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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1988

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 the Ubyssey
Students get their day
CFS declares Student Day
Inside:
Drug and Alcohol
Awareness	
page 3
By Deanne Fisher with CUP files
In an effort to direct some of
the federal election fever to post-
secondary education issues, the
Canadian Federation of Students
has declared October 19th National Student Day.
The lobby group asked its 60-
odd member university and college student councils to arrange
all-candidate meetings to address
issues of cutbacks which have
caused tuition fee increases, cutbacks in library book purchases,
and have left buildings in disrepair.
Although UBC is not a member of CFS and will not be participating, other B.C. universities and
colleges will be hosting press conferences, all-candidate meetings,
and cake cutting ceremonies, according to CFS Pacific Region
Chair, Rob Clift.
"Well be talking about the
coming federal election, things
like financing the federal government provides to provincial gov
ernments," said Clift.
"And well be asking candidates' opinions on whether there
should be a fixed percentage of
tuition paid by students," he said.
Other issues to be discussed,
said Clift, include international
students and differential fees,
funding for Native students and a
proposed national advisory council on post-secondary education, a
recommendation that came from
last year's national forum on post-
secondary education.
The focus ofthe University of
Victoria's events will be accessibility and advanced education minister Stan Hagen's newly released
Access Report, said UVic student
union president Suzanne Klassen.
"We expect that there'll be
press here," said Klassen, adding
over 180 people and all federal
candidates in the area have been
invited to the university for a press
conference and coffee house.
The Pacific Region of CFS has
prepared leaflets on accessibility
of education and buttons which
say "Join the Classroom Struggle"
and "Down With Class Size" for
the event.
Across the country, student
sponsored activities range from
celebrations and ceremonies to
debates and rallies.
The New Brunswick Students' Alliance is taking over the
provincial legislature for the day.
"They've created new minis-
trie-—the ministry of student aid,
the ministry of childcare, ministry
of student housing. It's their way
of saying that student issues are
important," said CFS information
officer Catherine Louli.
A "Freeze Tuition" postcard
campaign is underway in Ontario
with 10,000 cards being distributed on campuses. A rally protesting higher tuition fees and the
underfunding of post-secondary
education is planned for Oct. 31.
"BoGged"
Gay Games organizers may
have to wait until December or
later for a final decision from the
Board of Governors as to whether
or not they can use UBC's facilities
in 1990.
The board will not issue a final
decision until the next board meeting on December 1 or the one after,
on January 26.
"The university has not reversed its decision (to deny the gay
games the use of UBC's facilities).
Nothing has changed," Don
Whiteley, UBC's News Bureau
Manager, said Monday.
On October 11, games organizers tried to persuade the board to
reverse an earlier decision denying the games access to UB C facilities.
After the meeting, President
David Strangway requested
games organizers to provide more
information about which facilities
they want to use, and on which
dates.
Gay games organizers initially interpreted Strangway's request as a sign that the board's decision had been reversed.
But games organizer Betty
Baxter said Monday night she did
not know if the board had reversed
its decision, and declined further
comment.
Your worst nightmare come true, being caught In soiled undies. Real men wear boxer shorts.
DAN ANDREWS PHOTO
Frat members suspended
MONTREAL (CUP)—Montreal
police are investigating an alleged
sexual assault at the Zeta Psi
Fraternity chapter at McGill University.
The McGill women's rugby
team held its initiation party September 22, and players ended up
at the Zeta Psi fraternity's house.
Later that night, one of the
women, a new McGill student, was
allegedly assaulted by three ofthe
fraternity members, while 10 men
allegedly watched from the door.
The fraternity has suspended
three of its members.
Lieutenant Detective Jean-
Guy Bouchard said the investigation could take two weeks.
The woman who laid the
complaint said she reported the
assault to the police, but could not
identify the suspects.
"Trie Crown Attorney's office
is handling the whole thing. They
are doing a lot to help me out.
That's the way it goes in a sexual
assault case. That is the way they
are handled," she said.
Three sources, a woman present at the party and two from other
frats, said the woman went upstairs with one man and the couple
was joined by two other men.
"I think the first guy influenced the other guys. I think he
convinced one of the other two
guys to 'share her with me'. And
there was a third guy too...about
10 guys were watching from the
door," said the party-goer.
"People guarding the door
wouldn't let anyone in. One ofthe
girls figured out something was
up, and tried to get in. They
wouldn't let her. Then she just
demanded they let her in. She's a
rugby player, somehow she got
past them. She saved her. She
went in there and dragged her out.
The girl was pretty out of it by that
time, I think she'd passed out."
"It was a great party. I
thought 'wow, what nice guys'.
They had this massive bowl of
punch with every alcohol under
the sun in it, vodka, all these
strange liquors, and it tasted like
nothing, you couldn't taste a thing.
So everyone was drinking it. Everyone was totally wasted."
"That's the only reason I'm
talking about this to you right
now. I didn't realize anything like
this could ever happen. I didn't
know they did things like this, not
really. I want everyone to know it
happens," she said.
Zeta Psi president Steve
Mansfield said he was upset. "Ifs
guilt by association," he said, and
denied any knowledge of a sexual
assault, though he was at the
party.
"It was a great party. I had a
really good time.
"I'm sure the girl has her side
of the story. I can't pass judgement. I'm not involved. It happened at a fraternity-sponsored
function, but the fraternity isn't
responsible for the actions of individuals," said Mansfield.
The Zeta Psi fraternity,
founded in 1874, is the oldest frat
at McGill. It has been notorious for
holding wild parties.
"They are disliked by all the
frats," said a woman from Gamma
Phi Beta Women's sorority who
did not want to be identified.
McGiU's Inter-Fraternity
Council president Ian Palm said
there is little the group can do but
ask Zeta Psi International in New
York   to  revoke  the   Montreal
chapter's charter.
"It's frustrating," Palm said.
"We have nothing to hold over
their heads. They could just not
show at the judicial hearings."
Once a fraternity loses its
charter at McGill, it can never be
re-established.
McGill Dean of Students
Irwin Gopnik said McGill has
little control over Zeta Psi. The
fraternity owns its building and
has no formal ties to the university.
Gopnik said the university's
student discipline committee will
wait for the police to complete
their investigation. The 11-mem-
ber committee, made up of students and faculty, has the power to
expel the students for violating the
Code of Student Conduct.
The Zeta fraternity is very
worried about its tarnished reputation. Brother Robert Wexler told
a reporter: "Do not even touch this
story. You have no idea how many
people you will hurt if you put this
kind of thing in a newspaper."
VOLUME 71, Number 12
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October 18,1988 Classifieds
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, $3.00,
additional lines60 cents, commercial-3 lines,
75 cents. (10% Discount on 25 Issues or
more) Classified ads payable In advance.
Deadline 4-00 p.m.. two days before publication. Room 266, SUB, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T
2A7
05 - COMING EVENTS
The Canada Council and the B.C. English
Teachers Assoc, invite the public to a
Poetry Reading by
Tom Wayman
at the Graduate Student Centre at 1:00
p.m., Oct 21st, 1988.
2-BR. SUITE near UBC, Wallace & 10,
avail, imm. $580/mth. util. incl. Call 224-
3413 eves.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT PREPARATION course for the Dec.
3rd LSAT - November 14, 15, 16, 17 (evenings). Forinformationcall 1-800-387-1262.
PIANO LESSONS, classical, evenings, in
your home. 228-0086.
MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY training,
for further info contact Montessori Elementary Foundation, c/o 6330 Sophia St, Van.,
B.C.V5W2W6.
70 • SERVICES
G. TE HENNEPE
Barrister & Solicitor
#203 - 4645 W. 10th Ave., 228-1433.
30 - JOBS
11 -FOR SALE -PRIVATE
SANYO COMPUTER (IBM XT Turbo Compatible), 640K, 8.00 clock, 20 MByte HD,
keyboard, monitor, Roland 1250 printer
(240 CPS), 732-3799 321-4484.
1982 ENCYCLOPAEDIA Britannica plus:
Encycl. Annuals to date, Medical and Health
Annuals to date, Sci. and Technology Annuals to date. Phone 228-1247. $650 OBO
($1800 new).
1979 V.W. Westfalia Camper, very good
condition, well maintained, 4 spd., beige,
$8500 o.b.o. 420-6962.
IBM Turbo XT clone. 640k ram, 8MHz CPU,
V20 Processor, Hercules graphics, multi I/O
card, 30M fast harddrive, keyboard, brand
new monitor. Call mornings or evenings
737-0591.
1978 CAMARO Z28, orig. owner, PW, PS,
PB, tilt, blue, auto, exc. cond. $3900. 431-
0890.
TRS-80: monitor, keyboard, printer, tape
programs. $200. 228-0086.
1980 HONDA ACCORD hatchback, exc.
cond. - driven since new by a little old lady of
76 (seriously!). $4150, only 48,000 miles.
Phone 736-1603.
COLLECTIBLE SIGNS 1988 DuMaurier
Jazz Festival & DuMaurier Golf Classic
signs. 433-5094, Larry.
ARE YOU FREE MONDAYS? I need a baby
sitter for my 5 yr old and 1 yr old for a full day
alternate Mondays; possibly a few more hrs.
during the week. References required. 224-
1993.
POLL CLERKS for recreation facility referendum (Oct. 31 - Nov. 4). Flexible hours,
support your university, club, constituency
or yourself. $4.00/hr. Sign-up SUB 246.
Sign-up early! Limited space.
CHRISTMAS CHARTERS
RETURN AIRFARES
Vancouver to:
Toronto
Montreal
Ottawa
Saskatoon
429.00
449.00
449.00
239.00
Plus Tax
BOOK NOW AND SAVE
CALL TRAVEL CUTS
228-6890
35-LOST
ON OCTOBER 4TH a black Casio 6-.-3800P
calculator was lost. If found please call Sun
For 224-8808.
50 - RENTALS
TopsI
_
iTR Mobile Sound
228-3017*»SUB Rm 233
20 - HOUSING
AVAILABLE NOW - one bedroom in shared
house. Near UBC, $300/month, 1 1/2 baths,
fireplace, woodstove, sundeck, workroom.
Call 261-6155.
MUSIC MASTER D.J. SERVICE
Highest quality digital sound
*For any occasion*
5 hours in SUB! Only $189
732-9503
PROOFREADING PRO, EDITOR,
will polish your grammar and style.
TOUCAN TANGO PDQ at 731-1252.
DO GRAMMATICALLY PERFECT papers
get better grades? Satisfied engineers and
English majors say YES. Editing - Katie
737-0575.
SPEAKEASY: A friendly voice and an attentive ear. Open M-F 9:30-9:30. 228-3700 or
drop-in SUB 100B.
80 - TUTORING	
DO YOU NEED HELP with written essays,
syntax, spelling, pounctuation, editing?
High school English Teacher would like to
hei p particularly students for whom English
is a second language. Phone 228-0926.
NATIVE SPANISH TEACHER prepares
students for all levels, conversation, translation and composition. Nora, 254-9948.
85 - TYPING	
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
word proc. & IBM typewriter. Student rates.
Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed, fast &
reliable. Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351.
Typing, Editing, NO NOTICE REQUIRED, resumes. (Same day service).
Tapes transcribed. 224-2310 (Days), 327-
0425 (eves.).
WORD PROCESSING, $2.00/dbl. sp. page,
MLA, APA, CMS, editing. Comput-
erSmiths, 3724 West Broadway at Alma,
224-5242.
Canada' s Premier Rock-Reggae Band
/faqfd.
You saw them in the Tom Cruise movie -"Cocktail"
You saw their new video on "Much Music"
NOW see them live at the
Tickets available at the door.
First come—First Serve (limited number)
ROXY
932 Granville Street
684-7699
ACCURATE REPORTS word processing,
Word Perfect, laser printer, dictation, student rates avail. #16-1490 W. Broadway at
Granville 732-4426.
WORD WEAVERS - still on 41st bus line.
New location #101 - 2258 W. 41st Ave. at
Yew St. Excellent student rates for quality,
custom word processing, aussi en francais.
Tel. 266-6814.
A & Y Manuscript Masters
Specialists in scientific texts, graphs, grammar correction and style polishing. 253-
0899. Free pickup and delivery on campus.
SCRIBE ACADEMIC SUPPORT, typing,
proofreading, WordPerfect, same day service. 224-5617.
A.T.A. secretarial services. Fast! Accurate!
Efficient! Reasonable rates for students.
263-3173 Mary Tobin.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discounts for students, 10th
and Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
Between
PROFESSIONAL Word Processing/Typing
at reasonable rates. Call Heather at 737-
7382.
FAST AND PROFESSIONAL typing/word
processing, IBM PC/Lazer Printer, special
rates for students. Pick-up and delivery
avail. Jennifer 939-8711.
FAST, ACCURATE wordprrocessing. So
good: 5 cents rebate each typo. $1.50/pg.
Rachel 228-3881 or 224-1595.
WORD PROCESSING - Scientific papers,
theses, all publications, English-French
Mac/LaserWriter. 244-2737.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
SCRABBLE PLAYERS!
NOVICE OR EXPERT
The Vancouver Scrabble Club wants YOU!
No memberships * Lots of fun
Call "SCRABBLE BOB"
325-9940 after 5 p.m.
THURSDAY
Note: <Woor_'*= 12:30 p-m*
TUESDAY	
UBC Personal Computer Club
AMIGA Meeting, Noon, SUB 111.*
APPLE Meeting, Noon, SUB 211.
Multifaith UBC
Club Meeting - New Members
Welcome. 1:30 p-m-, Buchanan
E27&
UBC Pre-Medical Society
Lecture: Medical School Admissions, by Dr. Jim Carter (New
Dean of Admissions). Noon., IRC
#2, Woodward.
WEDNESDAY
Murrfn Lecture Series
Dr, Pauline Wei*; "Making A
World of Difference - Justice Be*-
tween Races," Noon, Buchanan
A106.
UBC Personal Computer Club
ATARI Meeting, Noon, SUB 211.
UBC Personal Computer Club
IBM Meeting. Noon, SUB 211.
MAC Meeting, Noon, SUB 215.
Chinese Christian Fellowship
Come to our joint meeting with
InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. Dynamic speaker; James
Hudson Taylor. Noon., Woodward
IRC #6.
Sikh Students' Association
General meeting, new members
welcome. Noon, Buchanan Rm.
D340,    "
UBC Circle KClub
Come jc. n our weekly meeting and
fin dout what we're all about!
Noon, Angus 321.
AMS Cycling Club
General meeting to discuss Main-
tenance Clinic and Hallowe'en
Party. Noon, Hennings 302.
University Christian Ministries
Everyone welcome for coffee, cookies, and talk about New Age Myths
about Jesus. Noon, Brock Hall
302.
UBC Stamp Club
Noon at UBC, Angus 221.
tt UbTSSET f°HJfl TO
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UbYSSEY
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WEDNESDAY,
OCT. Mil
1250 PM
ALL WRITERS
PLEASE ATTEND
SUb 241
2/THE UBYSSEY
October 18,1988 WBKS^BKmWB.WHKBSMBSB
Think before you drink
By Jon Derksen
In an attempt to reduce the
number of alcohol related injuries
on campus this year, UBC residences have been encouraging
students to think before they
drink.
The new awareness campaign
is partially in response to an incident which occurred during frosh
night last September, in which 13
students were treated for excessive alcohol consumption.
"This year we stressed distributing information as soon as
possible," said director of housing
Mary Flores, in an interview
Wednesday.
At the beginning of September, Student Housing provided
each resident with a "Campus
Welcome" package which included
a paper called "Smashed", donated
by the RCMP, and a newsletter,
"The Resident," both warning
against   excessive   alcohol   con-
Drugs: The five
biggies
By Chris Beck
You may know tobacco is
much more addictive than marijuana, but did you know booze can
kill you in four times as many ways
as heroin?
The restrictions on drug-use
in North America haven't a lot to
do with the real effects ofthe drugs
themselves. In fact, no one troubles to tell us why some drugs are so
feared, while others are so commonplace we don't even call them
drugs.
No one tells us what the real
effects of these drugs are.
Decide what you think—on
parade we have five favorite
drugs: alcohol, cocaine, heroin,
marijuana and tobacco. Well rate
the five biggies on addictiveness,
over-dose effects, withdrawal
symptoms and health effects.
Most addictive drug: the
compulsion to take that drug regardless of the consequences. Cocaine is the most addictive drug in
our "fave five." Especially Crack, a
free-base form of cocaine which is
usually smoked.
Heroin is a close second. But
alcohol is also highly addictive,
like tobacco.
Least addictive is marijuana.
Even regular users can stop taking marijuana without real cravings.
Worst over-dose effects:
the more addictive a drug, the
more likely you are to increase the
dose to dangerous levels. Alcohol,
cocaine and heroin can all kill you
ifyou take too much. But the way
you take the drug makes a big
difference. Injected drugs like
heroin and cocaine have to win in
this category and this is why:
Alcohol, which you drink
means the drug has to be absorbed
through the gut and into the blood-
brain barrier. A big blob of food in
the stomach slows down the whole
absorption process.
It takes persistent drinking to
down enough to bring the alcohol
level in your blood up to that 0.5
per cent point where respiratory
comr on coloux __•«•_>
STAND OUT
ask us about
Special Ordering
Student Union Building
Opposite Gaines Room
Open Every Pay
228-4388
arrest becomes likely.
Taking heroin and cocaine isa
different story. Heroin and cocaine
are usually injected which means
large concentrations of the drugs
hit the brain at once, making accidental overdose easier. And because the government declines to
regulate the quality of socially
consumed heroin and cocaine, you
could be sticking just about anything into your vein.
Crack can kill you handily
because it's so potent.
Cocaine is also snorted, or,
more scientifically, absorbed
through the mucous membranes
ofthe nasal passages. Perhaps not
quite as dangerous as sticking a
piece of metal in your arm, but if
you stuff enough of it up your nose
you'll eventually have a stroke or
suffer respiratory arrest.
Marijuana won't kill you, but
breathing in enough smoke can
make you sick to your stomach and
make your eyes burn.
Tobacco over-dose won't kill
you—unless you've got a nasty
heart condition which makes you
susceptible to the constrictive
properties of nicotine. All that
should worry smokers is emphysema and lung cancer.
Worst withdrawal syndrome: ifyou stop taking a drug
you are addicted to, you get sick.
The sickness is called a withdrawal syndrome. Only one of our
five drugs can kill you in withdrawal. Any guess?
First prize for withdrawal
goes to alcohol. Alcohol withdrawal can be fatal in two different
phases of withdrawal: during the
convulsive phase and during the
third phase called delerium tremens (DTs).
Of course, that's not to say
that cocaine and heroin withdrawal are fun. The syndromes
make you very sick for up to a
week. But you don't die. Tobacco is
left tailing in the rear, though
quitting smoking isn't too enjoy-
continued on page 11
GMAT LSAT
GRE
Weekend Test
Preparation
Courses
at UBC
Call 222-8272
&exton i|
I
Educational Centers
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATON  'I1
sumption.
"Everyone was aware of the
dangers involved with drinking
before frosh night," said Lori Will,
a Dene resident and Alcohol
Awareness week volunteer.
Frosh night, traditionally an
event during which first year residents are initiated into the world
of university drinking, has caused
at least twenty-seven injuries
requiring hospitalization over the
past two years.
"It was tame this time compared to last year," said one Totem
park resident who participated in
frosh night. "People realized they
had the choice not to drink."
No injuries were reported
during frosh night this year, but
the problem of alcohol related injuries still mars campus life, according to Student Health's Outreach director Margaret Johnston.
"Last weekend a kid went
through the glass, and he and his
friends had had so much to drink
that they didn't apply any pressure to the wound. He had to have
a vascular surgeon replace the
damage that was done, and he lost
two pints of blood," said Johnston.
"We consistently get kids
coming in for minor injuries which
are alcohol related."
"My main concern for Student
Health is student awareness
about the resources available for
an alcohol or drug problem on
campus," she said.
In a continuing battle against
alcohol abuse among students, the
Outreach program of Student
Health Services is sponsoring an
Alcohol Awareness Week Oct. 17-
21 in the SUB main concourse.
MANDEL NGAN PHOTO
Taffy the Terrier is a hardcore kibbles 'n bits addict. Not a pretty story.
Varsity athletes tested
for drugs
By Narrtha Kumar
MONTREAL( CUP)—Soviet
weightlifters introduced Neale
McDevitt to anabolic steroids at a
competition in Sao Paulo, Brazil,
in 1981.
"The Russian team was
amazed at our ignorance about
steroids. They gave us Nerebol,
which is equivalent to Dianobol,"
the 25-year old Concordia English
student says.
Dubbed the "grand-daddy" of
steroids, Dianobol is the most
commonly used muscle-building
drug among weightlifters,
McDevitt says.
As a result, Canadian weight-
lifters are the only athletes in the
world who are tested for steroids
on a monthly basis.
At the varsity level, the Canadian Inter-university Athletics
Union (CIAU) announced in June
that member universities must
start testing their athletes for
"performance enhancing drugs."
The 46-member CIAU, which
represents every Canadian
university except Simon Fraser,
must ratify the proposal at its
December meeting. Under the
proposed program, athletes will be
tested starting next spring. Those
testing positive will be banned
from competition.
First to undergo the tests will
be football players and wrestlers—two sports where steroid
use is known to be widespread.
Players who test positive once
will be suspended for a year. Repeat offenders will be banned from
inter-varsity competition permanently.
Universities will have to contribute $100 per team per year to
pay half the cost of the International Olympic Committee-accredited tests. The CIAU will pay
the other half.
In addition to anabolic steroids,
which build muscle mass, drugs
banned by the IOC include beta-
blockers, diuretics, amphetamines and analgesics.
Beta-blockers are used by athletes in shooting events to slow
their body functions, including
their pulse rates, so they can
steady their aim.
Diuretics increase the flow of
urine. The loss of water makes
competitors lighter and allows
them to move into lower weight
classes.
Amphetamines are used as
stimulants before competition.
Analgesics such as codeine can
stop swelling.
Steroid use has been linked to
kidney and liver problems, hyper
tension, aggressive behaviour and
decreased sperm count.
"The drug program is a hard
line on performance enhancing
drugs," says CIAU executive director Bob Pugh. "We expect them
to give their consent to drug tests.
If students want the privilege of
competing in CIAU sanctioned
events, they should be willing to
sign consent forms."
Some coaches think the CIAU
organization is over-reacting.
"Drugs are expensive. I don't
think any athletes can afford
them" says McGill university athletics director Harry Zarins.
Although officials downplayed
the extent of drug use by
athletes, a Concordia varsity football player says some players have
been known to take the outlawed
drug.
"I know football players who
use steroids, but they make such a
small minority," says running
back Leonard Gervais. "I never
felt the need to use steroids, but I
have seen many athletes use it.
"If I had a strong chance to
make it into professional
football and make a lot of money, I
might have been tempted to use
steroids, but I'm not at that stage."
continued on page 11
The Vancouver Institute
FREE PUBLIC
LECTURE
Saturday, Oct. 22
A NEW APPROACH
TO CANCER
THERAPY
Prof. Julia Levy
Department of Microbiology
UBC
Lecture Hall 2,
UBC Woodward
Building at 8:15 p.m.
Lets face it...
You need
a break.
UBC
SUB
Lower
Concourse
Attention to all Students
DINO
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This special applys to
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224-7440
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October 18,1988
THE UBYSSEY/3 PRINCIPLES OF FUN 88/89
Duneb & Concert Studies
(prerequisite: The Philosophy of Fun)
Learn to have fun without guilt! Todays students
need to balance scholastic encleavors with Social pursuits. Enrol in this course by purchasing
AMS Concert tickets at Fogg n'Suds. Afterademanding
practicum of dinners and parties, graduation is marked
by a diploma ceremony and photos of students having
fun appearing in the Ubyssey paper.
Upcomins Foi AMS Events
Evmt Puci Din
Rugby Oktoberfest Annourief October 14
Halloween Barney Bentall Armouries October 28
Idle Eyes Armouries October 29
Register At FOGG U CAMPUS • Kitsilano • Broadway English Bay
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2ND FLOOR
2174 W.PARK WAY,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
224-6225
OPEN EVERY DAY MTH 8-9
FRI 8-6 SAT-SUN 11-6
Facts About
The Federal Voting Process For Students
The riding where you vote is
determined by where you consider your ordinary residence to
be located.
As students, you must decide
whether you consider this to be
your family's residence or the
place where you are currently
living (if they are two separate
places).
Make sure you are enumerated in the polling division
where your "ordinary residence"
is located. Your name should
___D_vr—
then appear on the Voters' List.
If you will not be able to vote
on Election Day itself, remember
that you may vote
in advance or by
proxy.
TO FIND OUT
MORE, PICK UP
THIS PAMPHLET
AT YOUR STUDENT
UNION OFFICE, OR
CALL YOUR
ELECTIONS
CANADA OFFICE.
ELECTIONS
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Helping Canadians Make Their Mark.
> - v^^*'-""^'"'"-"*;**     ■■■^■■■■■■■•■-gjj^^ijj^j- ■■■■-■ •■■■■■■ j
Basket-Birds grounded
The UBC Thunderbirds women's basketball travelled to Salmon
Arm this past weekend for an exhibition game against the University
of Victoria.
The Birds lost 80-70 but Bev Smith, UBC coach and Salmon Arm
native, was optimistic about the result: "Despite the ten point loss, it is
too early to tell how we will fare this year but we've discovered the
intensity and determination needed to be a competitive power in
women's basketball".
Smith also suggested that Victoria's complete domination of the
cross-straight rivalry may be a thing ofthe past. The game was played
in Salmon Arm "in recognition of the outstanding contribution the
community has made to the development of B.C. girls' basketball," said
Smith.
BIRD DROPPINGS
UVic triumphs in field
The women's field hockey team finished their second qualifying
tournament of the year this past weekend with a 3-1 record. The T-
Birds lost to the Vikettes in the final game of the tournament.
The result left UBC in second place overall with 22.5 points. UVic
leads with 23 after the completion of two of three qualifying tournaments to determine the western representative for the national tournament. UBC must beat UVic in the final tournament to surpass them in
the standings.
Last minute F-G lifts Birds
The Thunderbirds football team kept their play-off hopes alive
with a 22-20 victory over the Alberta Golden Bears in Edmonton last
Saturday.
Kicker Mike Bellefontaine booted a 30-yard field goal with 11
seconds left allowing the T-Birds to leave Edmonton victorious.
The Thunderbirds have two games remaining and must win both
of them if they hope to make the Western International Football League
final. The next T-Birds game is at home against the University of
Manitoba Bisons. Kick-off is at 7:30 p.m.
Birds blow away Albertans
The Thunderbirds men's soccer team still has a mathematical
chance of qualifying for the national championship after a pair of
convincing wins on the prairies this weekend.
A stellar goaltending performance by Rob Zambrano enabled the
Birds to post back to back shutouts. UBC hammered the Lethbridge
Pronghorns 8-0 paced by Steve Burns with a pair of goals.
The second match saw the Thunderbirds defeat the University of
Calgary Dinos 2-0 with both goals scored by Neil Wilkinson. The T-Birds
must win their remaining games to stay alive in the playoff picture. The
Birds' next game is against the SFU Clansmen in the annual Diachem
Bowl, Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
The UBC Women's Soccer team lost to the visiting
University of Washingtons' Women 4 -3 Saturday
UBC. The match was in preparation for the CWU/
Tournament to be held at UBC September 21 - 23. All
games are to be played at OJ Todd Field.
4/THE UBYSSEY
October 18,1988 -fT^r-v,*-- *■.-•*•*•*■**-•■-■"**'
Thunderbird heavy weight crew bring victory home. Vikes take shower
after the Deep Cove Classic Regatta Saturday. Andrew kay photo
Rowers rout UVIC
By Laurie McGuinness
"UBC rowing is back."
Thus spake UBC men's rowing coach Tan Barkley after weekend
victories by the heavy-weight men over long-time nemesis University of
Victoria at Burnaby Lake.
Saturday's win over UVic in the men's 8 km "Deep Cove Classic"
was the first at that distance in over eight years.
Sunday, the heavy-weight men again triumphed over UVic as well
as U.S. crews from Mt. Baker and Green Lake in the 3.5 km "Turning
ofthe Stake".
UBC's winning time of 11:33 was five seconds ahead of U-Vic.
UBC's heavy-weight-women finished third in the "Deep Cove
Classic" but coach Bob Downie was pleased with the results as the
winning crew from Burnaby Lake Aquatic Club boast national team
members. UBC finished in a close race with UVic for second place.
"The victories were the result of crew unity, good technique, and
conditioning", said Barkley, although the rest ofthe crews present were
in as good as shape as UBC, he added.
The conditioning program for the rowers is not for the faint of heart
as during the week the crews have four workouts lasting up to two hours
each and starting at 5:20 a.m.
The crew runs and lifts weights three times per week and rows both
days on the week-end. There is no off season in rowing.
The UB C men's crew leaves Wednesday for a Regatta in Boston Oct.
23rd. The women have a two week layoff before their next meet.
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UBC crowned at Calgary
By Joe AKwasser
The UBC T-Birds ice hockey team upset the perennial Canada
West power, the University of Calgary Dinosaurs, to capture the
Empress Cup in Calgary this weekend.
UBC romped over the host Dinos in the final 7-2. The UBC victory
ends the Dinos' five year domination of the cup.
UBC coach Terry O'Malley was pleased with the team's result,
understandable in light ofthe low calibre of UBC hockey in recent years.
O'Malley credits the success to a, "strong team effort with the scoring
evenly spread out."
The newcomers on the team contributed much needed scoring
punch and the steady play of the defence provided the balance which
clinched the victory, said O'Malley. "Six returning defencemen is a great
asset to the club, considering last year we had only one."
The T-Birds went 3-0 this weekend defeating Regina 7-3 and
Lethbridge 6-2 in their march to the final against Calgary.
O'Malley was cautious in predicting the fate ofthe 1988-89 Birds in
Canada West play: "This (coming) weekend will be a good indicator as
we open the regular season at Calgary with a couple of games. Well see
if they (Calgary) were playing possum with us."
O'Malley also noted that Calgary had a few injured key players
suggesting that the return match may not be as much of a walkover as
the tournament finale. Calgary lost to the U of Toronto in the C.I.A.U.
finals last year.
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TICKETS IN ADVANCE AT VTC / TICKETMASTER, $9 & service. Produced by F.U.N. PROMOTIONS
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THE UBYSSEY/5 BUCK THE SYSTEM
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with the
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Offer good through Oct. 28 (Wed & Thurs only)
Regular admission $6. Phone 688-7013
Back Alley Theatre, 751 Thurlow
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COMPUTER SHOW '88
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"MAKING A WORLD OF
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MURRIN LECTURE SERIES
featuring
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internationally known writer and broadcaster
"JUSTICE BETWEEN RACES"
Wednesday, October 19,12:30 p.m.
"PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN GENDERS"
Wednesday, October 26,12:30 p.m.
BUCHANAN BUILDING, A 106
Sponsored by the University of British Columbia with the support
of the Murrin Foundation
x - Country
UBC thrashes UVIC
Men and women look forward to Canada west finals
By Myron Neville
The University of Victoria played meet host under cloudy skies for
the local cross-country races this weekend, and was soundly thrashed
by the UBC men's and women's teams.
On a 2500 metre grass loop course relentless in its hills, the
women's team placed all their counting runners inside the top ten for a
low wining score of 35 points. UBC's first team finisher was Teresa Rind
in a race won by Vikes runner Cathy Dargie who powered her way to a
5 km time of 18:09. The UBC men's team produced a gratifying result
with all their counting runners saturating the top positions, while re
cording an excellent score of 24 points.
UVic never proved to be a contender and finished well back, though
their top runner, Gary Barber pushed UBC's Rob Lonergan to a photo
finish of 30:56 for 10 km.
The Victoria race was the final opportunity for UBC athletes to
make selection for the upcoming Canada West Championships on
Oct.29th, and provided a preview ofthe course site for that race.
UBC's coaching staff of Marek Jedrzejek and Thelma Wright have
been working with their athletes intensively since the season's September opener at Mundy Park.
Simon Fraser University sponsored the race held on an ideal course
of crushed wood trails. The men's 8 km race was broken open just past
the half-way point by UBC's Zeba Crook after early work by team mates
Larry Nightengale and Allen Klassen. The winner cruised home with a
time of 25:44 and the UBC team scored its first win.
The women's race was equally impressive as the UBC runners
garnished the team title with strong performances by Carolyn
Daubeny, leading the team home in 21:05 for the 5 km loop, and with
Fredrique Schmidt and Kristen Madsen in close pursuit.
Recently, UBC hosted the Pacific Northwest Cross-country Cham
pionships which served as a preview ofthe flat and fast grass course to
be used for Canada's cross-country championships in late November.
With the men's race, UBC continued to define its presence with
another strong performance. Last year's national medal team looked
like a solid bet for another medal placing in this year's CIAU Champi
onships being held in Quebec.
UBC's men's team performance locked the Pacific Northwest title
away with all the counting runners led by Zeba Crook breaking into the
coveted top ten. No less awesome was the women's squad which, lead by
Teresa Rind, captured team honors.
Given the measure of success that the men's and women's crosscountry teams have met with this season they should look forward to a
strong showing at the Canada West Championships and possible
advancement to the CIAU meet.
...,.../: h' L ■»_' xi*.v',,A&* iC *i<*
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Start Your Own Business
through the
YMCA Youth Enterprise Centre
If you are unemployed, employed part-time or a
part-time student and have dreamed about
owning your own business, we can help. The
YMCA Youth Enterprise Centre provides the
following free services to young entrepreneurs.
Individual Consultation:
An intensive course covering the basics of writing and implementing a business plan. Follow up is provided by professional staff and volunteers.
Comprehensive Training
A16 week comprehensive program covering all aspects of
starting a business. Topics include market research, marketing, legal issues, insurance, product distribution, inventory control, personnel, credit collection, and financial
planning. Seminars are provided by professional staff in
conjunction with volunteers from the business community.
Resource Support.
Take advantage of extensive physical resource support including: shared offices, telephones, computers, photocopying, typewriters, office equipment and supplies.
The YMCA Youth Enterprise centre is a unique partnership of the Federal Government, IBM Canada Ltd, Arthur
Andersen and Company, Northern Telecom, Clark
Wilson, Bedford Software Ltd, and the Vancouver YMCA.
Apply at:
The YMCA
Youth Enterprise Centre
620 - 1033 Davie Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6E 1M7
Phone: 685-8066
6/THE UBYSSEY
October 18,1988 ENTERTAINMENT
Playhouse magic in season opener
By Laura Busheikin
When Larry Lillo returned to
Vancouver this summer to take
over as artistic director of the
Vancouver Playhouse, people
predicted great things. Here was
the man who would revitalize
Vancouver theatre with much
needed injections of artistic
courage, expertise, and inspiration. The word "renaissance" was
used to describe the potential
quality ofthe 1988/89 Playhouse
Season under Lillo's wizardry
guidance.
Everyone seemed to agree
that Vancouver was ready for a
theatrical Prospero to conjure
away the specters of dull programming, stale directing, and
disenchanted audiences. But did
media create a myth that Lillo
couldn't fulfill?
The season opened with Sam
Shepard's A Lie ofthe Mind.
Lillo's magic wand is doing its
stuff.
THEATRE
A Lie of the Mind
The Vancouver Playhouse to
Nov.5
This potent theatrical brew is
a mixture of a number of
top notch ingredients. First of all
there is Shepard's powerful writing. A Lie of the Mind is as compelling as a bad dream is a nightmare—it is delivered in unforgettably haunting poetry. The play
also avoids slipping into the
abyss of unrelieved despair,
thanks to a rich vein of wickedly
funny (but undeniably black)
humor.
Like all Shepard plays, plot
has surrealistic grounding.
"When it gets normal, well talk
normal," says one of the characters. No one talks normal in this
Play-
Jake thinks he's killed his
wife Beth in a violent fit of
jealousy. He returns home to go
half crazy in his boyhood bed,
under the ministrations of his
bizarrely insensitive and over-
protective mother (unconcerned
with her son's crime, she is glad
to have her "boy" back under her
wing). Jake's brother goes off to
see if Beth is still alive. He finds
her brain-damaged but not
dead. Suddenly, she too is in the
care of her malfunctioning
family. And so is he, since Beth's
father had accidentally shot him
in the leg, mistaking him for a
deer.
This play explores the complicated and seemingly mutually
destructive relationship between
internal and external realities.
All characters are victims of
their own and others' lies of the
mind. But Beth, the most abused
victim, has somehow found a
higher wisdom although she has
virtually lost touch with external
reality. Like an oracle or a
soothsayer, she speaks in half
formed, eerily poetic sentences
that reveal profound truths
behind the confusion ofthe
others. "This is my father. He's
given up on love...Only death
counts for him," she says.
Shepard's fascinating play is
justly crystallized by a uniformly
excellent cast. These actors have
all made their stand in other
shows, but in A Lie ofthe Mind,
Lillo has honed their talents to
an incredibly fine point. Maureen Sheerin in particular stands
out with her painfully intense
portrayal of Beth.
The set is arguably the
production's most powerful element. It comments on and adds
resonance to the action of the
play. Wooden planks cover the
surface of a raked stage—a vast
desolate expanse, littered with
tumbleweeds and dilapidated old
beds. The beds are half sunk into
the ground as if they were more
permanent than seeds. Each
character's half-absurd, half-
tragic life seems just another
piece of debris on the barren
landscape.
A Lie of the Mind runs for
three hours, but not a moment
drags. If the rest of the Playhouse season is as good as this,
Lillo will have performed a
miracle indeed.
Inventive acting intense
By Kathy Chung
In a fine example of ensemble acting, the student cast of
Studio 58 has created a wonderful production of Brechf s
Caucasian Chalk Circle. The
story tells ofthe hazardous trials
ofthe good maid, Grusha, who
rescues and adopts the abandoned son of a Governor. The
play culminates in a dramatic
test of love when the Governor's
greedy wife returns to claim the
child, now heir to a wealthy
estate. This epic parable of love
and justice, set in the mythical
country of war-torn Grusinia, is
brought to life with refreshing
honesty and energy.
THEATRE
The Caucasian Chalk Circle
Studio 58 Langara Campus
to Oct. 23
Director Jane Heyman's inventive production contains
marvelous moments of theatre.
Touching scenes are invoked
with a simple face. In a blend of
fine acting, lighting and amazing
vocal effects, the cast invokes
Grusha's dangerous crossing of a
deep precipice and later, the
urgency of snow melting in
spring. The staging of the river,
which separates Grusha and her
returning lover, Simon, is
achieved with undescribable
beauty.
Ms. Heyman makes every
use of the intimate theatre space
and limited properties. Some
very interesting directional
choices are also made. The
characterization of the tyrannous
upper class is literally bestial.
Tne Corporal's description of a
"good soldier"— while riding on
the back of his subordinate— is
brilliant.
The Caucasian Chalk Circle
contains a large variety of characters to be enacted and a demanding pace to maintain. The
cast meets these challenges, performing with admirable confidence, skill and economy. They
integrate different acting styles
from the humorously grotesque
caricatures ofthe ruling class to
the natural grace of Grusha, the
kitchen maid.
Jennifer Haley is a charming,
gentle and spirited Grusha. Darren Andrichuk's Fat Prince is
wonderfully hoggish and Robin
Kelley shows amazing vocal dexterity as the horrible wife of the
Governor. The brutish villains,
with their stylized masks, movements and voices, are so entertaining that at times they
threaten to overshadow the
naturalistic portrayal of the
commoners.
David McKay is properly
witty and paradoxically corrupt
as the good judge, Azdak. Joel
Wirkkunen, Martin Shaw and
Francis Boyle are also wonderful
in their various roles. Note the
singers and chorus who narrate
passages ofthe play.
The whole cast must be commended for a brilliant perform-
UBC Bookstore invites you to the
PACKARD BELL FESTIVAL
October 20th & 21st 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Special!
50 PB1272A monitors
will be given away
freeto the first 50
-Ss"--.*-
customers purchasing
a PB8810 computer!
^
* „
-■>,
Free Draws!
Enter your name for a chance to win
• 1 of 3 PB8810 computers (basic configuration)
•1 of 6 PB1200 PLUS modems.
DRAW TIMES
• Thurs. Oct. 20,3:30 pm
• Fri. Oct. 21,12:30 pm and 3:30 pm
The draws will take place just outside the front entrance ofthe Bookstore.
Join us for fun, food, music and the great North American
tradition of technology through Packard Bell.
BOOKSTORE
PACKARD BELL
October 18,1988
THE UBYSSEY/7 r m KELVIN DOUGLAS
L W INTERNATIONAL
open 7 days a week   Your 24 Hour Business Centre
desktop publishing
word processing
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24 HOUR BOOKINGS
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688-6151
we don't sleep, ...so YOU can!
Suite 201,905 West Pender Street, Vancouver, BC V6C1L6
(Hornby and Pender, Downtown)
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liaboocll
"I always dress up at
Kaboodles," says
regular customer,
Grizelda the Witch
• warts, scars, noses and chins
• hair spray in wild colours,
sparkle too!
• make up galore
• dracula capes and skeleton
earrings
■ wigs, moustaches and beards
• furry werewolf masks
• dangling eyeballs and groucho
glasses
Meet Grizelda
Saturday, Oct. 29
Kids Only at 10 am
West 10th at 12 noon.
OPEN FRIDAY EVENINGS and SUN. PM's
4449 W. 10th Ave. 224-5311 and Kids Only Market, Granville Island 684-0066
YORK
FACULTY OF
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
THE FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES offers
INTERDISCIPLINARY. INDIVIDUALIZED, FLEXIBLE programs leading
lo the degree of Master in Environmental Studies (MES).
urban planning
social policy
resource management
organizational environments
biological conservation
environmental thought
international development
women and environments
human services and health
environmental policy,
planning and design
northern studies
communication, advocacy
and social change
environmental politics and
economics
Native/Canadian relations
environmental education
regional planning and
development
tropical environments
impact assessment
environment and behaviour
quality of working life
action research
housing
cooperative management
recreation
For information come to talk with
PAUL WILKINSON
Associate Professor and Associate Dean, FES
Wednesday, October 26th 2:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Room 204D, Brock Hall
Ifyou can't attend but would like information on our Faculty contact:
Coordinator of External Liaison
Faculty of Environmental Studies
Room 355 Lumbers Building
York University
4700 Keele Street
North York, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3
Rocker of our time
By Giles Gysel
"The girls would turn the colour
of Avocado
When he cruised down the street
in his Eldorado.
The girls could not resist his
stare—
Pablo Picasso
Was never called an asshole
Not like you."
Jonathan Richman
Jonathan Richman is one of
the most distinctive and
imaginative songwriters in rock
music. His group, The Modern
Lovers, combined garage band
sensibility with Richman's zany
lyrics in the early 70's to create
music years ahead of its time. The
original lineup included such notable musicians as the Talking
Heads' Jerry Harrison and the
Cars' David Robinson, yet Rich-
man and The Modern Lovers
never made it big. He remained
essentially a cult figure while
other more pretentious, less talented bands rode the new-wave
aesthete he pioneered all the way
to the bank in the late 70's and
80's.	
MUSIC
Jonathan Richman
Vancouver East
Cultural Centre
October 12
But now the year is 1988.
Punk is dead, new wave has been
HEATHER JENKINS PHOTO
assimilated into the commercial
mainstream, and once more rock
music finds itself in a rut, waiting
in a haze of nostalgia for the next
big thing to happen. And, surprise
of surprises, Jonathan Richman is
still out there, the same as he ever
was, and as charming and entertaining as ever.
Armed only with his guitar
and a pair of stomping boots to
provide percussion, the ex-Modern Lover easily seduced the audience with his hilariously weird
tales of suburban life.
Richman is, like most of us, a
product of North American pop
culture. He sings of the strange
and wonderful suburban universe
which we are all a part of, whether
we like it or not—that homogenized world of 7-1 I's, ice cream
trucks, supermarket tabloids, prefabricated housing developments,
and nosey neighbours. Furthermore, his songs are essentially
pop-rock structures with wonderfully naive lyrics. Richman is like
a nine-year-old making up the
words to Johnny B. Goode with the
tongue-in-cheek wariness of a
supermarket Bob Dylan.
Richman finds warmth and
humor in even the most banal elements within our society. Rather
than condemning pop-culture,
Richman prefers to poke fun at it,
whether attesting to having seen
UFO's fly over his house or lamenting the economic wipeout of a
local corner store by a suburban
shopping mall. He further emphasized this through his parodies of
established pop stars such as
Dylan, Jagger, and Elvis, much to
the delight of the sold-out crowd.
Few performers are as sincere
and unpretentious as Jonathan
Richman. During the intermission, Richman spent the entire
time chatting with a number of
fans, as likeable and accessible in
person as he was on stage. Truly a
class act, this Modern Lover definitely has the jam to satisfy his
audience. And after Wednesday's
ninety minute show, you can bet
that no one is going to call Jonathan Richman as asshole either.
Tragedy is reborn: Antigone
Sophocles for our time
By Keith Damsell
How does one approach a
2500-year old tragedy
and make it relevant to a modern
audience? In 1944, Jean Anoilh
filled Sophocles's Antigone with
political allegory concerning the
Nazi occupation of Paris. To your
disbelief, the UBC theatre
department's Brenda Leadlay
takes Anouilh's version one step
further: she sets the play in the
present. The political message is
extended dramatically. Tragedy
is given a different concept.
The civil war ends in Thebes
with both leaders slain.
Oedipus's two sons, Eteocles and
Polyneices, lie dead at the gates
ofthe city. Creon (John Murphy)
who is declared king publicly
proclaims one brother a martyr
and the other a traitor for his
own welfare. Eteocles has a
hero's funeral while his brother,
the 'traitor', is left to rot in the
street. The body's stench serves
as a reminder of Thebes' bloody
past.
Antigone (Alison Saunders),
sister of the two brothers, takes
it upon herself to see that justice
is done. Against Creon's wishes,
she tries to bury Polyneices so
that his spirit will not wander
forever.
Thanks to the tongue in cheek
nature in which the tragedy is
approached, a balance results between humor and fate. The Theatre Department's own Errol
Durbach revels in his role of the
Chorus, obviously enjoying the
omniscience with which his
character is blessed.
With sublime charm, the
audience is presented with the
calming aspects of tragedy.
Timothy Hyland's Jonas, the
first guard, is bureaucracy at
work; ignorant to the consequences of his actions but happy
nevertheless.
A wonderful counter-weight to
these witty performances is the
studious authority of John
Murphy (Creon). He grounds
Creon's magnetism with potent
speech. The final confrontation
between Antigone and Creole
packs a good punch. The two
spar and plead with one another
while straightjacketed in their
own destructive principles.
Antigone argues for the value of
her sacrifice while Creon wants
her to submit to a life of docile
happiness. Each falls victim-to
the agony of their own strength.
Globally, the stage does not
come across anachronistic, but
the language of Jean Anouilh is
stilted at times. One ofthe play's
first scenes between Antigone
and her nurse is meant to be
warm and touching. However, we
can't help but smirk at the
cliched affection within the
dialogue. Furthermore, the first
half of the play is primarily
exposition. It would have been
nice to see the drama unfold
sooner.
Antigone is a great stride for
student director Brenda Leadlay;
the work is much more solid
than her convoluted one-act productions of last year. By approaching the play with more
literary license, she lights the
two masks of theatre into
passion.
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8/THE UBYSSEY
October 18,1988 SNUfcTAINMINT
'Doors" revolve slowly
Keith Damsell
Oh, how I empathize with
the Canadian spirit.
What with Ben Johnson on drugs
and Free Trade in the wings, I
was looking forward to a slice of
home-grown culture to boost my
sense of patriotism. It was with
high hopes I sat down to watch
Francis Mankiewicz's Les Portes
Tourantes (The Revolving
Doors), a new film out of Quebec.
The Decline Of The American
Empire and My American
Cousin had satisfied both the
critics-at-large and added a
dimension to Canadian identity.
Would Revolving Doors continue
the valiant search to define who
we are?	
FILM
REVOLVING DOORS
Vancouver Film Festival
In a word, no. The film is
much like one of the old photographs it features—pretty to look
at but it can't hold one's interest
for two hours.
Ironically, the film is about
an artist's discovery of his own
past. Blaudelle (Gabriel Arcand,
who won a Genie for his portrayal of a lost homosexual in
Decline) receives an old suitcase
in the mail. It contains photographs and a long diary written
by his own mother Celeste
(Monique Spaziani), a woman he
never knew. Blaudelle and his
son Antoine (Francois Methe)
begin a journey into the past. In
flashbacks we see Celeste
leaving her family's small farm
for the big city of Campbelton;
she has been hired on as a piano
player at the movie house.
Celeste becomes lost in the world
of Hollywood fantasy, dressing
Celeste (Monique Spaziani)
like the twenties stars she plays
for. Meanwhile, in the 1980's,
Blaudelle and Antoine can't get
along. Blaudelle is bent on
keeping the family past a secret.
Then zip!..back to 1928. Celeste
breaks down when Jolson and
the talkies arrive. She marries
into the town's millionaire
family, and has a son who is
commandeered by her wicked
stepmother, Simone. The war
arrives and zip!...back to 1988.
jAntoine sets off to find his
grandmother in the jungle of
New York.
Despite the intriguing idea
of the present coming to terms
with the dream-like past, the
film fails to really take off. Due
to the plot structure, neither
story is fully explored and we are
left with big questions which
distance us from the characters.
Celeste is portrayed as an
independent woman yet she
marries a wimp and gives up her
baby. Why? The present day
story of Blaudelle, his estranged
wife and Antoine has conflict
brewing beneath it that is never
realized. Arcand and Wife Miou
Miou (yes, that is the actress's
name) exchange desperate looks
but that's it. The acting and
direction is safe and with few
chances taken. Revolving Doors,
as a result, is bland and dull.
There is a bright spot in this
postcard. Francois Methe as
young Antoine brings a freshness
and vitality lacking in the other
performances.
Wait a minute. Maybe I've
missed something. This film is
long winded and boring—maybe
there is a comment about
Canadian identity lurking inside
The Revolving Doors.Where.
Porno passes for art?
By Cindy Dowsling
"N:
ew York is the clitoris
ofthe world", or so it is
described by one ofthe characters
in the movie Mondo New York.
The movie begins with a blonde-
haired bombshell singing a tune
about Marilyn Monroe while
humping her guitar. The content
gets more licentious and absurd as
the film progresses. The film is at
times humorous, at other times
very offensive, but unique. There
are scenes in this film that would
shock the most avid filmgoer.
We are shown a night club performer biting the heads off of mice,
a man biting the head off of
chicken, and probably the most
offensive part—the naked retarded cripple in a wheel chair
with naked painted women crawling all over him. There is a slide
show projected on the retarded
man and women in a surrealist
atmosphere. The retarded man
gets more excited and jerks
around in spasmodic movements
as the women fondle his body.
One performer gets on the
stage nude and proceeds to place
six or seven dozen eggs on the floor
with a stuffed rabbit. She smashes
the eggs on the floor and then
wipes the egg yolk all over her
body with the stuffed animal. She
asks the audience if they "like her
bunny, it's a baby bunny." After
she is finished with the egg yolk
she throws colored sprinkles all
over herself and then tells someone in the audience that "this is
art, babes."
We are forced throughout the
film to follow this angelic blonde-
haired typical WASP as she parades about New York City. The
seedier places she visits don't even
get her a cursory glance from those
around her. The director subjects
us to the sensibilities ofthe "little
blonde." The use ofthe girl doesn't
wash since many of us don't have
the same thoughts or feelings that
she does.
The film offers its viewers just
about everything with the exception of plot or meaning.
Lapp mystical thriller: hits big
Raste is the Obi Wan of the story, the spiritual
leader and expert hunter who gives Aigin heavy logic
to guide his mission. "You cannot break away from
the whole (of existence)," he tells the spellbound lad.
With stunning landscape shots and pans over a
bleak winter world, a bone-chilling sense of awe is
conveyed to the viewer. Inside this milieu, the tension never lets up until the end. At any time one
expects a crossbow quarrel to thunk into someone's
chest.
There are corny predictable scenes—especially
the obligatory romance. However, they do not detract
from the saga. The cast contributes convincing, believable performances, with doses of wit and laughter to occasionally break the tension of danger.
The film is for all (with reservations, due to some
brutal violent scenes). The greatest fault of the
feature is that it is too short, being only 90 minutes
long. It is a mystical world you do not want to leave.
by Greg Davis
In Pathfinder, director Nils Gaup presents a
tense, ruthless portrayal of Lapp life during the Dark
Ages.
Itis a haunting film of spirit and skullduggery direct
from Norway. Nominated for the best foreign film at
the 1987 Academy Awards, the film contains the type
of action packed adventure appealing to North
Americans along with the embodiment Scandinavian artistry.
The film is based on Lapp legends and includes
many elements from the grain of mythological tradition. The plot echoes strands of Star Wars, Tolkien,
and medieval fantasy.
Young Aigin is the boy hero whose parents are
killed by invading black clad enemies (called
Tchudes), similar to the way Luke Skywalker's aunt
and uncle were murdered. Aigin sets out to save other
Lapps in the valley, with vengeance in mind.
Dr. Rex E. Fortescue
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October 18,1988
THE UBYSSEY/9 ^.
__*s
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£     -3     &|     ■$-.*■     p     ^      ««_     ^     .j
UBC reaps CFS
rewards
The responsibility of post-secondary education
does not belong entirely to the provincial government.
Considering the record our Social Credit government has produced with respect to post-secondary
education funding, B.C. college and university students should be grateful we have someone else to turn
to.
Last year's national forum on post-secondary
education made the issues of national concern. This
year, the Canadian Federation of Students recognizes that issues in education are viable federal
election issues. The CFS and most of Canada's universities and colleges will be drawing attention these
issues tomorrow for what has been declared National
Student Day.
UBC is not a member ofthe Canadian Federation
of Students. Our student council has nothing organized for National Student Day. Yet we continue to
reap the benefits ofthe work of lobby groups like the
CFS who have brought student issues into the limelight.
UBC does not need to belong to CFS to become a
lobbying force. But if we think we are too big and too
important to bother with improvingthe quality of and
access to all post-secondary educational institutions,
we can at least demonstrate a concerted effort to cure
our own maladies.
Make a decision
You're full of it, Dr. Strangway.
You don't need any more information about the
gay games.
You based your original decision to refuse the
gay games on "principles," not on the availability of
UBC's facilities.
All you need to do now is say "yes, gay games organizers can book whatever facilities are available."
The conference centre can negotiate the organizers' specific requests. The Board of Governors does
not need to know if the gay games needs to use the
volleyball courts on, say, August 4th or 5th.
So why are you waiting, Dr. Strangway?
Are you hoping that everyone will just forget
about the whole thing ifyou wait until December or
maybe later? Or perhaps another "less controversial" group will book facilities between August 4 and
11 of 1990 and you'll be off the hook.
You've had 22 months to negotiate with gay
games organizers.
You do not need any more time.
You need to say "yes" right now to gay games organizers and end any suspicion that UBC discriminates against homosexuals.
theUbyssey
October 18, 1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year bytheAlmaMaterSociety
ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or ofthe sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k of the
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301; advertising, 228-3977.
Laura Busheikin . tin lunch pail produced a hallow twang as it
bonked the heads of Keith Damsel, Giles Gj-el and Keith Leung
consecutively.'Half-Pint, stop it!" cried Robert Groberman
angelically.doting on his dull wife Laura J. May. Alex Johnson
flapped her wings and tried to control the class Joe Altwasser tugged
on his bitchy sister Katherine Monk's dress.Deanne Fisher didn't
care. The deceased were entertainment writers.The washed-out
townspeople—Chung Wong, Myron Neville and Dan Andrews—
remained colourless. Derek Craig had arisen from the dead but
Martin Chester, LaurieMcGuinnessbelieved, was hidingin Walnut
Grove.Kathy Chung and Giles Gysel hopped the skytrain to Winoka
and left Mandel Ngan and Stephen Scrimshaw to feed the ant
colony. Ted Aussem was the ant colony .Jon Erksen ate the dirt.
Heather Jenkins and Chris Weisinger emerged content from the
darkroom.Robert Groberman and Steve Chan sang campfire tunes
in the wilderness.And Chris Beck roasted weinies.
news:
DoaniM Fisher
•ntartalnment:
Robort Oroborman
crty desk:
Katharine Monk
photography:
Mandol Ngan
production:
Chris Wieolngor
Now how do we turn this little fellow into an election issue ?
Letters
Questioning
judgement
The decision by the
Board of Governors to deny
the use of UBC's facilities to
the Gay Games is puzzling.
Is not this a straight
forward business arrangement, financially
beneficial to the university?
Does UBC not need the
money? Are the proponents
not Canadians and B.C citizens whose taxes have paid
to build and run UBC?
If the answers to the
above are tyes' and the facilities are not already committed, the choice and the
duty of the President and
the Governors is clear. The
'politics' and the so-called
'morality' ofthe mattter are
unimportant.
Tex Enemark
Liberal Candidate
Vancover Centre
The breaking
of the dam:
Johnson
In a world where the
best is the only thing that
matters we are suddenly
surprised.
Ben Johnson won the
100m at the 1988 Seoul
Olympics. Ben set a world
record. Ben ran 9.79.
Citius Altius Fortius.
We have come to a dam
that will ultimately break.
Ben tested positive for
steroid use.
I'm surprised at the
reaction of the world. In
sports today, only gold is
rewarded, only being the
best—even if it is only by a
margin of one one hundredth of a second.
We have turned greatness into the only thing that
makes a person matter. We
are no longer interested in
competing in sports for the
joy of competition. We have
lived and breathed the
Olympic ideals until we
have stunk of a contorted
ideal.
We have placed the
weight of this contorted
ideal on the shoulders of our
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with Identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
people. And we have disguised this contorted ideal
in the joy of the Olympic
spirit—much as a wolf in
sheep's clothing. And this
contorted ideal, although
magnificent, has pressured
our people to a desperate
means. You are a nobody if
you are not the best but to
become the best has meant
contravening morals.
So who will bear this
weight?
Let's return to the
Olympic ideals and hold
them high in the light of
reality. For the weight we
place on our people is a
weight we ourselves will
ultimately have to come to
bear.
Citius Altius Fortius.
The dam has broken.
.-Tow's the time for us to
bear the weight.
Ben ran and Ben got
caught—in the ideal of older
men.
Linda Diano
UBC should
cash in cans
I was extremely
pleased with the current
issue of the Ubyssey in
which the whole issue was
devoted to enviornmental
concerns.
I would like to see an
effort made by the U.B.C.
student body as a whole to
try to make a difference. A
very basic move in this direction would be recycling,
two items: paper and aluminum cans and are wasted at
the University at phenomenal rates.
I find that I'm leaving
aluminum cans on benches,
on the floor ofthe sub or any
other visible place with the
hopes that someone will
pick it up and return it.
A receptacle situated
next to every garbage can
would be enough. If cost is a
problem then they would
pay for themselves in the
first few cash ins.
If this succeeds then paper could be the next concern.
Omar Diaz
Money ^ Education?
I did not enjoy the naivety of the article 'Money *_
Education" (The Ubyssey, Oct.63- Despite our profession*
alisra, energy, empathy and good old classroom support,
if the money is not there, government and the clientele are
laying upon the real individual teacher. Money ia not a
guarantee of success or of professionalism but it is a
critical tool in the provision of equal educational opportunity. The reality is that the teachers of tomorrow can not
closet themselves away with S0+ kids and a few meagre
supplies whilst ignoring the budget and the political
realities of the system. If they do—they will fail as
teachers.
Your author claims funding is a cop-out. This is not
so! Teachers must strive tobe energetic professional educators and if politics and money force them into a contra-
personnel existance, they clearly are disabled and demoralized in their ability to help kids.
Children are the business and as they are paramount—the best possible environs are needed; but not
given, when funding or politics create obstacles.
R.S. Paulin
Teacher and Student
Students fleeced by Faculty
Another tuition hike is imminent- To use a fitting
cliche^ UBC is caught between a rockanda hard place: the
rock of a government which underfunds education and the
hard place of a faculty which has rejected a 5% salary increase. The path of least resistance for the university is,
once again, to make students pay for faculty salary demands.
Why has the facul ty rejected a rather generous salary
offer? The reason is that senior academics at UBC make
less than senior academics at Canada's other top universities and want to catch up. For example, full professors
make an average annual salary of $ 75,0-48 at U of T and
(only?) 63,995 at UBC. Junior academics, on the other
hand, make slightly more at UBC because President
Strangway wants to attract some of the best academic
talent to tenure-track positions.
UBC's Faculty Association complains bitterly about
this policy ofgiving higher priority to competitive salaries
for junior academics. Two questions arise in my mind;
Should UBC really be concerned about givingcompeti ti ve
average salaries to senior academics? And should senior
academics at UBC press for catch-up salary increases at
the expense of tuition hikes?
My answer to the first question is a clear no. UBC
should not be too Concerned about competitive average
salaries for full and associate professors, but di scrimi nate
sharply between senior academics with proven competitive skills and senior academics who could never meetthe
test of real competition. Let us not forget that many senior
academics who rest secure in tenured jobs are beneficiaries of UBCs hiring spree in the sixties when almost
eYefyone got tenure, including some incredible mediocrities.
My answer to the second question is also a clear no.
Pressing for catch-up salary increases in the absence of
better government funding means higher tuition fees.
Students have been fleeced enough-! Now is not a good
time to redistribute funds from students many of whom
are very poor to senior professors all of whom are amply
paid.
Kurt Preinsperg
Graduate Student in Philosophy
10/THE UBYSSEY
October 18,1988 M:
NEWS
DfUgS      continued from page 3
able either.
A note on drug addiction: the
battle with a drug addiction
doesn't end with withdrawal. In
fact, ifs barely begun. Trying to
beat an addiction is a life-long
thing. Most people who quit smoking, drinking, or taking heroin or
cocaine will go back to taking that
drug. The more time you spend in
the same places with the same
people you took your drug with,
the more likely you are to go back
to taking it. Even the smallest
things can trigger a craving for the
drug—ifs along and terrible fight.
Some doctors feel ifs better to
simply try to control the addiction
than deny it entirely.
Worst Health Effects: Good
competition here between our two
legal drugs. Alcohol takes first
StetOidS continued from page 3
Last   week,   UBC   football
coach Frank Smith told Canadian
University Press  that he  suspected some athletes took
steroids last year.
Tm quite confident that steroids are not a factor this year," he
says, adding the problem has not
vanished entirely.
A former football player for
the UBC Thunderbirds said members of his team took steroids because they "were looking at something further" such as a career
with the Canadian Football
League.
McDevitt says when an athlete  gets  caught  using   drugs,
prize again because of the sheer
number of organs it screws up.
Alcohol kill brain cells (you
may think you have a lot to spare
now, but just wait until you're
sixty). Alcohol scars your liver
(this can kill you). Alcohol makes
you fat, leading to heart attacks
and strokes (these can also kill
you). Alcohol abuse leads to malnutrition (why eat carrots when a
beer can fill you up?) and, specifically, . a deficiency in thiamine.
Missing out on thiamine for years
makes more brain cells die, leading to a condition called
Korsakoff's syndrome—a form of
amnesia.
Second prize for worst health
effects goes to tobacco. This prize
could be shared with marijuana,
but for the fact that tobacco is
addictive and marijuana isn't,
which means if you're addicted to
smoking cigarettes you're likely to
keep smoking them even while
they kill you. Smoking, as we all
know, causes cancer of the lungs,
throat and mouth.
Third prize for worst health
effects goes to cocaine. Cocaine
doesn't cause cancer, or heart attacks, or strokes, or pneumonia—
but if you take enough of it over
time, cocaine will drive you mad.
This madness is called cocaine
psychosis and ifs much more
glamorous than dying in the hospital from cancer. For one thing
you can recover from cocaine psychosis and write books about your
experience.
Heroin has only three serious
health problems. The most serious
of which is AIDS transmitted by
re-used needles. This disease kills
addicts every day. Heroin itself
depresses appetite, sometimes
resulting in malnutrition. Finally,
heroin causes constipation.
On the other hand, heroin
won't induce heart attacks. In fact,
heroin addiction is much easier to
manage medically than alcohol
addiction in many ways. Heroin
was, strangely enough, successfully used as a treatment for alcoholism around the turn of the
century (before the government
realized how much fun it would be
to outlaw even the medical use of
heroin).
In the end, ifs up to you to
make your own decisions. Just
make sure it's you, and not the
drug.
Hong Kong
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sports officials are quick to say
that only a few athletes use steroids.
"And when you see an athlete
get caught, everyone from
coaches to administrators hold up
their hands and say that they
didn't know anything about it.
They leave the athletes high and
dry. They crucify the athlete, and
only the athlete, and the problem
goes up a lot higher than that."
McDevitt says resourceful
athletes can go to any gym in
Montreal and find banned drugs
for sale within 20 minutes.
"The more I found out about
steroids, the more I wanted to do
them," he says. "I went out (in
Brazil) and bought steroids which
were being sold over the counter."
He returned to Canada with
"several hundred dollars" worth of
the banned drug.
"Passing Canadian Customs
was almost a joke. We wore our
medals and everyone was congratulating us. They just whisked
us through without checking our
bags."
McDevitt says hard training
coupled with oral and intravenous
steroid use gave him the advantage he needed to win medals at
the Canadian Championships and
the senior Pan-American Champi
onships.
He won the junior Pan-American Championships twice, and his
chances to make this year's Olympic team were good, but he quit
weightlifting in January last year.
"You know that you are doing
something illegal, and if you get
caught you'll get suspended. But, I
really had no choice
competing with weightlifters from
East-bloc countries.
"Compared to these countries, we are in the Dark Ages as
far as steroids are concerned. They
have it down to a fine art, a highly
refined science."
SILKSCREENING
Kenny
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The Great Ubyssey                     [
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VANCOUVER
FILM
SCHOOL
THE ONLY INDEPENDENT
FILM SCHOOL IN CANADA
NIGHT
CLASSES
NOV 1-DEC 23
'Cinematography
-Editing
-Production Planning
as a First A.D.
•Directing for Film
•Scriptwriting
•Sound Recording
•introduction to
Filmmaking
'Short Subject
Filmmaking
Improv Acting
Workshop
EARLY REGISTRATION
RECOMMENDED
Applications now
being accepted for
January '89
full time program.
Financial Assistance
Available!
October 18,1988
THE UBYSSEY/11 NEWS
Student group calls for
boycott of Shell Canada
By Martin Chester
Calling attention to Shell
Oil's role in continuing apartheid,
between 30 and 40 UBC students
demonstrated against Shell Canada on the corner of Denman and
Burrard Friday afternoon.
Peter Scott, leader of UBC
Students Against Apatheid, said
Shell Canada is 70 per cent owned
by Royal Dutch Shell, which has
similar interests in Shell South
Africa.
Shell South Africa provides
the South African military with
between 18 to 20 per cent of the
petroleum it uses—petroleum
they receive from the parent company despite the 1973 international oil embargo against South
Africa, Scott said.
The oil being sent to South
Africa by Shell is therefore illegal,
he added.
Scott said Shell South Africa
supplies the products necessary to
produce   the   Napalm   used  in
Pretoria's war in Namibia.
Questioning why the Royal
Dutch Shell company has doubled
their interests in South Africa
despite the public controversy and
the fact that only two per cent of
the company's profits come from
Shell South Africa, the group
called for motorists to boycott
Shell.
Several customers left without purchasing gas, others ignored
the protest, and still others argued
with the students.
UBC enrolment increases
By Stephen Scrimshaw
Statistics show more students
than ever before registered for this
year's spring session and nobody
seems to know why.
According to UBC enrolment
figures, 4,266 students registered
for the 1988 spring session, up 16
per cent from the 1987 spring
enrolment.
Norman Watt, director of extra-sessional studies, attributed
the higher enrolment to a host of
factors, with the need for students
to be able to work while attending
school as the most likely.
"The fact that summer
courses are during the day and
spring courses are in the evening
is likely to be one of the major
factors causing students to favour
the spring session," Watt said.
A similar situation occurred
during Expo when student sum
mer employment was high as it
was during this past summer, he
said.
Spring courses allow students
to work during the day and attend
school in the evening.
Watt also pointed out that the
spring session was the first session that students were given the
opportunity to use Telereg. Perhaps the convenience of this system was enough to persuade some
students to attend, he said.
Watt said the overall enrolment increases in the spring,
summer and winter evening
courses reflect the trend towards
universities and other educational
institutions becoming full-year
operations to meet the academic
needs of adult and older students.
"The age variable of the student population is changing. No
News writing seminar
with ex-Vancouver Sun, ex-Edmonton Journal
and now CUP B.C. Bureau Gordon Clarke.
All news writers and those interested in becoming news writers should attend.
Meeting (a brief one) to follow.
Wed. Oct. 19 3:30pm @ SUB 241k
THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN N. TURNER, PC MP
MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT FOR VANCOUVER QUADRA
LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
WILL BE VISITING U.B.C.
FOR A QUESTION AND ANSWER SESSION
DATE: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1988
TIME: 12:20 P.M.
PLACE: SUB BALLROOM
Plan to attend, everyone is welcome!
Sponsored by the UBC Student Liberals
THIS AD IS AUTHORIZED BY THE FEDERAL LIBERAL AGENCY OF CANADA,
REGISTERED AGENT FOR THE LIBERAL PARTY OF CANADA.
longer do the seventeen and eighteen-year olds make up the entire
first-year class," said Watt.
John Chase, UBC Director of
Budget Planning and Systems
Management, gives similar cause
to the increase in spring enrolment.
Chase said enrolment jumps
during inter-session as well as in
other terms, reflecting a general
trend in all universities of increasing attendance since 1986.
Trom then on," he said, "we
have been practically bulging at
the seams—we wonder where will
it end?"
But Chase is still lost for a
better explanation as to why the
spring session saw such large
enrolment increases, when the
normal enrolment fluctuation for
spring is in the 5 to 8 per cent
range.
The Great Ubyssey
Hallowe'en
Short Story and Photo Contest
Rule, Regulations, Requirements,Prizes to be
announced in Friday's Issue
Watch for it!
USER FRIENDLY.
When you need copies quickly and hassle-free, see us at
Kinko's. Our self-service Copiers are very easy to use and
give you the great quality, inexpensive copies you expect.
kinko's
the copy centre
Monday to Friday 8 a.m.-Midnight 5706 University Blvd.
Saturday 10 - 6 Telephone: (604) 222-1688
Sunday 11-6 FAX: (604) 222-0025
"The most anti-macho film around.
It holds you breathless until its
final.unsettling scenes are over.
AFTER IT ENDS:'
Joy Gould Boyum,GLAMOUR MAGAZINE
ASTA CADELL HAS
ARRIVED IN TOWN.
THERE WILL BE
NO MORE...
AME
BARRON FIWS^'SHAME"
^DEBORRA-LEE FURNESS TONY BARRY SIMONE BUCHANAN .-GILLIAN JONES
^MARIO MILLO*^^ JOSEPH PICKERING ""KERRY REGAN c^PHILPETERS
^BEVERLY BLANKENSHIP^MICHAELBRINDLEY
SSTEVEJODRELLft^DAMIENPARERrtPAULD. BARRON .SKOURASPICTURES RELEASE
SKOURAS  \^sssssssaJ*%
PICTURES    C-MSOrenCTlfBKUinrc !!__*€]
*1S»*S»
October 26,1988
Pick up your free tickets as of Friday noon
at The Ubyssey or CiTR offices
12/THE UBYSSEY
October 18,1988

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