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The Ubyssey Jan 30, 1987

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STUDENTS STAGE PROTEST at Board of Governors meeting Thursday afternoon.
-dan and rows photo
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 33
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 30,1987
228-2301
Strai^way calls for student outcry
By JENNIFER EYALL
UBC president David Strangway
says he is fighting hard to increase
government funding for universities
but students must cry out too if
changes are to be made.
"If there were 5,000 students
here today it would have helped,"
Strangway told 50 students who
came to hear him speak at SUB
auditorium about UBC's four per
cent tuition hike.
Later he said he was disappointed
by the turnout.
"One of the reasons I was willing
to come today was because I wanted
a real outcry on these (funding)
issues," said Strangway. "This is
the time to make sure the people
out there fully understand the issues
we face."
When asked after the forum if he
wanted to spur students on to pro
test, Strangway said, "that's why I
came here."
Strangway said the university ad-,
ministration has been extra active
this year in fighting against cutbacks and doubted the possibility of
getting any more funds from the
government.
He said the administration is
under intense pressure to keep
faculty at UBC and maintain
facilities.   A   tuition   increase   is
Students protest fee hike
By ALLISON FELKER
A small but vocal group of
students worried about UBC's tuition fee hike staged a protest inside
the board of governors meeting
Thursday.
About 25 students, angry about
the board's decision to impose a
four per cent increase to tuition
fees, which are now among the
highest in Canada, voiced their concerns to board members about the
increasing financial burdens placed
upon students.
Robbie Fleming, a member of
UBC's New Democratic club, said
it is impossible to run a first class
university on a "third class
budget." He compared the board's
relations with the provincial
government to Neville
Chamberlain's appeasement policy
in World War Two.
"I'd like to see the (BOG) refuse
to raise fees," he said.
Alicia Barsallo, a member of
Students for a Democratic University,   said   "the   board   moves   the
Pell thews race en
It will be a fight to the finish as Rebecca Nevraumont and Blair
Longley race neek-and-neck in the third annual Alma Mater
presidential burger poll in the Pit Pub.
Longley is quickly catching up with Nevraumont who held the lead
Tuesday with 44 votes.
As of 5:00 p.m. Thursday, out of a total 308 burgers sold to date,
157 were Nevraumont burgers while 151 were purchased in the name
of Longley.
But Pit kitchen supervisor Bruce Michael, formally in charge of
tallying daily sales, said apathy is still the dominant factor.
"We're only selling 90 presidential burgers a day compared with
300 regular burgers?' he said.
Last year, apathy burgers took 60 per cent of total burgers sold.
Michael Said the burgers were not included in this year's poll to force
students to take a stand on the issue one way or the other.
"The numbers indicate that students couldn't care less about this
election?'he said.
When contacted Thursday, Nevramont said: "Many people view
the AMS with humor and Blair provides them with that outlet." She
did not comment farther on the poll, whieh Michael claims has accurately reflected the previous years' winners.
university but it doesn't show any
concern for the students of the
university."
Board chair Bill Sauder assured
the group that the board has worked hard with the government to obtain additional funding. "I can't
emphasize that enough," he said.
Alma Mater Society president
Simon Seshadri, said he was unhappy with the way students staged the
protest, saying they created a poor
image with the board.
"Do students honestly think that
by coming in and hurling
obscenities at the board that they
will listen? He added the board
doesn't have a choice in raising tuition fees because it must balance the
university's budget. "The students
should petition Victoria, not the
board," said Seshadri.
AMS presidential candidate Blair
Longley, assuming the role of what
he called a Socred, told students to
"piss off and die."
"All we care about is out big corporations," said Longley.
After the meeting, the protestors
formed a group called The Student
Coalition for an Accessible Education. A speaker for" the group,
Michael Moeti, said the groups' objective is to actively obtain universally accessible education for
students by raising money to assist
with tuition fees, housing, transportation and food.
necessary to preserve the quality of
the university, he said.
"One ought to realize that as
costs increase then so must the
source of revenue (government funding and tuition) increase. The simple fact is that costs continue to
rise."
A few hours after Strangway's
address, the board of governors approved the four per cent hike in a
closed meeting, which was preceded
by a student protest.
With the newly-imposed increase,
tuition fees will account for about
15.2 per cent of the university's
operating budget.
Strangway said the percentage is
reasonable.
"It's almost exactly the same as
the rest of Canada with the exception of Quebec."
Alma Mater Society president
Simon Seshadri also expressed
disappointment that so few students
came to hear Strangway speak.
"Tuition fees are an issue on
campus and more (students) should
have come out to voice their
displeasure if that's what they're
feeling," he said.
Seshadri said taken by itself, four
per cent is not unreasonable. But
taken together with the past increases, it adds up considerably, he
said.
"Council felt that a four per cent
increase was reasonable," said
Seshadri. "It's inflationary and
that's happening everywhere."
Marzari attacks Socreds
By ROSS McLAREN
The New Democratic Party's Advanced Education critic lashed out
at the provincial government
Wednesday for its continuing
failure to meet the needs of post-
secondary students.
Darlene Marzari, speaking in
SUB, attacked the government's
position on tuition fee increases,
student aid and government funding for universities.
Marzari said the latest four per
cent tuition fee increase at UBC is
inevitable but tragic because the
cost of an education will double in
the next six years.
"Four per cent is not a bad increase but the cumulative effect is
indicative of the government's
desire to cut back on enrolment",
she said.
Student aid is another area where
the government has failed to meet
the needs of students, said Marzari.
"Premier Vander Zalm's goal is
for parents and their children to
save together for university. This
attitude won't lead to greater accessibility," she said.
Students are being cut off from
university   because   there   are   no
grants, impossible loan loads and
inaccessibility to humanities
courses, she added.
UBC political science professor
Mike Wallace agreed problems exist
in the Arts.
"Students are being cheated. I
have 150 people in one of my classes
and no T.A.'s," he said.
Between 1979 and 1982, Wallace
said, International Relations enrolment grew from approximately 30
to 180 students with no increase in
staff. "Every course in our department is full," he said.
Marzari said the provincial
government should not interfere
with university autonomy.
"There is a lot of political interference with the courses universities can offer." She said community college courses do not
reflect what the communities want
but provincial policy on job creation.
"I don't know if Stan Hagen (the
minister for Advanced Education)
is going to fight for more funding
or for the down-sizing of universities. We will have to wait for the
throne speech," she said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1987
Province lifts mining ban
(CUP) — B.C environmental
groups are radiating anger over the
provincial government's recent
decision to let a seven year ban on
uranium mining expire Feb. 28.
"The government is using the
argument that there's some money
to be made," said Bev Pinnegar,
media coordinator for Greenpeace
in Vancouver. "But we should consider health effects and the destruction of the environment when dealing with something like uranium
mining," she said.
Environmental groups
throughout the province are planning a huge protest against the decision at the legislature in Victoria
Feb. 27, said Pinnegar.
Premier Bill Vander Zalm announced the cabinet decision Dec.
17, thus ending the moratorium on
Ooooops
In our Friday, January 23 issue,
the name of a very talented Thear-
tresports performer was misspelled.
Her real name is Lori Dungey. The
person responsible has had their
name accidentally changed.
It ws»2:30 h tho morning. A story puN and an
•dwrtitwnent shift had ftrtt < b*«*io whits tpaoe
an page two. With e auddart fluffy ot buttering
typewriter key* I sprang into •utjnance. I arn a
grey box. I tike to eradicate whit* ipacat.
Another thing I enjoy doing it bagging. Yes, you
too can eradicate whitas. Jut* come to SUB
241k, writ* a story or compose a etoure. Then
on Monday and Thursday evenings we rush
down to CoHegs where the dreaded wM white
apace* are known to lurk. Please, i beg you, help
The Ubyaaay. Come to SUB 2*1*.
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Graduate Courses:
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For information write to:
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uranium mining imposed in 1980.
The NDP, however ,is in favor of
continuing the ban.
Government communications officer Jake Banky agrued the
moratorium "serves no useful purpose" as it hinders the growth and
development of more plentiful and
less controversial minerals found in
conjunction with uranium.
And Jack Davis, minister of
energy, mines, and petroleum said
there was little likelihood of mining
actually occurring because of low
prices for uranium on world
markets.
Greenpeace official Pinnegar,
however, said a number of mining
companies, including Noranda and
Cominco, are currently exploring
for uranium and the stakes are big.
In 1979, for example, a Toronto-
based company, Norcen, signed a
$600 million contract with South
Korea   Electric   for   3.2   million
kilograms for the powdered
uranium knows as "yellowcake."
The ore was to be extracted from a
mine near the interior city of
Kelowna.
But on the environmental side,
Pinnegar said tests indicate radioactive waste products would be carried into nearby creeks and rivers.
She also pointed to the long term
health hazards associated with
uranium mining such as radon gas,
which causes lung cancer, and
Radium 226, which causes bone
cancer. With a half life of 1660
years, Pinnegar said it would take
16,600 years before exposed
Radium 226 would be safe to
human life.
While small deposits of uranium
dot the province, Pinnegar said the
major commercial sites were in the
Okanagan, the Omineca-Peace
River country and in the far north
near Atlin.
The University Health and Safety Committee
Task Force on
OCCUPATIONAL STRESS
is soliciting submissions from Faculty and Staff
on situations of stress contributing to
accidents, illness or increased absenteeism
at the University.
Written submissions should be sent to the
Occupational Health and Safety Office
209-A Old Administration Building
Campus Mail
Show your support for UBC's very own
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Man in MotionWorld Tour
Friday February 6th
12:35 pm
S.U.B. Plaza
3.0 km or 6.8 km
All donations collected go to the
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UBC //dhaMiAa&... fan,  aood Sporfs Friday, January 30, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Survey shows need for
!•
Key
(CUP) — More than half or
women students at Simon Fraser
University have experienced sexual
harassment on campus, according
to a recent B.C. Public Interest
Research Group survey.
The major offenders are professors when graduate students are
involved, and other students for
undergrads.
The survey of 444 women found
235 have been subjected to at least
one incident of sexual harassment
or sexual assault, as defined by the
survey's authors. The incidents consisted mainly of sexual harassment
in the form of discriminatory
remarks and inappropriate staring
and leering at their bodies.
Sixteen women reported incidents
of sexual assault, and 49 reported
inappropriate advances suggesting
sexual intimacy.
The survey sample of about 10
per cent of the women students on
campus is considered statistically
accurate and can be extrapolated to
the whole female campus population, according to sociology professor Ellen Gee.
According to B.C. PIRG, the findings indicate need for a campus-
wide policy to address the problem,
and an ongoing campaign to raise
awareness among the university
community. The survey showed
that only 48 women recognized
their experience as sexual harassment.
"Discriminatory remarks aren't
the same as someone sticking his
hand down a woman's shirt," said
research   co-ordinator   Dorrie
Nagler. "But the fact that those
statements can be made in a
classroom setting and nobody says
no, indicates that it's permissible
and okay — and it is definitely not
okay."
"This is the first hard data we've
seen about SFU," said Blakely,
who also chairs an ad hoc committee on sexual harassment. "It proves the anecdotes we've heard are
really true."
Blakely said although she expected the results for undergrads,
she was quite shocked at the
statistics for graduate students.
The survey also found that 98
students, approximately one in five,
limit their activities for fear of sexual harassment or assault or
because of a previous experience of
either.
New program viewed with caution
By EVELYN JACOB
Premier Bill Vander Zalm's plans
for a new province-wide sex education program in public schools was
welcomed with caution by the director of AIDS Vancouver Thursday.
Bob Tivey said he is hesitant to
give full support to the program
because of Vander Zalm's statement that his own moral views
could influence what is taught. The
premier said previously that teenage
students should avoid sex to prevent
contacting Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome.
"I   want   to   respect   people's
religious beliefs but at the same
time this (AIDS) is a major public
health concern. Students have a
right to information, and it is
criminal not to give it them," said
Tivey.
The program — which will include education on the dangers and
— malcolm pearson photo
THE INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD of Tools, Local rF78, on East Mall during their latest strike action. Said Local president Wally Shovel "It's
about time that we were given our basic rights —we want no more snide remarks from Premiers offering to give us away to welfare collectors." The
tools then broke into the song "Toolidarity Forever," and dispersed quietly.
Concerts banned but banquets allowed
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
An Open House banquet and spring convocation will be allowed to
go ahead on the newly repaired War
Memorial Gym floor, but rock concerts are banned indefinitely.
"Convocation tends to be a
quieter, sedate thing," said Dennis
Haller, assistant director of design
division of physical plant yesterday.
Haller said rock concerts, which
include the overloading of equipment, running of a forklift, and
students rushing the stage, caused
the structural damage discovered
under the floor of the gym in
September.
"Most of the damage has been
repaired. But we don't want it to
happen again. Another rock concert would definitely damage the
floor again," he said.
Robert Morford, head of UBC's
physical education department who
is responsible for the gym floor,
said after a meeting last week with
physical plant, he has decided to
continue the ban on rock concerts.
"The Open House banquet and
rock concerts have very different
set-ups. I think the banquet is mostly a question of putting up tables,"
he said.
But Bruce Paisley, AMS concert
director, said there is no difference
between the events. He concedes
the floor was not built for concerts,
but questioned why it could be used
for convocation.
"We could have had Robin
Williams. They (the physical education department) refused me. It's
just a seating show. How could they
have graduation?"
He denied Haller's assertion that
a fork-lift had been used in concert
set-up, and questioned how
Physical Plant can be certain the
damage was caused by concerts.
"The heaviest part of concert
equipment is the speakers, and they
were nowhere near the centre of the
floor where the damage is," said
Paisley.
Paisley also said the gym floor
was flooded in September and that
the damage might have been caused
by water weight.
Jamie Collins, AMS director of
finance, said concerts may be more
damaging to the floor than other
events, but said the physical education department "has never liked
concerts  and the  damage  to  the
floor gives them a solid rationale to
refuse them."
He said when he heard about the
damage in September, he told both
the department of physical education and Physical Plant that the
AMS would invest in upgrading the
floor to allow "multi-uses for the
facility."
"They never called me," he said.
Haller said he had not heard of
the AMS offer. When asked what
he thought of the idea, he said
"that's not their perogative."
prevention of AIDS — will follow a
month long survey conducted by
the ministries of health and education and is expected to be implemented this fall.
Tivey said he has not received
details of the program, but that it
should be formulated in consultation with health officials, and be
uniform for school districts across
the province. He said he is opposed
to individual districts creating their
own procedures.
"There may be a conservative
group that could pressure a district
not to talk about condoms," said
Tivey. "We don't want watered-
down programs."
Al Sjerdal, a counsellor at Vancouver's Magee High School, said
the school system has a responsibility to inform students about the
dangers of the disease.
"If you're teaching a kid to
drive, then you should warn them
about the danger areas."
Although AIDS education has
not been a priority of the school's
sex education program, Sjerdal said
students discuss the problems
associated with the virus openly and
in a casual atmosphere.
A four-year UBC study on the
transmission of AIDS showed that
B.C. has the highest number of
AIDS cases per capita in the country.
Martin Schechter, assistant professor of epidemeology who headed
the study, said Thursday education is "the only way" for people to
prevent the transmission of the
AIDS virus.
He welcomed the premier's new
sex education program, saying it
should be introduced as quickly as
possible.
"If we act now and decisively in
educating the population, we could
avoid a disaster," said Schechter.
Tivey said AIDS Vancouver is
preparing educational guidelines on
the disease for submission to the
provincial government.
He said he is encouraged that
people are becoming more aware of
the problems associated with AIDS
and that parents are calling for
greater discussion on the issue.
"They're saying I want my kid to
live."
CFS report shows aid program in crisis
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
B.C.'s student aid program is
completely inadequate, according
to a recently released report from
The Canadian Federation of
Students.
The task force report, compiled
with input from college and university administrators, students, and
bankers, said the provincial government is not doing enough to help
B.C. students. The report was
broken down into several major
categories:
• Economic barriers
• Debt loads
• Repayment and default on loans
• Lack of government funding
• Awards reflecting achievement
rather than need
CFS researcher Roseanne Moran
said the main economic barriers to
students are the cost of living, high
tuition fees, low wages and high
unemployment.
"One out of every five B.C.
students did not find work at the
height of Expo last year so we're
quite concerned about the future,"
she said.
Moran said more students attending Douglas College are applying
for student aid than for admission.
She said the elimination of the
bursary program in 1984 has
created skyrocketing debt loads for
students.
The average student debt load for
an eight month term in 1981 was
$1,356, which jumped to $3,102 in
1985, an increase of more than 130
per cent.
James Rae, assistant deputy
minister   to   Stan   Hagen,   the
minister of advanced education and
job training, refused to comment
on the report. Hagen was out of the
province and unavailable for comment.
Darlene Marzari, New
Democratic Party critic for advanced education, said the provincial
government will react eventually.
"We'll be looking for some
modest proposals (from the
Socreds) but nothing comprehensive enough to address the cutbacks
in university funding," she said.
Moran said the provincial
government has been doing a lot of
talking about loan remissions but it
just isn't helping enough.
She said students are being forced
into an untenable situation because
they are not getting enough information about their loans. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1987
Incitement
President Strangway made a good point yesterday when he said that "a real outcry is needed to
deal with the whole set of (university) funding issues." After all, why should the government take
students' concerns seriously when most students don't even express those concerns?
Dr. Strangway was justifiably disappointed when only a handful of students showed up to discuss
the proposed tuition hike in what he had hoped would be an open dialogue between students and the
administration. The message came across loud and clear: students aren't interested in being involved
in the administration of the university, and they don't worry about tuition fees.
Is it really true that students don't care what happens to B.C. universities, or even to their own hard-
earned money? It seems unlikely. More probably our apparent apathy is due to a belief that the government and our administration don't care what we think or say, and that we are powerless to effect
change.
Besides, we might argue, we elected the Alma Mater Society to represent us to the government and
to the university administration; communicating our problems is their responsibility. They know the
problems faced by students — they have the facts, they have the power; why should we have to stage
mass protests to get our message across?
Unfortunately the AMS is not fighting very hard to address current funding issues. It often takes a
mass student protest to convince even them to take a stance on an issue (i.e. the proposed boycott of
South African products).
So it looks like it's up to us to voice our own concerns.
That could be a good thing. If students are unhappy about inadequate funding, meagre student aid
programs, limited accessibility, and rising tuition fees, there is probably no more effective way to express that displeasure than a good old-fashioned unified protest movement. Just like in Beijing.
Hopefully the newly formed Students for Universally Accessible Education are planning to organize
such a campaign, uniting all the different views on campus in a single cause: self-preservation.
Hopefully the students will shed their apathy and rally to the cause.
We use this space often enough to complain about the inadequacies in post-secondary education. .
.you're probably tired of hearing it. This week we want to strike a more positive note and encourage
students to fight against the government policies that threaten to destroy our university.
We endorse Dr. Strangway's call for students to cry out against funding cuts.
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Pro-choicers should get to root of problem
Well, it is no surprise that once
again a number of irresponsible
people have gotten together to say it
is OK to murder and to top it off
they have the audacity to hide
behind such an innocent and
"humane" sounding name as "pro-
choice."
If these people are really so interested and concerned about helping women and men who find
themselves with an unwanted
pregnancy, then they should get to
the root of the problem and form a
club or group called PRE-choice.
Their goal should then switch to
educating the public, starting at the
junior high school level, on how to
prevent pregnancies rather than
how to most conveniently destroy a
human life.
It is very ironic how Freyja
Bergthorson (The Ubyssey, Jan. 23,
1987) says that the aim of their
organization is to "increase
awareness, and make information
more accessible to the people who
need it." From various different
radio talk shows I have listened to
and magazines I have read on this
issue, not once has a member of the
"pro-choice" group or a doctor
properly explained to the woman
what exactly will happen to her and
her baby, nor have they shown her,
through sonography (ultrasound),
the fully formed life that bears
within her, nor have they explained
to her the physical pain she will
have to endure or the psychological
devastation felt after realizing that
her once future child now lies rip
ped and mangled in a common garbage bag.
I challenge the "pro-choice"
people, as well as Dr. Percival
Smith, to truly consider whether the
name "pro-choice" has not been
used as a shield for long enough and
the more appropriate name "pro-
murder" be used instead, since the
baby obviously has no choice in the
matter. Walter Hajen
agriculture 3
Science student questions abortion
THE UBYSSEY
January 30, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
These are a few of our favourite things: Svetozar Kontic: raindrops on roses; Jennifer Lyall: dirty
things; Evelyn Jacob: hot, masculine . . .; Allison Felker: anything with peanut butter on it; Michael
Groberman: sin and lust with his mother; James Young: beets, yogurt, carrot bread, peace; Dan Andrews: 'I can't tell you her name'; Malcolm Pearson: Billy Joel's nipples; Scott Beveridge: pining for
sheep; Katherine Monk: Eddie Murphy; Sarah Chesterman: hot, masculine . . .; Cassandra Freeman:
'nice buns'; Chris Fraser: 'the world may never know . . .'; Ron Stewart: Janice Irving tied up in beads;
Peter Burns: hot, masculine . . .; Rick Hiebert: cutlines mentioning Phil Laird, Arts 1, and Ross
McLaren: Rebecca Nevraumont.
Letter specifics clarified
My friend is single, pregnant and
scared and she is going to have an
abortion.
"I can't have a baby now," she
says. "It would ruin my life."
Does she know what it will do to
the baby's life? Does she know the
little child growing inside her womb
is alive, human and that its little
heart started beating weeks ago?
Does she know that a suction
abortion will pull the child apart,
that afterwards its tiny, developing
body will have to be pieced together
so that the doctor can make sure
nothing of it is left in her womb to
cause infection?
Maybe, but I don't think it makes
much difference to her. It all comes
down to whose life is more important and I suppose we decide on the
side of the bearer of the fetus. I cannot call her the mother for a mother
is someone who gives birth, not
death to a child.
I know I will be labelled closed-
minded because of this letter and in
this age that is terrible thing to be.
Indeed it would almost be easier to
go along with the crowd who say a
woman's right to control her own
life regarding whether or not she
has a baby is of ultimate importance, but until I am convinced that
a fetus is not alive and is not a
human being I cannot do this. So go
ahead and call me closed-minded;
that is far less terrifying to me than
to be an encourager of apathy
towards human murder.
Muriel Hiebert
science 2
Where is my money going now???
Regarding Pinky Manji's letter
on Friday, January 23, yes she has
misunderstood the specifics and objectives of my letter to the editor
published on Tuesday, January 20,
"King's legacy celebrated."
In her letter Ms. Manji suggests
when I use the phrase "for Jewish
students to join hands with all of
God's children," I was excluding
Arabs. This is certainly not the
case, as I presume that Arabs are
among God's children.
So far as the tragic events your
letter identifies, to understand how
Israelis agonize over and debate
these events, and the twentieth cen
tury imponderables that provoke
their occurence, I suggest you
subscribe to products of Israel's
free press such as the Jerusalem
Post.
Sometimes the test of a society's
moral fibre is not limited to its
moral abuses, but how it attempts
to overcome and correct them.
Finally, however, I agree with
you that Dr. King was a proponent
of justice, and (fortunately) not
fanaticism, and embrace your invocation — "Peace be with us all —
Jews, Muslims, and everyone."
Janna Stark,
Network, arts 4
Neil Risebrough! Who the hell
are you? And what are you doing
with my money?!
From what I've gleaned from the
Ubyssey, you are Chair of the
University Athletic Council. UAC
was formed in March, 1985 to
monitor university athletic expenses
after the Board of Governors increased our athletics fees to $32.
The idea was to make the Athletic
Dept. accountable to the fee-paying
students.
Why are you now approaching
the Board of Governors asking for
another $5.50 athletic fee increase?
Who do you represent? It can't be
the UAC; a committee to monitor
expenses i.e. to make sure students
aren't ripped-off, doesn't ask for
fee increases without some sort of
budget outlining where those extra
dollars are going. Yer this is exactly
what is happening, if The Ubyssey
can be believed.
Your petition for the fee increase
was supported only by an Athletic
dept. claim of "increased costs"
(The Ubyssey, Fri. Jan. 23). Well
what are those costs? We have a
right to know, and you have a
responsibility to inform us.
(Perhaps you're a personal envoy of
Bob   Hindmarch,   Director   of
Athletics and Sports Services. If
this is so, how do you have the gall
to chair the UAC?)
Maybe the UAC really is a
"farce", as suggested by AMS
Director of Administration, Martin
Cocking? At any rate, this proposed   fee   increase   isn't   being   ac
counted for and as a paying
member of the AMS, I'm feeling
burned.
Simon Seshadri! What's going on
here?
Jeff Christian
applied science 3
Apartheid not comedy
It is very sad, indeed, to see Doug
Collins and Harry Rankin turn a
debate on the imposition of
economic sanctions against South
Africa into an exercise in ego-
bashing. Furthermore, it is sad and
demoralizing to see some students
viewing the debate as a form of
cheap entertainment.
What if the B.C. government
were to legislate a policy of apartheid against UBC students in some
way? Clearly, we would be outraged and would employ every means
possible to regain our rights and
freedoms. In our struggle, we
would accept support from across
the nation and around the world to
further our cause. UBC students
would want political action NOW.
Surely, if we attempt for a moment to imagine life under apar
theid, we will understand the demand for immediate political
change in South Africa.
As citizens of the global village, it
behooves us to take responsible and
quick action. I believe that
economic sanctions are a painful
but necessary part of this action.
Duane Lawrence
arts 4
All letters must be brief and
typed on a triple-spaced,
70-character line. They must be
delivered in person with identification shown by 4:30 p.m.
the Friday before publication
to the Ubyssey office, SUB
241k. Friday, January 30, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Tide dances in and is full of teeming life
By CASSANDRA FREEMAN
TIDE'S (Toronto Independent
Dance Enterprise's) performance
Thursday night began gently and
playfully but soon plunged into a
whirlpool of diverse emotions and
thought provoking scenarios.
In The Egg and Creature, Denise
Fujiwara appears in a spandex body
suit that covers everything except
her hands, feet and eyes. She convincingly portrays a newborn
creature whose curiosity leads it to
explore the many different ways its
new body can move.
The most inventive part of the
choreography is at the very beginning when this half human-half insect is bent in half with both hands
and feet on the ground looking at
the audience between its legs. As the
electronic music gains control of the
creature, its backside bounces up
and down as its knees bend and
stretch to the quick pulsating
rhythms.
In One House explores the emotions of big sister-little sister relationships. TIDE'S technique of con
tact improvisation - lots of pushing,
pulling, carrying and falling on top
of each other - works well in this
donee
TIDE
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
January 22-24
piece to bring out the trust and affection that both sisters have for
each other, together with a lot of
Daring play not coy
By SARAH CHESTERMAN
Over a year ago, UBC's Dorothy
Somerset Studio presented Caryl
Churchill's Top Girls, about a
woman who sells out her working
class roots for corporate success in
London.
This week Dorothy Somerset
presents another Churchill play,
Fen, which examines the less
privileged sisters those "top girls"
left behind.
The action of this class-
conscious, impressionistic portrait
of an agrarian community — "one
of the richest farming areas in
England" — opens with the
foreboding wailing of a crowscarer
on a bare-bones, dour set.
stage
Fen
By Caryl Churchill
Directed by Roderick Menzies
Dorothy Somerset Studio
UBC campus
Until tomorrow night
The empty, brown stage floor is
bordered by boxes of dirt and
withered-looking potato plants,
with a startling, white sheet as
backdrop; no promise of the
laughter of Top Girls here.
Yet the gloom that pours off the
stage befits the change of focus.
The audience is transported
through fragmented, nighmarish
scenes.
One minute the women are picking potatoes under the eye of a
bullying master; then, through
sharp transitions that occur
throughout the play, this image
gives way to illicit lovers dancing in
moonlight, or a forelorn but comical Baptist revival meeting.
"We're all rubbish," says one of
the suffering Baptists, "but Jesus
still loves us, so it's all right." Most
of these women are laborers, bound
to the land by oppressive tradition.
Their private miseries hinge on
social injustice. The play is certainly
not coy about its politics — which
adds to its bite. So the axe-blows hit
the audience, in between
Churchill's comforting wit and
cleverness.
It's a difficult play, however, and
this production has its problems.
These lie mainly in the pacing, in
moments where a slight falling-off
of energy, a monotony of gesture,
slow it down.
The 22 characters — preventing
the audience from getting involved
with any, which could be intentional in a Brechtian kind of way —
are played by six actors: not easy.
Surprisingly, though, it works, a
success that comes from casting
strong actors.
The character transitions of Sue
Elworthy and Dennis Kuss are
undertaken with subtlety and concentration — both are riveting, and
very real; Laura Di Cicco's sadistic
stepmother packs a disturbing impact; Janine Payne is a delight to
watch (in fact, they all are, off and
on) and Cara Tekatch's
characterization of Val's six-year-
old daughter is perfect.
Director Roderick Menzies, with
his interesting and imaginative
blocking, manages to capture the
surrealistic aspect of the play and
gives it a kind of poetry.
The play is provocative and wat-
chable. "The earth's awake!" says
one of the characters — and the
UBC Theatre Department is obviously awake, too, if they are daring enough to put on new plays that
have a bit of jab — and modern
social comment — to them.
Fittingly tucked behind
"mainstage" Freddy Wood,
Dorothy Somerset Theatre is unearthing not potatoes but some interesting new material. Worth the
free admission.
JERRY'S COVE
NKKJHBOKHOOU PI B
Minutes away from UBC Campus 'a-*--^—
Remember "DAILY SPECIALS"
Hot & Cold Food from 11:30 a.m. until Midnight
3681 West 4th (4t„ & Aima)     734-1205
MUSSOC
rjfrsstni},
J&* MUSICALC/?-S>?
i   •<    x
CAROUSEL
Direction & Choreography     Musical Direction by
NORMAN LEGGATT DAVID SMITH
JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 7
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM 8 P.M.
TICKETS: $6.00 Students/Seniors      AMS Box Office
$8.00 Adults 228-5656/228-6902
TRUE CHROME AT THIS PRICE!
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playfulness, anger and gentleness
along the way.
This work also has just the right
amount of humour as the
mischievous child struggles from
the beginning and finally succeeds
in getting into her sister's lipstick.
The TIDE dancers dive into pure
drama with Casting The First Stone
which presents a long drawn out
buy potent insight into sex and
religion. Amidst the sounds of
church bells and gregorian chants
the two men and three women
bounce between their strong
religious alliances and sexual needs.
The ingenuity of this work is the
lack of overt sexual feeling behind
each movement. Every step is
solemn and pious; even when the
dancers kiss each others' necks, it is
a gentle sacred act.
But while the choreography
shows inherent harmony between
the sacred and the sensual, it also
shows the fear and suspicion between the characters revealing the
hypocrisy of those who preach but
don't follow the Catholic Church's
rulings on sex.
Life Lines has some great
moments but strains its point by going on for too long. It presents the
complex history of two couples who
are constantly fighting because of
their own jealousy, infidelity, indecision and faltering friendships.
One of the most creative pieces of
choreography begins when one man
struggles to convince the other to sit
down in a chair. As both men test
each other's determination and patience they end up in some
hysterical positions and
predicaments around, about, and
finally on top of the chair.
There are also moments of
superb acting, as when two very shy
adolescents slowly and painfully
work their way into each other's
arms and then dance off into their
uncertain future together.
AUDITION FOR BANFF
Vancouver
February 18
Dance
Opera/Music Theatre
Academy of Singing
Drama
February 20 & 21
Music
For appointments call
(403) 762-6180
For more information on
Summer & Winter Programs
please write:
^
The Banff Centre
School of
Fine Arts
Office of The Registrar
Box 1020, Station 15
Banff, Alberta T0L ()C()
M-\
QffiZ^POULET
^
LICENSED
PREMISES
EXPERIENCE LA DIFFERENCE
Highest   Quality,   "Grain-Fed"
Chicken With the French Touch!
Finally, For You!
Exquisite cuisine at affordable
prices. Our menu includes
"Montreal styled BBQ Chicken"
10% STUDENT DISCOUNT
with AMS Card
Delivery for $8.00 order minimum in a 3 mile radius
1909 W. 4th Ave. r^u™,731-0042
(La Collage) Take-out731-0111
Open Everyday, Fri. & Sat. 'til 2:30 a.m. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Victory party — come celebrate, 8:00 p.m., Grad
Centre.
THE UBYSSEY
Campus plus meeting, and vote, 3:30 p.m., SUB
241k.
THUNDERBIRD GYMNASTICS
UBC women play host to CIAU rivals, York
University and University of Calgary, 6:00 p.m.,
Osborne Centre, spectators welcome, no
charge.
LAW STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Law dance week featuring "Barney Bentall,"
8:00-2:00 a.m., SUB ballroom.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Tahitian, Maori and Hawaiian dancers, tropical
punch and friendly people are only a few of the
attractions of IH's South Pacific Night. A
demonstration of various island dances and instruction will be provided. Audience participation strongly encouraged. Come dressed in
tropical attire, 8:00 p.m., dance demonstration
8:30 p.m., Upper Lounge, admission $1 non-I.H.
members, 50c members. All UBC students,
faculty and community members welcome.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Badminton tournament, 7:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m.,
Osborne.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
"East-West Relations: Will Gorbachev Make A
Difference?", Dr. Paul Marantz of the political
science department, noon, SUB 205.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet ll/IH, 8:30 a.m.-10 a.m., SUB partyroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
GAYS Cr LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden, 3:30 p.m.-7 p.m., SUB 212.
SATURDAY
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Motown Madness, 8:30 p.m., Montgomery Cafe
- 433 West Pender.
THE TENNIS NETWORK
Drop-in tennis, 7 p.m.-11 p.m.. Armoury.
AYN RAND CLUB
Intellectual  wrap  session,   2   p.m.,   SUB  film
society office.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie cup game, 2:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Stadium.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
The big game of the season. The Victoria Vikings
are in Vancouver for their only appearance of the
year, women at 6 p.m., men at 8 p.m., UBC
students free with AMS card,  War Memorial
Gym.
UBC SQUASH CLUB
Squash clinic, 10:15-11:45 a.m., Winter Sports
Centre.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion Service, 10 a.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 12 p.m., basement auditorium
of Kits United Church, 2490 West 2nd Ave.
MONDAY
SUBFILMS
Film: "Help", starring The Beatles, 7 & 9:30 p.m.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Lunch time drop-in, all welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet ll/IH, 8:30-10 a.m.; Beg. Jazz, noon; Jazz
I, 3:30-5 p.m.; Jazz I, 5:30-7 p.m.; Ballet ll/lll
and Jazz I, 3:30, SUB Partyroom; Beg. Jazz and
Jazz I, 5:30, Plaza South.
TUESDAY
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
A talk with medical students, noon-1:20 p.m.,
Woodward 1.
SUBFILMS
Film: "Last Tango in Paris," starring Marlon
Brando, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Anson's Amiga Activists unite for a strategic
meeting concerning upcoming election campaign, 12:30 p.m., SUB 111.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Warren Fong's IBM followers re-union. Topic of
discussion is how to clone a PC through mitosis,
12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Attuigr&pif
fchi&taa Vtii.
Phone now for your
COMPLIMENTARY SITTING
Choose from 18 previews (proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWAY
Resume photos as low as
75c in colour.
n--*ai£^*S**i-
PRIV A TE FUNCTIONS: FOR MORE INFORM A TION . .
5 - COMING EVENTS
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial -
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van,, B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
30 - JOBS
85 - TYPING
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
SATURDAY, JAN. 31
BYZANTINE
ARCHEOLOGY:
A CITY REVEALED:
Prof. James Russell
Classics, UBC
Lecture Hall 2, UBC Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
SOUNDS FISHY? BUT IT'S NOT. I need
promotion-oriented people for my entertainment company. You can work in your
spare time & make extra income the funest
way possible. If you are a social organizer,
have lots of energy, and enjoy people, give
me a call. Eran 261-FISH.	
65 - SCANDALS
GRAND OPENING
Saturday, January 31st
LADIES SHOES
Canadian Crafted
Quality Leather
Fashionable Colours
Wide Range of Sizes
Three Unbelievable Prices!
$21.99 $24.99 $27.99
Opening Soon in Richmond
S&cuteMe
FOOTWEAR LTD.
-L
2680 West Broadway, Vancouver
=^=^= 731-6774 =-•■■■■■=-•■•=--
11 - FOR SALE - Private
3 ONE WAY SEATS to Frankfurt. Male &
female, $300. each. Depa. Feb. 1-12,
738-4794 evenings.
20 - HOUSING	
41st Er SELKIRK. Female share 3 bedroom,
2 bathroom house. 5 appl. & furnished. On
41st bus route to UBC. $185. 266-2636
(Tom).
L6E. 1 BR. & extra study rm. Gd. floor &
own entrance. Bright. Close to UBC. Feb.
1st, $460. 669-7788.
1 BR. SUITE S. Granv. in new house. Cable
& util. incl. N/S, no pets, female or couple
preferred. $450. 266-8423 aft. 4 p.m.
BEDROOM. KITCHEN, LIVING-DINING
bath, free utilities, $210. 228-1839, Mark. 5708
University Blvd. on campus.
4TH Er DUNBAR. 1 BR. apt. Close to UBC,
very spacious and clean. $480 incl. heat and
hot water. 222-0801.
ROOM ONLY AND ROOM/BOARD available for immediate occupation in the Single
Student Residences: Fairview Crescent,
Walter Gage, Place Vanier & Totem Park.
Contact Student Housing Office at 2071
West Mall, 228-2811, 8:30-4:00 p.m.
weekdays.
25 - INSTRUCTION
INTENSIVE HANDS-ON instruction in word
processing (WordPerfect, WordStar,
Word). 2 per class. Wordpower 222-2661.
30 - JOBS	
THE   PEAK   PUBLICATION   SOCIETY   is
seeking a business manager. Applicant
should be experienced in financial statement preparation, all aspects of financial
record keeping including BC computerized
(Bedford) system, budget preparation &
general office procedures. Experience in a
co-op environment and/or background in
campus papers is desireable. Resumes Er a
handwritten covering letter should be sent
to: Business Mgr., The Peak, SFU, Burnaby, B.C. V5A 1S6, no later than 12 noon,
Wed., Feb. 4, 1987.
HUNTING CAMP COOK, northern B.C.,
Aug. 15-Oct. 15/87. Must be fluent in German & English. Capable of meal prep, for
15 hunters. Prefer outdoor exp. Send
resume by May 1, 1987: Grizzly Outfitters,
Box 1684, Fort Nelson, B.C. VOC 1R0.
VALENTINE
Dearest Heartthrob:
You stick in my mind
like peanut butter &
cornflakes!
Send you message in The
Ubyssey's special Valentine
Issue, Feb. 13th. $2.75 for 3
lines. Forms available in SUB
Rm. 266. Deadline Feb. 11th.
70 - SERVICES
EXPER. SECRETARY with home typewriter,
will do research, in library or archives, of
any facts, historical or otherwise, required
by writer of university books or theses.
732-0701.	
CRISIS PREGNANCY! Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests).
EXCELLENT EDITING SERVICES. Profes
sional editing for readability, organization.
Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547 or 327-4761.
PENTACARE DAYCARE has limited # of
openings for children 3-5. Behind daycare
gym on Acadia Rd. 228-5420 (days),
224-3078 (eves)
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 D.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1
following the service,
A string recital by
Alice Waterman
&
Lisa Moody
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
RESEARCH PAPERS
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
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75 - WANTED
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732 0529.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
WORDPOWER- editing, proofing & word
processing -— Custom, self-serve in eves.
Stud, rates. 3709 W. 10th at Alma.
222-2661.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a pro
fessional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud ofl 324-9924.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333 M/C & Visa accepted .
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U-
write, we type, theses,  resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING $1.50 per page.
Letter quality. Theses my specialty.
Call Cathalynn 324-5921.
THE ORIGINAL fast accurate typing. $1.25
a page. Dunbar area. Ph. 228-1517.
WORDPROCESSING on Macintosh.
Reasonable Rates — Graphics
Call Jack Eves. 224-0486
RESUMES PROFESSIONALLY prepared-
$5/pg. — student typing $2.25/dble. spaced pg. Westend Office Services, 684-9952.
JUDITH FILTNESS
Quality Typist
263-0351
ARISTOGRAPH WORD PROCESSING,
essays, thesis, letters, resumes,
med./legal terminology. Ph. 224-7690.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227 24
hours.
TYPING? YOU BETI Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Professional elec. typing, fast, accurate,
reas. call Jan 271-6755 R.mond.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
tech. equations, letters, resumes, bilingual.
Clemy. 266-6641.
3 ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS want to
contact physically challenged people for
design advice. 273-4501 or 228-1675.
USE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
FOR FAST RESULTS Friday, January 30, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
By SCOTT BEVERIDGE
ANERCA is Inuit for poetry, and
breath.
ANERCA is also poetry rebels
and UBC students Adeena
Karasick, Kedrick James, and
Wreford Miller. Together they are
out to break traditional forms of
expression in poetry and extend the
realm of that poetry and its influences into the community at
large.
interview
With   Adeena   Karasick,   Kedrick
James, and Wreford Miller,
Three poets who perform as, and
edit a periodical called,
ANERCA
The three formed ANERCA last
February in response to what they
saw as a narrow-minded view of the
physical qualities of words and
sounds in contemporary poetry.
They began a small press company
in James' basement, to publish people who, because of their alternative
ideas, had difficulty getting
published in other magazines.
"We became totally disgruntled
because we weren't allowed to explore the meanings of the poems,"
says James, explaining the frustration he, Miller and Karasick experienced in searching for a forum
to express their own approaches to
poetry, "We wanted poetry to take
on the feel of the word through a
collapse of narrative structure."
Miller further explains the
group's approach, "The elements
of logical stories are subverted in
order to point out where other
elements can take the reader. The
problem is it doesn't work for all
people. The images must be thought
MILLER, JAMES, KARASICK . . . challenging poetry in perodical and performance.
Rebel poets on campus
on and interpreted by the individual, so it poses more of a
challenge."
James adds, "It's an obsessive
thing. The whole page is a moving
picture upon which you try to
sculpture words."
In performance, ANERCA takes
a "proprioceptive" approach to
poetry says Karasick, which enables
the audience to take the reception
of the consciousness of words and
their images through the body.
When reading live, as at The
Western Front on January 22, all
three artists like to theatricize their
work, exploring various sounds and
textures to encourage the audience
not only to make pictures by hearing, but by feeling also. What they
lack in technique, stemming from
their inexperience, they more than
make up for in enthusiasm.
Although ANERCA receives support from the Vancouver community at large, and have received submissions from as far away as India,
China, and Hong Kong, they have
received no funding for their project from UBC. The university's
response to their ideas has been
lukewarm at best, they say.
"The academic field tends to
commend us on our energy, but
they are not really condoning what
we are tying to do," says James.
The publications and public performances are entirely the work of
the poets themselves. Determined
and dedicated, they have completely immersed themselves in their
work, as writers, editors, and performers.
The three members of ANERCA
8**.-
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have all used different mediums of
spiritual creativity to arrive at their
particular style.
"We all have different ways of
expressing, but when you pull away
the layers, we have a unifying core?
says Karasick.
That "core" stems from bringing
together concepts from beliefs such
as Judaism, Catholicism, Native
spirituality, and numerology, interpreting the mysticism, not the doctrines, involved in these religious
systems, and creating a re-
enactment of their own connections
to these ideas. They are inspired,
they say, by such artists as bill
bissett, bp Nichol, Louis Zukofsky,
and Charles Olson.
An expansion into other conceptual visual experiments involving
mime and theatre might be a
natural course to follow.  But all
three artists say they'd like to stick
to poetry at least for the moment.
"We'd just like to continue
writing, while exploring the boundaries of what writing can mean.
We don't see an end to it. It's very
important to us to keep reading in
front of an audience though. Poetry
began as an oral tradition, a release
of energy. We want to work back to
that concept," Karasick says.
ANERCA is now only beginning
to see beyond the walls that restrict
contemporary writing. Their innovative style of art appears to be
forging a new road for progressive
poetry in the future.
To receive more information, to
get a hold of an issue, or to submit
your own work, write to ANERCA,
3989 Arbutus St., Vancouver, B.C.
V6J 4T2.
UBC
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LAST DAY TO RETURN
YOUR WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS IS...
JAN. 31st
UBC BOOKSTORE RETURN POLICY
Course Books - Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by original receipt)
for tull refund any time up to JANUARY 31. 1987 for WINTER SESSION TEXTBOOKS. After
this deadline all course books will be NON-RETURNABLE.
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR SALES RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND - NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
228-4741 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 30, 1987
Blues impact
By RONALD STEWART
"Colin James? Yeah, I've heard
of him — hot blues guitarist, right?
But his shows are kinda lightweight
and repetitive, aren't they?"
music
Colin James
The Town Pump
January 27, 28
Not anymore. At the Town
Pump last weekend, Colin James
added some new numbers and
altered some old ones to overcome
the problems his sets used to have.
Don't worry, James still plays
that 50's-style country-blues like
few others can. James and his band
have mastered that music and made
it the foundation of their shows.
However, James has finally
found the courage to take some
risks, to stray outside his established territory. All the numbers in his
set had a bluesy sound, but some
drew their material from other
musical styles.
For instance, Why'd Ya Hurt had
a distinct reggae rhythm — quite a
change from the usual basic blues
the band plays. Other tunes like
Breakin',and Big Chef had a jazzy,
big city sound to them; they contrasted well with the more rural
sound of James' other^numbers.
James also played some slower
blues tunes, like Hard Luck and the
beautiful, poignant Baton Rouge,
with a lot of soul. James has started
to feel his songs as well as play
them.
The variety James added to his
set gave the blues numbers greater
impact; they no longer sound the
same. James and company can fly
through hard, raucous blues like I
Hear You Knock or Ridin' Moon,
or bounce through the light, fun
numbers like Mighty, A Little Bit,
and She's Tough.
With his biggest problems solved,
James is certainly on the verge of a
major breakthrough, especially if
he keeps his talented band together.
The rhythm section (Darrel Mayes
on drums, Mark Weston on bass)
provides the power for this unit,
and demonstrates some unique
talents in their soles. Johnny Ferreira on sax may turn out to be just
as much of a draw as James — not
only is he technically astounding, he
also pours his soul into his instrument.
The whole band gave an infectious mood to the proceedings —
they all looked like they were having the time of their lives. The only
exception was Rick Hopkins on
keyboards. Then again, if you were
so far down in the mix that no one
could hear you, you might not be
the life of the party either.
Colin James could always keep
his audiences in rapture purely on
technique — for about fifteen
minutes. Now, thanks to some
maturity (at the ripe old age of 22)
and a lot of stage experience, James
finally knows how to handle an audience.
JAMES
audiences kept in rapture.
Mozarf s enduring marriage
DENNIS  PETERSON,  SWENSON,
siderable depth and substance.
By CHRIS FRASER
Based on the second play in
Beaumorchais' Figaro triology,
Mozart's opera is often considered
the pinnacle of the "opera buffa"
genre. On the surface this is true:
with many uproarious comic interludes and nonsensical plot convolutions, it chronicles the efforts
of the irrepressible Figaro to marry
his beloved Susanna in the face of
innumerable obstacles.
However, this vision of the opera
reveals only a fragment of its content, because it both ignores the
social and political implications it
had when first performed, and
tends to trivialize Mozart's insight
WILLIAM   SHIMELL.
con-
into the common experiences and
passions which are essential to the
defining of our human identities.
Fortunately, director David
Walsh has avoided the limitations
of a purely "opera buffa" interpretation of Mozart's Figaro. The
result is an excellent production,
with considerable depth and
substance, without sacrificing the
"opera   buffa's"   appealing   light
comedy.
The social and political overtones
of the opera are emphasized well by
the production. The guileful out-
manouevering of Count Almaviva
by his servant Figaro, and his wife,
were unheard of events in the
patriarchal feudalism of eighteenth
century Vienna. Mozart's score
strengthens this rebellious message
of the plot by giving bolder, more
powerful arias to Figaro, and much
more exquisite melodicarias to
Countess Almaviva and Susanna,
leaving the Count arias which are
pleasant enough, but in comparison
to those of the other leads, lack
character and intensity.
Director Walsh cleverly augments
this theme and the fate of the Count
by having him stoop awkwardly
beneath a ladder during his ' 'grand
entrance" on stage in Act I.
Mozart's score bursts with
genius. The themes he develops during the opera intertwine with the
libretto's plot and come to
characterize the vital human
qualities of its main figures.
The music enables the audience
to   experience   Figaro's   assertive,
GRADUATE 10
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MARCH 7-8
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barrel-chested pride; the youthful
playfulness and vivacity of Susanna; and the regrets and sadness of
the aging Countess.
stage
The Marriage of Figaro
By Mozart
Directed by David Walsh
Conducted by Kees Bakels
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Closes tomorrow night
The duets, quartets, and other
ensembles of the lead characters are
also vehicles for Mozart to communicate love, anger, resentment,
envy, greed, dishonesty, guile — all
undeniably human experiences.
And so dynamic is Mozart's score,
that the characters almost become
emotional archetypes, moving from
one state to another in reaction to
their experiences.
Walsh responds to this important
aspect of the opera by placing a
chessboard in the foreground of the
stage during Aa III. This clearly is
intended to suggest the conflicts
and other interactions stemming
from the interplay of these timeless
emotional themes which are as relevant today as they were in Mozart's
time.
To be successful, this demanding
musical communication requires
outstanding musicians. This is exactly what is provided by conductor
Kees Bakels and the orchestra. In
addition, the cast of. singers is
superb, with Ruth Ann Swenson as
Susanna, and Joanne Kolomyjec as
Countess Almaviva the standouts.
The School of
Urban and
Regional
Planning
Queen's University
at Kingston
invites applications from graduates in arts,
social sciences, humanities, engineering,
natural sciences, etc , for its two-year
professional Master's Program.
The curriculum offers students a core of
planning courses and the opportunity to
specialize in: (1) housing; (2) land use
planning and community development; and
(3) program planning and development.
Other fields of specialization can also be
arranged by the student
Please write or telephone
School of Urban and Regional Planning
Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6
(613)545-2188
UNIVERSITY
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• IN THE HEART OF ENGLAND
• 5500 FULL TIME STUDENTS
• STRATFORD   15 MILES,  LONDON  70 MINUTES  BY
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8th July-7th August. 1987
British studies courses for credit or audit taught by resi
dent faculty of an outstanding British university. Mature
students welcome. Courses in
archaeology art history english
political science history theatre studies
business studies
For illustrated brochure by air mail, write or phone
Dr. D. Mervin, University of Warwick, Coventry, England
CV4 7AL. Tel. 011-44-203-523113 (24 hrsl.

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