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The Ubyssey Oct 16, 1981

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 14
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 16,1981
228-2301
Arts on the chopping block
By BRIAN JONES
Liberal arts education is coming under increasingly disparaging and blatant
attacks. There is a growing demand in some circles that universities concentrate on providing "practical" education rather than "frivolous" liberal arts
education.
At the heart of the debate is an examination of the university's goals and purposes in
our society. At one extreme is the belief the
university should provide the student with
practical training which will allow him or her
to obtain a productive job upon graduation.
The other extreme holds the belief that the
university should provide the student with an
opportunity to obtain a general education, an
understanding of the "human condition."
Although open to many interpretations, this
usually involves the pursuit of personal
enlightenment and the development of an
ability to critically analyze our society.
Reality falls somewhere between the two
extremes. Depending on the perspective, recent trends in post-secondary funding at both
the federal and provincial level are encouraging or disastrous.
Provincial universities deputy minister
Robert Stewart's recent leter to the Universities Council of B.C. is a case in point.
Stewart suggests in his letter that universities
"make substantial adjustments in the programs they are providing, in order to meet
the evolving needs of society."
According to Stewart's letter the government translates the "evolving needs of society" into more graduates from business administration, engineering and medicine.
Redirecting the modern university will
have a profound impact on the so-called non-
practical disciplines, especially the liberal
arts. Stewart says in fact, "these increases
will have to be compensated — probably
overcompensated — by decreases in lower
priority areas. It may, for example, be
necessary to eliminate certain programs
altogether ..." There can be little doubt
that "lower priority areas" are liberal arts
programs, even though Stewart refrains from
being that concise.
And what exactly does Stewart mean when
he suggests decreases in "lower priority
areas?" According to Hugh Greenwood,
geology professor and faculty elected board
member there is no ambiguity about
Stewart's intention—that liberal arts programs should be limited.
"The board of governors is aware of the
letter, and its implications,"  says  Green-
the university community itself seems to be
undecided about the issue. Administration
and faculty members have offered varying
viewpoints.
The faculty association like the board
has yet to take a stand on the issue of funding
priorities. "It's a difficult issue for the faculty association to have an opinion on until we
have really looked into the issue," says An
drew Brockett, an association spokesperson.
"At this point we can't comment on it
because there's no clear position common
among all the faculty members," he says.
But according to  UBC political science
professor   Phil   Resnick,   subjecting   the
The market
should not determine
what universities do.
Universities were never
meant for job training
wood. "The board has discussed it, but has
passed no resolutions."
The federal government is more direct.
Employment and immigration minister Lloyd
Axworthy recently tabled a report that, according to a recent article in University Affairs magazine, "has the potential to change
the character of Canadian universities," and
"contains a sweeping set of proposals that
could lead to a complete restructuring of
Canada's university and training system."
The report urges a redirection of universities toward emphasis on programs which
correspond to society's labor requirements.
Put simply, the university will be influenced
by the marketplace.
Although both the provincial and federal
government's intentions are readily apparent,
JttflKH
S-***»
university to the fluctuating demands of the
job market could seriously alter the character
of higher education.
"The market should not determine what
universities do," says Resnick. "Such a
policy will emasculate the university. Universities were historically never meant for professional job training," he says.
Educational institutions should not merely
provide job training for young people, he
adds, because the study and knowledge of the
liberal arts is essential to the good society.
Resnick says he condemns the
''if-things-can't-pay-their-way-
let's-forget-about-them" mentality that is
currently being applied not only to education, but many other services and institutions. "One could think that society has
other values that it would like to put forward
other than the buying and selling of goods."
Resnick says he does not deny there is a
need for job-oriented programs within the
university, but feels that "we are talking
about things more important than the concerns of market analysts and econometri-
cians."
There are those who disagree. G. D.
Hobbs, a government appointed board of
governors member, says universities are
headed in an appropriate direction. "It is important that students have training that will
fit them for the market, if that is their interest. The demand is from the students, not
the government," Hobbs adds.
He says he rejects the idea that federal and
provincial governments are trying to influence university programs. "There's no
possibility of the government telling the
board of governors or the senate how to run
the university's academic affairs."
The available evidence contradicts
Hobbs' statements. Axworthy's report and
Stewart's letter to the UCBC reflect a trend
toward greater government involvement with
an influence upon the programs offered at
universities.
Is there, or will there be, government
pressure on universities to offer more practical programs at the expense of other, less
practical programs? "I would not be surprised," says Robert Kelly, a UBC commerce
professor and faculty elected senate member.
"I'm not justifying it, t. ,'s just what I read
as the government's attitude," he adds.
Commenting on Stewart's letter to the
UCBC, Kelly says "my suspicion is that it is
more or less an official attitude, rather than
one man's."
Kelly adds that it is the students who
are demanding the change toward practical
programs. "The students themselves are
making the choice," he says. "The government does not have the capacity to do that,
except indirectly."
The issue must also be examined from both
angles,   says   Kelly.   "It   would   do   great
damage  to  universities  if there   were  no
general arts and science programs. They are
See page 8: Science Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1981
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
ECONOMICS:
a complex field where
Reagan's slogans wont work
Despite the efforts of the Reagan Administration and Time magazine to reassure
America and the rest of the world that the
government's economic program will work,
doubts are growing. With the 150 point fall
of the Dow Jones Industrial A verage from an
April high, investors have demonstrated that
Reagan's program is what vice president
George Bush called it during the primary
campaign — "voodoo economics. "
Will Reaganomics prove to be a
disastrous last ditch attempt to revive a
faltering economic system? Was Canadian
prime minister Pierre Trudeau right when he
muttered on television in 1974 that "the
market economy no longer works?"
Economists Paul Sweezy and Harry Magdoff
would answer a resounding "Yes" to the
above.
Sweezy and Magdoff edit the renowned
New York based socialist journal Monthly
Review. Sweezy was co-author of the classic
Monopoly Capital with the late Paul Baran.
They probably don't have much of a following within UBC's economics department nor
the rest of the profession.
It would not be surprising considering their
unorthodoxy. They don't teach at a
prestigious university (although Sweezy did a
stint at Stanford) or make forecasts for a
large corporation. And after all they've been
questioning the very foundations of the
capitalist system for a few decades.
The Ubyssey's Paul Kaihla talked to these
self-described 'rag-tag economists" last summer during a visit to New York. The interview took place in the Monthly Review's offices which overlook the busy intersection of
14th St. and Sixth Ave. in lower Manhattan.
What kind of economic system are you advocating?
Sweezy: I'm not advocating any specific
type of economy. I am generally speaking,
REAGANOMICS
a sticky economic mess 'certain to be discredited'
SWEEZY AND MAGDOFF . . .
convinced that an economy which is organized as the present capitalist economy, by
private corporations — for profit — is so full
of contraditions and fatal flaws, that
ultimately it simply won't be able to continue
to exist. Therefore an alternative method of
organizing the ultilization of resources to
make the things we need to continue1 to exist
as a society will have to be devised.
But I don't have any specific blueprint of
what that economy should look like. Milton
Friedman's and supply-side economists'
assumption has been that government deficit
financing has spurred inflation by creating
money with no goods to back the expansion
— "too many dollars chasing too few
goods."
Sweezy: This is nonsense. In the first place,
by far the largest amount of purchasing
power is created not by government deficits,
but private.
The private debt in the last 25 years, last 30
years, has grown 1600 per cent, and public
debt 400 per cent — something like that. And
it's not at all a question of not being able to
produce enough goods.
The fact of the matter is that because of
monopoly, rigid controls of various kinds,
subsidies and what not, prices go up continuously under the increasing demand
generated by growth of debt — mostly
private.
It does that in a way to prevent the full
utilization of the productive resources of this
society. So inflation is by no means simply
the creation of more money chasing too few
goods. That's an old oversimplified and
discredited view which unfortunately a lot of
people like Friedman and to a certain extent
supply-side economists, are reviving.
Although after the Great Depression these
ideas were thoroughly discredited, they're
going to be discredited again by the time
Reagan and Mrs. Thatcher get done proving
how wrong they are.
How does the creation of private debt increase demand and hence inflation?
Magdoff: Now in this period of stagnation, the way the economy has functioned
has been through the extreme use of credit.
Consumers have been stimulated to buy more
through easier credit. The banks and financial institutions have promoted credit,
stimulated credit in order to get this demand
up. So that for example in the United States
at the end of World War Two, the normal
credit arrangements in the purchase of an
automobile was that the loan would be repaid
in 18 months; when business got slow this 18
months was spread out to three years.
Now the purchase of a car is paid out in
four and five years. The same thing was done
with housing with the easing of mortgage
loans, where in some areas of the United
States you don't even have to put down a
cash payment.
The other form of credit stimulation is in
the business community itself, through the
extension of credit to purchasers of supplies
and intermediate products — wholesalers
and retailers. This use of extra money supports the demand for the goods produced in
the stagnant economy. And finally it's the
banks who have pushed the creation of
money because that's their business, they
make a profit out of the amount of money
that they themselves produce, and they
themselves have become borrowers in order
to do that.
It is this form of coping with stagnation
that has stimulated the inflationary process,
in a rigidly organized economy where industry is concerned.
Taking that into consideration what then
are the motives behind Friedman's panacea?
Magdoff: Well, it's not a question of
motives behind Friedman. Friedman's ideas
are old hat, reactionary, and have been proven wrong over and over again. It's the fact
that you rely on the market, that the market
can solve all the problems if you just let it
alone.
We've now had several hundred years of
experience under capitalism with periods
when there was a relatively free market; the
controls that have been instituted are because
of the failures of the market economy. The
market economy purely without any social
intervention creates enormous disparities in
wealth between different classes and regions.
Now what Friedman says is if you just let
everything alone, these issues become adjusted. It's a reactionary political position
that has no basis either in theory or history.
He points to Japan as the great example of
pure free enterprise. Well he's just absolutely
wrong and everyone knows he's wrong.
While capitalism is rampant in Japan, a considerable amount of its success is due to state
intervention and subsidies. He gets away with
it because he is saying things that are popular
in certain areas and he says them boldly and
simply. When people are confused arid
uncertain they grasp for slogans. It also happens to be convenient as far as the government and banking community are concerned
... if anything it would help to protect the
. . . rag-tag economists in Big Apple
profits.
Sweezy: I'm just going to add to what Harry
said about the market. There's probably been
no  period  in
See page .6: CAPITALISTS Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1981
ipt a
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AMERICAN
ATR0C/TIE5
IN 1970, THE PEOPLE OF CHILE ELECTED A MARXIST PRESIDENT,
SALVADOR ALLENDE. HIS GOVERNMENT* IMMEDIATELY  IMPLEMENTED  SWEEPING  REFORMS,
INCLUDING THE NATIONALISATION
OF THE  FOREIGN e NATIONAL
MONOPOLIES -US. COPPER  MINES,
THE   I.T.T-OWNED TELEPHONE
SYSTEM, BANKS, CARS, AND OTHERS.
OTHER REFORMS. INCLUDING: FREE
HEALTH   PROGRAMS, THE APPLICATION OF AGRARIAN REFORM,
A FREE MILK PROGRAMME  FOR CHILDREN (IN 1970, 507o OF CHILEAN CHILDREN WERE UNDERFED, 600,000 OF WHICH
WERE MENTALLY   RETARDED DUE TO
mm DIET DEFICIENCIES). IN 7973, ALLENDE
F*- WAS DEAD, A VICTIM OF A U. S. - BACKED COUP THAT CLAIMED 30,000 LIVES,
VICTIMS OF TORTURE e STATE TERRORISM.
r»itecT
■ WHOLE
^spt,kh«!
WHEN ALLENDE  WAS  ELECTED, US.
BUSINESS e GOVERNMENT   WERE
ALARMED -PR/MARLY   THOSE WHO
STOOD TO LOSE   THE   MOST: THE
BIG U.S.   MINING COMPANIES, THE
ROCKEFELLER-CONTROLLED
AUACONDA MINES BEING THE &IGGEST.
THE US REACTION CAN SE BEST
SUMMED   UP /N A QUOTE  BY
HENRY KISSINGER
WELL-KNOWN
CRIMINAL-"
WAR
I DON'T SEE WHY WE
NEED  TO STANO BY
AMD WATCH A COUNTRY,
GO COMMUNIST DUE
TO THE IRRESPONS-
iBlLITy OF ITS
OWN PEOPLE."
THE MONEY MACHINE COT
TO WORK. THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK,
THE WORLD BANK, AND THE
CLUB OF PARIS   SUSPENDED
MOST LOANS AND ALMOST
ALL CREDITS TO THE NEW
CHILEAN  GOVERNMENT. ECONOMIC CHAOS RESULTED.
.BUT THE AMERICAN GOVERNMENT]
DID GRANT THE MILITARY A
6 MILLION  DOLLAR CREDIT/
WITH THE ECONOMIC TURMOIL AND
THE GROWING THREAT OF A FASCIST
COUP, THE RIGHT WING PLACED THEIR
HOPES ON  THE MARCH  73 ELECTIONS.
ALLENDE  WON EASILY, TAKING 44%
OF THE VOTE( HE HAD 36.3% OF THE
VOTE  IN THE   1970 ELECTION).THE FORCES
OF REPRESSION!   REACTED  BY MOVING
INTO  HIGH GEAR. THE ARMY PURGED
ITSELF OF PROGRESSIVE  MEMBERS
AND BEGAN STOCKPILING ARMS AND
SUPPLIES. THE MILITARY   INCREASED
THEIR RAIDS ON  FACTORIES AND WORKERS
QUARTERS LOOKING FOR WEAPONS,
ON JUNE 0.9^,1973* AN
ILL-PREPARED COUP
ATTEMPT   FAILED. IT
TURNED OUT TO BE
A DRESS REHEARSAL
FOR THE   Vth
OF SEPTEMBER,
THE 2EAL
THING.
THE PRESIDENTIAL  PALACE  WAS SURROUNDED.
THOSE INSIDE, INCLUDING ALLENDE, REFUSED
TO SURRENDER. THE   PALACE WAS BOMBED,
AND ALL  INSIDE   DIED. THOUSANDS OF CIVILIANS WERE  KILLED, TORTURED , OR
PLACED  INTO MAKESHIFT CONCENTRATION
CAMPS. STRONG RESISTANCE MET THE  FASCISTS AT SOME  FACTORlES,SO THEY   USED
NAPALM. MASS BOOK BURNINGS WERE
HELD.
THE MILITARY  DECLARED ITSELF THE MEW GOVERNMENT. A JUNTA   WAS  FORMED, CONSISTING OF THE
HEADS OF THE ARMY, AIRFORCE, NAVY,i POLICE.
LEFT-WING PARTIES WERE   DECLARED    ILLEGAL,
AND   ALL OTHER        _        POLITICAL  PARTIES
WERE   "RECESSED".   POSSIBLY  150,000 PEOPLE
PASSED  THROUGH THE JUNTA'S  JAILS, AND UP
TO 300,000  FORCED TO FLEE THE COUNTRY.
STRIKERS WERE SUMMARILY   EXECUTED. USE OF
TORTURE  IS A STANDARD PRACTICE. FORlEGM INVESTMENT, PARTICULARLY U.S. INVESTMENT, WAS
ENCOURAGED   BY THE JUNTA.
IN A TESTIMONY TO A US.
CONGRESSIONAL COMMITEE ON
APRIL 22nd, 1975, WILLIAM COLBY
(DIRECTOR OF THE CLA. IN 1973)
DESCRIBED CHILE AS A "PROTOTYPE
OR LABORATORY EXPERIMENT TO
TEST THE TECHNIQUES OF HEAVY
FINANCIAL INVESTMENT IN AN
EFFORT TO BRING DOWN A
GOVERNMENT." OVER $8 MILLION
WAS MADE AVA1LA8LE FOR USE IN
MANIPULATING CHILEAN  POLITICS
BETWEEN   1970-73.
PINOCHET, HEAD OF THE CHILEAN
AP.MV  AMD PRESENT DICTATOR
OF CHILE HAS STATED   I HAT THE
JUNTA WILL STAY IN POWER
"UNTIL A NEW GENERATION   (S
FORMED? SINCE 1973, HITLER AND
MUSSOLINI HAVE BEEN REQUIRED
READING IN CHILEAN SCHOOLS.
WELL KIDS, WERE OUT OF SPACE. THERE'S
LOTS  OF STUFF THAT WAS'NT DISCUSSED
HERE,THOUGH - l.T.T.'S INVOLVEMENT
IN THE COUP, THE PRESENCE OF THE
US, NAVY  IN CHILE AT THE TIME OF
THE C0UP,D£SCR|PTIONS OF WHAT HAPPENED IN THE ''DETENTION CAMPS"-
AND LOTS MORE. SO HERE'S SOME
BOOKS   ON THE SUBJECT : "INTRODUCTION TO CHILE (A CARTOON HISTORY)  BY
CHRIS WELCH, AMD 'CHILE'S DAYS OF
TERROR" BY EYEWITNESSES   OF THE
COUP. Friday, October 16,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Expectations conflict,
characters blend
a timeless dilemma of happy endings
confronted with agony of choice
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
She turned to look at him — or so it
seemed to Charles through him. It was
not so much what was positively in that
face which remained with him after that
first meeting, but all that was not as he
had expected; for theirs was an age
when the favored feminine look was the
demure, the obedient, the shy. Charles
felt immediately as if he had trespassed;
as if the Cobb belonged to that face, and
not the Ancient Borough of Lyme. It was
not a pretty face, like Ernestina's. It was
certainly not a beautiful face, by any
period's standard of taste. But it was an
unforgettable face, and a tragic face. Its
sorrow welled out of it as purely, naturally and unstoppably as water out of a
woodland spring. There was no artifice
there, no hypocrisy, no hysteria, no
mask; and above ail, no sign of madness.
The madness was in the empty sea, the
empty horizon, the lack of reason for
such sorrow; as if the spring was natural
in itself, but unnatural in welling from a
desert. _ John Fowles,
The French Lieutenant's Woman
It is 1981. The waves splash violently
against the limestone coastal borders of
Lyme Regis. There, a film crew has arrived to film an adaption of John Fowles'
The French Lieutenant's Woman. An actress walks across the set confidently.
She is wearing a black coat that is slightly too large for her. The hood covers her
head and obscures her face. She glides
towards the edge of the wet quarry.
Gophers and gaffers are moving about
hurriedly, setting up props for the next
scene. A clapper board appears on the
screen and snaps shut. Everything is
set.
Silence.
It is 1867. The woman in the black garb
is Sarah Woodruff. She is staring out to
sea as the waves assault her and soak
her face. She is waiting for her former
lover, the French Lieutenant's arrival.
Locally, she is known as Sarah, but as
the "French Lieutenant's Woman," or,
as one resident says of her, "She be the
French Loot'n'nt's Hoer." Sarah is an
outcast, but not in the Hardyesque
sense. Sarah is more than a victim of her
time. She is beyond time and fate. Sarah
is a modern woman.
In this adaption of Fowles' novel, An
na, the actress (played by Meryl Streep),
and Sarah, the pariah (also played by
Streep), meet and converge into one
woman to create a challenging
cinematic puzzle inside the head of
another actor/character, Mike (1981) and
Charles (1867). The film is Karel Reisz'
The French Lieutenant's Woman.
The French Lieutenant's Woman
Directed by Karel Reisz
Starring Meryl Streep and Jeremy Irons
Playing at the Vancouver Centre
On one level, The French Lieutenant's
Woman is merely a film-within-a-film-
within-a-film. There are two narratives at
the outset. The modern, 1981 story about
Anna and Mike, and the 1867 tale of
Sarah and Charles. At the end, a third
narrative coalesces, and consolidates
the two into a particularly modern dilemma about the problem of happy
endings.
The modern story interrupts the 1867
narrative only a dozen or so times, but it
makes its presence felt. In the Victorian story, we have Sarah and Charles
desperately trying to affirm their love for
each other. Compared with Sarah,
Charles is inexperienced and immersed
in science. Darwinism is cropping up on
the times, and Charles is riding on its
crest.
Sarah is emotional and enigmatic —
but superbly in control. If she appears
distraught, it is only because the stifling
age expects her to be so. She is a free
spirit, but she talks in Victorian terms.
"I've fallen in love with being a victim of
fate," she says.
All indications are that she has "fallen
in love with being a victim of fate." She
punishes herself deliberately by becoming governess to the wickedly religious
and hypocritical Mrs. Poulteney (Patience Collier).
In his novel, Fowles describes Mrs.
Poultney as bearing "some resemblance
to a white Pekinese; to be exact, to a
stuffed Pekinese, since she carried concealed in her bosom a small bag of camphor as a prophylactic against cholera
... so that where she was, was always a
delicate emation of mothballs."
At nights, Sarah sits by her mirror,
looking at her reflection as if she were
trying to discover who she really is. She
sketches self-portraits that reveal her
tortured soul.
For Charles, meeting Sarah is an experience. She is unlike other women of
the day. Loving Sarah teaches him to
defy convention and respond to his deep
passion for her. Like Fowles' character
Nicholas in The Magus, Charles
undergoes a growth process, and slowly,
he becomes as much of an outcast as
Sarah.
But there is a difference in Charles
and Sarah's progres as characters in the
film. Charles is transparent. Sarah
becomes more and more enigmatic as
the narrative unfolds. She becomes,
essentially, an abstraction, an elusive
concept Charles cannot grasp.
It is the same in the 1981 version. Mike
and Anna are playing Charles and Sarah,
respectively. They are also having an affair together, although both are attached
to others. Charles and Sarah are constrained by convention. Mike and Anna
are not. They are left to themselves, at
their own wills.
One could look at Sarah and Anna in
this way: Anna is the woman Sarah
would have been in modern times. Yet
there is an essential difference in the execution of the stories about Sarah and
Anna. One plays up to the viewer's expectations of how the tale of forbidden
love in Victorian times should turn out
— i.e., happily — while the other is
vehemently modern and open-ended.
The two narratives inevitably and
ultimately converge into a third level, as
do the characters of Sarah and Anna.
The 1867 version assumes a romantic
mode at first. All the conventional trappings the viewer expects are present; the
attention to detail in costume, dress and
locale is immaculate. And characters appear suitably moralistic and stiff.
But something curious happens in the
film. The 1981 story not only interrupts
the Victorian tale, it intrudes upon it and
challenges it. While the story 1867 is
leading towards a reunion of Charles
and Sarah, the 1981 version pretends to
follow suit, only to turn the happy ending
of the former tale upside down.
The audience observes what appear
as dual narratives. At the end, however,
another narrative eclipses the other two.
What we have, essentially, are
anithetical positions of the two narratives synthesizing into one. Whatever
the characters of Sarah and Anna may
have seemed at the beginning, what we
refuses to be molded by Mike's expectations of her. The character, in another
words, refuses to obey the commands of
its creator.
In Fowles' book, the same thing occurs. The narrator intrudes on the story
and offers modern comments about the
Victorian characters and their progress.
"It is only when our characters and
events disobey us that they begin to
live," he says. In the film, screenwriter
Harold Pinter substitutes the narrator of
the novel with Mike. In the novel, the narrator assumed his characters' independence as fact. In the film, Mike has
to learn this lesson.
What Pinter and director Karl Reisz
have done is ingenious. First, they have
done away with any concept of a narrator. Having a voice-over commentary
would have been a glaring intrusion on
the 1867 story. Instead, the writer and
director have agreed on a modern
framework for the story in the form of a
second narrative. The modern story does
not so much offer commentary of the
1867 tale, as Fowles does, but presents
antithetical parallels to the larger story
about Sarah and Mike.
The remarkable thing about The
French Lieutenant's Woman is that the
1981 framework is neither cumbersome
nor welcome. Because the film begins
on a movie set in Lyme Regis, we accept
the shift in tenses with no problems. The
film goes back and forth in time with
ease. Reisz lets the audience enjoy the
transitions.
In one instance, for example, Anna
and Mike are rehearsing a scene for their
movie. The script calls for Anna to fall
near Charles. Dissatisfied with the first
try, Anna proceeds to give the second
try. She performs the fall effortlessly,
and with a single cut in the film, we're in
Lynme Regis, 1867, as Sarah is falling at
Charles' feet. In another parallel scene, a
1981 kiss becomes, again with a single
cut, a kiss in 1867.
The film uses cinematic language to
make smooth transitions since literary
devices are of no use here. Angles are
duplicated in both stories to suggest
close parallels. Thematically, though,
the two narratives are different.
The 1867 story begins and progresses
in a romantic mode and convention; it is
a love story. The modern version is also
a love story, but only of sorts. It is about
compatibility and the refusal of one partner to conform to the wishes of another.
see at the end is that they have merged
as one in Mike's mind.
Because the central plot of the film is
taking place inside the framework of a
film being shot in 1981, the actors and
the characters start losing their individual identities. The borders of their
personalities are purposely blurred.
Mike is not simply an actor playing
Charles. He becomes Charles and expects his and Anna's affair to match
Charles and Sarah's in the film being
shot. Charles' movements become
Mike's,  but  Anna's character  stubbornly
As we progress towards the end of the
film, things begin to trouble us about the
narratives. Why is it that Charles and
Sarah are getting back together, while
Anna and Mike seem to be drifting
apart? The scene in which Charles and
Sarah are united seems not Victorian at
all. There is something anachronistic
about the whole set, the whole mood the
scene invokes. The composition is
idyllic and the colours are cool light
blues and whites; the rest of the film is
See page 9: FILM Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16,1981
Chariots burn with quiet power
By GREGG MITTAG
Watchng 'Chariots of Fire,' one
might conceivably find the whole
enterprise uncomfortably lacking in
what we have come to think of as
contemporary cinematic values. For
one thing, the film is utterly devoid
of the self-conscious artifice of such
recent Hollywood confections as
'Body Heat' and 'Mommie
Dearest.'
As well, those expecting their
customary ration of brutal violence
and sultry sex are bound to be
somewhat unnerved by the sheer
modesty of the movie's concerns.
Rather than serving up some protuberant aspect of modern life with
the self-reflexive squint of both
ironist and voyeur, director Hugh
Hudson comments on the pattern
of our lives by confronting them
with another world and time, one
essentially unfamiliar and unimportant to a movie-going generation
more interested in the regular cycles
of myth-making than the burdensome convolutions of history (read
'Raiders of the Lost Ark', 'The Empire Strikes Back' and the recent
glut of technically sophisticated and
emotionally vapid sci-fi and horror
flicks).
Chariots of Fire
Directed by Hugh Hudson
At the Capitol Six
The cinematic elements of
'Chariots of Fire' are disarmingly
simple. The story is an absorbing
account of the lives of two male
runners, whose individual strivings
for excellence lead them to the 1924
Paris Olympics. The pair share a
moment of mutual triumph, but the
film focus on the aspects of their
lives which distinguish each runner
and drive them, for very different
reasons, towards the same goal.
In one of the film's several fine
cameo performances, John Gielgud
dryly suggests that the obstacle between the young Jew Harold
Abrahams and the rest of Cambridge is that of "another God,
another mountain," says the Cambridge head master.
Abrahams, brilliantly portrayed
by Ben Cross, doesn't exactly peer
down from his Sinai perch for tljose
reasons. His arrogance stems from
a powerful sense of cultural
persecution, and that insecurity informs his whole personality and
provides the basis for his inexorable
will to triumph. The contrast between his motivation and that of his
rival Eric Liddell, who regards his
personal identity basically in terms
of his relationship to God, is made
apparent without elaborate
editorial shading.
Hudson clothes the material in
such exciting visual language that
one is drawn almost unwittingly into the film's low-keyed action and
pensive ambience. His eye for
detail, whether in the colourful
recreations of 1920s Scotland and
Paris or in Liddell and Abraham's
emotional subleties of self-
realisation, is a remarkable blend of
generosity and intuitive self-
discipline.
Hudson handles the athletic sequences with similar economy and
dramatic skill, his slow-motion
camera bringing us closer to the
characters rather than enshrouding
them in an impenetrable mist of
their own, as Scorsese achieved with
the same technique in 'Raging
Bull.'
The film tastefully avoids most of
the cliches embraced so enthusiastically by the new breed of
Hollywood movie-makers, a par-
ticuarly impressive feat given the
ample opportunities for twisting the
material into stereotyped academic,
religious and personal situations.
Obviously, if the two leads had
been played by Paul Newman and
Robert Redford, our culturally
segregated pair would have overcome all barriers towards becoming
cheerfully mismatched pals.
This film, however, reaches for
something considerably subtler. It
evokes a more innocent and clearly
focused era which is admirably
controlled; nostalgic without veering into sentimentality or facile
evaluation of complicated social
issues. And rather than coming
across as a sober period piece, the
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film breathes with vigor and emotional immediacy.
Chariots of Fire quietly expresses
an appreciation of personal integrity, and the intimate pleasures of
shared experience, whether it be the
fellowship at Cambridge, the competitors at the Olympics, Scotland's
tightly knit rural community, or the
members of the omnipresent church
choir.
It   effectively   invokes   the   atmosphere of a different time and
generation, not too removed from
our own in years, while implicitly
marking the yearning of contemporary society for such a spiritual
hub and unifying vision — a vehicle, like the chariot of fire, of personal transcendance.
Capitalists lack historical sense
From page 3
the 20th century when the market
had such free play as in the 20s,'
with the presidencies of three successive Republicans — Harding,
Coolidge and Hoover — who were
very sympathetic to business. The
secretary of the treasury Andrew
W. Mellon was probably one of the
richest men in the country. These
people were in charge of all
economic policy for nearly the
whole decade; the culmination of
what was the crash of 1929 and the
Great Depression of the 1930s.
You said industry is rigidly
organized and this is a large component of inflation. How do corporations pass on costs to consumers?
Sweezy: Well price leadership is one
rather simple way in which an
oligopoly works if there's one
recognized leader, usually the
largest corporation in the industry.
It takes the initiative in either raising or lowering prices and is followed more or less automatically by the
other members of the industry.
The point is that all of them are
interested in maximizing the total
profits of the industry, and not in
cutting each other's throats so that
they all lose. That was the way
business worked in the last decade
of the 19th century with the consequence that the wholesale price-
level fell by something like 50 per
cent between the peak of the post-
Civil War boom and the end of the
century.
That was what led in turn to the
combination movement, the
mergers and the trust-building.
There was a fundamental change in
the structure of industry between
1890 and 1910. But nowadays it's
forgotten; people simply doiVt pay
any attention to that piec« of
history. In fact one of the saddest
things about the way people under
capitalism think, and particularly
economists, is that they have no
historical sense.
You say we need a planned
economy. The eastern-bloc
economies are planned. Why in
many cases are they failing to meet
the basic consumer needs of their
societies?
Magdoff: You have to remember
that most of them were
underdeveloped, backward
economies before they began to
plan. They have been very successful in industrializing. To a certain extent they have proven that
with planning you can overcome the
limitations that existed in countries
that were on the periphery of
capitalism and suffered from
special forms of exploitation. The
shortcomings have come about by
concentrating too much on industry
and not enough on agriculture.
There have been distortions in
some societies where the direction
of production has shifted towards
meeting primarily the needs of certain strata, certain sections of the
population. It's a question of what
kind of planning and for whose
purpose and in what historical conditions.
What do you think will be the
outcome of the Reagan administration's policies in the United States?
Sweezy: There's not going to be any
control of inflation, there's not going to be any reduction that
amounts to much, of the government deficit. So I think what's going to happen is sort of what's happened in Britain. The only difference being that if the Reagan administration goes through with its
plans to increase military spending
on the scale that they're talking
about, that could sop up some of
the unemployment, but it could also
very much whip up the rate of inflation.
The chances of anything that
anybody could call a solution along
these lines is just about zero. The
only thing you can say is they may
try and get us into a war because
historically, thinking of the last 50
years, it's been wars that have
brought capitalism out of depression. Of course they'll use a lot of
controls and things which they now
find ideologically abhorent.
It's just that their whole panacea
as they're putting it forward is a
tissue of lies, misconceptions, and
stupidities. I think someone who
wants to know what's going to happen to Reagan should look at Thatcher; after all, that's a real experiment and it certainly showed some
of the potentials of Friedmanism
and monetarism and all that.
SIMCHAT TORAH 5742
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Lubavitch Centre Tuesday Night
5750 Oak Street Oct. 20, 1981-7:30 p.m.
Come and bring your friends along
For more information call Chabad House 266-1313 Friday, October 16,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Art, calm and rest
SZETO KEI'S . . . spring over Lingnan
By BARRY STEBEN
To appreciate fine quality works of art,
one requires a calm and restful place.
It is appropriate, then, that UBC's Asian
centre's first exhibit should be a collection of
works by 17 local Chinese artists. The exhibit
provides an opportunity for local residents to
appreciate the excellent traditional Chinese
art being produced in the city.
This exhibition was an excellent opportunity to learn or deepen appreciation for the
calligraphic brush.
Tse Vim's running script characters, for
example, seem to dance with a light-hearted
joy created by the kinetic balance of heavy
and light lines. The composition grants expressive individuality to each character that
forms an integral part of a larger pattern.
Chang Ch'ing-kuei's cursive script expresses a different sort of movement, more
rhythmic or oscillating like little fish or tadpoles, though the complexity and variety of
its lines of motion could only be created by
Chinese characters.
What is so striking about the works is
their never ending flow of energy. Even in the
sharpest changes of direction or in the line
breaks between one character and the next,
the movement is entirely without tension or
strain in its intensity.
But even the standard, fully legible style of
writing characters can be charmingly
beautiful, as illustrated by the masterful symmetry of Chan Kin-cheung's rendition of
master Chu Hsi's Maxims on Running a
Family. It contains advice on the importance
of rising early and being constantly aware of
the bitter labour involved in producing every
useful article so one will not waste a morsel
and so on.
Among the non-calligraphic pieces, the
two flower paintings by Szeto Kei were particularly striking in their combination of
delicate and bold expression. And few
viewers will be able to forget Wong Sui-
chang's Rat or Bird for the marvelous way
both paintings capture the soul of these little
creatures in an intense moment of feeling.
We need the spiritually tranquilizing and
sensually refining effect of Chinese art today
more than ever. People outside China cur
rently have more access to it than ever
before.
The language still presents a barrier to the
non-Chinese in understanding calligraphy
and its tradition. But many Chinese, even
those well-versed in their language, cannot
read a lot of the cursive styles of calligraphy
without special tutoring. It is not necessary to
understand the meaning of the characters in
order to appreciate the brush's beauty and
magic.
Included in the 48 works of painting,
calligraphy and seal carving on display are a
large number of calligraphic pieces, representing the five traditional styles of writing
Chinese characters: seal script, official script,
regular script, running script, and 'grass' or
cursive script.
There ae even two pieces, based on the
most ancient known stage of Chinese writing,
the oracle bone script, from the Shang dynasty are also represented.
The Shang people centered their social and
political organization and religious world
view on an ancestor cult particularly important to legitimize power holdings. The royal
ancestors' will was discovered by applying
heat to sacred animal bones and interpreting
the cracks produced.
The Shang diviners also developed a symbol system to record their transaction^ with
the ancestors alongside these cracks; they
recorded politically significant events, and
decisions. The records contained all the basic
principles of character formation that
Chinese written language was built upon.
Character writing was a charismatic art
monopolized by government officials who
deliberately kept it arcane and difficult to
learn. Throughout the long course of Chinese
history it remained the central symbol of the
transmission and possession of ancestra.l
authority. The basis of political, religious
and cultural authority became synonomous
with the civilization itself, embodying
supremely its moral and aesthetic values.
The power of the brush and the written
word was in some ways analogous to the East
Indian power of mantra; sacred sound-
syllables transmitted by the priestly class and
believed to have power over material as well
as spiritual and psychological reality.
However much Chinese calligraphy and
close-related arts of painting and seal-carving
became a secularized part of general cultural
education, they were still \believed to have
great powers against evil and illness.
Even the gods, when they communicated
through mediums, attained more prestige if
they chose to communicate their advice in
cursive characters, (basically illegible, they
were open to varying interpretations). No
civilization has equalled the Chinese
reverence for the written word.
Among the educated classes, calligraphy
and painting were often pursued with an
almost religious zeal and devotion. They were
considered not only essential aspects in the
cultivation of character, but also paths to
self-realization and insight into truth. Master
artists usually undertook some form of temporary or long-term self-discipline, such as
Zen meditation (restriction of meat and
stimulants, sexual abstinance, religious devotions, fasting and particularly quiet pastoral
retreats from the concerns of family and official affairs), to sharpen their artistic sensitivities and concentrate their spiritual
energies.
They could even occasionally attain the
moments of pure inspiration which produced
some of the great masterpieces which have
survived.
These factors explain r predominance of
natural objects (such a:> oirds and flowers)
and mountain landscapes rather than more
human or social themes as the subject matter
of Chinese painting, at least after the Tang
dynasty.
Many of the other works wrhch are on
display at the Asian centre are equally worthy
of praise. It is hoped that Vancouverites will
have many further opportunities to view the
creative achievements of these local artists.
They are continuing age-old traditions of
their forefathers in exploring and perfecting
the power of the human spirit and imagination.
Deserved thanks are due to individuals involved with the exhibit, including the artists,
the Chinese students' association, and others
who helped sponsor the event.
RAT ... by Wong Siu-chang
tarry ko photo* Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1981
'Science over culture'
From page 1
the foundation of the university.
But any provincially supported
university has to be responsive to
what the province needs."
But arts faculty dean Robert
Will says that he cannot help but
take great exception to what seems
to be "an attempt at social
engineering." Will says there is an
increasingly popular attitude that
technology training should be put
above the study of culture and
society. The university must provide students with individual
development, rather than mere
training, he says, adding university
graduates should be citizens and
community people, not just nine-
to-five professionals.
But there are those in the university community who altogether reject the notion that governments are
attempting to redirect the universities' role as an institution of learn
ing. "I think your conclusion is
totally wrong. I see no evidence
whatsoever of such a trend," says
David Mclean, a government appointed board of governors
member.
If students want practical programs, that is what the university
and government will attempt to
supply, says Mclean. "All the
government is saying is that there is
a huge student demand for such
programs. If anything they're reacting to student demands," he says.
Liberal arts education is also
coming under attack from other
quarters, and the mass media often
reflects this growing opposition. A
recent opinion column in a local
daily reflects the current attitude.
Barnett Singer, a University of
Victoria sessional lecturer, argues
the majority of young people are
wasting their time by going to
university, because what they study
does  not  prepare them  for jobs
upon graduation.
Singer's column is a straightforward call for practical, career
oriented programs. "It is all very
well to learn from books and
saunter among the ivied halls," he
writes, "but it must be remembered
that one is also sacrificing important
years of one's life for . . . what?"
Singer raises the crucial question
— what is the purpose of higher
education? To him, it is occupational training. "Young people
should seriously consider what it all
leads to in the great beyond called
The Real World," he writes. The
goal, he says, should be to prepare
students for "worthwhile jobs."
For now, the direction that
universities will eventually take remains an unanswered question, but
it is clear that such an important
issue deserves open and increased
discussion among the university
community, the government, and
the public.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Kim and Gary finally hit paydirt
By ROB GUZYK
Every morning I say hey, hey,
hey . . . thank you BRUCE.
— Gary U.S. Bonds at last
Thursdays concert in reference to
Bruce Springsteen's work on
Bonds's Dedication.
The best thing about the road is
that it's just like being back in high
school.
— Kim Carnes, Rolling Stone
magazine July 9, 1981 vol. 347.
Although both Kim Carnes and
Gary U.S. Bonds are linked to the
same record conglomerate there is
nothing in their past that suggests
they would complement each other
on a double bill
But they have both worked hard
respectively  for the  last   15 to 20
years before gaining widespread acceptance.
Carnes, from Los Angeles, was
known for years as a respected but
largely unknown songwriter. Gary
U.S. Bonds played seedy New
Jersey clubs after success in the early '60s until fellow New Jerseyite
Bruce Springsteen produced a comeback album this year.
And after all those years the work
has finally paid off for both performers.
While most of the 2,500 fans at a
recent Alma Mater Society sponsored performance at the War
Memorial Gym saved their reaction
for Carnes' single Bette Davis Eyes,
it was Gary U.S. Bonds who made
the show.
Bonds, born Gary Anderson in
Jacksonville Florida, was a big hit
in the early 1960's with such novelty
songs such as Quarter to Three
(1961), New Orleans (1960) and
Dear Lady Twist (1961). Most rock
critics considered this "trash rock"
but they were — and are — great
party tunes that have since been
revived in Springsteen's concert
sets. (Anyone who has witnessed a
Springsteen concert knows that
these songs capture the spirit of
rock and roll).
Never mind that Bonds is past 40
and that his last major hits were at a
time when many UBC students were
still in diapers. Bonds has the ability
to make his oldies sound terrific
and his newer material relevant.
Opening with the Cajun classic
Jole Blon, Bonds did not stir the
complacent audience until he plunged into Springsteen's Dedication
and This Little Girl of Mine. (For
those who yelled for Bruce to come
out, it was all in vain, but such is
life .  .  .)
For his encore Bonds was joined
by Carnes and some of her band
members. And then it happened.
The audience responded — finally.
No longer was it a crowd of complacent UBC students; most of the
audience started singing and
twisting. And while Bonds confessed it was "good to be back in rock
and roll" it was getting late. It was
time for him to go and let Carnes
take over.
Carnes' contribution, on the
other hand, was altogether different. While Carnes the songwriter
has been around for 15 years,
Carnes the rocker has only recently
been performing a harder, more
rock-oriented show. Her act was
characterized by a number of light
effects (until the light system supposedly screwed up) and a rather
serious show that could be best
described as 'L.A. slick."
Accompanied by ten musicians,
BONDS
. good to be back
-craig yuill photo
Carnes worked her way through her
Mistaken Identity album, with the
odd new or old song thrown in for
good measure. And while ihe band
seemed competent enough, and at
times even impressive, Carnes did
not fully captivate the audience's
attention.
The most refreshing aspects of
her show were a couple of diversions. Two birthdays (cakes included) were celebrated on stage and
Carnes used a unique way of introducing the band. During Lynard
Skynard's What's Your Name,
Carnes would name the respective
band member and he or she would
do a solo number. After the bongo-
player did her solo, she jumped off
her perch and proceeded to tap
dance. Neat stuff, which proves
that solos do not have to be boring.
While the crowd of 2,500
responded enthusiastically to
Carnes' Bette Davis Eyes it was also
past midnight and many of the
patrons headed for the door before
the encore, as if they were at a
Canuck game or something.
Villains just really super, yunno
CARNES
— crai(
L.A. slick
By EVAN McINTYRE
Shifty types, yunno. Heads so
close-shaven they could compete
with sandpaper. One of 'em seems
to be doin' just fine without any
neck to speak of, another one wriggles and jumps like a bony spook in
tight union-jack pants what don't
even reach his bleedin' ankles.
Once the shackles came off and
the bars were firmly cemented in
place, the whole SUB ballroom Friday night shook and reeled for the
Villians at a sold out concert. While
line-ups for cold beer got big and
bouncy,    it   was   everyone   for
themselves on the dancefloor as the of amber elixer being poured by the
Villains sang "We're gonna rob the gears.
national bank." Guitarist Legs Neal, of the union-
People danced an' sweated off jack trousers, jumped and jived 'til
gallons of bodily fluid then hastily hell wouldn't have it and the fren-
replenished 'em with greedy gulps zied crowd  followed every move.
Film a triumph,
wonderful creation
From page 5
immersed in dark hues of brown
and green.
The happy ending is, then, taking
place in Mike's mind. Mike has
been slowly transposing Charles
and Sarah's relationship on his and
Anna's. Things go off-kilter in the
movie the moment Mike's relentless
yearning for Anna matches
Charles' obsessive passion for
Sarah.
At the end, The French Lieute-
nent's Woman, like Fowles' novel,
explores the modern dilemma about
happy endings. How do you satisfy
a creator's expectations, the
characters' expectations, and the
audience's expectations? For the
novel, the answer was innovative:
two endings, one happy, the other
not.
The film could have easily incorporated such an innovation. But
because it opts for alternative narratives, the film has to work out
the demands of each section individually. As it is, we are not told
what the ending of the film-within-
a-film's ending will be; everyone —
especially Mike — cannot make up
his mind about how Charles and
Sarah's story should end.
The film-within-a-film destroys
the illusion of the 1867 story
because  we  see  Anna  and   Mike
preparing for their roles as Sarah
and Charles. Other actors appear as
themselves at the end, at a cast party. The final scene of the film — in
which Mike shouts "Sarah!" after
Anna leaves him — transcends the
1867 narrative and at the same time
envelopes it in Mike's mind.
Jeremy Irons, who plays both
Mike and Charles, manages to
make the shifts in tenses believable,
especially at the end, when the past
and present emerge. The film relies
on him for its cohesiveness since the
conclusion depends entirely on his
ability to suggest Mike's confusion.
Meryl Streep is the perfect Sarah.
Our attention remains fixed on her
the moment she first appears on the
screen as Anna, the actress who is
playing Sarah. Whenever Sarah
threatens to become simple and
understandable, Streep jolts the
character to newer and more daring
heights. She retains the enigma that
is the French Lieutenant's Woman.
The film is, finally, Reisz and
Pinter's triumph. They have
translated Fowles' tale without losing complexity. At the end, the
viewer emerges from the theatre
with a smile, aware that he has just
experienced a wonderful creation,
and that the director has not
downplayed to his audience. It
makes going to movies worthwhile.
- holen y.gl photo.
Union-jack trousers jumped and
jived till hell wouldn't have it and
the crowd followed every move
To his right, Count Steve, the beefy
lead-vocalist, blurted out unintellig-
ble words above the roar of bass,
drums and congas courtesy of Tom
Robertson, Skankin' Steve and a
mystery percussionist whose name I
can't remember.
And in the midst of them, this
one bloke Saxophone Tom screwed
up his face an' like shouted through
his horn. He moved freely thanks to
a contact microphone stuffed deep
inside the quiverin' brass of his
tenor sax.
Did anyone care that the Villains
didn't come on stage until almost
two hours after they were scheduled
to and then not until a local comedian was brought on to open up for
them? Nah. People were too busy
howlin' to care about that.
Besides, the Villains did do a second set just as lively as the first
and they were more cocky the second time 'round.
One exchange saw both Saxophone Tom and Legs Neal lying
on their backs for a few minutes
and playing like their lives depended on it. They rose to their knees
and finally their feet, snarling at
one another. And there was a
smashing duet between Skankin'
Steve and the other percussionist
that lasted for minutes without getting dull.
What really got the dance floor
sprawling was the percussionist's
"talk-over" (or dub-reggae) vocals.
He leaned so far out over the stage
with the microphone stand that he
damn near fell off.
Things got kind of hazy at that
point. The last call for beer was
beckoning and the floor and tables
were strewn with empty plastic
cups. The excellent sound system
was taking its toll. A few diehards
were dropping from physical exhaustion to the floor.
If these blokes are here in Vancouver to stay, my advice is to track
'em down wherever they're holed
out. Let's hope they return to the
campus before career goals and
good studying habits blinker all of
us. As it is, ears will be ringing and
legs aching well into the next week.
Cheers, lads. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1981
Ross — vibrant; fluid
By WENDY CUMMING
"Devotion to the intellect means
sensuality of the body is often
overlooked," claims Vancouver
choreographer Paula Ross. Her in-
studio performances this year prove
it and the choreography indulges in
intimate sensuality.
Whether slinking surrepticiously
under capes or colliding with garbage cans, the Paula Ross dancers
swell with versatile energy.
Paulatics, a symmetrically powerful piece, opens this "process evening." The six dancers explore the
stage individually, in pairs, and in
groups. They are components
which synthesize throughout the
evening into integral wholes.
The mystical occult-like tableau
of Strathcona Park unfolds this
progression. With wise white masks
and brilliant capes the dancers reinforce their presence only to hide in
the blinding swirls of colour.
Despite the folding material's intricate patterns, Ross retains pure,
almost Neo-Classical lines.
During intermission, Ross announced "something she just
couldn't resist," an addition to the
program. This just-born jazz
number by Kevin Kitt McCloud is
irresistable.    Four    male   dancers
In Studio performances
Directed by Paula Ross
Paula Ross dance studios,
3488 W. Broadway until Oct. 24.
in blue-purple tights stalk proudly
across the stage, their angular
gestures suggesting primitive warfare.
Momentarily, the music twists,
The dancers meander. No longer
proud, their movements are lilting
and graceful yet tenacious and self-
controlled.
Leslie Manning's solo to Pink
Floyd's Another Brick in the Wall is
equally impressive. Her range of expression is awesome. With quick
darting leaps and distorted  falls,
satire on industralism. The dancers
shout chorus lines from
newspapers, balance on garbage
cans and skip or blunder across the
floor.
We   find   more   than   comical
gestures   though.    Amidst   this
iHlililllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
CAREER ORIENTATION FOR WOMEN
PANEL DISCUSSION
ON
WOMEN IN WRITING CAREERS
PANEL PARTICIPANTS
AUDREY THOMAS, Novelist
BRENDA RABKIN, Writer & Broadcaster
KAY ALSOP, Fashion Editor, The Province
HELEN HODGMAN, Playwright & Novelist
ROSALIND MacPHEE, Poet
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 12:30-1:45
WOMEN STUDENTS' LOUNGE, BROCK HALL
SPONSORED BY THE WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
|
H
WHITE MASKS . . .
Manning is a rebellious teenager.
First graceful and nymph-like, then
obstinate and hateful, she arouses a
multitude of highschool memories.
The last piece, The Bridge, is set
in several movements. The dancers
in black costumes and fingerless
gauntlets slither in sombre, menacing motions. This vacuum of emotions is calculatedly frigid, in fact
perturbing.
But the repetoire develops into a
frenzy of theatrical motions; Ross'
part of primitive image
drunken silliness, each dancer
becomes a unique character. And
the audience is taken; we respond
enthusiastically.
NOMINATIONS ARE OPEN
FOR APPOINTMENTS TO THE
FOLLOWING
RESIDENTIAL COMMITTEES
Child Care Services
Committee
(1 position)
Food Services
Advisory Committee
(3 positions)
Men's Athletic Committee
(2 positions)
Youth Employment
Programs Committee
(1 position)
Student's Court
(7 positions)
Closing Date: Tuesday, Oct. 20/81, 3:30 p.m.
Submit application and resume explaining past
related experience to SUB 238.
Nominations are open for one student senator
at large position to serve on the University
Senate.
Application Forms are available in SUB 238
Application Forms and resumes must be submitted to SUB 238 by 8:30 p.m. on Friday, October 23/81.
t^*§5
"THE TOTAL EXERCISE EXPERIENCE"
Mon. thru Thurs. in SUB
upstairs from 3:45-5:00 p.m,
$1 Admission
ESSAY SKILLS
WORKSHOPS
Three one-hour sessions to improve the
preparation of essays
Dates: Thursdays, October 22, 29, Nov. 5
Time: 12:30 p.m.
Place: Brock Hall, Room 301
WOMEN STUDENT'S OFFICE
ENQUIRIES: 228-2415
BROCK HALL 203
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THE BOTTLED ROMANCE OF MEXICO Friday, October 16, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Waters relives Williams with emotion
By GREG FJETLAND
New Year's Eve, 1952. The life of
country star Hank Williams has just
ended, a victim of his passion for
drugs and alcohol. But tonight the
stage is decorated with streamers
and a banner proclaims the occasion. The instruments are ready for
the Drifting Cowboys.
Hank Williams' life has ended
but "recreated" in an evening of
theatre by Sneezy Waters and his
Excellent Band.
Hank Williams: The Show He
Never Gave
Vancouver East Cultural Centre
Oct. 8-31
Waters is returning to Vancouver
WILLIAMS
the show he almost gave
in the guise of Hank Williams after
the show ran here in 1979. It received rave reviews and then went on to
tour North America, playing to
packed houses. This reporter's high
expectations were not disappointed.
The first half of the
theatre/concert (for this performance melds the two) shows a
Hank Williams past his peak but
still in control. If he has tasted his
"milk" today, it's not much.
"Hank's" here to entertain the
folks and show them a good time.
And he does, though he slips now
and again: a forgotten line, the
same reminescences are told twice.
The tunes are lively and Hank
Williams and the Drifting Cowboys
are just as tight and bright as a new-
pair of boots. But the shadows are
there and somehow Hank Williams
lapses into bitter melancholy. He
taiks about his divorce and the
"good old days" and abruptly excuses himself from the stage.
I did have some misgivings about
the first act, while mulling it over
during the intermission. Williams
was an alcoholic and he died an
alcoholic's death. So what? He died
nearly 19 years ago. Why have a
play about him, why see a play
about him? The first half was too
heavy with foreshadowing and
though Hank Williams tunes are
bright and melodic, they are still
shallow like much modern music.
In the second half the perfor-
Lucas' play tacky but fun
By MARK LEIREN-YOUNG
Not many people will see The
Misanthrope. The Dorothy
Somerset Theatre has limited
seating. The publicity is good but
not especially. The play only runs
until Saturday, and besides, it's only a student production, an MFA
thesis production at that. Too bad.
The Misanthrope is an enjoyable,
dynamic comedy with a lot of style
and a lot of flair.
The Misanthrope
Directed by Richard Lucas
At the Dorothy Somerset Theatre
Moliere's The Misanthrope (the
slave of truth) is about a man who
ignores the fashion of his time (the
Celimene (Alison Davies), who
epitomizes all of the pretensions he
despises.
The music is by the group,
New Romantics. It's fast paced and
infectuous; the kind of stuff you
feel like dancing to. It's fun and
very well used. When the music
begins and the stage is filled with
gaily dressed fops reminiscent of
manequins, the fantasy has begun.
The music was chosen because
the fashions of the New Romantics
owes a great deal to the play.
There are currently a number of
clubs in England catering to the
New Romantics and their style of
dressing flamboyantly in pseudo
17th century costume.
Designed   by   Lily   Yuen,   the
Jfv
FALCONER AND KRAMER .
mid 1700's) and chooses to speak
his mind. His frankness is met with
disdain.
Everyone wants him to conform
and tell pleasant lies rather than
nasty truths. Flattery is in vogue
and kissing ass is considered an art
form rather than a vice, at least by
those in positions of power. Some
things never change.
The misanthrope, Alceste (Rick
Stojan), gets into a number of
predicaments because of his stubborn refusal to tell even little white
lies. He's not into tact either, which
doesn't help him much. He offends
Oronte (Brent Alston), a man who
isn't a poet but doesn't know it. He
loses a law suit to some unseen
scoundrel and then manages to collect assorted admirers and would be
lovers while he dotes on his chosen
. bizzare costumes add life
costumes are beautiful and
elaborate. They gave off a feeling
of being in the 17th century and the
20th century simultaneously. To
quote the director's note, "The
New Romantics of 1981 are stylish,
glamorous and androgynous. Like
the fops and gallants of Moliere's
time they represent the jet-set dilen-
tantes who dance the night away as
the apocalypse approaches."
The play's dialogue is rhymed
throughout, and at first threatens to
be deadly sing-song. But director
Richard Lucas set a fast and funny
pace so the rhyme works for the
production, not against it. What
has potential to be annoying turns
lyrical. And it's the pacing and the
overall energy that really give the
play its life.
The   choreography,   by   Faye
Cohen is flashy, like the rest of the
play, and is fun. The show is staged
as if the actors are having as much
fun as the audience.
The dance routines serve to further the characterizations and the
actions. Rather than act as filler,
they help the plot and serve for
truly entertaining entrances.
When the curtains open to reveal
Celimene's apartment, the
ultramodern room is solid white;
like entering a jet-setter's penthouse. Lovely yet tacky.
The ultimate touch is a luminous
pink flamingo that evokes images
of pretentious scenes; prepies in
alligator shirts marching to
whatever beat the latest issue of
Rolling Stone declared "in."
The show is great fun to watch.
Stojan's Alceste is so marvellously
self-righteous it's tempting to shoot
an arrow right through his pretensions. Philinte (Rory Mandryk),
Alceste's level-headed friend is solid
throughout, as are most of the performances. Acaste (Greg Kramer),
a fop just bordering on a gay
stereotype, is hysterical with his indignant barbs and petty asides. But
it's the little touches that  really
Like Moliere's
fops and
gallants they
represent
the jet-set
make a play. And this play is laced
with enjoyable little touches. The
maid Basquette's (Kim Falconer)
eyes come close to stealing certain
scenes.
The Misanthrope is a flashy and
amusing play. It's refreshing. And,
it's well done. And that's not just
idle flattery ...
mance begins sans Hank Williams.
He finally makes a belated entrance
on the arm of a Drifting Cowboy
showing signs of dipping into the
"milk". If Williams is too inebriated at first, it is not for long.
It's as though the pain reaches
through the alcoholic stupor to
sober him. And the songs he sings
now   are   really   from   the   heart:
Broken Men, Your Cheatin Heart,
Angel of Death.
Such drama is difficult as it
strikes a tenuous balance between
soap and slapstick. It is a challenge
Waters ably meets. The role might
have been written for him as it requires not only excellent musicianship but consummate acting as well.
Sneezy  Waters  does  it.
SNEEZY ... no need to milk audience
Play paltry fare
By MARGARET COPPING
Some social occasions are so
painful that an intelligent participant/victim can only attempt morbid humour — and
leave as early as possible.
Abigail's Party currently
playing at City Stage,
celebrates this genre of
disaster, with such accuracy
and artistry it is almost as un-
comforable to watch as it
would be to attend the party.
Abigail's Party
Directed by Henry Woolf
Al City Stage
There are no good guys here;
the actors explore a limited
range between obnoxious and
pathetic. But the cast does so,
superbly. Relying heavily, and
effectively, on repetitive mannerisms and verbal quirks, they
present five very appealing
characters.
Gillian Barber, as Beverly, is
so fabulously hateful that
members of Thursday's audience could be overheard, in
gleeful suspension of disbelief,
wishing they had guns.
Malicious and irresponsible,
Beverly has invited an incompatible assortment of
neighbors for her idea of a
fashionable evening. Her taste
in such evenings is so unappealing, it is to her guests'
credit that they cannot fullfil
her expectations.
Ellen Kennedy is Angela; inelegant, good-hearted, and
tedious, a perfect foil for the
garish Beverly. Her husband,
Tony is a weak-willed nonentity (though by intention, or
Stephen Dimoupolous' low-
key acting, it is hard to say. If
it is intentional, the man is a
genius.)
Although Angela is hardly a
dominating wife, Tony is completely her creature — until
Beverly gets her well-painted,
adulterous   claws   into   him.
Director and actor Henry
Woolf, elicits pity as Beverly's
husband, and is the constant
victim of her machinations.
Susan Williamson plays,
with style and subtlety, a
discreet middle-aged matron
who emphatically wishes she
were not participating and
enlists the audiences sympathy
by behaving as any rational,
sensitive person would under
such circumstances — she
vomits.
The tensions between the
characters, particularly between Beverly and her husband,
are beautifully reflected in the
set. It is worth a perusual at the
interval — and City Stage is set
up for that kind of thing. Set
designer Pam Johnson has obviously enjoyed collecting
books, records and paintings
that are subtle essays on the
different tastes and
backgrounds of the two antagonists.
The play's major failing is
an almost non-existent plot.
According to the program
notes, the play originally evolved from improvisation. In the
director's notes, Woolf says
that "improvised art may be
high on spontaneity but it is
usually very low on structure.
A collapsed souffle is the
trademark."
Sadly, he precisely describes
the problem with Abigail's
Party, and though he explains
its originality as rising above
the generic failing, he is
mistaken.
Although the characterization is consistently excellent,
the play goes nowhere and ends
in an absurd, hysterical climax.
Apparently a playwright is still
required, to make an integral
whole out of the elements.
The director and cast have
made the best of a bad job,
and the play remains as an
awkward social occasion. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16,1981
HE DREAMS OF HIS TOTEM Friday, October 16,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
—alice thompson photos Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1981
('Birdwatch)
The UBC women's soccer team
was down in Eugene last weekend
and placed second in a four team
round-robin tournament.
UBC was defeated by the University of Oregon 2-0 in the final game,
despite putting up a strong defensive performance.
In the early games UBC beat
Oregon State University 3-1 with
goals by Lori King, Lia Sofronio,
and Wendy Hawthorne and downed the Eugene soccer club 2-1 with
goals by King and Sabina Foster.
UBC plays next on Sunday
against the Hotspurs at 10 a.m. on
Mclnnes field.
The UBC rugby team will be hosing the UBC Old Boys this Saturday
on the Thunderbird rugby field.
The Old Boys are not an alumni •
team but a regular team in the Vancouver rugby league. The Old Boys
also won the Western Canada
championship as the representative
side for B.C.
* *    *
The hockey team will be hosting
its alumni tonight at 8:00 p.m. in
Thunderbird arena. This will be
followed by an all-alumni game on
Saturday at 2:00 p.m. The athletic
department will also be honoring
the 1962/63 'Birds as the reunion
team of the year.
* *    *
The women's field hockey team
will host to the Ramblers of the
Lower Mainland league today at
Spencer field at noon. The junior
team will host Washington State
University on Saturday, and I have
forgotten the time.
* «    *
And there is one more high
school volleyball tournament in
War Memorial gym. It starts
tonight at 6:00 p.m. and continues
all day on Saturday.
Gorilla
wrestling
Yes, it's a very popular sport
in the small emerging
African nation of Heywhats-
happeninman? But you won't
find it at R J. Burger & Sons.
Nope. Just 15 incredible
burgers; huge salads; chicken
and other great sniff.
Open 7 days a week from
11:30 a.m. till really late.
Furs optional.
P*' H
Vancouver
Ski, Sport
& Vacation
Show '81
PACIFIC NATIONAL EXHIBITION
October 16th — 18th
• See world class free-style skiers • Preview latest
in ski fashions • Watch exciting ski & travel movies
• Learn all about X-country skiing • Visit B.C.'s
largest ski swap & sale • Relax in country &
western lounge • Over 75 travel, sport & ski exhibits
• Enjoy fitness & health displays
VANCOUVER'S BIG TRAVEL & SKI SHOW
SHOW HOURS
Friday, October 16th    6 p.m
Saturday. October 17th 11 a.m
Sunday. October 18th 11 a.m
ADMISSION
Adults 16 & over	
Youths 10-15     	
Children 9 & under FREE accompanied by an adu
10:30 p.m.
10:30 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
$4.00
. . . . $2.00
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f^VB        University
jjfcMl      Pharmacy's
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ASSOCIATED
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Thirty-Five Years of Engineering Excellence Friday, October 16,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
HOT NEWS THAT FITS
Students Rally Today
Against B.C. Hydro's
Hat Creek Strip Mining
Students opposed to B.C.
Hydro's plans for strip mining at
Hat Creek will rally at noon today
on SUB plaza.
The controversial Hat Creek project would see the construction of a
coal strip mine and a 2,000
megawatt generating plant in B.C.'s
interior. Environmentalists say the
plans seriously threaten forestry,
agriculture and salmon in the area.
UBC's Environmental Interest
Group is organizing today's protest
against the project.
"It's a rally to stop B.C. Hydro
from undemocratically committing
B.C. to a high-growth, no progress
future," EIG spokesperson Arle
Kruckeberg said Thursday. "The
environmental impact of B.C.
Hydro's project is fantastically
negative."
The rally will feature speakers
from the EIG, student council and
possibly faculty.
Following ceremonies at UBC,
those who wish to take their
grievances downtown will be offered rides in front of SUB. The
point of UBC's rally is to "psych
people up" for a 2 p.m. march
beginning at Oppenheimer park and
ending at the B.C. Hydro building
(Burrard at Nelson), Kruckeberg
said.
UBC Group To Fight
Canada-Chile Meeting
Canadian and Chilean representatives will be sitting down next
week to discuss and promote increased investment in the South
American country, despite increasing human rights violations and torture under the current military
regime.
But a UBC-based group, the
Latin America Support Committee,
will be joining others in protesting
the attempt to increase Canadian
business and government support
for the Chilean junta.
A conference organized by the
Canadian Association-Latin America
and Caribbean (CALA) will attempt to entice Canadian investors
to spend millions of dollars in a
country described as an "investor's
paradise" by CALA organizers.
But Canadian engineering firm
H.A. Simon dropped out of the
conference after it learned of
Chilean human rights violations,
Counter-CALA coalition organizer
Beth Abbot said Wednesday.
Business and government
representatives from both Canada
and Chile will attend the conference, to be held Oct. 19 and 20 at
the Four Seasons Hotel and Robson
Media Centre.
Amnesty International and inter-
church committees report that tortures, arrests and political detentions have increased since the beginning of 1980.
"As long as assaults on human
rights continue in Chile, Canadian
investment has no place in that
country," said LASC spokesperson
Rod Haynes.
The counter-CALA coalition has
planned the following protest meets
against Canadian dollars in Chile:
picket-line, Sunday Oct. 18 at 6:30
p.m.; public march-rally, Monday,
Oct. 19, beginning at 7:00 p.m. at
the Four Seasons hotel, Georgia
and Granville; and a picket line
Tuesday, Oct. 20, at 5:00 p.m. at
the Vancouver Board of Trade,
1177 West Hastings.
Rick Hansen Breaks
Own Rickathon Record
UBC athlete Rick Hansen finished his third Rickathon Thursday by
knocking eight minutes off of his
record time set last year.
The Rickathon is a 20-mile
marathon set up by Hansen, the
engineering undergraduate society
and the Canadian Wheelchair
Sports Association to raise donations for wheelchair athletics.
Hansen, who this year will
become the first disabled person to
graduate from UBC with a degree
in physical education, completed
the course around UBC in one hour
and 36 minutes.
It will not be known until late
next week whether Hansen raised
more than last year's $12,000.
—criig yulll photo
"GEE, I FEEL so left out, everything around here moves on wheels," sighs gloomy gear to ace athlete Rick
Hansen. Phys ed pro was out testing new radar traps, breaking all previous records in charitable efforts to give
campus cops something fast, streamlined and non-polluting to chase for a change. Hansen is still collecting
money to pay off speeding tickets, but will probably flout law and turn it over to the Wheelchair Sports Association instead.
Gear prank may lead to jail
Those funny people in red have
done it again.
An engineering prank may have
backfired as criminal charges are
being considered against at least
two UBC engineering students.
Vancouver police Supt. Vic Lake
said Thursday a criminal summons
request had been sent to Vancouver
crown counsel office after a West
End incident Oct. 9.
Lake said a five foot high solid
concrete pyramid, with a four foot
base and weighing one ton, had
been placed at the intersection of
Pacific and Burrard streets at 4
a.m. The block had a large "E"
engraved on the side, Lake said.
The students were caught by
police before they placed a\second
pyramid at the intersection of Den
man and Georgia streets, Lake said.
"Good God," applied sciences
dean Martin Wedepohl said Thursday after being told of the possible
charges. "I will certainly investigate
it," he said.
At a press conference this week
police said they were asking for
criminal negligence charges to he
laid against the participants. If convicted, the students could face ja|l
sentences.
The pranksters' names were
unavailable at press time.
Because of the rainy conditions at
the time, the speed of traffic coming off the Burrard street bridge,
and the possibility of impaired
drivers, the block represented a
serious traffic hazard, police explained.
Another police officer said one of
the participants seemed not to care
if an impaired driver hit the block.
"If he was impaired, he deserves
to die," the engineer allegedly said.
Engineering undergraduate
spokesperson Lance Balcom called
the charges "unfortunate." He
denied further comment.
Wedepohl said a criminal conviction would cause problems for
students who try to gain entrance to
outside professional societies upon
graduation.
Two years ago a member of the
engineering stunts committee was
charged with breaking and entering
after he was caught in Buchanan
tower attempting to steal arts faculty letterhead. He was subsequently
acquitted after a long legal battle.
Premium brew. Regular price.
Distinctive, satisfying taste.
MOLSON BRADOR
...when you demand more from a beer. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16,1981
"It's not my factory that's polluting the lake. It's
all those dead fish that are doing it."
Where are you?
Welcome to the '80s. Students are taking to the streets. Where will you
be?
This week two campus groups have been organizing to involve students
in protest activity that is taking place off campus.
A protest by environmental groups against B.C. Hydro plans to destroy
Hat Creek, and a demonstration at a conference of Canadian and Chilean
business people are the two events which will see a student presence this
weekend.
It is apparent that there is a growing force of opposition in the community at large to actions by our governments and their associates in private industry on a broad range of issues.
It remains to be seen the extent to which students are going to become a
part of community based protest movements which seem to be gaining
momentum without much connection to the university.
But both protests this weekend represent issues which have long caused
concern on this campus.
Since the 1973 military coup, students have refused to bury Chile amidst
their general complacency toward most other things in the world.
Students have a long history of opposition to Canadian involvement with a
regime that has consistently committed gross abuses of human rights,
shocking the world community.
Student concern for environmental issues reached a high point in the
last two years partly in response to the provincial government's plans to
establish Discovery Parks Incorporated at UBC, and activity was focused
last year on efforts to start a student public interest research group.
It is appropriate that students are building links to the community on
issues such as these. It is clear we have a contribution to make. Indeed we
have been absent from the streets too long.
Letters
Welfare group fights for food and shelter
What is the Welfare Rights Coalition?
The coalition was formed last
year by a group of women living at
Skeena Terrace in East Vancouver.
They spent a lot of time talking
about what they faced as people on
welfare and subsequently drew up a
position paper putting into their
own words how welfare policy must
be changed.
The topics that they covered are:
welfare rates for families; privacy
and access to information; working
incentives and training; special
needs, crisis grants and other
allowances; welfare policy and
children (bill 45, the family and
children's services act); maintenance and support; childcare.
Last spring another group of
welfare women and men began
meeting at a family place on Victoria Drive to discuss their shared
experiences. We adopted the
Skeena Terrace Position Paper as
the basis for our work and we
agreed that our goals would be the
realization of the demands as stated
within. The discussions we had
taught us much about ourselves and
our relationship to the system of
welfare in B.C.
Welfare recipients live well below
the Senate poverty line: Welfare
rates should reflect the rising cost of
inflation. Families are using food
money to pay for rent because the
shelter allowances are minimal.
Living on welfare means having
our privacy invaded. Too many of
us are made to feel guilty. If we
need special money, we have been
accused of not budgeting properly.
Our bank accounts have been examined. We aren't allowed to see
worker's reports made on our
families. We can be kept totally
dependent when we don't know
what our rights are. (A very helpful
booklet entitled 'Welfare Rights
and Gain' has been written by
members of the School of Social
Work at the University of Victoria)
There's no recognition of the
urgent   need   for   good   childcare
alternatives for all the mothers,
whether they are working inside or
outside the home. The ministry
won't pay relatives to do childcare.
For many of us, childcare is unaf-
fordable because the ministry
childcare subsidies don't cover the
actual cost of childcare facilities.
All parents would benefit from the
support services which recognize
that children are our most important resource.
The Minister of Human
Resources recently announced a
'let's get 'em off and back to work'
program, by implementing new
standards for judging ability to
work.
With this new policy persons 65
years or better, persons suffering
from a physical or mental condition
which prevents them from accepting employment, single parents
with one child under six months or
two children under 12 years old,
single parents whose children have a
physical or mental condition which
requires the parent's presence in the
home,    are    not    considered
employable.
Persons not in these categories
are now given 'employable' status
and will be expected to find work.
'Employable' persons will be required to keep reapplying for
assistance, which, as of Nov. 1, will
be cutback $35 to $55 per month.
Forcing thousands of recipients
to continually reapply will vastly increase the paperwork. Social and
financial aid workers are upset. The
focus of their jobs has suddenly
shifted from social and community
work to mere paper shuffling.
The cutbacks will force us into
the lowest paid jobs, increasing the
competition between unskilled
workers. This directly threatens the
minimum wage and bargaining
rights.
While in pursuit of the elusive,
poor paying job, we'll have to get
by on an amount chopped further
away from, and below the poverty
line. One adult with one child can
receive a maximum of $300 for
shelter, and $170 for a single. These
amounts don't cover average rents
and therefore large portions of the
support (food, etc.) allowance
covers the difference. The
withdrawal of $55 will come directly
from the food budget. The undernourishment of the children of the
poor must be stopped. Also, there's
not enough daycare spaces for
children of parents forced off
welfare. There's long waiting lists
right now!
We're contacting community and
labour groups and individuals to
support our work to have this
regressive policy rescinded. 1
wouldn't want to watch the Human
Resources minister change into the
Exploited Resources minister. Call
or write your MLA. Send a letter to
the editor of the daily papers. Support the Welfare Rights Coalition.
Jeanne
Welfare Rights Coalition
876-2849
Civil rights jeopardized by Goliath in Quebec
We are writing to enlist your help
in a major civil liberties and labour
rights case. The case is a clear example of political discrimination
against three women unionists,
feminists and political activists and
their union, Local 510 of the United
Auto Workers.
The Goliath in the fight is the
multinational corporation, Pratt
and Whitney of Longueuil,
Quebec. Pratt is part of the conglomerate United Technologies,
whose past president was General
Alexander Haig, currently
Secretary of State in the Reagan administration.
The   three   women    —    Katy
Atrocities
welcomed
As a newcomer to UBC I was interested to see the True American
Atrocities feature in Friday's (Oct.
2) Ubyssey. Subheaded No. 3, I
presume we will be able to anticipate a full series highlighting
other shameful episodes from U.S.
history, to be followed, no doubt,
by a series on atrocities from the
history of other nations, such as the
Soviet Union. No doubt?
James Gray
LeRougetel, Wendy Stevenson and
Suzanne Chabot — were production workers at Pratt and Whitney.
Pioneers in the fight of women to
work in non-traditional jobs, they
were fired by the company on
November 16, 1979.
An investigation by the Quebec
Human Rights Commission found
that the firings did not emanate
from a "personnel surplus" as
Pratt had claimed, but rather that
the three were victims of "political
discrimination" with "visits by an
RCMP officer (to the company)
having played a decisive role in the
decision."
On December 1, 1980 the Human
Rights Commission began court
proceedings against Pratt, charging
it with political discrimination in
the firing of the three socialist
women workers, members of the
left political organization, the
Revolutionary Workers League.
Since then the company has spent
many thousands of dollars and used
a host of top lawyers to delay the
court proceedings.
The women, their attorneys, and
the Pratt Three Defense Committee, which raises funds and coordinates publicity for the case, have
only the truth and the support of
people like you on their side.
In their campaign to be rehired,
the women have spoken to and won
important moral and financial support from civil rights, women's and
labour organizations. That is what
has made it possible, despite the
company's money and legal tricks,
to conduct the fight so far.
The next months will see a big increase in expenses — printing,
photocopying of documents and
soaring legal expenses. In addition,
the three women have applied for
any government files on them under
the Freedom of Information Act,
hoping to shed light on the firing
and RCMP involvement. This, and
a parallel application to U.S.
government agencies, also entails
hundreds of dollars of expenses for
notary fees, agency search fees and
photocopying of files.
Although we do not necessarily
share the political views of the three
women, we believe that a victory
in this case is important for civil
liberties and labour and political
rights. If the attack on the three
women succeeds, it will be a blow
against all who support such rights.
Financial contributions are
urgent. Won't you help? Your contribution can be decisive.
Robert Dean
member of Quebec National
Assembly and former Quebec
regional director, United
Auto Workers
Simonne Monet Chartrand
civil libertarian, author
Margaret Laurence
author
Louise Harel
member of Quebec National
Assembly
June Callwood
author
Svend Robinson
M.P., Burnaby
Warren Allmand
M.P. Solicitor-General
of Canada
I
THE UBYSSEY
October 16, 1981
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
"Angel trumpets and devil trombones!" cried Brian Jones, Shaffin Sharrif, Greg Mittag
and Kate Friesen as they warmed up their horns. Rob Guzyk and Wendy Cumming played
with their mouthpieces as Rob Whittome, Mark Leiren-Young, and Margaret Copping leered
into the f-holes of Charlotte Otsen's violin. Kerry Regier flailed about with his baton while
shrieking "Wilhelm Furtwangler! Pablo Casalst Willem Mengelberg!" until Glen Sanford and
Julie Wheelwright stuffed him into a tuba headfirst. Eric Eggertson made the error of blowing
into the tuba, and the escaped conductor had to be chased all over the stage by Nancy Campbell, Craig Brooks, Alice Thompson, Verne MacDonald, and Craig Yuitl. Finally Ian
Timberlake tripped the errant director with his bow, but Corinna Sundararajan took exception
and went away to practice with Paul Kahila and Scott MacDonald. Helen Yagi, Barry Steben,
Even Mclntyre, and Gene Long jammed in the wings, trying desperately to sound like Charlie
Parker. Greg Fjetland called Federico Fellini for advice. Friday, October 16, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
Humanity 'sure to lose' from U.S. arms race
By STEPHEN CHALLIS
There are signs that the arms race
we have lived with for 30 years in
undergoing an ominous transition.
( freest yle)
Immediately apparent to the concerned observer is the fact that the
race is speeding up. What began in
the early 1950, as a slow jog on the
part of the U.S.S.R. and the U.S.
towards insured national security
has now broken into a frantic
sprint.
Along with the increase in speed
of the arms treadmill the world is
seeing a change in the nature of
weapons being contemplated for
production. Today's military scientists are looking to the heavens for
new ideas.
The London based International
Institute for Strategic Studies
recently confirmed that both the
U.S.S.R. and the U.S. are pursuing
research and development programs directed towards the military
use of outer space, with emphasis
on laser technology, both for anti-
satellite warfare and for defence
against ballistic missiles.
Both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R.
have acknowledged the possibility
of space-based systems designed to
destroy in-flight missiles from
above, utilizing high-energy lasers
and heavy particle beams which will
be in place before the end of the
decade. British Brigadier General
Michael Harbottle who recently
spoke in Vancouver commented on
the potential lethalness of outer
space defence systems: "Today's
nuclear arsenal will seem like toys in
a child's nursery in comparison to
the weapons being contemplated
for use in outer space."
Harbottle, now retired from the
army and now secretary-general of
the British Campaign for World
Disarmament, was the key-note
speaker at a weekend conference
staged recently by the Vancouver
branch of the Coalition for World
Disarmament.
What is a military man doing
talking about disarmament? Harbottle is not a typical soldier. Since
the early 1950s Harbottle has spent
his time in the army not a war-
maker, but as a peace-keeper.
He notes with concern that the
arms race has evolved from a well
defined competition between the
two superpowers to its present state
as multi-faceted embroglio.
Members of the nuclear weapons
club now include Britain, France,
China, India and probably Israel
and South Africa.
The latter two nations, both of
them situated on global hotspots
and led by governments that consider themselves answerable only to
themselves in terms of their global
responsibilities, are of particular
concern to Harbottle. He feels
strongly that the next nuclear bomb
ignited in anger will be a rash act of
a desperate head of state involved in
one of the world's regional conflicts. It will only be luck if this
event does not serve as the catalyst
to a global wide nuclear engagement.
Harbottle pointed out that
perhaps the gravest change that has
occuted in the world arms race is
psychological in nature.
Increased military expenditures
and recent expansionism by the
Soviets have, along with the Iranian
hostage incident, precipitated a
crisis mentality in the U.S. The
Reagan administration has decided
to move from a defensive to an offensive posture.
Ronald Reagan's and Alexander
Haig's sentiments are clear: the best
way to deal with the threat to national security posed by the
U.S.S.R. is to construct a larger op
posing threat. At the root of this
logic is the assumption that the
U.S.S.R. will seriously seek an arms
"limitation agreement only when
they face a superior opponent.
Flistory has shown that the
Soviets, when they find themselves
in a inferior strategic position,
spend money and human resources
until they find themselves in a
secure, if not superior position.
There is no reason to believe that
this policy will not continue.
The Kremlin's response to
Ronald Reagan's announcement
over the weekend to spend $150
billion over the next five years on
the U.S. military, published in
Tass, was predictable: "We will
provide an appropriate counterbalance to the Reagan plan."
It is folly to think that one side
will achieve a position of significant
military supremacy. The impossibility of maintaining exclusive
control over technological and
military secrets means that any
weapons breakthrough will in a
very short time be replicated in the
opposition camp.
General Harbottle has proposed
a solution to the tail-chasing exercise  that  is  the  arms  race.  The
leaders of the U.S.S.R. and the
U.S. have decided that for the short
term they will protect themselves by
constructing invisible nuclear
arsenals and at the same time work
for the acceptance of long term
disarmament agreements.
Harbottle argues that any long
term arms agreements will be
nullified by the ongoing short term
arms race. World leaders must
abandon what Harbottle calls
"pedestrian attitudes" and look to
immediate and radical solutions.
He says, "If we try to turn the
corner slowly we will never get
around it." He maintains that the
roots to the arms race are
psychologically based and hence the
solution can be found in new thinking. We must reject long term proposals and instead think of short
term 'dismantlement" schemes —
in the order of three to five years.
Harbottle feels strongly that until
the leaders of the superpowers accept this notion the arms race will
continue ad infinitum or until an
earth-shattering nuclear confrontation occurs.
Freestyle is a column for Ubyssey
staffers who need to get something
off their chests. Steve Challis is a
first year law student.
Students protest Hydro development plans
Friday noon (today at noon),
many students will meet at the SUB
plaza, get on a bus and travel downtown to Oppenheimer Park to
register their objections to B.C.
Hydro's plans  for our province.
Why? Is it protest for protest sake?
A more careful examination of
what such people are saying reveals
that they are asking questions which
affect each one of us.
Some of these questions include:
What will be the culminating effect
of all of Hydro's proposals on what
remains of our wilderness with its
delicately balanced systems of plant
and animal life? What of the native
people who  still depend on this
What happened to marijuana?
When Dave Barrett spoke last
week, he said: "This is one of the
most apathetic student bodies I've
seen in years." Somehow this
assessment of us seems right on. We
don't seem to have the steam to
make waves like the 'Peakers' up at
SFU, nor do we appear to have the
creativity and imagination of our
counterparts down in Berkeley or
UCLA at the University of California.
For the most part, we are overfed, pablumized, stereotyped, middle class kids trying to scramble up
the economic ladder on our way to
professional careers or the civil service. Whatever happened to student
activism? And radical social
movements like the SDS (Students
for a Democratic Society)?
Which brings me to my central
theme: Whatever happened to marijuana?
Is it such a hot issue that nobody
wants to touch it? Will it rot our
brain cells just by thinking about it?
These are questions that should be
addressed before this issue dies on
the order paper.
Far from being a dead issue,
marijuana is an inspiration to many
of us in Arts and a wide variety of
fields including the Sciences. Personally, I'd rather have a pleasant
toke of weed and a good laugh than
a drag on a cancer stick any day and
any time of day, including right
now.
So why isn't this happening?
Because to myself and many others
of us, marijuana is so pervaded
with paranoia that it has become a
'dying issue'.
So as the bright colours of fall
turn to winter's grey, I gaze out at
the green grass out there and muse
to myself: "Whatever happened to
the good old days, when a nice big
bag of Mexican buds cost twenty
bucks and we could lay back and
smoke ourselves into a pleasant
state of euphoria?" I for one can't
say.
Maybe all those dope-smokers
went on a permanent holiday in a
sunnier clime, or maybe they've
hidden themselves away in the
woodwork. Wherever they are,
they're not here, and they're sure
not sitting in boardrooms deciding
our educational futures.
So what does all of this mean? It
means that for now, on this
apathetic campus of ours, marijuana is a dying issue. Now that the
truth is out, you can roll up this
priceless paper and smoke it. I hope
you don't get sick.
Bill Hempstock
wilderness for survival? What will
be the effects of the massive borrowing such plans require? Why
does Hydro's rate structure reward
those who consume and punish
those who conserve? Why are
Hydro's exports to the U.S.A. increasing and why do Americans pay
less than we do for our electricity?
Why are Hydro's forecasts of
energy demand always higher than
those of other agencies including its
nominal master the ministry of
energy? At a more general level,
does the injection of energy-
intensive industries create jobs?
These are questions which should
arouse some concern amongst all
citizens of B.C. Today offers
an opportunity for all of us to begin
to explore some of the answers to
these questions. We may find that
Hydro's critics not only restrict
themselves to criticism but also
spend a great deal of time developing alternatives which can work
given public support. But we must
be willing to learn. Education is at
its best when it combines action
with reflection. In the process,
we make it possible for the rest of
our fellow citizens to participate in
this important process. If we are effective, the government will have to
slow down development and conduct public inquiries into the future
plans of Hydro and their impact on
our lives. See you there at noon.
F.J. Frigon
grad studies Page 18
THE    U BYSSEY
Friday, October 16,1961
'*.**■ * *
mmmmmmmmmmtmmmmm
Milk prices offend newcomer
it is with some regret that I was
confronted with the prospect of
massive price increases in one of the
commodities we as Canadians
cherish most. It is a commodity
more Canadian than the constitution. It is essential to the development of Canadian youth. And the
price increases occurred right here
on campus in our own Subway.
What is this good?
Homo, skim 2 per cent chocolate
. . . it's pasteurized and it's complete with vitamins A and D. It's
refreshing served cold and no, this
is not an "ad" for milk.
Students, who are being battered
on all sides with massive price increases in all categories were hit
hard with yet another in their own
backyard. An across the board increase of 20 percent with selective
increases (on Chocolate) of 40 per
cent!
Trivial you may say, but in the
last month this represents a 75 per
cent increase on the price of a 250
ml.  container of chocolate milk.
On a more serious note these_
prices would translate to $4.80 for a
2L container of white milk and
$5.60 for the equivalent in the
chocolate variety.
I realize that there are
"economies of scale" in purchasing
the large size containers, but isn't
there some logic in seeing some sort
of price discount on the smaller
containers given the huge quantities
of milk that Food Services buys.
On behalf of milk consumers
everywhere I ask for some explanation for these gross increases.
Managers of Subway, don't hide in
the Underground.
Chris S. Davis
A Recent Arrival
to the Wet Coast
Free gold
Boy, wouldn't that be something. And believe us,
pal, our staff would be the first
in line to pick up that gratis
glittery stuff.
But they'll just have to be
content with serving our 15
gigantic, creative burgers,
super salads and other tasties.
Open 7 days a week,
11:30 a.m. till like late.
2966 West 4th Avenue. And
remember all burgers less than
$500 an ounce.
talk about
career
opportunities
with
€ssd
Visit of Esso Representatives at our booths in
CEME Foyer
Computer Science Entrance
Commerce/Business Administration Foyer
on
Wednesday, October 21st
to discuss Graduate and Summer Opportunities
in
I • Engineering • Business Administration
• Geology/Geophysics •Marketing
• Computer Science     • Research
(Lxplorina  th*  fCtaun  of
tJjiuine J5ptrit
a Christian Science Lecture
to be given by
JACK EDWARD HUBBELL
a member of the Christian Science
Board of Lectureship
on
Thursday, October 22, 1981—12:30 p.m.
in the
Buchanan Building, Room 104
Sponsored by the Christian Science Organization at U.B.C.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1981 AUTUMN LECTURES
Conor Cruise O'Brien
Conor Cruise O'Brien has had a distinguished
career as a politician author, historian, literary
critic, diplomat and international civil servant. He
has served in the Irish Parliament, the European
Parliament and the United Nations, representing
Ireland. Formerly the editor-in-chief of The
Observer in london, he is now a consulting editor
of the newspaper. Dr. O'Brien has a reputation as
an articulate and witty speaker with a wide variety
of interests and a talent for communicating his
ideas.
RELIGION, LITERATURE AND POLITICS
Tuesday, October 20
In the Theatre, Curtis Building, Faculty of Law, at 12:30
p.m.
CONFLICT, POVERTY AND COMMUNICATION
Thursday, October 22
In the Theatre, Curtis Building, Faculty of Law, at 12:30
p.m.
THE PRESS AND THE WORLD
Saturday, October 24
In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
EXTRA GOOD
GOING DOWN.
^ /,.-•"   Now you're talkin taste. Friday, October 16, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
Board must consider concerns, communicate
By MIKE McLOUGHLIN
Graduate Student Association
My name is Mike McLoughlin. I
am speaking to the Board of Governors on behalf of the Graduate Student Association. Our organization
represents the graduate student
body at UBC. We are here to express our position on an increase in
student fees and on the process by
which this decision will be reached.
We recognize the difficulty the
board faces in making this decision
and we urge that it be made in a
responsible manner. We also
recognize the fine job that our student representatives, Anthony
Dickinson and Chris Niwinski, have
done in representing students' views
on this crucial issue. Their work has
been excellent in the past and we applaud their efforts to communicate
with student groups.
At the present moment the
university is facing a very bleak
situation. Students are becoming
very concerned about financial accessibility of the university. Unless
these concerns are controlled they
could explode into expressions of
anger and frustration, such as the
demonstration last March. The
GSA urges the board to recognize
these concerns and to channel these
emotions toward a constructive
end. We recommend this be accomplished by having students participate in the decision-making process. Participation involves three
steps: consultation, consideration
and communication.
The first step in participation is
consultation. Consultation will provide student groups with the opportunity to vent their concerns. Consultation will also provide the board
with the opportunity to make the
most informed decision. Both sides
will be served if consultation occurs.
However, consultation must be
an effective process. Unfortunately
due to time constraints the recommendations that the student board
representatives and the Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer are
making to you today are of an
understandably limited nature. Effective consultation has not occurred with respect to many of these
recommendations. We request that
these recommendations be considered the first draft and that they
be brought to student groups for
discussion and comment before a
final draft is presented to the board
Higher tuition,
less student aid
By JAMES HOLLIS
Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer
I shall start my presentation to
the Board today (Oct. 6) with a
quote from a highly distinguished
scholar, "The University of British
Columbia unlike other universities
in Canada was founded on the ideal
that higher education should be free
to all who qualify." This statement
was made by Douglas Kenny in a
historical sketch of UBC presented
to the Board just under three years
ago.
It seems that economic realities
coupled with the will and rule of
many governments have prevented
us from maintaining that ideal. Certainly the fundamental question of
whether or not to even have fees at
all is a behemoth of morals, social
responsibilities and social values
beyond the scope of our presentation today.
What we are primarily concerned
with today is the trend of costs and
ways of meeting costs associated
with attending the University of
British Columbia.
There has been a general tendency for administrators to compare
UBC's fees with the "real world."
One oft used yardstick is the Vancouver Consumer Price Index or
CPI. This is a relatively easy comparison to make, but let us not
make the comparison with ancient
history. I suppose that if we all
think back far enough, we can
remember the day when we could
afford to buy a house or to finance
a fledgling business. Those days,
like affordable rents for students,
are in the more pleasant memories
of yesteryear.
To be more meaningful one must
look at recent trends, more
specifically from 1976/77 to present
day. If we set 76/77 as our base, the
picture becomes much clearer.
From 1976/77 to present the
Vancouver Consumer Price Index
has risen by approximately 56 per
cent. Over the same period UBC
tuition fees have risen an average of
61 per cent. Overall UBC tuition
has exceeded the Consumer Price
Index from 76/77 to present by five
per cent.
If we deflate tuition increases by
the Consumer Price Index; ie.
discuss it in terms of 76/77 dollars,
the net result is that today tuition is
three per cent higher than it was in
76/77. Actual tuitions, therefore,
are not highly out of line insofar as
being much less expensive than they
should be when compared to past
years.
What is highly disturbing is the
diverging graph lines of student aid
ceilings and tuition fees. The major
question of financial accessibility is
centred around ability to pay. If
student aid was to be relied upon
for a UBC education, that ability to
pay has been eroded by 33 per cent
(tuition/CPI minus Aid/CPI).
If a student works during the
summer to pay for a university
education according to figures
published by A. F. Shirran, director
of UBC student services by 1980
that student was earning 10 per cent
less than he was in 1976, taking inflation into account.
Clearly, there is an overall
decrease in ability to pay and further divergence from our founding
ideal.
The provincial government of today does not wish the universities to
remain accessible to all. Robert W.
Stewart, in a letter to universities
council B.C. chairperson, Bill Gibson states, "The ministry does not
regard the total number of university students, or the number of
degrees granted per year, as a figure
of merit for our universities or as a
measure of their value to our province. It is better to have a smaller
number of better qualified and
respected graduates than a larger
number with more dubious
qualifications." The letter also
outlines that medical, engineering
and business administration
faculties must expand to the detriment of lower priority areas with an
implication that lower priority areas
include the liberal arts.
Rather than look to students for
increased funding for next year, the
Board must look to the culprit truly
causing the shortages, provincial
and by way of EPF, federal governments.
A student's financial ability to attend UBC has decreased
dramatically over the past five
years. The tuition increase for next
year will further reduce an already
strained ability to pay and follow
the provincial government's master
plan of education for the few.
at its November meeting. In our letter to the board we stated our opposition to any recommendations
unless this occurs.
The second step in participation
is consideration. Consideration
provides the board with the opportunity to contemplate the expressed
concerns of students and make their
decisions with these concerns in
mind. It will also provide the board
with the opportunity to gain from
student groups a degree of commitment to their decision.
The final step in participation is
communication. Communication
will provide the board the opportunity to explain to students the
reasons behind their decision. Com
munication will also provide
students with the opportunity to
evaluate the decision as to its
reasoning and the effects it will
have on them.
For example, in evaluating
recommendation three of the student board member draft we noted
the lack of justification for such a
recommendation. Decisions based
on such a recommendation must
have sound reasoning rather than
vague assumptions such as graduate
students are encouraged to stay
longer in their program because
their fees become less each year. In
our letter we stated our opposition
to any recommendations that are
not soundly justified.
In conclusion, the GSA would
like to make three requests of the
board. First, we request the board
consult with us and other student
groups through the student
members on the board. Second, we
request the board consider our concerns and the concerns of all
students before they make any decision about raising tuition fees.
Third, we request the board communicate their decision and the
reasons behind that decision to
students so that they may evaluate
it.
Thank you for your consideration of our requests and we look
forward to hearing your reply to
these requests.
Have sympathy for arts frosh
This letter is not in the form of a
complaint, rebuttal or highly obnoxious opinion (with no reference
to previous letters) but just a letter
from a first year "artsie."
My one question to all those who
have deemed me a questioning, lost
and confused freshman is "Weren't
you ever a first year student?"
I admit my first day at UBC was
spent following a second year student around because I couldn't
have found the bathroom alone,
but is that any reason to turn your
back on me?
Being in first year arts (in order
to get into commerce) I have been
subjected to mockery, harassment
from my car pool and even laughter
behind my back. So what's wrong
with being in arts? So what if I only
have four hours of classes (on Monday, Wednesday and Friday). I
have an active social life and it's
hard to fit classes into my busy
schedule!
My big upset at UBC was my
economics 100 class. The professor
asked who was in second year and
about two thirds of the lecture hall
put up their hands. When he asked
who was in first year, I heard moans
and groans from said second year
students. Well if second year is so
much better than first year how
come I'm taking the same course
you second years are taking, in my
first year? Come on, give me a
break!
So have a little sympathy on us
first year "students." Point us in
the right direction of the Pit, or the
lecture that we're late for. I promise
to be a good "artsie" until my first
year commerce, when I can look
down on all the first year 1982-83
students.
Beth Sywulsky
arts 1
Sex 'not for passing lust'
Re: the letter in the Sept. 24 issue
of The Ubyssey regarding abortion.
I was most appalled at the letter
written from the 26-year-old female
in her fourth year of arts.
This woman wrote to say she had
an abortion last year and that she
fully realized the state of the fetus.
Therefore she knew she was taking
a human life. One of her reasons
was she felt her popularity, number
of dates and her desirability would
drop during her pregnancy. I could
not believe a person could be that
selfish. In other words if her mother
became ill would she kill her because it would "cramp" her style. I
would hope not!
Then again she said she couldn't
go home to her parents for there
would be hassles. What does she expect, her parents to be overjoyed?
Still I feel even though her parents
may be disappointed, they would
stand behind her 100 per cent. I
know mine would. In my opinion
she was taking the easy way out.
Sometime in life she will have to
learn to face up to her responsibilities.
Also, for a supposedly educated
woman she is extremely ignorant.
She stated there were no organizations to help pregnant women.
Surely she must have seen the posters, shops, etc., advertising the Birthright Association.
She also stated she had been on
the birth control pill for 10 years.
This is very dangerous yet she has
felt it has been necessary. I find this
very sad that this woman since she
was 16 has felt that sex was a necessary part of life. Sex is something
that should be shared between two
people who love each other, not for
some passing lust. Too bad she
hasn't realized that all male-female
relationships must not lead to sex.
I rest MY case!
Nancy Heenan
A conscience proclamation
WHEREAS people throughout
the world have become more and
more aware of the urgent need for
effective international protection of
fundamental human rights;
AND WHEREAS despite efforts
at the United Nations and in the
field of international law, the world
is still without efficient machinery
to prevent these and other violations of human rights or to protect
the victims;
AND WHEREAS PRISONER
OF CONSCIENCE WEEK is a
regular multi-purpose event which
serves to emphasize Amnesty International's essential concerns about
prisoners of conscience;
AND WHEREAS this year the
theme is prisoners of conscience in
general:
NOW THEREFORE I, Michael
Harcourt, Mayor of the City of
Vancouver, DO HEREBY PROCLAIM October 11 to OCTOBER
17, 1981 as Prisoner of Conscience
Week in the City of Vancouver.
Michael Harcourt
Mayor, Vancouver Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16, 1981 Friday, October 16,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21 Page 22
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16,1981
Tween Classes
r
TODAY
AMNESTY UBC
Former CBC Moscow correspondent David
Levy, speaks on Sakharov, noon, SUB 207/208.
CITR
Dateline international, 3 p.m., 100.1 cable FM.
Indonesian politics are focus.
CSA
Welcome back dance, 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
Sheraton Plaza 500. Members $4.50, non-
members $5.50, door tickets $6.00.
GSA
Folk night, 8:30 p.m., Grad Centre garden room.
DEPT. OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Dr. R. L. Christie, on "Sedimentary Phosphate in
Canada," 2:30 p.m. Geological Sciences 330A.
ISA
Soccer game. 4:30 p.m., soccer field behind
SUB.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Party dance — "Streethustle", noon, SUB partyroom. No partner necessary, everyone
welcome.
UBC HOCKEY
Vs. alumni, 8 p.m., Thunderbird arena.
UBC LAW UNION
Law union conference, 7:30 p.m., Law 178.
Wine and cheese, speaker Shelagh Day on
"Human Rights."
UBC THUNDERETTES
Field hockey, vs. Vancouver Ramblers, noon,
Spencer field.
Volleyball tournament, evening, WMg. 40
teams, high school women's tourney.
UBYSSEY
Seminar, design with Tom Hawthorn, 4:30 p.m.,
Douglas College boardroom.
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Women and pornography, noon, SUB 211, slide
show and discussion.
WORLD FOOD DAY
Films, 10:30 a.m. to noon, SUB auditorium.
Speakers, noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
Films, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
SATURDAY
CITR RADIO
Behind four walls, 3 p.m. 100.1 cable FM, Ian
Timberlake takes a look at Office of Rentalsman.
Making waves, 4:30 p.m., 100.1 cable FM, looks
at holistic medicine.
CVC
Semi-annual car rally, 5:30 p.m., Beaver gas station at Oakridge shopping centre. $3 members,
$4 non-members.
INTRAMURALS
Outdoor adventure and horseback riding. Buntzen Lake. Intermediate and advanced. No time
given — your guess is as good as ours.
ROCKERS CO-OP
Free rock concert and party, 9 p.m., SUB partyroom, 3 live bands.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
UBC vs. UBC old boys, 2:30 p.m., Thunderbird
playing fields.
UBC LAW UNION
Law union conference, 10 a.m.. Law 178.
Workshops all day, supper and social evening.
UBC LAW UNION
March and rally, 1:30 p.m.. South Memorial
Park, 1000 E. 41st. Organized by B.C. Organization to fight racism.
UBC THUNDERETTES
Volleyball tournament, all day, WMg. Women's
high school teams.
SUNDAY
CITR RADIO
Laughing matters, 4:30 p.m., 100.1 cable FM,
comical look at children.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Fun bike ride, 9 a.m., SUB.
WHEELHOUSE CLUB
Chicken licking ceremony, 7 a.m., Wheelhouse
manor. Discussion of how to improve cat's golf
swing, chipping and putting. Volleyballs will be
served.
MONDAY
CITR RADIO
The melting pot, 3 p.m., 100.1 cable FM, subject
is memory and eyewitness memory.
Making Waves, 4:30 p.m., 100.1 cable FM, interview with Al Soroka on committee against racist
and fascist violence.
FROSH
General meeting, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., SUB
213, open to all frosh.
GSA
Meeting,   noon,   Grad  student  centre.  Tuition
fees, proposal for Board of Governors meeting
discussed.
INTRAMURALS
Corec badminton,  7:30 p.m.,  Osborne Centre
Gym A and B, drop in.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOC.
Jamatishana-Du'a, 6:45 p.m., SUB 115 or 117.
Mondays to Thursdays.
WINDSURFING
General meeting, organization of novice training,
noon, SUB 212.
TUESDAY
B.C. PIRG
Steering committee meeting, noon. SUB 119.
All welcome.
CITR RADIO
Gay issues, 3 p.m., 100.1 cable FM. An introduction to gay issues at UBC.
Thunderbird sports report, 5 p.m., a look at intercollegiate and intramural sport at UBC.
Airstage, 9 p.m., radio drama "Job Odyssey."
COLLEGIATE ADVENTISTS
Group discussion on  First  Corinthians,   noon,
'   SUB 213.
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES
Irish poet Maire Cruise O'Brien speaks on "The
female principle in Gaelic literature," noon (? not
stated), Buchanan 203.
GAY UBC
Organizational meeting, no time given, SUB 115.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film series "India," noon to 1:30 p.m., and 7:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m.. International House 400. Includes "Come to Kashmir," "River Ganges,"
"Destination Delhi."
PRE-MED
Dr. J. Goldie lectures, on cancer, noon, IRC I.
New memberships accepted.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Constitution ratification and election of officers,
noon, Biol. 2449.
WEDNESDAY
CITR RADIO
Still  not  satisfied,   3  p.m.,   100.1   cable  FM,
women's self-defence.  Speaking of "still not
satisfied," we're not printing any more of these
notices unless you use the Tween Classes forms
like everyone else.
DEPT. OF PHILOSOPHY
Peter Singer lectures on Morality and Animals,
noon. Law 101.
GAY UBC
Poetry reading by Ian Young, 7:30 p.m., SUB
205.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for men's Buchanan badminton
tournament, 4 p.m., WMg 203.
NDP CLUB
General meeting to elect new executive, noon,
SUB 215.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Movie "Animal House," 5:30 and 9 p.m., SUB
auditorium. Admission $1.00, all welcome.
THURSDAY
CITR
Cross currents, with Tony Charles and staff examining the state of the Fraser River, 3 p.m.,
cable 100.1 FM.
Thunderbird sports report, 5 p.m., cable 100.1
FM.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Meeting, noon, SUB 111.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Lecture on exploring the realm of Divine Spirit,
noon, Buchanan 104.
GAY UBC
Poetry   reading   by   Ian   Young,   noon,   SUB
207/209.
INTRAMURALS
Referee club general meeting, noon, WMg 211.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Panel discussion on women in writing careers,
noon. Brock hall 223.
Essay skills workshop, noon. Brock hall 301.
[
Hot  Flashes
Now fo maire
%hit look good
"Even if it's shit, make it look
good," is the basic credo of ail
good newspapers, even The
Ubyssey.
But there's more than one way to
design a newspaper, and how to
make a newspaper distinctive, appealing and readable will be the
subject of the next truly wonderful
and intellectually stimulating Canadian University Press seminar.
Join former Ubyssey editor Tom
Hawthorn and other crazed journalists over at the Douglas College
board room today at 4:30 p.m. to
find out how you can make a nifty
newspaper. Rides will be leaving
from The Ubyssey office for the
wilds of New West, just drop by
SUB 241k sometime today and find
out when the staff is leaving.
Who knows, maybe you'll learn
to appreciate us.
Liberal animal*
What a bunch of animals those
UBC student Liberals are. Do you
know how much clean sawdust the
SUB proctors have to put into their
office every day just to meet health
and safety regulations? And it's
pretty disgusting what they have to
take out, too.
But not only are those trendy
pseudo-lefties wallowing in their
own filth, they also want to con
taminate the rest of UBC with their
regressive religion. Bewarel Animal
House is appearing at a SUB
auditorium near you, especially at
5:30 and 9 p.m. on Wednesday.
An in-depth analysis of the real
workings of Parliament, Animal
House will cost you one inflation-
eroded dollar, courtesy of Bluto
Trudeau. Oh, Louie, Louie, where
are you? We gotta go . . .
Villeneuve?
What goes vroom screech vroom
screech vroom screech? A beginning car rallier trying to make it
through a flashing red light! Pretty
sad, huh? Well, wait until you see
the greenhorns try to make it
through the semi-annual CVC car
rally Saturday.
Those gas guzzling goofs will
start at 5:30 p.m. from the Beaver
gas station (Oakridge shopping
centre) and before they show you
how to get lost they'll ask for $4 (or
$3 if you're a member).
Staph moot
Attention all Ubyssey staffers,
this medium has a message. There
will be an important staff meeting
Saturday at 2 p.m. in good old SUB
241k. This paper runs as a participatory democracy, and if you
don't participate tomorrow don't
bitch at us if you don't like our
decisions. Got the message?
Fight racism
Law may be above politics to
some people, but the UBC law
union doesn't see it that way.
That's why they're urging people to
turn out and support the march and
rally organized by the B.C.
Organization to Fight Racism,
Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at South
Memorial park (1000 East 41st).
Law is not beyond you. Participate and learn about the issues
which   affect   you.
Wild
Yup, it sure is something,
right? But hold on, buster,
there's none of that stuff here!
Just 15 blast-my-socks-off
burgers, fair prices, and tons of
other great stuff. So keep
your hands to yourself!
2966 West 4th Ave., open
from 11:30 a.m. seven days a week.
Opening soon corner of
Georgia and Hornby. (Yuk, yuk.)
LIBERATION THEOLOGY AND THE THIRD WORLD
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22
Second in a series of JEWISH-CHRISTIAN DIALOGUES sponsored by the UBC
chaplains.
The series continues Thursdays at 4:30 p.m. at HILLEL HOUSE (across from SUB
behind Brock) through NOVEMBER 12
Upcoming topics include Jewish Self Image, The Middle East Question and Christian Anti-Semitism.
A   no-host   meal   is  served  at  6:00  p.m.   at   minimal   charge.
Everyone welcome.
Coopers
&Lybrand
chartered accountants providing
the full range o* financial and
business services in 21 Canadian
cities, and 90 countries around
the world through Coopers & Lybrand
(International).
Hairstyling for
Men and Women
We cater to young people
who want a modern, carefree
hairstyle at affordable prices.
For an appointment call:
4009 MacDonald
738-7310
THE CLASSiFiEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 inaa, 1 day -KLM;
Commercial — 3 Unas. 1
GfesaffiM arff ** not •eotptmf *y fkphoim md an ptyth fn
athmnet. Paadttia * Kk30*.nx tf» d*y ttfbn pubMoHlon.
Publications Otoe*, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vim,, B.C. YBT2A5
5 — Coming Events
36 — Lost
1
Improve Your Study
Habits Through
SELF HYPNOSIS
FEE: $40 for any 4 of 5
Ph.D GUIDED
Tuesdays, 6:15-7:30 p.m.
STARTING
Oct. 13, 20 or 27th
Blue Room, Arts 1 Bldg.
U.B.C. Campus
LADIES    SEIKO    WATCH.      Phone
733-0317.
40 — Messages
PRACTICAL acupuncture moxibustion
home study course. P.O. Box 35676, Vancouver, B.C. V6M 4G9.
ALPHA OMICRON PI, Happy 50th
Kidsl It's been a great half decade.
Love your Alums
50 — Rentals
65 — Scandals
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free public lecture
PROF. FREEMAN DYSON
Institute for Advanced
Study, Princeton
LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE
Prof. Dyson has gained an
international reputation as a
physicist, mathematician
and astronomer.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, Saturday, Oct. 17
at 8:15 p.m.
THE LEGACY OF THE FOLK NIGHTS continue . . . The GSA presents another Folk
Night Friday Oct. 16 at 8:30 pm in the
Graduate Student Centre Garden Room.
70 — Services
FOOTLOOSE IN NEW ZEALAND! Use our
personal budget quide to plan your trip.
$5.95 Can. Kiwi Publications, P.O. Box
94-UB Concrete, Wa 98237.
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hair-
styling. Student hairstyle — $8, haircut —
$3.50. 601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
80 — Tutoring
10 — For Sale — Commercial
FLEA MARKET every Sunday starting Oct.
18th at Westminster Drive-ln. 12500-110
Ave., Surrey 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. For info call
986-6389 or 683-1633.
FLEA MARKET: every Sat. starting Oct. 17th
at Saint Marys School 230 Keith Rd; North
Van. For info & Res. call 986-6389 or
683-1633.
REASONABLY PRICED older furniture &
desks at Townhouse Antiques, 3928 Main.
Student discount with A.M.S. card.
COMMUNITY SPORTS; A store packed
with ski wear, soccer boots, hockey equipment racquets of all kinds, jogging shoes
and dozens of other sports items at
reasonable prices, (including adult small
hockey jerseys for ladies hockey teams at
$10.95). 3615 W. Broadway
85 — Typing
11 — For Sale — Private	
OLYMPUS MICRO-CASSETTE recorder.
Excellent condition. 1 hour tape, includes
accessories. $200. Phone 228-8588 anytime.
10 SPEED Gitaine Tandem bike.
Quality components. Accessories. Extra
wheels and rims, Excellent condition, $650.
228-8588. anytime.
HP33E CALCULATOR still under guarantee
$125 obo. 22*0410 evgs.
30 — Jobs
RECORDS & TAPES: Rhodes on Broadway
looking for part-time or full-time help in its
Record & Tape Dept. A good knowledge of
classical music is essential. Phone Nicholas,
733-2215, Rhodes, 1905 West Broadway.
WRITER'S CRAMP7 Yours truly secretarial
services ltd. types up a storm day so you
can sleep at night. Dependable service,
reasonable rates. Professional results. Call
Kathy (yours truly) today. 873-5578.
PROFESSIONAL court recorder guarantees
fast, accurate typing. Essays, theses,
manuscripts, letters, resumes. Phone
Carol, 987-6527.
TYPING Special student rates. Filtness of
Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670 Yew
Street. Phone 266-6814.
TYPING, ESSAYS, termpapers,
manuscripts, theses, 85c per page, reduced
if you're poor and deserving, can transcribe
from tape recorder: Phone 732-0701.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist wfth IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
90 - Wanted
CAMPUS BAND needs bass player. Vocals
preferred. Must leap tall buildings with a
single bound. 736-0843, Paul: 526-3301.
99 — Miscellaneous
TOASTMISTRESS: Gain experience in
public speaking. For more information call
437-8494. Friday, October 16, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
vista
Welcome once again to the
Wonderland of Vista.
The march hare is here to inform
you that if you keep your eyes open
you won't be late for anything, including the play Jennie's story. It's
a new play by Betty Lambert about
love and revenge in the endless
prairie of the late 1930's. It opens
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. at the
Waterfront theatre. Sounds Cana-
jan, eh?
Also in the theatre world there's
the Wednesday opening of Michel
Tremblay's Les Belles Soeurs at
Langara's Studio 58. It's directed
by Barbara Russell and should be
interesting.
On North Shore Live a play on
television is opening at Presentation
House soon. It's written by and
stars Nicola Cavendish and Tom
Wood with Bob Baker as director.
It promises to be interesting at the
very least and it is running until
Nov. 14.
On the home front The Misanthrope will play at the Dorothy
Somerset theatre until tomorrow
night. It's fast, fun and flashy and
definitely worth catching. The
shows tomorrow are at 5 and 8:30
p.m. and tonight's showing is at
8:30 p.m.
Also at UBC is a concert by
guitarist Michael Lorimer. I don't
think he plays like Jimi Hendrix but
I don't think he wants to either.
This is for those of you with
cultured taste. It's happening on
Oct. 25 at 8 p.m. in the UBC music
recital hall. All tickets are $8.
For folk music affectionados
(ain't that a terrific word) The Boys
of the Lough will be appearing at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre
this Sunday at 8 p.m. The Boys of
the Lough are recognized as one of
the most exciting and accomplished
of the Celtic revival groups. Tickets
are $7 and available at Black Swan
records and Octopus books.
There are also two concerts
featuring   Malcolm   Bilson   being
presented by the Vancouver Society
for Early Music. Bilson is into 18th
century Viennese fortepianos and
will be playing some of the true
classics on Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
at the Ryerson United church with
the CBC Vancouver orchestra conducted by John Eliot Gardiner. It
will be an all Mozart program, including two fortepiano-concertos.
Tickets are $5 for students and
seniors and $7.50 for members of
the real world. Bilson will appear
solo at the Arts Club theatre on
Granville Island playing Mozart
and Hayden Sunday, Oct. 25 at
8:30 p.m.
Holly Arntzen and friends are ap
pearing tomorrow night at the Soft
Rock Cafe. The Bob Murphy
Quintet will be there Sunday and
the Grant Street String Band will
appear Monday.
Also, starting this Saturday at 8
p.m. the Vancouver Museum
auditorium will be beginning a
series of Documentary Master-
works presented for eight consecutive Saturday evenings. The
series will feature 20 films directed
and produced by the National Film
Board's top film makers. It opens
with Cree Hunters of Mistassino
and Wuxing People's Commune.
Admission is $2.50. Bye till next
week.
IN VANCOUVER -CBO:
Persuasions — Wed., Oct. 21
Quilapayun — Sun., Oct. 25
Pageant Ball — Sun., Oct. 25
Marty Balin — Tues., Oct. 27
LG73 UNICEF Hallowe'en Ball
Hallowe'en Hoe-Down (3 bands!) — Sat
UP AND COMING:
Sonny Terry and Browny McGee
- Nov. 6, 7
The Imperials — Nov. 19
A Night In Old Vienna - Nov. 27
Buy your tickets at
the AMS Box Office
AND
AMS
TICKET
OFFICE
AMS PRESENTS
CSA    "Welcome    Back
Dance'  - Fri., Oct. 16.
Indercut '81 — Blue Northern — Sat., Oct. 17.
Andre Kole —
Sun., Oct. 25.
Monty Python —
Graham    Chapman    —
"""hurs., Oct. 27.
Sat., Oct. 31
Oct
A cop is turning. Nobody's safe.
PRINCE OF THE CITY
"PRINCE OF THE CITY"
Starring TREAT WILLIAMS
Executive Producer JAY PRESSON ALLEN    Produced by BURTT HARRIS
Screenplay by IAY PRESSON ALLEN and SIDNEY LUMET
Based on the Book by ROBERT DALEY
Directed by SIDNEY LUMET
w—nucTao   <gB>
iTKRMftUCMMiTIK
Technicolor"   Panavis
AvO-KOrtwcruw s/WARNER BROS, w;/
thru WARNER BROS.O <- -va-r
NOW PLAYING AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU
"A gutsy, emotional movie about what it
really takes to be a her6. One of the
finest films of this or any year."
— Rona Barrett. Today Show. NBC-TV
"A masterpiece. The film's overwhelming
impact will touch and affect you.''
— Rex Reed, Syndicated Columnist
" Chariots of Fire' is a rare, intelligent,
beautiful movie. A thoroughly
rewarding experience.''
— Bob Thomas. Associated Press
CHARIOTS OF FIRE
ist'SiAc
CHARIOTS OF FIRE
Al I It H ".MKS TK! M ". [-. .\-> ! "H,*!* |'KOI>l!<   | |(>N
Sun nqBEM CROSS • IA-! I MAKI t.SO"!  • niCit I   11 "ATI'S
C'.MI-.KYl. CAMI'tilLl  ■ ALKT. 1\RIG(. • <„,. si Mai-. LINDSAY AhDl.KSO*'
DENNIS t MKISTOI'MLK • NKil-.l  DAVLNI'ORl • liRAD DAVIS
PKTKR tXiAN • SIR JOHN (ilKI.CilU) • I AH HOLM • PATRICK MAGr'.r
viivmpi.ii In COLI"! WLI LANDMiimc hi VANGIT IS
Cinuli.rl'r,Kli«vi DODI FAYL.D I'i.hIh. i-.l i.i DAVID IV M NAM
l)ii.-il.-ill,i HUGH MlinSO"*
'■"'"•■"'■"HKr"'""]   n*f||QOLBYST^io]
|6M,„
PG PMttKTAl GUHUWCf SUGGEST*!} -SB*    A LADD COMPANY and WARNER BROS HtUASt
voquc
WARNING:      Some
frightening   and   gory
918  GRANVILLE         ,cene*. B.C. Director.
685-5434 	
JOHN HURT IAN HOLM   DDLs
DOLBTSTH16Q
Showtimes: 2:35, 4:55, 7:15. 9:36
ocIeon
3J1   GRANVILLE
662-7468
duNbAR
(MATURE)
Warning:    Soma
language   and   swearing.        Showtimes:  Odeon. 2:15, 4:50, 7:15,
»WAA.k AM0,h B.C. Director. 9;40. Dunbar. 7:30 & 9:40.
224-7252
(MATUJ-ff)   Warning:     Som
| ^m^mm—*wi*-*r   language,   nudity   and   sug
• "■- BILL MURRAY
gestive scenes. B.C. Director
CORONET
• si GRiNvnir      showtimes:  2:00'  PJ. SOLES* JOHN CANDY.
• 51   GRANVILLE 3.50  5 40,7:40.9:40
665-6628
(SIeIjs) i%z -snrw.crg' Continental
occasional   sug gestive   ^^^ ——'   nm^^ ..
Divide
scenes. B.C. Director
CORONET
...   ,-.,....,  Showtimes:  2:00, 4:10,  6:00,
JOHN BELUSHI
(MATURE)
AT 8 P.M. ONLY
DARK
CAMBIE  at  18th
876-2747
A ROMAN POLANSKI FILM
'TESS'
NASTASSIA KINSKI    PETER FIRTH 1
Warning:   Occasional   sug
" "     gestive scenes of perverted
sex. B.C. Director
DROAdwAV
70 7   W. BROADWAY
874-1957
THE NIGHT
PORTER
(MATURE)
VARSITV
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
Showtimes: 7:30. 9:30
French w/Eng. Sub.
SIGINORET
-I SKNT \ LETTER TO MY
LOW
in Page 24
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 16,1981
RHODES OCTOBER
FESTIVAL OF VALUES
GIGANTIC SAVINGS!
Technics
fll) PIONEER
A COMPACT SYSTEM OFFERING SUPERB SOUND QUALITY.
Technics SA-203 slim-line stereo receiver with 30 watts per channel.
Brand new from Pioneer, the PL-4 direct drive semi-auto turntable
featuring a straight, low-mass polymer graphite tonearm, complete
with cartridge.
AR-28 COMPACT TWO-WAY BOOKSHELF SPEAKERS.
PERFECTLY MATCHED COMPONENTS FOR FANTASTIC STEREO
REPRODUCTION. The new Sony STR-VX4 stereo receiver features 40 watts
per channel, digital station readout, and eight-station memory preset tuning.
Technics SLD202 direct drive semi-auto turntable complete with Shure
M95HE magnetic cartridge.
AR94 speakers are a unique three-way system featuring two woofers and an
all-new tweeter.
>3Cr
tdk;
SA-C-90 MH
SAX C90        ..7"
L| Pi nihead SQ^98
lTI XJ ~U I demagnetizes.   l^T
discwasher
PRODUCTS TO CARE FOR YOUR MUSIC
■V
SH-8030
SPACE
DIMENSION
CONTROLLER
N/"
IN-DASH CASSETTE
TS-162DX
6'/2 INCH DOOR MOUNT SPEAKERS
BETAMAX
Video Recorders
SL-5000$1095°°
SL-5800'159908
KV-1946R
20 INCH TRINITRON
With express tuning
and remote control ...
-A.
KV-1945RS
20 INCH TRINITRON
Direct access tuning
Remote control 	
'899*
*999D0
PS-LX2 Semi-auto, direct
drive, servo-locked turntable,
complete with SHURE
magnetic cartridge.
tfE>
PLUS
OF IN-STORE
SPECIALS
LITTLE RIVER BAND
—Time Exposure
SAVINGS CONTINUE ON RECORDS AND TAPES
These Special Features available only from Monday to Wednesday, October 19-21
ROLLING STONES
—Sticky Fingers
DOORS
-Waiting for the Sun
VAN MORRISC
— Moondance
Available
All Week
%gmm^
GENESIS
—Abacab
THE FINEST FOR LESS
STEREO
VIDEO
733-5914
RECORDS
TAPES
733-2215
ICHARGEXI
VISA
1905 WEST BROADWAY
ONE BLOCK WEST OF BURRARD ... IN THE HEART OF VANCOUVER

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