it all the same. Several regular
players had been away playing for
B.C. at the weekend and Spence
had a good look at several new
players.
Next week UBC plays at home
against an alumni team for the Buzz
Moore mug.
SOCCER
UBC reached the half-way point
of their Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Union season Saturday,
losing to Calgary 2-1 at UBC.
It was another violent game and
the officiating was so liberal that
even athletic department head Rick
Noonan, whose sport is ice hockey,
was moved to tell coach Joe Johnson "I don't know you can possibly
play with goons like that playing."
UBC went a goal behind after 30
minutes when a Calgary forward
was allowed all the space he needed
to direct a soft header into the UBC
goal.
UBC carried the game to their
opponents in the second half but
they were frustrated by the violent
play of their opponents. Johnson
said that they had two outstanding
examples of penalty kicks turned
down. Johnson also said that his
team had failed to capitalize on the
plentiful set-piece corner and free-
kick opportunities they had had.
With just five minutes to go Calgary broke away to make the score
2-0. UBC replied at once with a tap-
in goal by Al Ladah and finished
the game desperately pressing for a
tie.
UBC now have just three points
in four games. The group is led by
the University of Victoria who beat
Calgary 4-2 on Friday for their
fourth straight win and a maximum
eight points.
UBC plays in Saskatchewan next
week and then have two games
against University of Victoria.
Johnson  remembers  that   at   this
—alison hoens photo
MEN'S FIELD HOCKEY team also exists at UBC. Usually overshadowed by their female counterpart, men's team
has equally outstanding record. Ubyssey photographer, forming 25 per cent of game's audience, showed once
again how athletic department gives inadequate publicity to minor sports.
stage last year UBC had won all
four games and still failed to make
the playoffs, so maybe things will
be reversed this year.
SAILING
UBC's sailing team started its
season Saturday with a third place
in the northwest kickoff regatta at
the University of Washington.
A close second in the A division
and a fourth in the B division gave
the UBC dinghy racers a solid third
place against seven teams from Oregon, Washington and B.C.
The team, which practises at the
Jericho sailing centre, is preparing
for a long season of weekend regattas throughout the Pacific northwest, hope to improve on last year's
second place (i.e. come first).
FIELD HOCKEY
The UBC women's field hockey
team won all its games last weekend
in Victoria. This victory gave UBC
their second Canada West Tournament win. UBC hosts the next
Canada West tournament on the
weekend of October 23.
ICE HOCKEY
The UBC ice hockey team had a
successful weekend in Grand Forks.
They beat U.S. National Collegiate
champions, the North Dakota
Fighting Sioux, four goals to three
on Friday night and then beat them
again 2-1 on Saturday.
On Friday night they fought back
from a 3-0 deficit by scoring three
times in the last seven minutes to
take the game into overtime. Dave
Brownlie then scored the tie-
breaking goal.
UBC won Saturday's game on
goals by Darryl Coldwell and Grant
Harris.
The Thunderbirds have their
season face-off at the Thunderbird
arena against the alumni on Friday,
October 15th at 8 p.m.
Ken Hippert Hair
We Offer Student Discount
15%
OFF
ANY
SERVICE
Expires November 1, 1982
With presentation of ad
by Terry, Karin, Debbie
For appointment 5736 University Blvd.
228-1471 (Next to LuckyDollar Store)
I ran
hair studio inc.
Make an appointment today
and give your head a rest.
5784 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
In UBC Village next to Bank of Commerce
224-9116 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Wednesday, October 13, 1982
I
"——-1
INTRAMURAL OFFICE
ROOM 203
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
IYTKM RAL STAR
^^^ _^v**^
Arts '20-How Do You Rate?
At last, the second annual Arts '20 Prediction Board. Not concerned? Well, listen to
this! Last year our bookies were good on 71% of their choices. Aha! So now you're
listening. Next Thursday there will be over 150 teams (not my prediction) in the Arts '20
Relay Road Race, and this is how they are picked to place.
TOP FACULTY (MEN)
Last year saw two of the top three teams disqualified for use of ineligible runners.
Naughty boys! This year the two culprits (Engineers and Medicine) have assured us they
will compete fairly. The result should be a most exciting race, but don't count out
Forestry and Commerce.
1. Engineers (7:4)      2. Medicine (7:3)      Darkhorse: Forestry (7:1)
TOP FACULTY (WOMEN)
As in the past years, the ladies from Forestry are sure to dominate this division. Last
year's winning performance by this team was just 15 seconds shy of a record pace. The
Commerce and Phys Ed teams will be relegated to battling it out for second place.
1. Forestry (8:5)      2. Phys Ed (3:1)      Darkhorse: Commerce (3:1)
TOP FRATERNITY
Last year the frats lived up to their competitive reputation by capturing three of the
four top overall placements. This year, there are four contenders for the winners circle.
The Phi Delts and Betas will be vying for top spot, with Fijis and Dekes'hot on their
tails.
1. Phi Delts (4:1)      2. Betas (5:1)     Darkhorse: Dekes (6:1)
TOP SORORITY
The top sorority position will be a repeat performance by Kappa Kappa Gamma. The
girls from KKG were over 3 minutes ahead of their nearest rival last year. The competition will come from Delta Gamma with Alpha Delta Pi and Gamma Phi fighting for
third spot.
1. KKG (7:4)       2. DG's (7:1)       Darkhorse: ADPi (8:1)
TOP VARSITY (MEN)
One look at the aging Arts '20 trophy and there is no doubt who will dominate this
division. The Rower's team will be tough to beat! The Swimming and Field Hockey
teams will be battling it out for second place. Should be no contest.
1. Rowers (8:7)      2. Swimming (10:1)      Darkhorse: Field Hockey (13:1)
TOP VARSITY (WOMEN)
As with the men's teams, the Rowing and Swimming teams are sure to be in the top
three finishers. However, they will have to compete for second spot. The Volleyball
team, which dominated last year's race, is chosen to win again.
1. Volleyball (7:4)      2. Swimming (5:2)      Darkhorse: Rowing (5:1)
Other divisions will see the Firefighters breeze through the faculty/staff division while
Medicine wins the Co-Rec category. Final Note: It's called the Arts '20 Relay Race but
where are all the Arts teams?
SPORTS TIDBITS
COHOE SWIM MEET (M)
Team Champion —
TIE Geers/Koyotes
50 M Free —
Paul Hasegawa (Arts)
50 M Back —
Mark Feeney (Koyotes)
50 M Fly —
Byron Green (Education)
50 M Breast —
Glen McEachran (Eng.)
100 M Free —
Ken Reesor (Grad St.)
200 M Medley Relay —
Education
200 M Freestyle Relay —
Arts
NOVELTY SWIM MEET (W)
Team Champion — Gage
Medley — Gage
Dog Paddle — Forestry
Snake — Phrateres
Flutterboard — Gage
UBC OPEN GOLF TOURNEY (M)
Team Champion — Phi Delts
Overall Champion —
Keenan Charles (Arts)
Flight 1 — Keenan Charles (Arts)
Flight 2 — Greg Kerfoot (Phi Delts)
Flight 3 — Duffy Cutler (Geers)
Flight 4 — Geoff Orr (Geers)
Flight 5 — Mike Serink (Phi Delts)
Flight 6 — Gerry Parsons (Phi Delts)
The
Intramural
Star
is written and conceived by Intramural Council, Linda King
— Editor. This publication is
made possible through the
generosity of the Old Fort
Brewing Company.
Run The Trek
In the spring of 1920, the Arts Grad class challenged all other classes to a relay road race. A
course was mapped out from the undeveloped site of the present university, the "point",
to the temporary shacks in Fairview, beside Vancouver General Hospital. The race was
founded to reinforce the campaign to permanently establish the university at the Point
Grey site. As a result of the Great Trek of 1922 and other mass student efforts, the dream
came true in 1925.
The first "Arts '20 Relay Road Race" had seven eight-man teams: four from Arts two
from Sciences, and one from Agriculture. The Arts '23 team won the first race in 37
minutes, 30 seconds. The challengers, Arts '20, ran a close second. In 1926, a new route
was designed that ran from Fairview out to UBC and Arts '27 made the record book with a
pace of 34 minutes, 48 seconds.
The "Arts '20 Relay Road Race" rapidly gained popularity through the '30s. However, on
March 1, 1940 the last relay road race was run. The war had taken many athletes away
from the UBC campus. There was very little athletic competition at this time because
everyone was concerned with the war effort. Thus, the annual race was dropped from the
athletic program. It wasn't until 1969 that the event was revived. The Phys Ed team beat six
other teams, completing the 7-mile course in just over 36 minutes.
Since the first "Arts '20 Relay Road Race, Arts teams have claimed 12 victories,
Science/Engineers have 5, Aggies and Rowers 4 apiece, and Forestry snatched 3 successive
titles during the early '70s. The Dekes were the first and only fraternity to win the "Arts
'20" . . . until last year. The 1981 edition of the Betas relay team won the 62nd Annual
Arts '20 Relay Road Race with a time of 34 minutes, 4'/2 seconds after the Engineering and
Medicine teams were disqualified.
Last year's race was recorded as one of the largest Intramural events in Canada. In 1920,
there were 56 runners. In 1981 there were over 1000 participants. And in 1982, the 60th Anniversary of the Great Trek, more than 1300 runners are expected to complete the historic
route.
1st Leg — 2.0 km VtiH lo Pine and 16th
2nd Leg — 1.5 km Pine lo Trafalgar
3rd Leg — 1.2 km Trafalgar lo t ollingwood
4lh Leg — 1.2 km Collingwood to ( amosun
5lh Leg — 1.3 km Camosun to Blanca
bth Leg — 0.6 km along Blanca to I ni.. Bhd.
7lh Leg — 1.6 km to Lni.. Hill L niled Church
8lh Leg — 1.6 km lo Cairn on Main Mall
Register your 8-person team by Friday, October 15 - AT THE LATEST. If you can't
run, come support your favorite tern along the route. ARTS '20 RELAY ROAD RACE —
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 12:30! And, don't forget to get in on some of the other exciting events planned to commemorate the Great Trek of 1922. All Arts '20 participants are
invited to the social in SUB immediately following THE BIG EVENT. See you there!
'
TOP 10
MEN
WOMEN
1. Engineers (1)
768
l.Forestry(l)
513
2. Betas (2)
410
2. Phrateres (8)
244
3. Phi Delts (6)
339
3. Gage
200
4. Koyotes (9)
253
4. KKG (17)
141
5. Dekes (8)
238
5. Rehab Med
132
6. Arts
212
6. Nursing (6)
118
7. Fijis (3)
165
7. Phys Ed (2)
69
8. Medicine (4)
165
8.  Rowing (3)
63
9. Forestry (5)
159
9. Arts (4)
47
10. Commerce (10)
138
10. Science (7)
42
Numbers in brackets reflect previous
rank held in points standings.
Totals are
as of October 4, excl
jding Touch Football and Cypress Bowl Cycle.
B.C.'s OWN
INDEPENDENT BREWERY
IS PLEASED TO SUPPORT THE
UBC INTRAMURAL PROGRAM
PRODUCERS OF:
IRONHORSE MALT LIQUOR
PREMIUM OLD FORT BEER
YUKON GOLD LAGER
.*■»<.

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