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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 30, 1984

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Array tjBC Arcttves
S*ri<&
-neil lucente photo
THE
LANGUAGE
OF
GRAFFITI
By CHRIS WONG
Ethnic issue
main    library's majestic and grandiose walls, a wealth of knowledge and wisdom awaits students. Cornerstones of a university such as the works of Aristotle,
Einstein and Shakespeare sit available for  inspection in this  stately
building. But alongside these classics,
some anonymous writers display their
craft. Their work is neither in the bookshelves nor listed in the card catalogue or
microfiche. Instead, these writers choose a
private but much frequented spot to scrawl
their views. Three stalls in the men's washroom near the library's fine arts division serve
as the main medium of communication for these
unknown authors. Their writings in ink, pencil,
felt, and paint, carry disturbing messages that rely
on violence, sexual degradation and stereotypes as
their motive forces. "Kick a Paki in his balls — it's a
great feeling." "Why can't you Chinks admit you are
bad drivers. Good, now that you have settled down a
bit, get the fuck out of our country, " declares another. " Yet another writer counters: "All racists should
be shot, pissed on, and then boiled until there is nothing
left but a gross-looking stew that should be dumped into an
active volcano. " Don Dutton, a UBC social psychology pro
fessor, calls this type of graffiti: "The language of hate,
quick glance at bathroom walls in main library and many other
buildings on campus that are also covered with graffiti reveals
the language of hate is spreading. Dutton says the graffiti writers
are likely to be male, between the ages of 18 and 25, frustrated
about work prospects and feeling inadequate. Choosing a bathroom
stall as a place to express such feelings also show they are frightened,
he says. "People who scrawl graffiti are angry and scared. They're basically gutless. Maybe if they had more courage, they wouldn't have
so much anger," Dutton says. "Graffiti is not indicative of normative       „
.attitudes. It's indicative of a small, bitter group of people." The graffiti .1
artists' target minority groups because they may not fight back, Duttoiip
,says. Chinese and East Indian people are singled out most frequently in thed
See page 2: STUDENTS Page 2
THE    UB/SSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
Students react to graffiti
From page 1
graffiti. These groups comprise the
largest minority populations in
B.C. and as a result they are
perceived as a threat, he says.
"B.C. has an incredible climate
of racism. Part of the problem is
that it is a very provincial place. It
doesn't have a very cosmopolitan
world view so there's no tolerance
for other cultures. There's definitely a kind of 'hie' mentality that runs
through B.C."
International House director
Rori McBlane agrees B.C.'s
redneck attitudes lead to racism.
And as administrator meeting
foreign students on a daily basis, he
has become well aware of the circumstances surrounding racism
directed at UBC students.
McBlane says about five students
a year come to him for advice after
encountering some form of racism,
adding many students fail to report
some incidents. "I'm quite convinced the actual amount of racial tension (encountered by UBC foreign
students) is much larger. No one
hears about it."
Most students are unwilling to
fight racism by seeking the help of
an ombudsperson or a human rights
organization, he says. Foreign
students want to be accepted in
Canada and will avoid trouble at all
costs, McBlane says.
Similarly, Dutton says trends in
the U.S. show an increasing reliance
on assimilation — the blending of
cultural groups — as an answer to
racism. He cites the prime example
of pop star Michael Jackson — "a
black who had surgery on his face
to make it look white."
Some UBC students have a name
for Chinese people who undergo the
assimilation phenomenon: bananas
— "yellow on the outside and white
on the inside."
Sitting in a tiny and cluttered
room in SUB, four Chinese
students talk freely about racism.
Their reactions to racist graffiti
range from mild surprise to shock.
"I wouldn't be surprised if some
of this graffiti came from Canadian
born Chinese," says Nancy, arts 4.
Nancy, and the other students who
requested anonymity, say
"bananas" try to blend in with
white society to lose stigmas attached with being Chinese.
They say some students fear
Chinese are becoming the intellectual elite at UBC. This fear is expressed in graffiti saying UBC
should be renamed the "University
of a Billion Chinks" and pointing
to the alleged presence of "Hong
Kong money."
"When they see all these
(Chinese) people getting extremely
high marks and being in
distinguished faculties, they feel left
out. I think a lot of times they see it
as a clandestine plot — it's so
paranoid," says one of, the
students.
This type of graffiti can be
dismissed he says, adding other
more vicious attacks evokes violent
images disturbing and angering
him.
One of the other Chinese
students  says  he  does  not  react
angrily to racist graffiti. "I don't
even take it personally. I take it as
part of human nature. Racism is a
dark side of every individual.
"There's nothing tasteful about
any of the graffiti. But it does
reflect the attitudes of at least a
minority on campus. All it shows is
just the majority group trying to
hold on as long as they can."
He grew up in Richmond where
racism was a daily problem. While
he remains indifferent to racism on
campus, as a youth he would react
violently to personal attacks. "On a
personal level that was the only
solution."
Nancy says youth must be
educated to understand and appreciate all cultures. Dutton agrees,
saying current education methods
about racism are too intellectual
and conceptual in nature. "We're
not reaching people emotionally in
the education system." High school
workshops showing students the
alienation and hurt resulting from
racism could be one method of
education, adds Dutton.
On the university level, Dutton
says there is some truth to the graffiti that reads: "Ten years ago, this
form of racist bigotry would have
never appeared on any campus
wall."
Dutton says students were more
politically aware ten years ago.
"UBC has always been conservative, but back then, there was
more of a left Liberal stance."
If there is a connection between
racism and political attitudes, then
racist graffiti could be called a
disturbing sign of the times.
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SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
AND RECREATION AND DEPARTMENT
OF ATHLETICS
is pleased to announce the opening of the new
TENNIS BUBBLE
(Beside Osborne Centre)
Booking of court space is available
IN PERSON at
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM, Room 203
WEEKDAYS 9:00-11:30 a.m. and 12:30-3:00 p.m.
Rental for PRIME TIME
Weekends & Holidays
10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. $10 per hour
NON PRIME TIME
a) Students, Faculty and Staff (with UBC cards) —
$6.00 per hour.
b) Non-Rec UBC Card holders, Off Campus —
$8.00 per hour.
Japanese
Student Scholarships
Peat, Marwick (Canada) announces a scholarship program
to enhance opportunities for Japanese students to study
in Canada.
The scholarships are open to any Japanese citizen who
is admitted to a course of full time study in Business
or Economics at a Canadian university, at either the
undergraduate or graduate level.
Scholarship Provisions
Cash amounts may be awarded annually to an individual or
individuals, to an aggregate total of S2,5(X).
The scholarships are tenable for one full academic year.
Individuals may re-apply in subsequent years, whether or
not they have previously been awarded a scholarship.
Selection
A selection committee to be named by Peat, Marwick
I Canada) will review applications and decide the number of
scholarships to be awarded in any year and their amount.
The Consul General of Japan, in Toronto, will act as advisor
to the committee.
Applications
Requests for application forms should be addressed to:
Mr. R. Michael Howard, B.A., C.A., Peat, Marwick,
P.O. Box 31, Commerce Court Postal Station, Toronto,
Ontario M5L 1B2.
Completed applications will be received until April 15 of
each year, applicable to the subsequent academic year at
the Canadian university which the applicant will attend. Friday, March 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Ethnic issue
Northern natives
continue fight
for political voice
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
"We are saying that we have
the right to determine our own
lives. This right derives from the
fact that we were here first. We
are saying that we are a distinct
people, a nation of people, and
we must have a special right
within Canada. "
—Robert Andre,
Dene Indian,
Northwest Territories, 1976
When Robert Andre said this
almost 10 years ago, few expected the dispirited and unorganized Dene Indians to realize
their dreams of self-government.
But in the last decade, the Dene
Indians and other Indian groups
across Canada have gained more
say in the political decisions that
affect their lives.
Thomas Berger, the former B.C. supreme
court chief justice and a current member of
the UBC law faculty, chaired the 1977 Berger
Inquiry into the impact of the proposed
Mackenzie pipeline through the Territories.
During his years of involvement with
natives, Berger witnessed many of these
changes first-hand.
"The native indians have gotten themselves on the national agenda; they've
gotten the attention of the people, and
they've gotten the attention of the first
ministers. They must be doing something
right," says Berger, referring to the second
annual first ministers' conference on
aboriginal rights held recently.
Berger maintains non-native Canadians
have neglected the Dene Indians' lifestyles in
their plans for NWT development.
"Many people believed that there was no
future in hunting or fishing; that they should
all become workers on the oil field, or clear
brush on the pipeline. That was well-
meaning, but it showed a basic blindness to
the desire of the natives to continue to live
off the land," says Berger.
This has led the Dene to seek their own
local governing bodies, says Berger. Berger
chooses his words carefully, reflecting on
questions before answering, pausing often.
"How do you work out arrangements that
are fair to all and still ensure that the Dene
culture and language will be protected? That
is why what the Dene aire doing is so important. They're pioneering in what we call
political science. Some people say the tenets
of liberal democracy don't allow for variation from institutions like the provinces that
we have in Canada. The Dene, on the other
hand, say no, let's use our imagination,
maybe we can come up with something that
can work for all of us."
Berger has long been a supporter of
aboriginal rights. In 1981, Berger publicly
aired his opinions on including native rights
in the constitution, breaking the traditional
silence maintained by judges on political
issues.
He believes government can be broadened
to benefit all segments of society.
"I think that the mind of man is not so impoverished that we can't work out new
political arrangements that will recognize the
distinct place of the Dene as permanent
residents of the Mackenzie valley, and pro
vide full democratic rights for those who
lome to stay for only a few years; public servants, workers in the oil and gas industry,
and so on," Berger says.
"The challenges of the North don't really
consist in drilling offshore oil and gas. We
lead the world in that area and it is a great accomplishment. But why shouldn't we be
equally concerned with achieving fair accommodation with the native northern people
and provide an example to the world in that
area?"
Berger followed this ideal by consulting
directly with the Mackenzie valley natives in
his inquiry. Largely because of their
testimony, the inquiry recommended a
10-year moratorium on the pipeline.
"We shouldn't be putting all of our eggs in
the mega-project basket," says Berger. "We
should be strengthening the local hunting,
fishing and trapping economies; we should
be concentrating on the renewable resource
sector."
Rene Fumoleau, a Roman Catholic
priest who has lived with the Dene for
more than 30 years, says government
development policy has added to the Dene's
desire to make their own political decisions.
"We feel that our political system is best,
and we impose it on them. We don't give
them a chance to grow as they are. They were
pushed down and pushed hard for 100 years.
They are a very dispirited people," says
Fumoleau, a small man with black slick hair.
Fumoleau says government attempts to
restrict hunting have threatened the entire
Dene culture, because it forms the mainstay
of their livelihood.
When the Dene signed treaties with the
Canadian government, they were ensured
they would always have the right to hunt as
they pleased, says Fumoleau, who wrote a
book entitled As Long As This Land Shall
Last  about the NWT treaties.
But since the establishment of the 1917
NWT game act, conflicts between the Dene
and the government have ensued. One case
involved a Dene Indian charged with
shooting a duck out of season in 1964. He
took the case to the supreme court, which has
refrained from passing judgment on the case.
Infringements such as this have led the Dene
to conclude that establishing their own
government is the only way to solve their problems.
Fumoleau says the Dene don't believe in
private land ownership. "For them, the land
is mother, it is provider. You cannot
anymore sell the land than you can sell your
arm or foot."
In addition, the Dene have a strong belief
in group leadership. "When the chiefs make
a decision, it has to go back to the communities for approval."
See Page 4: DENE Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
Dene seek rights
From Page 3
"These people have been ruling
themselves for 30,000 years and
they have survived for 30,000 years
in their own system. So it means
their system must have some
value," says Fumoleau.
Since the '60s the Dene have organized themselves and demanded
that the Canadian government settle land claims and establish self-
rule. To the Dene, this means local
control of game and resource management, education, health and social programs.
The Dene, together with the Inuit
in the eastern Arctic, have acquired
a majority in NWT legislature.
"The Dene land claims proposals
are well received by the territorial
government, and discussions about
new forms of political institutions
are improving," says Berger, adding that the federal government has
agreed in principle to the division of
the NWT into a Dene western portion and an Inuit eastern portion.
Negotiations are progressing well
in the NWT because the provinces
are not involved, as they are with
other native people.
Other Indian groups have begun pushing for self-rule,
and have gained a voice in
the first minister's conferences. But
they still have no vote.
The Indian groups were frustrated at the March 8 conference in
their attempts to amend the constitution. Most provinces are wary of
changing the language in the constitution, because it could mean the
loss of their public lands.
"From any governmental point
of view, a foolish thing to do is put
words in the constitution when you
don't know where they will lead
you," said premier Bill Bennett, expressing a common feeling among
the provinces.
New Brunswick premier Richard
Hatfield, one of three who support
a move to clarify aboriginal rights,
said, "When we talk about rights,
we don't talk about costs."
Fumoleau stresses the Dene are
not interested in cutting themselves
off from Canada.
"The Dene don't want to separ-
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ate from Canada. They know that
they live in the political structure
that is Canada. What they want is
to get into Canada. At the beginning of confederation, the English
and French were invited to the negotiations and the Indians were left
out.
"They want to have a chance to
use their intelligence and make decisions for themselves like any other
Canadian," says Fumoleau.
While Berger doesn't think self-
rule is essential to avoid assimilation, he believes it is the best direction for the Dene.
"I think that their struggle to remain distinct peoples will be made
easier if they attain self-rule, and
their lives will be improved under
self-rule," says Berger.
"Maybe the way to make native
people stand on their own two feet
is to listen to them, and to say, if
you want self-government, then
let's do it. Let's get on with it. And
then work out the specifics," says
Berger, offering a solution to today's burgeoning social problems.
Berger believes Indian groups like
the Dene have a better chance now
than ever before to achieve political
self-sufficiency.
"I think that there have been important developments in the way we
think about native people, their
claims, and their place in the political firmament," said Berger.
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JOB LINK
Interested in picking up a little CA$H or want
help finding a summer job. The AMS is sponsoring a referral service and we will be advertising extensively in the community.
APPLICATIONS available in SUB main floor
Friday, March 29 - Wed, April 4 11:30-2:30
We will be offering these services and more:
• clerical/secretarial
• childcare
• construction
• drivers
• garden work
• restaurant services
• household services
• recreation
• window washing
• repairs
• special skills
• warehousing
etc.
All you have to do is apply and we may be
able to help you find some part time or full
time summer work.
* Also 2 summer positions to run JOB
LINK are available — career related
marketing Job. $6/hour. Send resume
to External Affairs Office Sub 250 by
4:00 Wed., April 4th.
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EXTENDED HOURS: March 31
Open 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Ian Shepherd Tern Robertson
8620 Granville St. at 70th Ave.      266-6815
WANTED
FOR 1984-5 SCHOOL YEAR
ON CAMPUS
VOMER INTERVIEWERS
This is an ideal opportunity to gain job experience for students interested in personnel,
counselling, public relations or administration.
Students must be interested in interviewing
other students for volunteer jobs, and in the
promotion of volunteerism. Interviewers will
become part of Volunteer Connections, sponsored by the Vancouver Volunteer Centre, the
AMS and the Student Counselling and
Resources Centre.
If you are people-oriented, have good communication skills and can volunteer 4-5 hours
per week, then Volunteer Connections would
like to hear from you.
Interested students should contact
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS in the Student Counselling and Resources Centre, Brock
Hall 200 or call 228-3811. Friday, March 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
m line
acism is everywhere and affects everything — don't
pretend it's not part of your life."
Radha Jhappan, a political science graduate student whose master's thesis describes farmworkers'
fight for better working conditions, says racism only
veils employers' exploitation of East Indian labor in
the Fraser Valley.
"'Racism is not an accident — it's the mask of the
problem. It's only an excuse."
Farmwork is the third most dangerous occupation in Canada as a result of defective farm
machinery, impure drinking water and exposure to pesticides, Jhappan says. Poor sanitation,
overcrowding and the lack of childcare contributes to appalling living and working conditions.
"Sure, you could say we have a 'Grapes of Wrath' scenario in our own backyard, but 1 was
analyzing the conditions, not dredging for melodrama," she says.
While she briefly analyzes reports documenting health and safety hazards on the farms, her
thesis primarily deals with the farmworkers' campaign against the system of contractors and
piece-rate pay in the Fraser Valley.
Several contractors, personnel managers who are responsible for supplying farmers with
workers for the harvest, have withheld workers' pay, deducted unemployment insurance
payments and pension contributions from salaries, and provided unsafe transportation for
workers living in Vancouver and outside areas, she says.
"They're not all evil . . . They're just trying to make a living but some aren't as good as
others." She says contracting is a lucrative business, not adequately covered by labor laws.
Although most contractors are East Indian, they still deny basic rights to farmworkers, she ad-
A case against racism:
for cheap labor in B. C. • By Ian Weniger
^M
*•■-
r';:... »*v
ded. "For many workers the contractor is their only link to the world. Not everyone speaks
English well, and not everyone knows the laws very well either.
"If you don't speak English and you're new to Canada, what real choice do you have except to
trust your employer."
Jhappan says women are especially strapped by the system of contracting. About 65 per cent of
farmworkers are female, and the "paternalistic nature" of Indian society means women workers'
activity is restricted, she says. As a result, most of the workers are under the protection and supervision of predominantly male contractors.
The Canadian Farmworkers Union fought against the system of contracting by organizing its
own labor pool. And instead of piece rate pay, the union demanded minimum wage for all its
members.
Growers argue that the piece rate system, which is the method of pay based on the number of
"flats" (plastic trays with an average capacity of 16 pounds), encourages workers to gather the
harvest more quickly. But the union says minimum wage means every workers gets a reasonable
amount of money in all working conditions throughout the season.
"Firstly, how many auto workers get paid by the number of parts they assemble? And secondly, the union never suggested that growers be restricted from offering bonuses for faster work
during the day."
Minimum wage and overtime pay are demands justified by the B.C. Human Rights Code, she
contends.
Jhappan also analyzes the farmworkers campaign to unionize and expand the membership.
She concisely describes the fight for credibility among workers and owners at a variety of farms in
the Fraser Valley. The budding union had to persuade, embarrass, bargain with, and finally
coerce owners, contractors and the provincial government to realize its goals, she says.
But she also notes the controversy surrounding the union and its actions. Although the union
was certified and staged several successful strikes against owners and contractors, the B.C.
government pre-empt the movement by amending the Employment Standards Act in 1982. The
government effectively created the impression among workers that it was making moves to protect their needs, she says.
The union membership as a result has never numbered more than 1,600 since it was certified,
she says. And the same government that proposed the amendments "in such a hurry" dropped
them just as swiftly when it was re-elected in 1983, as part of its economic recovery program.
Political expediency seems to be the major motivation behind the government's moves, she
says. In her thesis, Jhappan continues her argument by examining the legal likelihood of
beneficial amendments becoming enforceable laws. Most of her analysis centres on the possibility
of entrenching workers' rights in the B.C. Human Rights Code and the new Charter of Rights
and Freedoms. But she sees little precedent for the statutes to change through the government's
own prompting.
Jhappan's thesis, called Resistance to Exploitation, states that racism is not a remnant of
slavery. The development of B.C. required cheap labor guaranteed by law, she says.
Discriminatory legislation gainst immigrant workers was subsequently entrenched.
"B.C. was virtually an apartheid state in practise and in law right up until 1946," she added.
It is more important to understand :he economic forces keeping minorities in a second class
position than to dwell upon the idea of "racial purity" that encourages society to accept immigrants as workers without right:-, she says.
"Stop fooling yourself. Cheap labor is the end, racism is the means." Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
English students to pay more in Quebec
MONTREAL (CUP) — Tuition
fees in Quebec are going up for
foreign students, and that includes
English-speaking students from
othr provinces.
For now Canadian students pay
an average of $450 in tuition, but by
1985 anyone from outside Quebec
may be charged $1,000.
Currently, no university in
Canada makes students from other
provinces pay more. Deputy education minister Michele Fortin says
Quebec wants "reciprocity" from
English out-of-province students.
Quebec, where tuition fees have
not been increased for 10 years, has
the cheapest university education in
Canada.
"The students should pay what
they pay in their own province,"
'Small fish' to protest Socreds' law
FREDERICTON, B.C. (CUP)
— St. Thomas university faculty
plan to join the nationwide
academic protest against the B.C.
government's legislation jeopardizing tenure for professors.
Faculty spokesperson Howard
Kody says the motion being proposed to the university's senate urges
the B.C. government to reconsider
its moves restricting academic
freedom.
"Universities do not wish to have
their traditional autonomy and
practices of tenure, academic
freedom and the like tampered with
by   provincial   governments,"   he
says.
The motion is similar to one passed by the University of Manitoba
senate, but it may encounter opposition from some St. Thomas
senators.
Another faculty member, Roger
Moore, is optimistic that the mo
tion will pass, but says St. Thomas
has little clout in the academic
world.
"We're a very small fish. I don't
think the motion will make much
difference," he says.
The Canadian Association of
University Teachers has asked
members to pressure university
senates to condemn the Social
Credit government's "restraint"
program.
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Maranatha Christian Club
RECREATION U.B.C.
Non-Credit Instructional Courses in Leisure
Pursuits— May Ist-June 30th, 1984
Our extensive  Recreation  U.B.C.   Program is available to all
students, faculty, staff, alumni and their spouses.
n. .n
PLEASE NOTE: Membership of $20.00 is required for all faculty, staff, alumni and their spouses — with the
exception of students and their spouses. This membership fee is valid from the time of purchase to
AUGUST 31, 1984 and only applies to faculty, staff, alumni and their spouses that are not present members
of RECREATION U.B.C.
Registration: APRIL 2nd - APRIL 10th, 1984
Late Registration: Through to APRIL 30, 1984
COURSE
CODE
212
242
272
612
ALL COURSES RUN FROM MAY 1st - JUNE 30th, 1984
COURSE
Judo
Shotokan Karate
Aikido
Advanced Modern Dance
DAYS
Tuesdays/Thursdays
Tuesdays/Thursdays
Tuesdays/Thursdays
Tuesdays/Thursdays
TIME
5:00-6:30 p.m.
8:00-9:30 p.m.
6:30-8:00 p.m.
5:30-7:00 p.m.
PLACE
Gym G-Osborne Centre
Gym G-Osborne Centre
Gym G-Osborne Centre
Armoury Bldg.-Room 208
FEE
$25.00
$25.00
$25.00
$30.00
6 Months Warranty
6,000 miles
Very Competitive Rates
WE
ALSO
DO BODY
WORK
ERIC'S BUG STOP
an 1505 West 3rd
731-8171
-•*■■.v
(UNDIR •RANVIU.I ST. MMDCI)
said Fortin.
"Discrimination is not a factor.
It would mean that an Ontario student who came here would pay
what he pays in Ontario. It's not a
big difference."
Tuition will cost international
students 33 per cent more for a
Quebec university education next
fall. Students already enrolled will
continue to pay $4,350 while all
others pay $5,800.
University administrators,
teachers and students, already
angry over differential fees for international students, are furious.
Edward Stansbury, a vice-
principal of McGill University, said
"it strikes me . . . an agreement of
that kind would be discriminatory.
"It would be a complicated thing
to administer and work out."
Stansbury doubted other provinces would want to be involved in
such a reciprocal agreement.
Victor Sim, an official for the
Canadian Association of University
Teachers, said his organization
would not likely support such differential fees.
He said limiting differential tuition fees to English students "is
more reprehensible" than the fee
itself.
Students, already upset over
charging international students 80
per cent more for university education than Canadians, say this particular proposal is just another step
towards raising tuition fees for all
ATTENTION
ALL AMS CLUBS
/ASSOCIATIONS
The following will be deconstituted as of
April2, 1984 for failing to comply with AMS
Clubs Regulations.
African Students Assoc.
Agriculture Engineering Club
Anthropology/Sociology Dept.
Assoc.
Astronomy & Aerospace Club
Baltic Association
BhaGti Yoga Club
Biochemistry Stud. Assoc.
Biology Club
Bridge Club
Canada Conf. of Engineers
Can. Crossroads int'l
Canoe Club
Carribean Students Assoc. •
Charlie Matheson Society
Chinese Martial Arts Club
Collegiate Adventists for Better Living
Committee Against Racist & Fascist
Violence
Counselling Students' Assoc.
English Students Assoc.
Farmworkers Support Group
Fine Arts Dept. Club
Fine Art Grad Students Club
Fitness Club
Forestry Grads Assoc.
Franklin Society
Friends of the Armadillos
Games Club
Gen Sic
Graphic Society
Gymnastics Club
Hispanic Cultural Workshop
Historical Dance Club
Int'l Socialists Club
Japan Karate Assoc.
Kendo Club
Latter Day Saints
Mature &■ Returning Students
Pacific Rim Development
Phi Delta Theta Social
Philosophy Student Union Pins
Progressive Conservative Club
Sociallenic Club
Student Broadcasting Assoc.
Students int'l meditation Soc.
T'ai Chi Club
Thunderbird Crew Club
Tournament Club
Trotskyist League
Ukranian Students' Club
Western Canada Concept Club
Wing Chun Int'l Key Fu
AMS Clubs Commissioners
SUB 246, 228-2361 Friday, March 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Ethnic issue
Canada a beacon of hope
for endangered refugees
By ROSS PINK
T First of two parts
o many world
refugees, Canada serves as
a beacon of hope in an
otherwise dark and discordant world. Each year,
thousands of refugees
pour into Canada seeking
asylum and safety. Yet for
each refugee who flees his
or her homeland there are
thousands more with no
chance of escape, those
who remain in homelands
where persecution and
death are inevitable.
Canada is signatory to the U.N.
Convention on refugees and so is
theoretically committed to provide
a sanctuary for these people. But
the Canadian government insists
these people undergo a lengthy legal
process to determine their status.
Although thousands of refugees
request asylum in Canada each
year, all are not accepted by the
Canadian government. In 1979
Canada accepted 27,740 refugees.
In 1980, 40,144; 1981, 17,891; 1982,
16,821 and in 1983, 13,566.
Despite risking their lives and
journeying hundreds of miles to
reach Canada, the majority of inland refugees are deported. A
spokesperson for the immigration
department says about 20 per cent
of inland refugees are allowed to
stay in Canada.
Of the three refugee status
categories, the most complicated
procedures are reserved for inland
refugees — those who apply for
landed immigrant status after they
get to Canada. Inland refugees are
people who have left their
homeland and travelled independently to Canada.
The review process for inland
refugees begins when the refugee
presents his or her case to a senior
immigration officer. "You must
prove your life is threatened before
you will be allowed to stay," says
Nancy Miller, chairperson of the
Inland Refugee Society in Vancouver. "Otherwise, Canada will
not look at the application."
Canadian government policy
essentially leaves the inland refugees
to support themselves until they
receive landed immigrant status.
This is granted about one year after
their claim is accepted and about
three years after they first arrived in
Canada.
The problems facing inland
refugees are immense. Tom Clark,
co-ordinator of the Inter-Church
Committee on Refugees, says:
"There is no government support
for inland refugees while they await
a decision on their status. Support
is left up to the public which is virtually unaware of the situation."
There are approximately 300 inland refugees in Vancouver and
three groups have become involved
with  their concerns:  Multi-lingual
Orientation Service Association for
Immigrant Communities, The Inland Refugee Society of B.C. and
the Vancouver Coalition with
World Refugees.
These groups provide basic needs
to the refugees such as food,
clothing, shelter and cultural orientation. However, their resources are
limited and many refugees are forced to seek further assistance in the
community. Many of the refugees
obtain their groceries from food
banks.
Miller says: "Basically our purpose is to look after the immediate
basic needs of the inland refugees.
We try to find shelter, food,
clothing and basic needs for those
who are indigent."
Despite efforts to help the
refugees, Miller conceeds that
"food and shelter are major problems and many of the refugees are
undernourished."
The Vancouver Coalition with
World Refugees and MOSAIC both
play key roles in refugee relief. The
VCWR offers counselling, cultural
orientation and housing to
refugees. Coalition member Dr.
John Conway says "one of our objectives is to find resources in the
community through churches." Its
general meeting on the fourth
Wednesday evening of each month
at 1410 W. 12th provides an opportunity for the general public to learn
from refugees and refugee workers.
MOSAIC provides an array of
services to the refugee population,
including interpretation in seventy
different languages.
/SAf
4/.-
"*,!&*
**«'*
'?
-*$#
THE FACES OF DESPAIR . . . Cambodian refugee family clings
together in monsoon rains at Thailand village after fleeing Vietnamese and
Cambodian crossfire.
Since inland refugees arrive in
Canada without following proper
immigration procedures or obtaining a visa, they are considered illegal aliens.
There are many complaints
against the review process for inland refugees. The refugee status
advisory committee never meets
with the claimant. Also, :he committee reaches its decision on the
claim solely on the basis of the
transcript. The transcript is often
translated from another language
and thus loses much of its emotional impact.
Another criticism of this process
has been the long delay in waiting
for a decision — usually 18 to 24
months.
There have also been complaints
against the committee for its narrow definition of the term refugee,
which resulted in fewer claims being
accepted. However, new guidelines
See page 9: INLAND
The Government of Canada
provides important post secondary
education assistance.
Can we help you?
The Government of Canada provides support to post
secondary education in a number of important wavs.
Here are some recent examples showing how the levei
of this support has been increasing:
Student Assistance     —■■■-■■■■■■■.
In March, 1983 the Government of Canada added $60
million to its student assist
ance programs for loans to
full and part-time students
and interest relief for borrowers who are disabled or
on Unemployment Insurance.
For 1982-83, the Government of Canada guaranteed
$300 million in loans to
184,000 students.
Canada
Get in on it.
Return this coupon to: Publications Canada, P.O. Box 1986. Station B
Ottawa, Ontario K1P6G6
Please send me the publication(s) entitled
□ Full-Time Students
□ Part-Time Students
□ Interest Relief Plan
Name:  '1;t .;■•( (■• ■ :■	
Address:	
City:	
Funding for the Post Secondary System
In 1984-85 the Government of Canada's financial support
for post secondary education, provided through transfer
payments to the frovinces, will total over $4.2 billion.
____——     This amount, which represents
f     an increase of about $240 mil
■     lion oxer 1983-84. equals
$16^.60 for every person in
Canada.
To leant more about the role
of the Goi 'ernment of Canada
in post secondary • education,
j     complete and mail the coupon.
I*
Province:
Postal Code:
8057-CA-1
Canada
Secretary of State
of Canada
The Honourable
Serge Joyal
Secretariat d'Etat
du Canada
L'honorable
Serge Joyal Page 8
"^
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
Vancouver
after Classes ...
THE KEG
AND
Introduces
A Dinner and Dance Special
Wednesday's
Student Night
Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
20% OFF ALL FOOD
Afterwards visit Brandy's
Featuring:
- Great music
- Friendly Atmosphere
- ALL NIGHT STUDENT PRICES
(Bring Student ID.)
The Keg Corner, Providing The Complete Night Out.
HORNBY and DUNSMUIR
[tfc> •»—!!—1|
3431 W. Broadway    738-5298
"The only place to eat around Kits/Point Grey. A great,
inexpensive menu of phenomenal variety in a casually,
comfortable setting, which will please everyone with
taste. This is a very highly recommended restaurant!
Try it out."
Fully licensed • plastic accepted • 7 days a week. Early to late.
Authentic Greek Architecture
ROMIOS
Banquet Room
for up to 70 people:
Anniversaries
Receptions
Birthdays
Phone us today.
Enjoy our
Homemade Pizza
and Pasta Dishes!
EAT IN or PICK UP
Lunch & Dinner
Specials Every Day
ROMIOS OFFERS FINE
GREEK CUISINE & A
TOUCH OF THE MEDITERRANEAN, IN THE
HEART OF KITSILANO.
S  2272 W. 4th Ave.     736-2118
UBC Gampas
^    Pizza
 i
Pitt.
Steak & Pizza       Lasagna
Spare Ribs        Ravioli
Chicken   -  Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224 4218 - 224-9529
Hours Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 am   -  2:00 a.m.
Fri   11:30 a.m   -  3:00 a.m
Sat. 4:00 p.m    - 3:00 a.m
Sun. 4:Q0 p.m.  -    1:00 a.m
2136 Western Parkway _
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10°'r  DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS      <
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fn    11  30 9 00 n m
^^^   CLOSED SATURDAYS
^■^■i   Sundays dnd Holidays     t
Af$ .,       4 00 p m   900p m
•    -       2142 Western Parkway
, UBC Village '.
Across from
Gassy Jack
{   ^if&r
Gastown
'        GOURMET CUISINE OF INDIA
15% off on food items
BRING THIS AD
x1!
/""'""'
GOOD FOOD - REASONABLE PRICES
GREAT ATMOSPHERE
Le J
Lunch & Dinner (Fully Licensed)
<kj
fir
8 POWELL ST.     O07 rVldQ
AT CARRALL      O0/~UU£T^
"THE PEOPLE WITH BETTER TASTE"
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
AT 2:15, 4:40,
7:20. 9:50
Against
Ail odds
rachel ward
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
Warning: Some violence & very coarse
language; occasional nudity & suggestive scenes, B.C. Dir.
MICHAEL CAINE   JOSEPH BOLOGNA  VALERIE HARPER
MICHELLE JOHNSON   DEMI MOORE
AT 3:00, 5:15, 7:30, 9:40
ttl GRANVILLE
682-7468
ttg&
Warning: Some nudity, suggestive
scenes & very coarse language.
B.C. Dir.
72 hours of liberty to forget everything
the Navy ever taught them.
Warning: Some very coarse & suggestive language; occasional nudity.
B.C. Dir.
851  GRANVILLE
685-6828
ȣ*s
AT 2:15, 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 9:50
<M^?ljZ^\        Warning: Some violence
CmhS^ & swearing; occasional
very coarse & suggestive language. B.C. Dir
coronet:
851  GRANVILLE
685-6828
AT 2:X. 5:00.
7:30. 10:00
"A movie of rare wit...NW  RK
(mature)
CAMBIE  AT  16th
876-2747
riMK-
Warning: Occasional coarse language,
swearing, nudity cr suggestive scenes
B.C   Dir.
AT 7:30, 9:30
£>ev*
ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST.'' TTJC
LLINS. CBS-TV       1    IjUD
DRESSER
NATIONAL BOARD OF REVIEW  PAT COLLINS,CBS-TV
REX REED • IUDITH CRIST
DUNBAR  AT  30th
224-7252
Cmatwc)
AT 7:30, 9:40
J ]    "A PURE DELIGHT!" -wnewtv C
"DEEPLY TOUCHING..."      v
varsity
I (mature)
—Gannett Newspapers
'Warning:    Occasional    nudity,    suggestive
4375  WEST 10th     scenes & very coarse language. B.C. Dir.
224-3730
AT 7:30, 9:30
"A bull's eye! A consistent      tieExperience
delight." —Archer \X instcn. NY Post ePreIkfTed~.
\mxrvKtj Warnjna. Some suggesIjVe    Hut rJot
"^Essential"
broadway
707 W. BROADWAY
874-1927
scenes & coarse language. B.C. Dir.
AT 7:15, 9:15
3 ACADEMY NOMINATIONS ™=^
BEST PICTURE       BIG
broadway
AT 7:00, 9:00
Warning:    Some    very    coarse
707 W. BROADWAY   language; occasional nuditv & sug-
874-1927 gestive scenes. B.C. Dir.
CHILL
w
FOLD
95,
FOLD i
99
n.
3293 W. 4th
ph73-BEERS
ZuAi
CELEBRATE
Before, During & After Exams .
.       BE HERE FOR CHEER       j
in & around the world in 80 ways \
We have a treasure hunt too!
Clip   this   coupon   for   buried   treasure.
Count your paces from  UBC to where
the      y
*» marks the spot in Kits. There
you will dig up CKVU and CFOX's
number one burger. Fold this ad to
discover the "Hidden Treasure Words."
Repeat the treasure words to your server
and you will receive one famous McFogg
Burger "FREE" when your mate(s) pur- i
chase another. ' FOLD
SPANISH DOUBLOONS ACCEPTED      ' —>
AT PAR
Offer Expires April 30, '84
By The Sea
overlooking English Bay at the
corner of Denman and Davie.
Valet parking 6 pm - 3 am
2 'Great' Restaurants
2 'Lively' Lounges
Now a New Dining Menu
Featuring fresh seafood, pasta, chicken
and specially prepared meats
Brunch — Sundays & Holidays
11:00 am -3:00 pm
Reservations 684-5322
Plants, Brass
& Glass
Munch on goodies
and while
you sip your favorite
brew, enjoy the
Pacific Ocean with its
sunsets, beaches and ships
CHECKERS
vwwwv
Restaurant & Lounge
(home of the 1 LITRE frosted mug)
DANCIN
(to an authentic 1948 Wurlitzer)
EATIN
(Broiled Burgers —
you choose the toppings)
WASH IT DOWN
(with ice cold brew
served in a 1 LITRE or
HALF LITRE frosted mug)
Full Menu Available
(Book Your Party)
RESERVATIONS
682-1831
Enjoy the live entertainment
at our Piano Bar
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m
FREE fast delivery!
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
HONG KONG
CHINESE
FOODS
Mon
-Fri.           11:30a.m. -2:00
p.m.
4:00 p.m.-10:00
p.m.
Sat.
ErSun.        4:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
tf
EAT IN
>>>
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OR
TAKE OUT
*
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LUNCH SPECIALS
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*
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r%
5732 University Bouleva
rd
TEL. 224-1313 Friday, March 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Refugees
From page 7
established by former manpower
and immigration minister Lloyd
Axworthy in 1982 have broadened
the definition of the term refugee,
thus allowing greater numbers to remain in Canada.
After amendments and additions
to the statement by the refugee, a
transcript is sent to the refugee
status advisory committee in Ottawa. The commitee reviews the
transcript, then recommends if the
refugee should be accepted. The
final decision is made by the
Minister of Immigration.
If the claim is considered valid,
the individual becomes a landed immigrant. If it is decided that the
claim is invalid, the claimant may
appeal the decision. If the appeal is
unsuccessful, the claimant is
deported.
During the review process inland
refugees are in a state of limbo. Section 13.11(2) of the Immigration
Manual states; "We must make it
possible for claimants to refugee
status to await the outcome of their
claim without undue physical or
economic hardship."
But the reality is far different. Inland refugees receive no'support or
assistance from the government.
They do not qualify for medical or
dental care and find it difficult to
obtain work permits.
Another obstacle facing refugees
is the absence of English training.
Only refugees sponsored by the
government or private groups
receive federal English language
assitance.
Many of these refugees settle in
British Columbia. In 1979, 2,848
refugees settled in B.C. In 1980
-5,111; 1981 - 1,704; 1982 - 1,687;
and in 1983 - 1,623. Approximately
75 per cent of refugees in B.C.
reside in the lower mainland.
The majority of the inland
refugee population in Vancouver
come from Central America. In the
report of a special team sent to Central America in 1982 by Axworthy,
it was estimated that the "refugee
situation in Central America involves upwards of half a million
people. More than 10 per cent of
the entire population of El Salvador
is either in internal or external
exile." Thousands of people have
fled Guatemala, where repression
and torture is rampant.
Vancouver also receives many
refugee claims from Iranians, Sri
Lankans and Afghans. The growing
refugee population of Vancouver
reflects the dangerous state of the
world today.
Canada has a legacy of generous
refugee relief. But the turbulent
state of affairs today may force
Canada to reassess its policies.
Refugees seeking asylum in Canada
are assessed against factors designed to determine their general ability
to adapt to Canadian life and on the
amount of settlement assistance
available to them in Canada.
In Sudan there is a refugee
population of 400,000, yet the
country continues to support an
open door refugee policy. In Northern Pakistan there are over three
million Afghan refugees. Thailand
and Hong Kong both support large
refugee populations. The generous
refugee policies of these nations
have not been matched by the
Western World.
Tom Clark points out "there are
10 million refugees in camps around
the world now. The less developed
countries carry the brunt of the problem." Yet the western world, including Canada, still maintain conservative refugee policies.
Clark also believes Canadians
sometimes remain indifferent
toward refugees. "There are three
million Afghanis in Northern
Pakistan, yet we in Vancouver
worry about providing welfare to
the few who are here."
Next week: Vancouver refugees
speak.
9"
A Town at alime.
For just $325, you can
take the train to Canada.
All of it! VIA Rail's Youth
CANRAILPASS gives you
30 days of limitless travel
to Kettle Rapids, Nonsuch,
Togo and Bick; Stewiacke,
Wetaskiwin. Sioux Lookout
and Hectanooga —and
anywhere else the train goes.
If you're 12 to 22, this is
your chance to discover
Canada — a town at a time!
If you're on a tight budget, or would like
to concentrate on a particular part of Canada,
shorter term, lower cost regional CANRAILPASSES
are available as well. You can enjoy 8 days of
unlimited travel in the Quebec City/Windsor
Corridor for just $85!
VIA s Youth CANRAILPASS lets you see the
country as it was meant to be seen — by train!
Travel straight through, from coast to coast.
Or, when you see something you like, stop and
explore. When you feel like moving on, hop the
train to the next town. The next experience.
And no experience packs more living into
30 davs as inexpensively as the 30 day Youth
CANRAILPASS.
Invest in the experience of a lifetime.
Check out the Youth CANRAILPASS at your local
VIA Ticket Office or your travel agent, today!
8 Days
15 Days
22 Days
30 Days
N/A
n/a;
$220.00
$300,00*
$235,00
$325.00*
Cross Canada
N/A
$14500
$18500*
H70.0O
$210,00*
N/A
Canada East
ofWinnipeg
N/A
$145.00
$18500*
* J 60.00
$20500*
N/A
Canada West
ofWinnipeg
185.00
$105,00
N/A
N/A
Quebec City/
Windsor Corridor
" Applicable from June 1 through September 30, 1984. Trips
may start or finish during this period. Other trips applicable during remainder of year until December 15, with the
exception of the Thursday before Easter to Easter Monday.
A Youth CANRAILPASS entitles the holder to travel in regular
coaches. Da\nitcr. Club or sleeping ear accommodation as well
as meals may be purchased by paying the applicable supplemental
charges.
A ticket tor each journey must be secured from a VIA sales office
On certain trains, advance seat reservations are required No
further payment is reyuired. after the VIA Rail Youth
(ANRAII.PASS has been purchased.
1 +
Transport Canada
Lloyd Axworthy, Minister
Transports Canada
Lloyd Axworthy, Ministre
with the new Mia Rail
lOlltn aa% v^,   ->/Hx./
^^^^Z^^^^^Zp.^ £fiX^^
s^
^.-    X     '  *  *. Jt&iZrtt   >   A- %-^iAs^~
2      „
Bcville Page 10
THE    UBVSSEY
Friday, Man
Or*".
&,r*
.,#*£
l&t.
.#•
\ f
TEXT BY ROBERT BEYNON
THE CHINESE INITIALLY
lived by the docks. Their community developed in the 1880s behind the
business frontage on Burrard Inlet,
by the new Canadian Pacific
railway terminal.
Vancouver was just beginning
then and Gassy Jack who established Gastown still lived.
Despite persecution the Chinese
stayed and formed a community, an
integral part of Vancouver's present
population. Later, the Japanese
and the Italians too came and
established communities at the narrow base of the peninsula that
squeezes between False Creek and
Burrard Inlet, today's east end.
These east side communities are older than British
Properties or Point Grey. But today most people view
this area as a curiosity, a tourist attraction ("the second
largest Chinatown in North America!"). Many still
speak of all Chinese as foreigners, strangers in their own
land, although their ancestors may date back to the 19th
century.
In fact these groups are the builders of Vancouver,
our parents. Chinatown, Japantown and Little Italy are
a part of our heritage, dimensions of a colourful,
heterogeneous, expanding city.
They are also a mark of our infamy. The Japanese remained when mobs broke their store window's at the
turn of the century. The Chinese and Japanese stayed
although neither received the vote until just before the
Second World War.
But they are proud of the place they have established
here. When Harvey Wong poses before his fish shop's
red snappers on ice, an arm around a friend, he's proud.
These communities are like aged trees in our midst,
staid and gnarled. Both the young clerk in Japantown,
dressed in his grocer's apron, and the women seeking
green beans there continue their tasks with a routine
decorum.
The Italian community on Commercial Avenue also
remains like a cornerstone in our city's social structure.
Tony and Bruna show off the goods of their shop proudly; the men sit resolutely in a barber's shop; at the
Continental Cafe-Bar a patron ponders life at a table.
These people have found a place. The place where
they live, grew up, where their children grow, where
their future is.
While her mother looks over ginger in a reed basket,
the young Chinese girl at far right stares out at
Chinatown's milling Sunday market crowd. She will bring something to Vancouver, even if only by living in
Chinatown and offering a different lifestyle.
In.future years she will change the character and
diversitv of Vancouver.
W   2
V
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3Mr«i*»r*     ^
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«7 *• 130,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Ethnic issue Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
Do I T/nd Your
Ctf£ B0R(N<S?
J*r_
Seats of inspiration
YOU SEC IVE
BEEN WO^KIWS TWO
30Efc TO ATOtt> AUTOS: BOOKS WVf
THE NeW.TO
01/ CIGK,
—WELL**-
-OH "fl&S SIR;
WAR IS HEM--
SiRr «H HUH.
You're sitting on the can, your elbows propped on
your knees and your head in your hands. Finals are
coming up and you're beginning to worry about getting passable grades.
Twirling a pen in your hands you're tempted to
scratch a little message on the steel walls. Nobody
will probably read it anyway, so you decide to write a
nasty note.
As you begin to scrawl painstakingly onto the wall,
you are reminded of the Chinese student who always
sits in front of the class. He works hard. His self discipline will eventually earn him a better job than you,
or so you think.
Your anger builds and you start to write faster.
Maybe the person in the next stall can hear you writing on the wall. You become a little nervous and
quickly finish the note.
Leaning back on the rickety toilet seat, you admire
your work. It's not too nasty, you think — it only
pokes a little fun at those Chinese keeners. Your nasty description fits all Chinese students, they are all
alike, you rationalize to yourself.
You clean up after yourself, leaving the stall door
swinging shut as you rush to your next class. You
don't think about the feelings of other students who
may come across your scrawled message. After all,
few will bother to read it even if they use the same
bathroom, you say.
But shortly after you leave, another student discreetly walks into the bathroom. Sitting down, he
begins to think of his exams looming at the beginning of next month.
To push thoughts of studying long nights out of
his mind, he looks at the newly decorated walls sur
rounding him. The words emanate hate, and loathing.
He is Chinese, and to him, the word means a family and relatives all belonging to a unique and valuable culture. But the word is perverted by the messages screaming at him from the walls.
He has not done anything to insult the writers of
the anonymous notes. He has not taunted them with
the same angry words or mocked their culture. His
only sin is the color of his skin.
He wants to erase the words of hate, to scrub the
walls until the last letter is rubbed out. But that
would not remove the feelings of hurt.
If you met the person you have angered and insulted, you probably wouldn't recognize him. Like
yourself, he too is anonymous — just another prick
in the stall.
But your words have provoked him. After reading
your slurs, he will feel a little less comfortable at
UBC, knowing that students he passes in the halls
every day dislike him for no other reason than that he
is Chinese. And he comes to UBC every day.
UBC is supposed to be a gathering place for budding minds to think about the social problems plaguing our society. But our own writing on the wall is
no more enlightened than graffiti lining downtown
streets.
Our feelings of fear and hatred toward other races
should be flushed from our bathrooms, erased from
the walls of our minds. The language of hate serves
no purpose — it only illustrates that we are all racist.
Whether or not we scrawl on the walls, we all contribute by failing to remove the bitter notes littering
our lives.
Letters
'Gears have crossed bridge to sexual equality'
The article (Putting the pressure:
on offensive professors, March 27)
by Cathy McDonald, once again
mentions the opinion that engineers
are sexist to the core. One remark in
question was comparing a bridge to
a woman's body — "well built."
After looking at the Cambie Street
bridge, 1 must conclude that the unidentified professor in question has
a strange idea of what looks good.
Wrong bridge you say? Well, if I
cannot be general, like with McDonald, then all engineers are not
sexist.
But, this seems to be going
against the grain, as anybody who
has read the editorial in the March
16 Ubyssey (Ringing truth) will
think.
The Ubyssey's coverage of the
UBC engineers is, even in the best
of times, slanted. They never seem
to say anything about people who
like to paint structures or a monument in a different color than they
were originally. Nor do they ever
see the graffiti, written for all to
see, none of it polite.
And they never said anything
about the Engineers' ball, good or
bad. But you always find two pages
for some rock band.
Also, the news coverage from
other universities always seems to
put engineers in a bad light, I recall
a stink about wet T-shirts. With all
this good coverage of us, it does not
surprise me that people outside of
engineering have a twisted view of
us.
It is heard that women who enter
engineering are confronted with a
wall of resistance to their being
there. Engineering is said to be a
non-traditional   job   for   women.
This thought may have come from
engineering or from society's perspective. Whatever the opinion,
both sides were to blame. Now, it is
possible to enter engineering on the
basis of academic achievement
alone. So, the only wall is the view
from the outside looking in. This is
nothing new — how many male
nurses have your seen?
I do not know why people insist
that sexism is alive and flourishing
in engineering. Far as I know, most
of us went through the same education system, where females and
males were treated equally. Then,
all of a sudden, when one enters engineering at university, sexism rears
its ugly head. It sure took its time.
Engineering cannot afford the
luxury of mistreating a growing segment of itself. The foundation of
engineering is the team. Each member pulls her or his own weight, no
more, no less.
From what I have seen this past
year, whatever sexism there was in
engineering has been buried. And if
it ever crawls out of its grave, it
would not survive a general engineering meeting.
A parting note, the March 16 editorial of The Ubyssey mentioned
the following: "Hundreds of engin
eers, dressed in business suits and a
few in dresses." A few? Not from
where I sit. I think it is time to look
at the trend in engineering. Try the
general information pages in the
UBC calendar: the numbers are
changing, in favor of the women. If
this is sexism, it is apathetic.
Jim Davies
engineering 1
Feminists rebuked for pettiness
I believe I've finally had it! I suppose it's this prevalent notion of the
world being a pradise of male per-
rogative that gets me. Anyone
should be able to look at their own
father for five minutes to figure
that one out.
Anyway, what I really need to say
shouldn't be news to anyone with
half a brain. It is simply this: Women are many things to men; they
are mothers, daughters, wives, sisters, lovers, colleagues, strangers,
and sometimes, with luck, friends.
Not in spite of this, or despite of
this, not along with this, because of
this, or apart from this; but interwoven with this, and by the very nature of things, women ARE sex objects to men. It's simply the way it
is!
And believe it or not, it has been
in my experience to understand that
some women have a reciprocal nature! Is this peculiar? Of course
not. It is only by virtue of this interesting evolutionary happenstance
that twits like Cathy McDonald are
around to write asinine articles
(Putting the pressure on offensive
professors, March 27) in the first
place!
Now let's get reasonable. Terrible
injustices have been, and are now
being done by men in power to women in subordinate positions. Men
who use their positions of authority
to exploit women in need of their
assistance, compassion, and good
will are clearly despicable characters. When caught, I believe their
punishment should bring them personal anguish at least equal to the
anguish these betrayed women must
feel. Dismissal and worse is certainly appropriate.
However, what gets me is that
some women have latched on to a
real, substantive, and important issue, and embroidered it with their
own neuroses to the extent that reality doesn't matter. Rape, harassment, and brutal exploitation are
real. But I'm not going to stop
looking at nice breasts, nice legs,
and nice asses because it upsets
Phyllis Leonardi (Status of women
coordinator at Carleton
University.)
In a very real sense, your body
belongs to you, but your appearance is public. Men have every right
to look at your body! If you want to
call this harassment, then you're
just a thin-skinned, unrealistic twit.
Essentially, there are an awful lot
of healthy, natural and utterly
harmless interactions taking place
which, with a properly bent frame
of mind, could be construed as harassment. Hopefully, men and women with good sense can see
through this so that genuinely destructive behavior can be dealt with
effectively.
Scott Mendelson
grad studies psychology
Frenzy II
Concerning the letter Marxist-
Leninist defends 'anti-imperialist
tactics' (Mar. 22), I doubt if Rene
Goldman's letter was as frenzied
("anti-communist frenzy") as the
response from Allen Soroka, with
its mindless jargon and confusion
of results with motives. May I commend to your readers the review by
Paul Wilson of H. S. Ferns'
autobiography — "Reading from
Left to Right: One Man's Political
History" in the February edition of
Books in Canada. It should help to
equip them to deal with such bombast.
Ann Ferries
THE UBYSSEY
March 30, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
The occasionally forgotten Peter Berlin was remembered tonight for his new wave haircut, evei
though he didn't come with the crew on our second last journey through chocolate decadence to the
printing reggata. Stephen Wisenthal was last seen heading off to see strange faraway lands as he did
not accompany the motley ensemble either. The New York times reviewer Shaffin Shariff would not
give his commands in the normal code and caused the code receiver to howl his "Can you believe this
Canada" commercial snicker. Patti Flather saved the entire crew from drowning of jerring, loud comments on Lions. Our favorite Leo, Neil Lucente roared over theories on the penis mentality mentality.
The weekend jock, Gordon Clark relaxed after searching in vain for a captain's chair, Muriel Draaisma's
wandering hands were stifled as the eight staffer crew crammed into the yellow unturbo canoe of Chris
Wong. Robby Robertson was proud of his true black and white scorpian another ethnic tie in. Robert
Beynon was equally happy to have been quoted by a higher source. Debbie Lo was looking to the
sunset curiously fuschia. Ross Pink was commended for his good work saving the drowning refugees
as we sailed on, and Ian Weniger changed into a bright snazzy new outfit as it would not look appropriate to greet a Liberal candidate in unshakable attire
'0/ ^J'Wh\ THE. H£Li_ ARt_
(     VOu   STKRV^   r\T?     j Friday, March 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Letters
Inflated costs make
for the rich kids
With reference to the ongoing
daycare debates, I have had my
child enrolled in an under-three unit
as well as operating my own in-
home daycare on campus. Consequently I did considerable research
on the issue and I hope to clarify
some facts.
Unit II now charges $445.00 per
month for full-time day care. This
contract requires four hours per
week of parent duty time — specifically janitorial duty. Substitutes are
available for about $7 per hour. In
addition the parent must attend a
monthly meeting and further, must
Just why is
12:30 p.m. called
noon at UBC?
One of the questions about UBC
(and The Ubyssey) which has
always puzzled me is why does noon
occur at 12:30? There are many
possible explanations for this but I
am completely mystified as to
which is the correct one. Perhaps
we're trying to mimic Newfoundland by being a half hour off
the rest of the country. That explanation would be okay if it
weren't for the fact that nobody
would want to copy anything from
Newfoundland.
Maybe it was invented by someone highly interested in lunches
and eating. That way, he or she
could meet for two seperate lunches, both at "noon," one on campus and one off. Could it be that we
wish to show how fashionable we
are by forcing even Father Time to
arrive fashionably late for lunch at
12:30? If so why not make noon to
be 2:00? That would be even better.
A more likely explanation is that
someone deliberately set out to confuse as many first years as possible.
Or possibly someone was suffering
from a greater psychosis. A fear of
l's, 2's,:'s, 3's, and O's perhaps?
Being deranged is certainly nothing
new on this campus. While on the
topic of deranged, maybe the
Liberals did it to show that they
could be something new and
original.
Doug Dosdall
Pre-Commerce/Computer Science
clean the entire daycare about every
10 weeks on a rotating basis. The
other choice is half-time, mornings
only, and the fees and duty times
are halved. Just imagine if you had
twins!
In addition to the exorbitant
monthly dues, a $222.50 deposit is
required which, for most students,
means they cannot afford to choose
alternate child care because their
money is tied up. Unit II requires an
entire month's notice to free the
funds. They are unbending in this
policy as Mr. Lueck found out
when they swallowed his deposit for
giving only 29 days notice in writing, although he did give verbal notice within the 30-day limit. (Daycares, Dec. 10/83.)
While it is unlikely that many students could meet these criterion of
unbending schedules, exorbitant
dues and excessive hours of duty
time, the centres are operating at
full capacity. In fact, there is usually a waiting list to get in. This is because a great majority of the children are enrolled by working parents
from local professions, UBC staff
and faculty and civil servants. In my
experience, less than 10 per cent of
DAYCARE
still not cheap at half the price -'•" *"c "h0
Protest to rejuvenate Coalition
It is no secret that the Solidarity
Coalition has become a shadow of
its former self. While the reasons
for this are many, it was really no
surprise after the high hopes of the
hundreds of thousands of people
were dashed by the bureaucratic
actions of Operation Solidarity's
leadership, when it entered into the
rotten agreement with the premier
on Nov. 13.
But the question of the
Coalition's rejuvenation remains,
at this point, an open one. A
preliminary answer to this question
— at least with respect to the immediate period ahead — may be
gained on Saturday, March 31. On
that day, the Lower Mainland
Solidarity Coalition and the Vancouver and District Labour Council
have called for a demonstration at
Oppenheimer Park (400 E. Cordova) at 1:00 p.m. in response to
the government's latest budget.
It is also no secret that the Social
Credit government and its allies
emerged shaken but victorious from
last November's strike. Indeed,
they are still reaping its spoils, as
the most recent provincial budget
graphically shows. Once again poor
people, the young, students,
women, seniors, tenants, workers,
disabled   people,   minorities,   tax
payers and the unemployed have
been made the targets of the
government's offensive.
For instance, while those forced
onto welfare have had their monthly stipends further reduced, while
the unemployed were told to remain
unemployed, while teachers and
other public sector workers are being thrown out of work, while
human rights programmes are being
axed by 50 per cent, while protective services for women are being
cut, and while students have been
told to pay and borrow more or get
out of the post-secondary system
(and join the ranks of the underpaid
or unemployed), $470 million was
kicked into the bloated pockets of
B.C. Rail (i.e. the banks, forest
companies and coal companies).
However, if there is one thing
that burns bright in the overall picture of the last nine months it is that
for the first time in recent history,
huge numbers of people, from varying backgrounds and regions, came
together within the framework of
the Solidarity Coalition to fight
against the government's offensive.
This was a step forward. It should
not be simply forgotten.
It is true that students and faculty
members generally kept to
themselves during the events of last
fall. But it should have become
clearer that, as government
measures rip apart the education
system of this province, those of us
who study or work within it have
much in common with those other
sectors of the population under attack.
The rejuvenation of Solidarity
and its internal change go together.
The leadership will remain the same
unless thousands of people act to
change it. This can only happen if
those who left after last
November's sell-out return with a
new resolve, and bring with them
thousands of new faces. And if the
massive opposition which
developed in response to last July's
budget was built through marches
and demonstrations, then these
continue to be basic ways in which
opposition can redevelop.
In the face of a government
which is deadly serious, and which
has much more planned for the
future, we can not afford to sit on
our hands for three years until the
next scheduled election. If the offensive is to be stopped, then it is incumbent on all of us to take part in
the demonstration this Saturday.
Bill Coller
students against the budget
law
the parents using the daycares are
UBC students. One can conclude
that the centres are filling a vital
need by servicing the higher income
parents in the area — everyone but
students.
Unfortunately this seems to have
resulted in artificially inflated costs
for parents. Just a few miles away
in Kerrisdale is the Shannon Daycare. They charge $385.00 per
month for a union-run, under-three
daycare centre and they require no
duty time. Are UBC units extracting too much money for child care?
They had me over a barrel. How
could I morally set a price on what
my child's care is worth?
How did this huge cost-plus-duties discrepancy come about? The
perceptive economics student would
immediately suggest lack of competition.
A monopoly? Here are the facts.
The immigration department recently approached students on student visas and crushed a growing
body of in-home care givers. As the
federal departments are a slow-
moving machine, I assume someone
was responsible for stirring up the
trouble. As a victim, I reluctantly
took my child out of a home where
loving care had nurtured him for
over a year. Who had vested interest in eliminating the competition?
Enrolment at the units shot up immediately.
I took a partner and set up a
small, family-oriented daycare service. We made the hours and price
flexible and staffed it with local parents, thus insuring that wages returned to students' pockets.
We contacted the UBC daycare
coordinator for information on getting a provincial government license. In spite of the fact that her
wages are paid by the Alma Mater
Society, she was unresponsive to the
endeavor and wanted to charge us
$20 for a daycare pamphlet that is
available at no charge from the
ministry of health.
Further, she refused our request
to purchase craft supplies from a
central store that services the camp
units. She hinted that we would be
unable to get our daycare licensed
by Victoria. She wasn't too sure
which provincial employee we
should contact about a license application.
The AMS council voted us a generous grant pending approval of
our license. We met the ad nauseam
standards and regulations of the
fire department, the ministries of
health and human resources, at no
small cost. We sent in a budget, a
blueprint, references, facilities, past
experience, etc., and bought smoke
alarms and a fire extinguisher. Four
months went by without a word.
The coordinator was right and the
UBC units, which she administers,
have a monopoly on licenses. We
closed our centre.
In all fairness, the AMS executive
changes every year so it is not surprising that they were uninformed
about the monopoly. The ministries
lacked coordinated information
which, for some of us, is also not
surprising.which, for some of us, is
also not surprising. The only person
who has been in the system long
enough to coordinate, or stonewall,
information is the reluctant daycare
coordinator, Mab Oleman.
This woman now makes over
$30,000 a year from the AMS. She
doesn't help in bookkeeping for the
units. She hasn't brought in any
community or business money to
subsidize the faltering units. She
isn't a resource contact for the province, nor informative about their
procedures. She hasn't provided
daycare services appropriate for a
student's budget or timetable and
she is all but obstructive towards efforts to diversify the present system. She does, however, throw a lot
of tea parties. If the AMS can continue to pay this ceremonial dignitary, who lacks a job description, I
have a suggestion. Why don't we
double food prices in SUB, tack on
15 per cent for textbooks and build
this woman a castle for her ceremonies! As for the children of UBC
students — let them eat cake.
Patricia O'Brien
Croc rock
Crocodile hunting and cowboys
are not what the average Canadian
usually associates with Australia,
but Australian recording star Ted
Egan uses them to give a new meaning to the term "country folk
music" — that is, Australian folk
music.
Egan's personal experience with
the aboriginal peoples of
Australia's Northern Territory, and
his life as a reserve superintendent
and crocodile hunter in the Outback are reflected in his many
'bush' ballads and songs. Egan's
music is a blend of country and folk
which is deeply influenced by its
Irish roots.
His many gold albums have won
him numerous honors at the
Australian Country Music Awards
at Tamworth (Aussie's Nashville),
and he has officially represented
Aussie at many international
country-folk music festivals.
Egan also makes regular appearances on Australian radio and
television, including the Rolf Harris
Show.
Ted Egan will be performing in
the SUB auditorium this Monday,
March 26 at noon, as part of his
North American Tour to promote
"Aussie — The Land Down Under.
Under.
This concert is presented by the
Vancouver Adventure and Travel
Club (UBC), in conjunction with
Westcan Treks-Adventure Travel
and CP. Air. Susan E. Burns
biology 2
73-, 000 irresponsible reasons
The tactless way in which the issue of student society general manager
diaries Redden's recent salary increase was handled (AMS manager to get
$"fojfXX), March 27) exemplifies both the irresponsible behavior of many
UBC student politicians and the sensalionaJistic policy of The Ubyssey.
In disclosing Redden's annual salary to The Ubyssey, Alma Mater Society vice president Doug Low chose to make public what should have remained privileged information.
* there is no defensible reason for The Ubyssey's publication of anything
more than Redden's percentage salary increase. The decision to do so farther violated the confidentiality of the information and the trust placed hi
our student press.
JimTectter
arts 1
Staff note: the Atma Mater Society of UBC is a public, non-profit society funded by students, who nave a right to know how their money is being
spent. Page 14
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Rental act coming soon
A new residential tenancy act that
will eliminate the current rental
review board and result in massive
layoffs at the Rentalsman's office
may be introduced in the B.C.
legislature Monday.
Wayne Maceachern, coordinator
AMS criticized
Redden's for
salary increase
The student council executive's
decision to increase the Alma Mater
Society general manager's salary by
10 per cent violates the AMS bylaws.
The code says the general
manager's contract must be
renegotiated by the outgoing president and approved by a council
vote.
AMS vice-president Doug Low
said council was not consulted.
"I'm concerned about the process
by which this whole thing was
handled," Low said.
AMS president Margaret Copping said while the process contravened the code, past executives
directed the outgoing president and
the finance director to negotiate the
general manager's contract without
council input.
Low said general manager
Charles Redden's current salary of
$66,000 is fair without an increase
to $73,000, even though he thinks
Redden is doing a good job.
Low said the timing of the increase is inapropriate considering
fee increases, bursary and grant
reductions, bus fare increases and
student housing rent hikes.
"1 think we should bring in a
private consulting firm and evaluate
our goals and how much we should
be paying," he said.
Copping said Redden is very well
qualified and was hired in 1982 to
expand, diversify and improve
AMS services.
"We make a lot of money;
revenue areas have increased, diversified and improved," she said.
She said the expansion of revenue
— generating ventures under Redden has been an important "phase"
in the society's growth.
"When the expansion is complete
we will not be able to afford him,
nor will we need him, nor will he be
interested in staying." She added
that next year will be the last of the
three year expansion phase and
Redden will stay to see SUB renovations finished.
Copping said the salary increase
was required to persuade Redden to
stay. She claimed the salary was the
going rate for a manager of Redden's calibre.
Members of the Office and
Technical Employees Union who
last fall negotiated 11.5 per cent
salary increase over two years,
declined comment on the increase.
Davy Fatechand, arts 2, said the
increase was "damned disgusting. I
don't think anyone's worth that
much."
David Burgess, law 2, agreed
with the increase. He said it was
great if Redden was making money
for the AMS, but he added the
whole council should probably have
voted on it.
Low and Copping both agreed
the AMS place too much emphasis
on financial matters and not
enough on serving the student community.
Copping implied this service
would be a greater concern after the
"expansion phase" is over.
Arts council representative Duncan Stewart said the increase should
have been brought before council
on Wednesday.
for the B.C. Tenant's Rights
Association, said he expects a new
tenancy act in the current session of
the legislature because the government wants to continue the process
it started last June with the elimination of rent controls.
Although the government has
promised to keep some form of
review board,  Maceachern said it
probably will not include present
board members. "There will be a
new board of Socred appointees,"
he said.
Maceachern charged the government is attempting to reduce public
reaction and media attention by introducing the act when there are
labor unrests in the province.
"It makes sense for them to do it
tim langmead photo
TRY LOOKING AT IT FROM different angle, says Liberal cabinet
member to students. In fact, Secretary of State Serge Joyal, who is not
candidate for leadership of Grit party, and is not here for extra dose of
charisma, spoke on campus and at regional office. Joyal, who seemed
committed to student concerns, especially when informed of possible job
opening for AMS general manager, would not comment any further except
to smile slyly and mumble "That's damn good money." See story opposite and page 19.
Faculty and
in row over deficit
The university may implement a
controversial proposal abolishing
academic tenure even if professors
oppose the procedures, says UBC's
administration president. George
Pedersen rejected assertions made
by some angry professors that a
"No" vote April 4 will result in new
negotiations between the faculty
association and the administration.
"There were long, serious and genuinely thorough negotiations for
the agreement," Pedersen said.
"The agreement recognizes the
value of the faculty but it also
recognizes that the university faces
serious financial problems."
Last month, the faculty association executive and the administration negotiated conditions, which
abolish tenure and will result in
some professors being fired.
The proposals are under attack
from faculty, such as economics
professor Gideon Rosenbluth, an
outspoken critic of the agreement.
"If there is a 'no' vote, then the
faculty association can call upon
the administration to resume
negotiations for a new agreement,"
Rosenbluth said. "Under the collective bargaining agreement the
university has to bargain in good
faith."
But Pedersen said UBC cannot
afford to wait for new negotiations
because the university faces a $10
million deficit. "The fiscal year
starts April 1 and we cannot afford
to enter it not knowing where we
are going to come up with dollars."
Pedersen also rejected proposals,
including those put forth by UBC's
committee of concerned academics
and the Canadian Association of
University Teachers, which believe
salary cuts and closing the university for short intervals comprise a
viable alternative to abolishing
tenure.
"CAUT provisions would not
resolve our budget crisis in the next
year or the next five years. And pay
cuts will cause the best academics to
leave UBC," Pedersen said.
He said the administration is also
trying to raise money in the community: "We're in the process of
trying to identify someone to lead a
fund raising campaign."
One third of UBC's debt will
be offset by a 33 per cent increase in
tuition fees. The remaining debt
will be reduced if professors are
fired by procedures outlined in the
agreement, if it is approved by
faculty members April 4.
now with everything happening in
the province," he said.
Rentalsman Jim Patterson indicated in a recent meeting I hat he is
writing a new act for consumer and
Corporate affairs minister Jim
Hewitt, Maceachern added.
The present rental review board is
a body within the Rentalsman's office which reviews the cases of
tenants who have had their rents increased by more than 15 per cent.
The elimination of the board will
seriously reduce tenant's rights in
the province, Maceachern said.
Chris Eve, a New Democratic
party researcher, said the recent
provincial budget showed dramatic
reductions in the salary costs of the
Rentalsman's office next year. In
1983-84 the total expenditure for
salaries was $2,226,647, while only
$503,678 has been set aside for next
year. Total costs for the office have
been reduced by over 75 per cent.
Hewitt's executive assistant
Micky Perrett said he had not heard
about a new act being released
Monday, although he knew it
would be introduced in Ihe near
future.
Perret said the Rentalsman's
staff will be reduced when the new
act comes out. Although the current review board will be terminated
by next June, some of the
employees will be reinstated after
the changes have been made, he added.
"It is reasonable to assume that
some of those people will be retained because they have experience,"
Perret said.
Perret said the current review
board was struck after the removal
of rent controls last June, adding it
was an interim measure for the one-
year transition period between rent
control and a "marketplace that
will dictate the value of rents."
"Rent review is part of a phase-
down period. It buffers the shock
of the period between," said Perret.
Maceachern said the "bottom
line" of the government's plan is to
introduce a freemarket at the expense of tenant rights.
"As it is there is not enough protection. And it just seems to be getting worse," he said.
Joyal gives DTUC
a boost of hope
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Secretary of State Serge Joyal
gave supporters of Nelson's David
Thompson University Centre a
much-needed boost Thursday by
agreeing to fund an action committee dedicated to fighting the centre's
impending closure.
"I share your concern. We
should find ways to deal with your
problem," he told a Nelson delegation in the Secretary of State's Vancouver office."
But during the hour-long
meeting, Joyal made no firm corn-
mil ments on behalf of Ottawa to
keep the centre open by direct
federal funding.
Joyal said he was concerned
federal government moves to help
DTUC might send a signal to other
provinces that they flaunt previous
federal-provincial agreements.
Charging that B.C. was attempting to re-write the "rules of the
game" with its use of federally-
allocated education funding, and its
decision to close DTUC May 1,
Joyal said he is willing to push for
parliamentary action — including
withholding funds from provinces,
if they do not use funding for intended purposes.
Joyal used the analogy of a
bathtub without a federal plug to
retrain abuse by provinces. He said
the federal government has long
been concerned about such provincial abuse, adding: "If they change
the rules, we will change too. We'll
be in the same bathtub, and they
(the provinces) might not like the
water."
Joyal said provincial attack on
education funding is not restricted
to B.C., but he said Socred cuts are
tantamount to a return to the "dark
ages" and an assault on commitments Canadians had previously
assumed were inviolable.
Asked when he might direct his
ministry to help the DTUC action
committee, Joyal said: Tomorrow.'
Prior to making the commitment
to help fund attempts to stave off
closure, Joyal heard from the
Nelson delegation, including mayor
Louis Maglio.
"We don't think total closure is
warranted," Maglio said. "We
have an education centre and that's
what we want it for," he said, adding they will not use DTUC
buildings for any other purpose if
the provincial government gives
them control.
Earlier this week, B.C. education
minister Jack Heinrich rejected
Nelson's bid to buy DTUC for $1
because the provincial government
would still have to contribute funds
to keep it running.
Photos shock busriders
A man flashing grotesque pictures of aborted fetuses in metro
buses may be a UBC physics professor.
"I think we have tracked him
down. He's harmless but he does
have quirks," UBC traffic and security spokesman Terry O'Brenan
said.
The: man rides Vancouver buses
carrying graphic and disturbing pictures of aborted fetuses. He deliberately displays the pictures to other
bus passengers.
Commuter Valerie Wagar said
she is angry the man imposes his
anti-choice views on people in this
manner.
"It infuriates me this man can get
on a bus and attempt to further his
cause this way," Wagar said. "The
pictures are intended to gross out
the average person and are used for
pure shock value."
The metro transit bus company
and various UBC departments have
received numerous complaints
about the incidents which began last
September.
Metro transit security tried to
persuade him to stop carrying the
offensive pictures, but they cannot
lay any charges or bar him from
riding the buses because he has not
committed a crime, a metro transit
spokesperson said.
"There is nothing we can do legally about it," he added.
But Jack Pearson, administrative
secretary to the physics department,
said the department is looking into
the matter and it may be brought to
the dean.
A spokesperson for the women's
student office said women angry
about the incidents have also complained to her office. Page 16
THE    UBVSSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
Last summer CEC for students made available
Replacements.
If you're a sUident
looking for summer
work, you owe it
to yourself to visit your
nearest Canada
Employment Centre or
Canada Employment
One
~H     ~H    "H     Summi
could be
this>ear.
Centre for Students.
(In Alberta, see your Hire-A-Student Office.)
Through "Summer Canada 1984", in co-operation with
the private sector, opportunities are available in a variety of
fields for varying lengths of time.
This is your opportunity to acquire i'previous experience'!
Summer work is the ideal place to get real on-the-job
experience. And in a few years when a
prospective employer asks about previous
work experience, you'll have it. It's also a good
way of defining your future career goals, and at the very
least, it sure helps to fatten up your resume.
Looking at it in the short term, the money earned from a
summer job can go a long way to furthering your
education.
With 333,000 placements, one could
be right for you.
With this many placements, there is obviously a large
variety of jobs. There may be some in your area, in your
specific field of interest. We urge you to register soon while
the selection is the greatest.
Find out more by contacting your nearest Canada Employment Centre
or Canada Employment Centre for Students.
■♦
Employment and Emploi et
Immigration Canada Immigration Canada
John Roberts. Minister      John Roberts. Ministre
Canada Friday, March 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
$1.2M SUB proposal gets n
• II
A design for SUB expansion
received unanimous approval from
student council after a brief debate
Wednesday.
The contracted architects can
now begin drawing working plans
for the construction, which will cost
Council Briefs
$1.2 million, student board of
governors member Dave Frank
said.
Construction should start in May
and the proposed finishing date is
Sept. 15, Frank said. "We're not
going to rush it," he added, warning that construction may be
delayed.
But Arts representative Barbara
Waldern   said   she   feels   students
have not had any input into the
design.
However, Frank said, most
students refused to criticize the proposal.
When completed, the expansion
between SUB's south mall and the
swimming   pool   will   contain    a
restaurant, typing services and club
space.
*    *    *
Council also approved a $4,200
grant to produce a summer
Ubyssey, provided federal or provincial grants are given and the
paper realizes its projected ad
revenues.
Graduate student representative
Francisco Cabanas said summer
students pay AMS fees as well as
winter students and they should be
entitled to the same services winter
students receive, such as The
Ubyssey.
*    *    *
Vice-president Doug Low told
council the men's athletic committee may transfer the UBC football
team from the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletics Union (CIAU)
to the American Evergreen Conference. The SFU football team
now plays for the Evergreen conference.
"We're having a lot of problems
trying to cope with the CIAU's
stringent rules," Low said. He invited students and council members
to comment to him on the proposal.
In other business, council approved several other motions, including:
— arnold hedstrom photo
HOT NEW UK BAND THE FLYING PICKETS come to Vancouver for photo session at Pacific Press picket
lines, signalling new trend in contemporary labour scene. Band shown here visiting trio staffing union information picket. All six convinced Ubyssey reporter to write story on strike in time for Friday edition.
Sun and Province strike out
No talks are scheduled to end a
two day old strike at Pacific Press,
the publisher of the Sun and Province newspapers said Thursday.
Late Wednesday, just before the
Province newspaper was about to
go to press, the joint council of
unions withdrew services.
Joint council co-chair Alf
Wheeler said Thursday the union
wants to negotiate several items
which affect all or some of the
unions represented by the joint
council, but the company refuses.
The company will only discuss its
own issues, he said.
Company   negotiator   George
Townsend was unavailable for comment.
Wheeler said the unions want a
wage increase over a two year contract comparable to other settlements in the Southam chain,
which owns Pacific Press.
Earlier in the talks, the
Newspaper guild which represents
clerical and editorial staff left the
joint council and now are
negotiating with a government appointed mediator.
The two sides served lockout and
strike notice respectively March 16,
and have been without a contract
since the end of February.
In response to the strike, the
Globe and Mail has increased its
local press run by 3,000 to 28,000
LovE
iy^QuicheS
5
*A   A
, \
K
*,
£ATIT!
We've got a tasty new \Mev\v,
ib3 our latest kit...
•Wildly delicjoos appetizer
• four flasuv head liguts
• snappy salads
• 2.0 creative burgegs
• CRAZY STUFFED SPUDS
CREATIVE COCKTAILS $ KAlXbUTY COFFEE3
CREATtVI   FOOD  £ 8EVERASE  CO
VOVJVST CAN'TBEMIT[
■lbie> Yew st • V/3. Blfc.s frorw Kita Beach -733-3933>
• a motion to place a $200
advertisement in The Ubyssey
publicizing this spring's Walk for
Peace, provided other organizations match their contribution;
• a motion in principle supporting the Job Link program recommended by external affairs coordinator Nancy Bradshaw. Job Link
is a listings service for students seeking summer employment. Bradshaw
said the program will hire two
students and help make work for
other students;
• the hiring committee's proposals, which make Debra Bellamy
next year's ombudsperson and
Chris Wong the editor of next years
Inside UBC, the information handbook the AMS publishes. Wong is
an editorial collective member on
this year's Ubyssey.
PRESENTATION HOUSE PRESENTS
DANCEWORKS-UBC in
FRIDAY, MARCH 30-8:30 P.M.
CENTENNIAL THEATRE, 123 e 23rd, n. Van.
TICKETS: $6 & $4 (students & seniors) AMS Ticket Office
Information: 228-6668
Sports Network!
We'll video tape your sporting event
for replay here at P.J. Burger &■ Sons.
You got it! Our ace video cameraman can
arrive at your game, tape the tasty
highlights and have them racked up and
ready to watch half-an-hour later in our
restaurant!
The cost? Zip!
Just enjoy your after-the-game festivities
with us (and yourself on video tape!)
Reserve your game's coverage in advance. Simply call the manager for details!
So lights! Camera! Action! The P.J. Burger
& Sons Sports Network is on the air! And
we're always looking for new victims . . . uh
. . STARS!
Eat your heart out,
Howard Cosell!
Richmond -270-6694 Kitsilano-734-8616 Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
m*
<UJ0&fi
TODAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
Buy tickets for the UBC GALA HALL. Drop by or
call the club office for tickets at 228-3248.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Beer Garden at 4:30 p.m. in SUB 205. There will
be elections or 84-85 executives, door prize
Ihelmet), and a guest speaker. Cheap beer.
PALESTINE EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Film, "On Our Land," arabic snacks, and
speaker at 6:30 p.m., in International House —
upstairs. Cost $3.
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Folk night featuring "Culloden," 8 p.m.-l a.m.,
garden room, graduate student association centre.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Student reading, 8 p.m., Home Ec 60, free admission.
SATURDAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
The 22nd annual Gala Ball along with the B.C.
open    championships    and    featuring    world
champs Michael and Vicky Barr, 7 p.m.! a.m.,
The Hellenic centre, 4500 St.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Pub nite, 7 p.m. 12 a.m.. Hut M-27.
THUNDERBIRD ROWING
UBC Invitational Regatta, all day, Burnaby Lake
rowing centre. Featuring national team crews.
EAST INDIANS STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Banquet tickets sold out,  dance starts at 9:30
p.m.. Sandman Inn, 180 W. Georgia St. Dance
ticket cost $5 person.
MONDAY
DANCEWORKS COMPANY
Audition for company dancers and students in
professional training program, 1 p.m.-5 p.m.,
No. 206-1420 Marine Drive.
FOURTH YEAR FINE ARTS STUDENTS
An show, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Monday-Friday,
A.M.S. gallery, SUB main concourse.
TUESDAY
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Regular meeting at 12:00 p.m. Newcomers
welcome. Conference room, Lutheran Campus
Center.
BAHAI CLUB OF UBC
Films and discussion on peace and disarmament
from both the Bahai perspective and secular
perspective. 8:00 p.m. at International House
Lounge.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for spring classes which will be held
in the music room of the Asian Center.
11:30-2:30 at SUB Foyer, main concourse.
HISTORY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
End of the year Party: Come dressed as your
favourite historical character, 7:30 p m. 12:30
a.m., garden room   -  gard centre.
BALLET'UBC#JAZZ
Registration for spring classes, 12:30-1:30 p.m.,
main concourse, SUB foyer.
THE BAHAI CLUB
INtroductory film on the Baht Faith, 12:30 p.m.,
International house lounge.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Guest lecturer: Dale Maranda on "The Essence
of True Leadership," 12:30, BUCH D327.
friendly Technology Corporation
USER FRIENDLY COMPUTER SOLUTIONS
KAYPRO II Only $1,999
KAYPRO 4 (new enhanced) $2,888
KAYPRO 10 (ten megabytes) $4,195
With any kaypro purchase you'll receive
$2,500 worth of FREE SOFTWARE.
Come to Friendly Technology
Corporation in downtown Vancouver
the home of
- HARDWARE
- SOFTWARE
- KNOWWARE
Friendly Technology Corporation
1161 Melville Street-Vancouver, B.C.
682-6408
MICROCOMPUTER
SALESPERSON
We are an established growing
microcomputer sales organization
who are looking to fill two
positions:
1. In-store microcomputer sales.
2. Direct sales of
microcomputers to
professionals and businessmen.
Previous experience in the area of
business sales is necessary and
knowledge of microcomputers an
asset.
Remuneration will be
commensurate with experience and
performance.
Please send resume to the
Personnel Manager.
Key Computer
1920 West Broadway
Phone 738-3541
OPEN 10-6 MONDAY to SATURDAY
Danceworks    —    UBC,    an    inovative
new dance ensemble will be making its spring
debut, 8:30 p.m., Centennial theatre, 123 East
23 ave., N. Van. The performance is
choreographed originally by Jennifer Mascall,
Barbara Bourget, and Jay Hirabayashi.
Tickets are $6 and $4 for students and seniors.
For more information phone 228-6668.
Monday noon.
That is the last time you will have
to submit Tweens, letters, perspectives, subpoenas, etc. to The
Ubyssey for this academic year. The
final rag of the year (cheers!) is
coming out Wednesday, and we
need lots of time, so like, we kind a
need your stuff early.
Remember, Monday, 12:30 p.m.
Precisely.
YUKON JACK ATTACK 3
The Bear Bite.
Squeeze the juice of a
quartered lime over ice
\,   Throw in 1'/2 ounces of
\U Yukon Jack, top it up with
". cola and you'll have trapped
\ the Bear Bite. Inspired
'  in the wild, midst the
damnably cold, this, the
, black sheep of Canadian
\'  liquors, is Yukon lack.
Mjkonjack
The black sheep of Canadian liquors. Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
For more Yukon Jack recipes write: MORE YUKON JACK RECIPES,
Box 2710, Postal Station "U," Toronto, Ontario M8Z 5P1.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial - 3 lines.
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977. —US*
5 - COMING EVENTS
BOWREN LAKE
CANOE TRIP
Little or No Experience
Required
JUNE 8-17
TOTAL COST: $545/per.
For info, call:
Barbara Milne - 228-7428
Chris Harris - 266-3381
CYCLISTS: Leopard skin cycling pants and
shorts. Custom fit. Great for dancers, too.
222-2412.
BEST BIKE EVER MADE. Must sell 82
Suzuki 400cc excellent condition 8000
km $1200 or best offer. Phone Ted
687-5237 mornings.
73 CHRYSLER SWINGER. Slant 6 cyl.
Green. Excellent running order. $1000 OBO
261-3266.
80 - TUTORING
15 - FOUND
FOUND: Calculator by cubicle in Sedgewick
2776180.
20 - HOUSING
NEED A TUTOR
TO PASS THAT
FINAL?
Tutor referral for nearly all
faculties available at
SPEAKEASY
Drop by SUB concourse or phone
228-3777
Open 9:30 a.m.-7:30 a.m.
Monday - Friday
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
free public lecture
THE UNITY OF
THE ARTS
and the Early Baroque
Opera House
Prof. Irving Lavin,
Princeton University
SATURDAY, MARCH 31
at 8:15 p.m.
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building
ROOMMATE(S) M/F req'd to share 2 br.
apt. for winter session Sept. '84-May '85.
University Village Location, pool, d.w.
Prefer quiet n/s. 228-9102 eves.
SUBLET: Fully furnished 1 bdrm apt.
May 1-Aug. 31. Sunny grnd fl with patio. 15
min to UBC $500 mo. 261-3266.
85 - TYPING
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT. GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
ESSAYS, term papers, reports, etc. Writer
with extensive academic exper. can assist
with research, writing editing. 682-1043.
TYPWRITING
Essays,    Resumes,    Tapes
transcribed
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED
U.B.C. Village location
224-6518 DAY or NIGHT
30 - JOBS
ONE SESSION ONLY
BEAT THE E.C.T.
attend    an   afternoon    seminar
(previous pass rate - 75%) especially
designed    for    ENGLISH    100
students, and learn all the skills and
techniques necessary to pass. Full
notes provided. Pre-register by April
6. 1:00- 5:00 P.M.
Sunday, April 8, 1984
SUB 213 Fee $35.00
contact:    L.A.    Johanson,    B.A.
(Hons.) 732-1593
Summer Study Tour Of
POLAND
May 30 - June 26, 1984
Four weeks of seminars on Polish art,
history and culture, and guided tours of
Warsaw, Cracow, Zakopane, Lancut,
Kazimierz and Lublin - all in English or
French. Total cost of $1,400 includes
return airfare between Montreal and Warsaw, 28 nights in first-class hotels, three
meals per day, and all transportation
within Poland. For more information call
George Tacik at 683-4739.
Commercial Printing Shop, well established in
Lower Fraser Valley, seeks ambitious individuals
for marketing-oriented sales positions. Successful applicants will be responsible for
establishing and servicing new accounts. Compensation package includes commissions, car
expense, and extended medical plan.
Send resume outlining skills to:
Calli Printers Ltd.,
20339 Fraser Hwy.,
Langley V3A 4E8
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: 16 healthy male
125/40 yrs.) volunteers are needed for two
pharmacokinetic studies involving drug intake and blood sampling. An honorarium of
$80.00 will be paid for each study. For
detailed info, and consent forms please
contact: Dr. Charles Kerr, Fac. of Medicine
873-5441 Hoc 3032) or Ram Kapil. Fac.
Pharm. Sci. 228-6772.
40 - MESSAGES
MAY THE PRINCESS OF U.B.C.  REIGN
TONIGHT AND ALWAYS.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
EXCELLENT TYPIST, IBM, AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0351.
NEW   SONY   SERIES   36   w/p   SYSTEM
installed. Have your essay, resumes &
manuscripts done on the best. We have
special rates for students. Four years in
business at 266-6814.
W/P & typing: term papers, theses, mscpt.,
essays, incl. reports, letters, resumes, Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
SAME DAY SERVICE. Fast, accurate,
typing. Reasonable rates. 734-8451.
EXPERT TYPING. Fast, accurate, reliable.
Near Arbutus/King Edward. 8.50 hr. Agni.
736-1544
65 - SCANDALS
FAST, accurate typing of term papers.
Rush jobs accepted. $1.25/page. Phone
732-0364.
SURE SHE'S GOOD LOOKING ... But it
was her personalized bumper sticker from
theT-Bird shop in SUB that caught my eye.
DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS
DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS
DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS
DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS DIRBY DAYS
WHAT A DEALI Fast, accurate, reliable
typing for $1.00 per page! Call Kathy
266-8498.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
TOSHIBA KT-R2. similar to walkman but
w/ recording AM /FMandA/C adapter (List
$380.00) $160.00. 688-5875
WASHBURN TANGLEWOOD acoustic
electric guitar w/case and accessories.
Sacrifice I List $905.00) $375.00 688-5875.
70 - SERVICES
FAST accurate typist available for manuscripts, theses, resumes, essays, etc.
$1.00/page. Refs. avail. 736-1305.
QUALITY TYPING on short notice. Reports
essays, resumes, etc. Reasonable rates.
688-5884.
RESUME SERVICE - Professionally written
word processor typed. Call Rick.
Reasonable rates. 732-9127.
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
90 - WANTED
SWAP: V & F 16 mm Film & 16 mm sound
projector for small portable tape recorder or
photographic recorder or photographic
equipment. 435-3104 John. Friday, March 30, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
Pulp mills, Expo to be open
Premier Bill Bennett ordered the
province's idled pulp industry back
to work and told British Columbians Expo 86 will be open to both
union and non-union companies in
a televised speech Thursday.
Bennett said the labor climate in
B.C. threatens the world's fair and
that the head of Expo, Jim Pat-
tison, would tell the cabinet in 10
days if the province will go ahead
with the fair or bail out early to
minimize cost and
"embarassment."
Bennett said Expo 86 had frozen
$114 million worth of contracts affecting 500 jobs until assurances
can be given that there won't be
cost overruns or delays. But Bennett
stressed the site will be open to all
workers — union nd non-union.
In the first eight minutes of his
speech the premier described the
province's labor situation which
has put "worker against worker"
and crippled the province's
recovery.
He said while the province has
tried to create a climate for interna
tional investment B.C. will have to
become more competitive to
achieve the goal.
But in the last 12 minutes Bennett
turned to two specific labor
disputes which have dominated,
and have given the province national and international notoriety.
In the industry lockout of the
Pulp and Paper and Woodworker's
of Canada Bennett said a government mediator would be appointed
to resolve the dispute.
He gave the industry 72 hours to
reopen the mills.
B.C. policy wrong — feds
By PATTI FLATHER
"The government of B.C. as well
as others is making serious errors
with its post-secondary education
policies," Secretary of State Serge
Joyal charged Thursday.
In a speech to 150 enthusiastic
UBC faculty in Math 100, Joyal attacked the provincial government's
higher education policy. He said the
B.C. government is reducing accessibility with its cutbacks in
higher education funding and promised a new education task force
will seek more secure financing arrangements.
Joyal challenged all provinces to
pass on federal increases according
to the Established Programs Financing agreement. He also called on
the B.C. government to honor its
commitment to student aid.
The federal government will
respect provincial jurisdiction for
education according to the Canadian constitution, but will refuse to
see higher education suffer in their
provincial boundaries, Joyal said.
"Universities are national institutions," he said to considerable applause.
But faculty questioned Joyal
after his speech. One faculty
member charged the rate of increase
in federal contributions to education is decreasing. But Joyal
disagreed: "We have maintained a
fair level of growth in EPF
payments."
Joyal said the education task
force will consider bypassing provincial governments and directly
find needy students. But radical
reforms in federal-provincial education funding arrangements must be
preceeded   by   public   debate   and
eventual consensus among the provinces, he said.
Later Thursday, Joyal met with
10 Lower Mainland student politi-
cions and representatives in his
regional office. He urged students
to propose concrete ideas on how
the federal government can pressure
the provincial government to
reverse harmful post-secondary
education policies.
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Drop by before May 15, 1984 and
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Experienced University framers, we
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 30, 1984
Gears decline sexism debate
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
leaders of engineering students
often love to flaunt sexist attitudes
in front of each other and the rest
of the education community, but
they aren't willing to face public
debate on the issue.
A report in the Winnipeg Free
Press said the University of
Manitoba engineering council has
flatly refused to meet with a group
called Men Against Sexism or participate in a public forum, according to group spokesperson Bruce
Wood.
Engineering council president
Jeff Mitchell said they have better
things to do than listen to the
group.
"If they want to make a stand, let
them have their fun," he said.
Mitchell also denied they had
been asked to take part in a forum.
Men Against Sexism and another
group, Men Against Pornography,
started campaigning against sexism
in the engineering council after last
fall's annual strip show held on
campus.
Men Against Pornography
bought an ad in the student
newspaper and littered the campus
with posters condemning the strip
shows.
U of M student union vice president Tina Hellmuth liked the idea
of a debate, adding the engineers
might learn something from listening to men with different perspectives.
Wood said his group decided to
ask the engineer's council to meet
with them after a demonstration by
the campus women's centre was
disrupted by the engineers.
Women's centre member Kate
Harrington said support from the
men's groups is important because
the engineers "can't dismiss us as
radical feminists out to destroy the
world."
She said pornographic magazines
and strip shows encourage men to
see women as objects and to treat
them violently.
There were several cases of sexual
assault reported on campus last
year.
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