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The Ubyssey Nov 6, 1987

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 the Ubyssey
Committee struck to discuss idea
By Corinne Bjorge
A new student-run athletic
facility may be constructed to reduce competition for prime-time
space between varsity athletics,
intramurals and recreation UBC.
The AMS voted Wednesday to
form a committee to obtain student input on the facility. It will
make its initial report on December 2.
Although there is no clear
concept yet of what the athletic
facility will include, director of
administration Tim Bird said
there might be "one or two gymnasiums, a concert hall, a convocation  hall,  weight rooms,   (and)
some racquet sports courts. It all
depends on the students?
Bird said he hopes the provincial government will pay half the
cost of building a facility if the
student society and UBC administration split the rest of the costs.
"It's either the students push
for it and get control of it, or the
administration gets control of it,"
said Bird.
Director of intramurals
Nestor Korchinsky said lie is
pleased the AMS is becoming involved in facility expansion.
"The current facilities are inadequate to accommodate the
growing demand of students? he
said. "Interest is accelerating at a
fast rate, and I don't think that the
rearranging of the current facility
time is an answer.
"The nature of our program is
not.just a participatory program,
it's a mass participatory program? said Korchinsky. And it's
time for the intramural program
to have some first choice access to
'priority time', he said.
But some student council
members are tentative in their
support of the new facility because
they are concerned it will be slotted in front of current priorities.
Graduate student representative Graeme Luke said daycare
gym
has been an issue on the Capital
Projects Acquisition Committee
plate for some time.
There was a referendum four
years ago, said Luke, and at that
time students decided their priorities. Daycare was the number one
concern on campus, and council
and CPAC are still dragging their
feet, he said.
But while Bird agreed
daycare was a concern, he said
that building a new athletic facility would not interefere with the
current priorities on CPAC's list.
"It (a new facility) will probably
require a referendum? said Bird.
"At this point CPAC does not
have the power or the mandate to
implement    this    particular
project(the athletic facility) because the funds that are in CPAC
are allocated to other capital projects? said Bird.
Korchinsky said he encourages a student-run facility because the roles of the AMS and
intramurals are already closely
linked.
One of the recommendations
(of the University Athletic Council) is to have intramurals run by
the AMS, said Korchinsky.
Korchinsky said he hoped any
plans for the facility would be very
broad.
"I would hope and expect that
they would look at both indoor and
outdoor needs? said Korchinsky.
"We want to avoid a situation
where you have to limit the number of (soccer and ball hockey)
teams, if people on the campus
want to play?
Driftnet fishing
threatens dolphins
JM-'K'**-*-
Incredible action from yesterday's heralded tea-cup festivities
Morning work stopped
•«_ _ *
a^V
By Barry Davis
Greenpeace members protested the use of deep sea driftnets
by unfurling a huge banner outside the Hotel Vancouver during
an international fisheries meeting
Tuesday.
According to Greenpeace, the
nets are indiscriminate in what
they catch, and they kill tens of
thousands of porpoises and dolphins, and hundreds of thousands
of seabirds each year.
In addition, many of these
driftnets are lost or abandoned
and continue to catch fish. By the
year 2000, Greenpeace says there
will be enough lost driftnets to
stretch one third of the way
around the world.
High seas' driftnets are large
panels of monofilament plastic
webbing that are stretched open
by floats attached to the top of the
panel and weights on the bottom.
The driftnets stretch across the
ocean, sometimes as far as 30 kilometres.
"We wanted to get across the
message that we want driftnet
fishing to be stopped," said Greenpeace ocean ecology coordinator,
Mike Earl. Earl said the message
was equally directed at the public,
the fisheries, and the International North Pacific Fisheries
Commission.
The INPFC concerns the fisheries of the North Pacific and the
Bering Sea, and includes Canada,
Japan and the United States.
Greenpeace is critical of the
INPFC.
"The present INPFC is completely ineffective as a management tool because it doesn't limit
the use of driftnets? said Greenpeace ocean ecology coordinator
Alan Reichman. "It should phase-
out Japan's salmon driftnet
fishing...(and) must act fast to
protect the marine ecology."
The same day as the protest,
minister of fisheries and oceans
Tom Siddon, announced a moratorium on Canada's experimental
driftnet fishery. The moratorium
was introduced because of high incidental catches of non-targeted
species observed during a two year
experiment.
"An average incidental catch of
one marine mammal per day of
fishing per vessel in the Canadian
offshore fishery is unacceptable?
Siddon said. "Given our experience, I believe uncontrolled high
seas driftnet fishing may impose
an unacceptable toll on our ocean
resources."
Greenpeace is also involved in
legal action against the Japanese
mothership salmon fishery, which
poses environmental hazards,
according to an Environmental
Impact Statement and a seven-
day administrative hearing held
last December.
Earl said Greenpeace would
continue to oppose driftnet fishing, and the protests so far are
"just one small part (of) a long
process?
By Greg Davis
Complaints from Acadia residents forced UBC Housing to seek
an end to the constant racket of
heavy construction at the new
housing complex behind Fairview
Crescent.
The work has been starting
at 6:30 a.m. and continuing until
nine at night, every day of the
week.
Residents complained to
housing and were told that the
outfit is legally permitted to work
extended hours, seven days a
week.
But resident Chris Fraser
was not satisfied with Housing's
explanation. Fraser contacted
Point Grey MLA Darlene
Marzari's office to complain about
the situation. Marzari's assistant
contacted UBC family Housing
and discovered a by-law limiting
construction from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.,
and not on Sundays.
"This by-law was not even referred to when they made up the
original construction contract?
said Fraser.
Yesterday Bill Hagen, of the
UBC Physical Plant, met with the
construction company. "I'm in the
process of clearing everything up
fairly soon. Normal construction
hours should take effect by next
week? Hagen said.
The residents are for the
most part satisfied, and Chris
Fraser is pleased with the results.
"Marzari's assistant and the student services were a major force in
bringing about this settlement?
Fraser said.
Green Peace banner on the Hotel Vancouver to protest driftnet fishing
Volume 70, Number 18
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Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
November 6, 1987 Women out in cold
Red tape delays women's shelter
By Lisa Langford
Abused women and their
families still wait for crisis housing vacancies in Victoria after the
provincial government rejected a
shelter society proposal to buy a
house in early October.
Approval to buy a second
stage transition house with provincial funding was obtained by
the Greater Victoria Women's
Shelter Society in April.
The society met with the
ministry and the B.C. Housing
Management Commission October 2, and agreed on two options
for purchasing a building for the
shelter after conflict with the
ministry over housing regulations.
The shelter could either
lease the building from the province, or buy it at a subsidized cost.
The society had rejected an option
to occupy seven suites and allow
the housing commission to rent
the remaining three apartments
(because of the security threat to
shelter tenants from vengeful
spouses).
But minister of social services
Claude Richmond vetoed both
recommendations.
Initially the society was told
that because the building they
wanted to buy had ten apartment
suites it contravenes ministry
guidelines which allowed seven
suites.
The ministry then told the
society the building
exceeded modest housing
standards,referring to the look of
the suites rather than the cost.
Richmond later told local media,
"that was an unfortunate choice
of words and then it got twisted?
Richmond rejected both options and put the shelter up to
tender.He said the society had
been difficult to deal with and
expressed   concern   that   they
would continue to be uncooperative.
"We were asking too many
questions? said GVWSS board
president Judy Liefschultz.
Liefschultz said the ministry
decided to put out a tender be
cause it refuses to recognize the
space needed for individual and
"That was an unfortunate choice of
words and then it got
twisted." — Claude
Richmond, minister
of social services.
group counselling and childcare.
"We were asking them to
commit themselves to a quality of
service to the women and children that would be supported by
the   quality   building,"   said
Liefschultz.
Liefschultz said special
needs housing warrants more
attention. "We are managing social housing for nothing." The
GVWSS is a volunteer organization which fundraises through
community donations.
Liefschultz said there is a
waiting list of families seeking
shelter from abusive and physically violent spouses.
Second stage transition
housing provides longer term
care than emergency shelters.
The residents are protected and
receive personal and substance
abuse counselling, childcare, and
access to other community assistance.
Richmond said that if the
building was used for the shelter,
present tenants, most of them
senior citizens, would have to be
evicted.
Liefschultz said the senior citizen issue is not a valid reason to
deny the society's request. "That
is a red herring. There are no
empty buildings in Victoria? She
said that no matter where the
shelter goes, some residents will
have to relocate.
Mike Thomas, the Victoria
regional director for the ministry,
said the tender will call for proposals from interested groups
that adhere to the tender's specifications. Thomas said he is currently preparing the tender, but
did not know when the tender
would be made public.
There is a waiting list
of families seeking
shelter from abusive
and physically violent spouses.
A Vancouver shelter awaitng
provincial funding for second
stage transition housing does not
anticipate any problems. "We feel
quite positive," said a Powell
Place house staffer.
AMS says yes to
senate reform
By Corinne Bjorge
The AMS has endorsed a
student senate caucus proposal to
eliminate the senator-at-large
positions.
Instead the five positions
will become student faculty senate positions.
A motion was passed at
Council Wednesday, calling for
distribution of the five positions
"on a per capita basis to the five
faculties having the highest enrolment number with no one faculty having more than two student senate representatives."
The distribution of the five
would be to the faculties of Arts,
Science, Applied Science, Graduate Studies and Education.
A reform of the positions is
needed because the current senator-at-large position is open to
abuse, said senate caucus representative Mike Fahy.
Senator-at-large Derek Pettingale encouraged council to
vote in favour of the motion. "It is
difficult to find direction without
a direct line to any faculty? he
said.
"The constituency cannot get
on their case if they're not represented properly. If you're at large
you're trying to cover everything? said Fahy.
AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont said another way to
make the at-large positions more
accountable would be to make
them report to the senate caucus,
rather than report to a constituency.
"Let them police their own,"
said Nevraumont.
AMS endorsement of the
motion cannot bind the senate
caucus to pass the motion but
demonstrates student backing
for the motion.
Nevraumont throws
weight behind
weighted voting
By Corinne Bjorge (with CUP files)
Weighted voting may be the
only way to bring UBC back under the umbrella of the Canadian
Federation of Students said the
AMS president Wednesday.
Rebecca Nevraumont, who
will be attending the next CFS
conference on November 13th,
said she would support UBC becoming a member of the federation if weighted voting was introduced.
Weighted voting, based on
student enrollment, gives larger
universities and colleges a
stronger voice during CFS voting.
Currently every institution in
CFS, regardless of size, has one
vote.
Nevraumont said membership in CFS could bring benefits
to UBC students.
"CFS is the only national,
political student voice? said
Nevraumont. "Unless there is
that voice, not much is going to
get accomplished? she said.
But Nevraumont said unless
changes are made, including
weighted voting, CFS may be in
serious trouble.
"(CFS) may not last much
longer if many more universities
pull out? said Nevraumont. "It
will not get the revenue base from
(these) universities and it will not
get their powerful political
voices? she said.
Nevraumont said a compromise for weighted voting was also
possible.
"Ifyou have a two house system, one based on population and
one based on institution, I think it
would be equitable," said
Nevraumont.
But Nevraumont dismissed
the idea of weighted voting for
only certain issues. "You would
spend time debating whether or
not it was a weighted issue, instead of debating the issue," she
said.
UBC can become a prospective two-year member of CFS by
paying a fee levy of fifty cents per
student. To become a full member, UBC must hold a campus-
wide referendum to decide if students want to pay four dollars
each to belong to the federation.
Currently CFS has 57 members. Six campuses will be holding referenda next month: Capilano College, Douglas College,
Malaspina College, Guelph,
Wilfrid Laurier and Waterloo.
November 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Hoop group
loses opener
By Victor Chew Wong
If there is one thing that
is apparent to UBC men's basketball head coach Bruce Enns, and
the hundred or so spectators at
Wednesday night's home opening
loss to the University of Manitoba,
it is the lack of firm on-court leadership.
With five minutes left in the
game the 'Birds closed a Manitoba
lead to a manageable 74-71, from a
previous deficit of seven points -
and looked like they would keep
the run going.
Instead, UBC committed
costly turnovers and fouls, and
handed the Bisons an 86-77 exhibition victory.
Enns made all the right
coaching moves in those last five
minutes; he called time-outs at
crucial times and he subbed re-
bounders and guards.
With time ticking and the
game slipping away, none of the
Thunderbirds on the court
stepped forward to take charge, to
settle the rookies, to direct who to
foul; no one called one of those on-
court huddles that were a trademark of last year's championship
team.
The 'Birds fouled, and fouled
the wrong people. Manitoba hit 85
percent of 26 free throw attempts;
UBC shot a paltry 47 percent (8/
17).
"We were very tenative tonight," said Enns.   "A couple of
guys are really struggling?
Another concern for Enns is
the lack of rebounding. The marginally smaller Manitoba team
out-rebounded the *Birds 40-35; at
times it looked like the Bisons
were playing volleyball on the
UBC backboard.
"A major problem right now is
rebounding? said Enns.
Granted, UBC was missing
starters J.D. Jackson and Kevin
Parkinson, but whether they
would have made a difference is
academic.
Despite the loss there remains cause for hope. At times the
defense looked formidable with
Perrie Scarlett dogging the ball
and Alan Lalonde waiting in the
wings for the steals.
And Jackson's replacement at
guard, Reg Wiebe, played an exceptional offensive game leading
the 'Birds scoring with 14 points;
many of them on inside drives
against the big boys.
The 'Birds were tenative and
looked like a team playing together for the first time. They will
get better as they become more
familiar with one another. Maybe
in the last five minutes of the next
nail-biter someone will call a
huddle.
The 'Birds next play the Brisbane Bullets Saturday at War I
Memorial and travel across town
to face Simon Fraser University on
Monday.
Swim 'birds
stroke south
The UBC swim team will divide its forces Friday end compete in two separate swim meets.
The elite national andinter-
national calibre athletes will
travel to Victoria for the ninth
Best Ever meet while the rest of
the varsity team will be swimming at the Husky relays in
Seattle, Washington.
The Best Ever meets are designed to provide high level corn-
petition between Western
Canada's elite athletes, and are
arranged in a series often meets
over the four years between
Olympiads,
Competingforth- UBC varsity team will be Turlough
©'Hare, Kevin Draxinger, Sally
Gilbert and Alison Gilbert. Also
competing will be two UBC students, Chris Bowie and Geoff
Donelly, who have taken a year's !
hiatus from varsity competition
to concentrate on making the
198S Olympic team.
The majority of the varsity
team, however, will travel south
to meet the powerhouse NCAA
Washington Huskies.
Other teams invited to the
Washington meet are the University of Alberta- University of
Puget Sound, Washington State,
Oregon State and the University
of Oregon.
This is the second preparatory meet before the complete
team travels to Edmonton in one
week for the Canada College
Cup.
Varsity coach Ken Radford
is expecting solid results from
the Huskie meet.
"The important thing in this
meet is to get the athletes swimming fast, and their minds on
racing in preparation for the
College Cup," said Radford.
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
... presents ...
The Collected Works of Billy The Kid
by Michale Ondaatje
November 18 - 28
Special Previews - Nov. 18 + 19
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8 pm
Matinee - Saturday, Nov. 21 @ 2 pm
Box Office * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
W**
UBC's Reg Wiebe skies around distracted Manitoba player waving at relative in stands
Fans injured at Ottawa grudge match
Ottawa (CUP) - The fate of a student who suffered brain injuries
remains uncertain while six others remain in hospital following
the worst accident in the history of
the annual football grudge match
between the University of Ottawa
and Carleton.
At least 14 people were injured when a Lansdowne Stadium
railing broke, sending as many as
20 fans plunging to the pavement
at half-time during the October 17
"Panda" game. A total of 40 people
were injured at the game, most of
them Carleton students.
The most critically injured
student is still in a coma after
undergoing brain surgery at Ottawa General Hospital.
The accident occurred when
the pressure of a crowd of people
converging in one section caused a
15 foot wade section of railing to
snap. A steady stream of specta
tors fell 13 feet onto the tarmac at
field level.
"I saw people falling, it was
like a waterfall of people? said observer Jim Baskin.
Two on-site ambulances were
joined by eight more, plus the fire
department emergency squad to
aidinrescueefforts. An additional
10 police persons were called for
crowd control.
City officials have sent the
railing to an independent consultant for stress testing.
Rick Derosiers, security supervisor at Lansdowne, said the
sheer mass of people caused the
accident. He also mentiond that
the stadium is checked for stuctu-
ral safety every five years, having
last been tested in 1985.
Estimated damage on the
Carleton side of the stadium is
over $100,000 and on the Ottawa
side damage is estimated between
$5,000 and $7,000. The disabled
spectators' area on the north sidelines had $7,000 damage alone.
Lansdowne park director
John Grey said the bill is being
sent to Carleton.
Civic and community leaders
have launched a campaign to place
a two year moratorium on the
event.
"The state of drunkeness was
responsible for the accident," said
Brian Jonah, President of the
Glebe Community Association.
But Carleton's student council president Bruce Haydon said
that police have embarked on a
"smear campaign" to shunt all the
blame to students.
"They (police) are trying to tar
us all with the same brush: that
we were all drunk. That's not true.
It's a smear campaign meant to
absolve them of any guilt? said
Havdon.
AIDS FORUM: I CAMPUS
THE MEANING I      C U TS
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Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
November 6,1987 £NTERT/ttNM£NT
Boorman calls his own shots
By Alex Bradley
John Boorman {Deliverance, Excalibur, The Emerald Forest) is a filmmaker whose work, with few possible exceptions, has never been regarded as the
type of "product" best associated with
Hollywood-style movie-making. Preferring not to compromise his stories for the
sake of box-office (He turned down an
offer to direct Rocky, finding the story
grossly sentimental), Boorman pursues
themes — man and nature, the Arthurian
legend, the repercussions of technology —
which often find their realization in
unsettling and strikingly graphic images.
Boorman visited the city recently to
attend a screening of his new film, Hope
and Glory, at the Vancouver International
Film Festival — one of numerous stopovers on a promotional tour which has
taken him from New York to Germany.
I met with Boorman at the Four Seasons Hotel to discuss Hope and Glory, a
semi-autobiographical work based on his
experiences as a child during the London
Blitz, and his views on the film industry
in general. The following are excerpts
from the interview.
Hope and Glory seems to mark a
departure for you in several re
spects. For one, it has numerous
comedy scenes, not something for
■which you are particularly well-
known.
Yes, I think that's so. It's certainly
very gratifying to make people laugh, and
it's something that I haven't really
explored much in the past, although I did
make a picture which nobody has seen
much here, called Leo the Last, which has
a lot of black humour.
I think in other respects it's a picture
which reaches back into my own past. I
was astonished, really, when I saw the
film with an audience for the first time.
Maybe that sounds strange because in a
sense, when I was writing it, shooting it,
and cutting it, I was always making this
act of imagination — to pitch myself
inside the mind of a child to see everything from that perspective. When I
stepped back and objectively looked at it,
a lot of things about the film really struck
me for the first time, such as how many
parallels there are to my other films,
particularly this thing I keep returning to
which is the theme of man and nature.
You see this boy in this urban situation,
all this violence, destruction, and escaping
to the river — to nature — and all that
wonderful, magical harmony that I felt as
a child at the time. Coming out of that —
the blitz — was particularly poignant and
important to me.
How did Hope and Glory come to
be? Once you entered the film
business, did you always know
that you wanted to film the story,
or did the idea only really strike
you within the last few years?
I had in mind to do it in a different
way about fifteen years ago; I was going
to try to do it for television, a kind of
semi-dramatized documentary, in autobiographical terms, and then for various
reasons I dropped it.
Living as I did when I was preparing
The Emerald Forest — with a tribe of
...stone age Indians, really — had a profound effect on me. That film is really
about a conflict between a nuclear
American family and a tribal family,
which made me speculate about the	
Director John Boorman coaches Sebastian Rice Edwards, who plays Boorman as a young boy,
on the set of Hope and Glory	
nature of family life. I asked myself what
it was that held my own family — an
ordinary family without strong religious
or cultural roots, hanging in a sort of class
limbo — together during a time in which
there were so many forces trying to tear it
apart. I wanted to reach back into the
tribal past to find the roots of these
instincts which tended to hold the family
together.
It's fascinating that family ties have,
of recent, become so fragile. Are we
seeing the disintegration of the family?
Does the disintegration of the basic unit
—if it really is the basic unit — of society
suggest that society itself is disintegrating? These types of questions led me to
revive my interest in the subject.
Marlon Brando would take
exception to. How would you
respond to Mailer's statement?
I run a mile at the word "art". That's
always my dread — making a movie
that's described as an "art movie". The
great thing about film is that it's a form
which has not been consigned to an
artistic ghetto; it's still a form which cuts
across class, nationality, language. I
think the less said about art, the better.
"Engineer"... I would also quarrel
with that word, because (film-making)
really isn't engineering — it's a technique.
Obviously you need a knowledge of the
technique of film-making, but (pauses)
what it is, is ... problem solving. It's
Hope and Glory's John
Boorman: An interview
You said in Money Into Light
[Boorman's book about the mak
ing of The Emerald Forest] that
Akira Kurosawa would not "allow
a writer to describe something
that could not be shown." Being
a screenwriter yourself, do you
maintain such an attitude?
No. He's a purist, and while it's a very
good exercise, I don't actually work in
quite such a pure manner. Very often, I
find it more useful for me and the actors
to suggest things — feelings, thoughts —
which aren't on the surface. This helps
inform the actors, and it reminds me,
when I'm shooting it, of what my intentions were.
Norman Mailer was recently
quoted as saying that "a director
is an engineer first and an artist
second." Of course, such a
statement necessarily presup
poses that film can be art, some
thing that someone such as
trying to find ways — practical ways — of
putting your visions into practice.
Shooting, for me, is a bit of a bore,
and a very stressful bore, because the
more you've thought out the picture, the
more boring the shooting is. It's seldom
that you're happily surprised; mostly it's a
disappointment, because you never quite
get what you hoped for. Movies are not
engineered — the word, I think, suggests
a kind of precision, a ... plastic medium.
The last seven or eight years has
seen what seems to be a major
upsurge in British film produc
tion. To what would you attrib
ute this? Tax incentives...?
[Laughing] No, not at all. There are
no incentives to make films in the United
Kingdom. You can always reckon that
when the death-knell for British films
sounds, every time it sounds, you can
guarantee that it's a harbinger of a new
revival. In this case, the revival came
about because the government licensed a
"I run a mile at the word art. That's always my dread -
making a movie that's described as an art movie. The
great thing about film is that ifs a form which has not
been consigned to an artistic ghetto...
new television channel called Channel
Four, and their policy was to finance
pictures, or part-finance them — low
budget pictures, really — which would
have a theatrical life before going on to
television. That's been a tremendous
boost, and out of that came Room With a
View, My Beautiful Laundrette, and Wish
You Were Here. They like to make films
about interesting subjects; they're not
interested in making out-and-out commercial potboilers. That's why some
interesting pictures have come out of that
situation.
The impact of technology often
appears to find its way into your
films; You have been quoted as
saying that your main reason for
making Zardoz. was to explore
"the growing gap between our
technological development and
where we are emotionally." The
Emerald Forest is also strongly
informed by this feeling.
Very much so. I think that emotionally, we're still in tribal times. I learned
so much from living with that tribe in the
Amazon. Patriotism, I think, is a kind of
echo of tribalism. The tribe is an extended family with powerful obligations
and responsibilities — emotions are very
much a part of that system. We try to
reproduce the emotional comfort of the
tribal life, whether it's in a film or in the
flag.
What does it really mean when you
say "I'm a patriot?? You look around your
country, and what do you really have in
common with most of the people? Not
much. What is it you're connected to? It's
an abstraction — it's become an
abstraction instead of the reality which it
is in a tribal situation, but we still feel it.
We have these archaic feelings which we
can't divest ourselves of, so they often
express themselves in dangerous ways.
That gap — between emotional and
technological advances — is fascinating to
investigate.
What are your views about
making films in Hollywood? I've
often read about other filmmakers complaining that the
problem with the major studios is
that they're totally immersed in
"the deal", and that the substance
of the film is secondary.
Hollywood is so unpredictable.
Things are constantly changing. Look
what's happened to Puttnam (producer of
Chariots of Fire, recently fired by Columbia pictures). [This type of thing] happens constantly — it's unstable — and it's
run on fear. Everyone seems to be
terrified, and it's irrational.
I like to make pictures in the States,
but I don't want to be in the hands of the
Hollywood studios. The studios are very
voracious in the way that they hold power
over the film-maker, without in any way
knowing how to exercise it responsibly.
There are exceptions — I don't want to
condemn the whole thing out of hand —
but it's not easy, and it's not a good way of
working.
[In Hollywood], things get categorized
in (pauses)... banal ways. [Even if you're
successful] ...it doesn't get any easier.
Even ifyou prove them wrong, over and
over again, they hate you for that, too. If
their judgement was that it was a dud
idea, they want it to be a dud to prove
their judgement.
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Wednesday, November 11 at 7:00 p.m.
The Center for Attitudinal Healing
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Call 736-7112 for directions
November 6f 198f
THE UBYSSEY
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Beat
poet
plays to
a beat
By Tim Pearson
Michael McClure— Beat poet,
playwright, and essayist, has
teamed up with former Doors
keyboardist Ray Manzarek. They
will be at Graceland next Thursday,
November 12, at midnight.
"It's a synthesis, the two of us?
McClure says. "Ray plays piano and
I do the words?
Such a sparse description
prompts the imagination towards
excess: a peyote-inspired, self-
described "mammal patriot" chanting
quasi-Buddhist mantras over the
surging organ chords of "Riders on
the Storm"? The actual picture is
perhaps a little less bizarre, but
certainly no less intriguing.
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PERFORMANCE POETRY
Micheal McClure & Ray Manzarek
Graceland
November 12, Midnight
McClure will draw upon his
thirty-odd years of published poetry,
while Manzarek will rely upon his
wide-ranging experience as a keyboardist to create a fusion of words
and sound, of voice and music.
Words like "synthesis" and
"symbiosis" reappear frequently as
McClure discusses the project. And
the recent convergence of careers—
the collaboration is only eight
months old, despite a friendship
initiated by Jim Morrison over
twenty years ago — obviously leaves
him excited. "Ray and I have the
same background, we sing the same
music. We happen to be very
compatible? he said.
"I've never been so comfortable
on stage... [the meeting of words and
music] has such a real physicality,
it's almost hke a symbiosis? McClure
says, his enthusiasm readily apparent even over a crackling 'phone line.
He is at pains to emphasize the
equal standing of his and Manzarek's
contributions, insisting the music is
not merely a convenient vehicle to
augment his words. "His music is
not below my words, it's a synthesis.
We play off each other, partially set,
partially extempore."
While jazz-like improvisation
forms a large portion of their repertoire, the musical forms vary: rock,
boogie-woogie, jazz and so on. The
rhythmic base chosen is a function of
the rhythms inherent in the poetry.
When asked how much
Manzarek's presence changes his
audience, McClure replies, "We get
an entirely different crowd. We get a
lot of [my] regulars, a lot of Doors
fans, and a lot of people just curious
about the combination... They sense
this is something brand new and
something nostalgic."
McClure claims not to mind the
labels that unavoidably come with
nostalgia. When asked about his
almost complete identification with
the Beat movement and the heady
days of late-fifties, early-sixties San
Francisco, he insists with a quiet
intensity that "those were important,
vital and scintillating times. Some
identify me with them. Others would
label me a Playwright. Others only
remember The Beard [his award
winning, yet harassed and censored
play]. I've got so many labels. I don't
think they're damaging."
One reason McClure doesn't
mind the labels is that he considers
the ideals and aims of the Beat
movement to be relevent today, not
just a bunch of fossilized anachronisms.
"The worst part of [the movement], the touristy part, got forgotten, and thank God. But the good
parts remain: environmental awareness, consciousness expansion, the
anti-war movement, Buddhism, and
so on."
Whether you buy his message or
not, the show promises to be interesting and entertaining. So if you like
Beat poetry, ifyou like the Doors, or
if you're just plain curious, be at
Graceland next Thursday at midnight. And remember, it's late
enough that you can fit in both this
and the U2 show.
by Rolf Boon
Kitaro is on cloud nine and doesn't
know how to get off. He's stuck,
musically and creatively, and has no
where to go. Would someone please tell
him there's more to music than string
pads and cutesy melodies?
MUSIC
Kitaro
Orpheum Theatre
November 1
Sunday night, at a two thirds full
Orpheum Theatre, synthesist Kitaro
soothed the audience with simple harmonies, melodies, and orchestrations.
Simple music for simple minds. Music to
sleep to. Boring, very boring.
This "New Age Music" may have its
place. It's probably more suitable as
muzak or underscore for a B grade movie.
You know the scene—the sun breaking
through the clouds in English Bay. It
certainly is not concert material. Kitaro
did not entertain and never attempted to
challenge himself or the listener.
There is nothing more annoying than
watching a performer gesticulate, with his
head, to a simple four or five note idea
over which he has no control because its
being performed on a non-touch sensitive
synthesizer.
Kitaro is not a virtuoso, let alone a
dynamic composer. His music lacked
depth. Syncopation, counterpoint,
extended harmony, pushes, pulls, and
colorful orchestrations are not part of his
vocabulary. The string sounds and synth
patches were overused and tedious.
There were no new and unusual sounds.
This comes as a great disappointment
considering he must have at least a
hundred thousand dollars or more worth
of technology at his disposal.
One cannot help but get the feeling
that daddy bought him some toys as a
teen and this is how he plays with them.
Musically he's immature and self-
indulgent.
The supporting cast included two
percussionists, a violinist (to give that
raw string edge to the synth pads) and
two other keyboardists. Their perfor-
maces were strong but didn't really make
a major contribution. Perhaps they just
needed the gig.
The stage setup and lighting created
a great atmosphere but Kitaro could not
live up to the visual expectations.
After one piece someone in the
audience shouted "beautiful". I guess
Kitaro's beauty lies in the ear of the
beholder.
New Age Music has come of age,
proudly states the PR. Now lets get on
with the future—please.
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Jumpstart: Meaningful Movement
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By Martin Dawes
The press release for this show made
'Cory...Cory!' nearly as tempting as
Tolstoy's War and Peace. Says
Jumpstart: "'Cory...Cory!' tells the story of
CONTEMPORARY DANCE
Jumpstart's 'Cory...Cory!'
Van. East Cultural Center
October 29-31
confine her imagination? Oh boy. And
then it goes on to say that "dance, text,
and visual design combine with sung .
vocals anda compelling musical score?
Does this mean, we wonder, that we
are about to witness dancers acting badly,
actors singing badly, and singers dancing
badly?
No. Jumpstart cleverly solves this
problem by exploiting the individual
talents of its six members while avoiding,
for the most part, their weaker points.
And all of this marvelous dancing and
singing is not just for show. It examines a
universal human experience - coming of
age - in a coherent and meaningful way.
What more could we ask of contemporary dance?
Sarah Williams, who played
the part of the young girl Cory,
is a wonderful dancer, but
not quite as effective when she speaks.
Clad in a flimsy nightgown, she communicated an intense physical brazenness,
leaping and tumbling and stretching. Her
oh-so-conservative parents, played by the
two directors, Lee Eisler and Nelson Gray
(who wrote the text), begin to get concerned about her emerging passions, and
even Bible-thumping uncle - played by
Randall Scott Webb - gets involved,
preaching at length from the dinner table.
And so Cory escapes: she dreams.
She's off to Paris. She meets a young
man (Raymond Milne). They dance (and
Raymond, too, is an energetic and
athletic dancer). She is sucked into a
whirlpool of murmured French, of
smoking sophisticates.
After the dream there is a beautiful
mother-daughter duet in her bedroom,
but the family is disturbed, arguing; Cory
dances in a spotlight which grows as she
moves until, suitcase in hand, Cory
breaks away from the family.
Little sister Monique Lefebre and
Uncle Randall - both members of the vocal
jazz group Le Quartet - did most of the
singing, which was gutsy and in tune, one
highlight being a lovely song of sympathetic understanding sung by Monique for
Cory at the end. The musical score, by
"white-collar composer" Greg Ray, made
effective and judicious use of menacing
electronic noises during the dream
sequences, and the aural aspect was
further enhanced by props that spoke
when touched, as things do in dreams.
'Cory...Cory!' seemed like great fun
for the company, and the audience, mostly
couples in their 30's and 40's, evidently
got a real bang out of it too, especially the
children brought along by a few adventurous parents. The influences of gymnastics
and breakdancing give Jumpstart the
kind of energy that makes you want to
leap right onto the stage with them.
Although the VECC was 3/4 full", f
kept thinking of all the other people who
could be enjoying it, all the children who
would be thrilled, inspired, if only their
parents brought them. Is it an advertising
problem? Or is contemporary dance
considered just too weird? .
It doesn't cost any more than a
crummy Hollywood movie and there's
much more to be learned from it. Call the
Dance Center at 872-0432 for information
about its Dance Update publication.
Petrol rocks
Gastown at
the Pump
By Ann Rogers
The dark rainy Gastown streets were
nearly deserted on Sunday night, but
the scene was really different inside the
crowded Town Pump. A suprisingly large
contingent of rock and roll pioneers
braved the raw November evening to
catch the Vancover debut of That Petrol
Emotion ("That Petrol who?" people had
been saying to me all week).
Out to promote their new album,
"Babble", these so-called Renegades of
Pop are touted as being one of those
MUSIC
That Petrol Emotion
The Town Pump
Sunday, 1 November.
increasingly common things, a Political
Band. Fourth-fifths of them hail from
strife-torn Northern Ireland (the fifth is a
Seattle native they discovered down and
out and making pizza in London), so they
come by their political leaning honestly
enough. But music, thankfully, comes
before dogma in this band.
Painted on one of the guitars was the
slogan "Agitate, Educate and Organise"
but on Sunday night singer Steve Mack
was inviting us not to revolt, but to dance.
Those of us who strained to catch the
message this Political Band was supposed
to bring had to content ourselves with the
snatches of lyrics about missile ignorance
and reactionaries. That was about all the
politicking in evidence.
Petrol plays an extremely hard-edged
brand of pop, lots of chugging guitars and
growling vocals. But the sound is never
ponderous, and indeed often borders on
the melodic. In concert the four rather
dour Irishmen get down to the business at
hand and deliver a tight lean sound, free
of musical pyrotechnics and any trace of
self indulgence. They leave the entertaining to their flamboyant American vocalist,
Steve Mack.
Clad in spandex cycling shorts and
high boxer shorts with lime green laces,
arms akimbo and feet flying, Mack was
undoubtedly the band's focal point. However, That Petrol Emotion is a much more
democratic unit than the stage show
might suggest.
The Pump crowd was its usual
inhibited self. In the front of the stage
the requisite slam dance party was
carrying on, sending shock waves though
the more reticent members of the audience who were content to just bob up and
down and watch (although even this was
too much for one girl who was heard to
complain "Could you please quit bouncing
against my friend? What do people
expect to happen on a crowded dance
floor?)
Petrol's Sean and Damian O'Neill
were former members of the Undertones,
a leading British new wave band that
split up in 1983. Undertones singer
Feargal Sharkey took his distinctively
unpleasent voice over to the banal
wasteland of AM radio and the O'Neils
went their separate ways. Happily, the
founding of That Petrol Emotion reunited
the two talented siblings in a band much
more volatile than the Undertones ever
were.
Despite three encores, it ended all too
soon. British bands generally play much
shorter sets than Americian ones (a Brit
friend told me it's because they're not
enslaved by the Protestant work ethic,
but in Petrol's case it could just be a lack
of material to draw up on). We found
ourselves back on the wet streets scarcely
an hour and a half later, our appetites
merely whetted, wishing we could go back
and do it all over again-
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
November 6,1987
November 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 Book bash is bogus
By Laura Busheikin
An event took place last Friday
night that ought to have pricked
up the ears of anyone interested in
literature: The B.C. Book Prizes Gala
Awards Evening. What a great idea—a
gathering together and a celebration of
B.C. literary talent and its appreciators.
But what a poor result. While the Book
Prizes made big waves among a small
minority—mostly those who deal in books
as commodities—it created scarcely a
ripple among the general reading public.
The purpose of the prizes is, according to publicist Celia Lazaruk, "to honor
B.C. authors and to bring to community
and national attention the fact that we
have high quality writers here".
Honor B.C. writers??? At thirty
dollars per ticket, the Gala Awards Prize
Dinner was far too expensive for the
average B.C. writer to attend. The
audience consisted mostly of bookstore
owners, book reps, and librarians. The
venue was classy: the Crystal Pavillion in
the Pan Pacific, complete with a catered
dinner catering to the mostly yuppie
crowd, lots of fancy clothes and coiffed
hair-dos, and few people under thirty.
The common reader—that creature
without whom no written work would
have relevance—was quite left out of the
B.C. Book awards. The comments of the
speakers were full of cliquey in-jokes. The
general tone of the evening was self-congratulatory and self-conscious all at once.
The B.C. Book Prize Committee is a
non-profit organization. One assumes
that it is maintained by a group of truly
committed people. Since the first awards,
three years ago, they've managed to get
quite a bit of fun ding. Great. But aren't
their good intentions going awry?
"I am amazed that all kinds of
corporations and individuals can find
money for something like this when they
find so little for publishers and writers?
said Ralph Maurer, Editor at New Star
Books, publishers. Although Maurer
attended the event, he was clearly less
than charmed.
"Ninety per-cent of the budget—
which I imagine is huge—goes to the hotel
industry. I doubt there's much left for
writers, continues Maurer, "I don't see
many B.C. writers hers and I think that
must have something to do with the
Thirty dollar ticket prices. I'd hke to see
this event—which I think is important—
at a cheaper venue with more money
going to the writers".
So who are these B.C. writers
anyway? The winners are...(the envelope
please...): Doris Shadbolt's Bill Reid
won both the Bill Duthie Bookseller's
Choice and the Hubert Evens Non Fiction
Prizes; Leona Gom's Housebroken won
the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize; Ruth
Kirk's Wisdom of the Elders won the
Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize;
Sarah Ellis' The Baby Project won the
Sheila A. Egoff Children's Prize; and
Diana Hartog's Candy From Strangers
won the B.C. Prize for Poetry.
Modern dance to modern music...see review p.12
steve chan photo
a\ng
Chronicles-
Foreign exchange students
Ubyssey staff hit the great outdoors this weekend for a staff retreat. Policy, pasta, and partying at the AMS Whistler Cabin. It's not too late!
Any interested staff should be at the Ubyssey
office at 5 p.m. today.
BRAINS &
BRAWN
PLAY THE
MOST
EXCITING
LIVE TV
COMPETITIONS
IN HISTORY.
For the first
time in history, you
can actually interact with
live TV
football
games via satellite right
here. Compete with other
players here and nationally
by anticipating live
quarterback plays.
MONDAY
NIGHT N.F.L.
FOOTBALL
LIVE AT
6:00 PM.
Also remember
Sunday, all day
football on the
big screen.
University Golf Club
5185 University Boulevard
Vancouver B.C. V6T 1X5
224-7513
• LOW LOW PRICES
• SUPER COPIES
NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR
• automatic collating
• 3 hole paper
• standard coloured paper
2nd Floor, 2174 Western Parkway
(at University Village)
Vancouver, B.C. Tel: 224-6225
Mon-Th 8-9    Fri 8-6    Sat-Sun 11-6
The next
Ubyssey staff
meeting is
Wednesday
November 18.
There will be
no meeting
on the Remembrance
Day holiday.
Agenda items
include editors' names
on the masthead, National Conference
info, and endless debate.
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
November 6,1987 Pianist plays with hands of magic
By Anya Waite
Last Sunday at the Vancouver Playhouse, a young Italian pianist
created what was certainly one of the
year's major musical events. Once more
Andrea Lucchesini transformed a sedate
Vancouver concert audience into a
roaring, stamping crowd, brandishing
programs and shouting for more.
All Luccesini's musical breadth and
complexity came through with con-
sumately beautiful technique: his long
fingers articulated cleanly from a round,
high hand and flexible wrists; his shoulders and elbows were fluid.
He chose an interesting program,
opening with the rarely performed Ham-
merklavier Sonata (Sonata in B flat
major, Opus 106) by Beethoven, and
finishing with a cluster of crowd-pleasers
including the Chopin B flat minor
LUCCHESINI... astounds
Scherzo, and the popular Hungarian
Rhapsody (#6 in D flat major) by Liszt.
The Hammerklavier Sonata is musically a difficult work. It is long, sometimes disjointed, and consistently esoteric,
demanding extended periods of intense
concentration, both for the performer and
listener. In short, for an audience, it
walks a tightrope between a challenge
and a trial. It exhausts. Lucchesini's
achievement here was his close meditative focus throughout, especially in the
long third movement. Unfortulnately his
concentration was not always matched by
the audience.
His only difficulty, in the last allegro
movement, was a patter of percussive
fortes—which might have been more noticeable had there not been so many moments of real artistry. Though it was not
a smooth performance, it was a commanding one, unusual enough to raise eyebrows
and elicit an explosion of enthusiasm at
its finish.
Not so in the second half of the program. Here Lucchesini relaxed wholly
into the popular romantics, really in his
element. His perfect precision, clean articulation and icy, liquid tone sent the
audience into wild paroxisms of applause.
He played with breathtaking delicacy and
passioned fervour. He was astounding.
Music
Andrea Lucchesini, Pianist
Vancouver Recital Society
Vancouver Playhouse
November 1
For those who missed this memorable
evening, Lucchesini will return next year
to the Vancouver Recital Society. He is
worth hearing; at 22, he already demands
acknowledgement as one of the great pianists of our time.
For enquiries about this and other
concerts in the outstanding series of solo
recitals organized by the Vancouver Recital Society, call 736-6034.
Grandad plays the best blues
By Shari bte. Abdullah
Oh, that peculiar, primal energy
that is the blues.
John Mayall once again brought his
intense, driving brand of the blues to the
Commodore.
Music
John Mayall and his Bluesbreakers
Commodore Ballroom
October 29
The set started with old standards
"All Your Love" and "Oh Pretty Woman"
and moved into new material like the urbane "Renaissance Man". The highlights
of the evening were sizzling, a smoldering
rendition of MayalPs "Wrap Your Arms
Around Me Baby", and an absolutely
searing version of "You Don't Love Me" by
guitarist Koko Montez. The sound was alternately raw and tight, periodically
punctuated by Mayall's wailing harmonica and Walter Torren's manic explosions
on guitar. It was a show that no true
blues fan would want to have missed. If
you did, well, you'll know better next
time.
The Bluesbreaker's composition
seems to vary quite regularly, but the list
of those that have passed through their
membership includes such noteables as
Eric Clapton and John McVie.
There is a strong
temptation to ask why
John Mayall himself
never attained the
stellar heights that
former members of his
band did. The
answer  is simple.
John Mayall stuck
with what he does
best. The Blues. His
reputation as the
"Granddaddy of
British Blues" is well
earned and Thursday
night he most convincingly re-established it.
Farmers' Revolt brings
Canadiana back to today
By David L. Young
* "   I      he country was ripe for
JL     change...and I employed a
fortnight in attending secret meetings,
assisting in organizing towns and places,
and otherwise preparing for the revolution". These are the words of William
Lyon Mackenzie, the radical first mayor of
Toronto, and the Reformist revolutionary
of Upper Canada.
The FTS Theatre Company's production of "1837...The Farmer's Revolt", succeeds in recreating the energy, frustration, and emotions inherent in
Mackenzie's era, an era when both Upper
and Lower Canada were revolting against
the tyranny of colonial rule.
The play, written by Rick Salutin,
and developed in 1974 by Theatre Passe
Muirelle, succeeds in two ways. One - as
a historical piece of early Canadiana; and
two - as a timeless message advocating
the rights of "the average person", versus
corrupt Government. This production
adeptly stresses both these messages.
The clean ensemble work of the cast -
fifteen actors and actresses - as they move
in and out of different, and sometimes
brilliant, vignettes, is definitely the highlight of this production. The transitions
are smooth, and the acting is impassioned.
Theatre
1837 - The Farmers' Revolt
Anne MacDonald Hall
Presentation House
November 2
The company takes the audience
through a number of different scenes of
MAYALL ... sizzles
social commentary
leading up to the actual
farm revolt of December, 1837. There are
poignant and satirical
moments, portraying
the colonial government and clergy, as
corrupt proponents of the "Family Compact", a system of Crown run monopolies.
Social problems such as education,
government representation, fixed elections, and Canadian apathy are all hit
upon. A scene in which a Canadian
farmer named Bob crosses the border into
the United States is one of the best in the
show. Bob sees industrialization, growth,
universal education, cheap land, pride,
and progress in the U.S.. He is asked to
stay, but decides to leave the land of
"happy" prosperous people who "talk
loud", to come back to Canada, to help her
shari bte abdullah photo
realize the same potential.
This play is a must for anyone who
possesses any Canadian patriotism, as it
gives one a sense of pride in our all to
often mediocre heritage. The Ann
MacDonald Hall in which this play is
performed, is the perfect venue for this
piece; it has a churchlike atmosphere with
a stained glass window backdrop, which
gives one the feeling that they are a part
of the show's particular era.
The play is particularly valuable in the
way it creates a sense of history; it reminds
us that things change very little in a span
of 150 years.
COMMUNITY SPORTS
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612
We offer 10/0 OFF
regular prices of ALL
merchandise to ALL
Students, Faculty and S  taff
Hours: Sat. to Wed.    9:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Thurs. - Fri.     9:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1987 AUTUMN LECTURES
EDWARD G. SEIDENSTICKER
A translator of lapanese literature and a first-rate literary critic. Professor Seidensticker's stunning translation of GENII
MONOGATARI (The Tale of Genji) has won him accolades within Japan and throughout the English-speaking world.
It is a rich definition of the extraordinarily refined aestheticism of its time which has inspired some spectacular Japanese
paintings. He is a man with an enormous ability to communicate his rare and profound insights.
TRANSLATING JAPANESE
Monday, November 9 In Room D-225, Buchanan Building, at 4:00 PM
DIFFERING CONCEPTS OF FICTION IN JAPAN AND THE WEST
Tuesday, November 10 In Asian Centre Auditorium, at 3:00 PM
JAPANESE LITERATURE IN WORLD LITERATURE
Thursday, November 12        In Room A-104, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 PM
THE FORTY YEARS WAR: JAPAN AND I
Friday, November 13 In Room A-106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 PM
THE WORLD'S FIRST NOVEL: THE TALE OF GENJI
Saturday, November 14 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 PM
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvcrlised seminars are presented.
Jovember 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 Divided we fall
The Canadian Federation of Students knows there is strength in numbers. That is why the organization
exists.
By consolidating students across
Canada into a unified force CFS has
the potential to give them a strong
voice, a voice to which people, and
governments, will listen. Students
need that voice to wrest funding from
reluctant governments and to ensure
fairness in educational policy.
But the vision can only be realized
if it is shared by all Canadian students.
UBC students have no faith in the
collective power of students and three
years ago they demonstrated their lack
of conviction by voting to stay out of
CFS.
CFS has a lot of problems, but
UBC's absence weakens the national
lobbying force and not only denies us a
voice, but denies other Canadian students the support of our voice.
- reprinted from The Summer Ubyssey, August 5,1987.
CFS - Here we go again
UBC's student council is once again-
considering a move to join the Canadian Federation of Students. We've reprinted this editorial because we think
the issue is the same as the one that
raged in the summer, and we still feel
membership in CFS gives students a
unified political voice.
The current debate centers on the
issue of weighted voting - giving UBC
more votes than smaller institutions.
It's the same debate the Ubyssey
covered in 1982.
"Universities to get more votes
in CFS" (January 1982).
Stuff Hr a tiwe CipnltVjhf Eichnes
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 6,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a
member of Canadian University Press. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 228-2301; advertising, 228-
3977.
Victor Chew Wong blasphemed. He blustered. 'This fuckin' letter's bitchin'
'bout the fuckin' Masthead and the rest of the fuckin' paper as bein' fuckin'
offensive!" Chris Wiesinger feigned shock: "Offensive things in the Masthead? I thought puking, defecating, and having sex were natural acts..." Tim
Pearson looked disturbed. "You mean we can't say things like "vomit' and
"shit'?" "Well, gaaawddamm," offered Anya Waite, "maybe those things are
offensive." Alex Bradley looked at the letter and read: Your paper is left at
the Library for free but it is mostly read by the 'freaks" and "weirdos' who
are delighted with your choice of language... "Some fun, huh Bambi," he
said. "Maybe," Laura Busheikin said thoughtfully, "we should stick to more
civilized things — like war, human depravity resulting of economic disparagement." Rolf Boone pondered her statement. Ann Rogers, Shari bte.
Abdullah, and Patrick Kirkwood harmonized on an up-beat version of the
Seven-Up commercial. "You know," murmured Deanne Fisher dejectedly,
"we should become more like The Province and The Sun, and use less
offensive language to describe more offensive human actions." "We should
grow up just like the older generation," added Lisa Langford, "and quit this
paper, get a job, buy a house, have ten children, settle into a divorce, and
then have a war." Alex Johnson nodded — she was not impressed with the
state of the world. David Young cowered in a corner, sucking on a huge
Cuban cigar. Dan Andrews — on principle, it seemed — lashed out with a
steel-toed boot to catch David in the chest. "Is that the token incident of
violence for today's masthead?" asked John Boehme and Greg Davis, in
unison. "Yep — Chris told me to," answered Dan, grinning happily. Mandel !
Ngan and Steve Chan looked on in confusion as Martin Dawes belched loudly
and longingly, following this act with a stream of vomit thankfully directed at
a wall. Clearly this was designed to offend, thought Katherine Monk as she
pondered how she could contribute to this hastiness. Ross McLaren smiled
broadly — he thought all bases of grossness had been covered. Suddenly
Corinne Bjorge pirouetted into the room and sang a few bars from Mozart's
Don Giovanni, which she mistakenly attributed to The Butthole Surfers.
"Let's surf, Mrs. Phlegm," screamed Peter Francis frantically.
Letters
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters should be as short as possible and may be edited for brevity as well as for sexism, racism and
homophobia. Bring them In person with your ID to the Ubyssey Office, SUB
241k.
Correction
I would like to bring it
to The Ubyssey's attention
that I was not the author of
the letter, mistakenly accredited to myself, in the
Nov.3, 1987 edition ("Med
school rowers riled"). I
merely submitted, it as a
representative and member, of the Medicine Longboat Team. Thank You,
Lloyd
Westby
Why no
funerals for
fetuses?
I can't believi> the con-
tro v'ersy thai; i s ta dng place
about the abortkn issue.
Leis look at the issue of
wh .-n the fetus is considered
a "human being".
Many people iliink that
as soon as the ba.y is conceived it is a kv ng being
worth the rights that every
oth.r person should.receive.
If this is true, then let's
consider funerals and the
rights of dead people.
When a person dies the
church (and many other
groups) think that, the body
should have a funeral and
get buried. I can agree with
this.. How much does a funeral cost? About $2000.00?
Okay, how come, if a fetus is
considered a person at conception, it does not get a
proper $2000.00 funeral if it
is "killed" by a miscarriage
or an abortion (if the mother
has a good medical reason
for one). Is it not true that
the "human being" is just
disposed of at the hospital?
Why don't these people who
think that it is a "living
human being" give it a
proper funeral?
When I see that everyone that is pro-life is paying
to have miscarriages given a
proper funeral then maybe I
ma)' start to believe that a
fetus is a "living person".
John Broughtoii
Speeders
jeopardize
young lives
Many students and
staff of UBC use 41st
Avenue or 39th Avenue to
travel to UBC each morning. Kerrisdale Elementary
School lies between 41st
and 39th on Carnarvan
Street.  The streets around
the school are congested
every weekday morning
between 8 and 9 a.m., and
between 3 and 4 p.m. every
weekday afternoon.
Recently the number of
cars moving along 39th and
41st has increased, giving
rise to even greater anxiety
about the safety of children.
Last week there was one
accident, with injuries, at
41st and Carnarvan. Accidents do occur, all too often,
with tragic consequences.
May I therefore ask,
through your columns, that
all your readers, students
and staff alike, take special
care when passing Kerrisdale - indeed any school -
and remember that there
are children about.
G.E. Mynett
Chairman. Kerrisdale School
Consultative     Committee
Left, right,
wrong
Gosh darn, but I'm tired
of vitriolic letters in The
Ubyssey. Why, just two
weeks ago it was
Fornataro's vituperative
attack on apartheid (how
could he?) and vigorous defence of Chile's elected socialist government in the
1970's (those tricky Reds!).
Now Greg Lanning tells us
virulently that the vice
versa is the verity! (Loony
Left Lambasted, Oct.30).
What's a poor moderate to
do? Vacillate?
Fortunately, Greg
saves us philistines from
that: it's all black and white.
'Cause there's this book by
David Moss (an' he's respected and conservative
and British—wow!) where
he shows that "Allende was
not the reformer he was
cracked up to be!" And this
baby's got "quotations
straight from President Allende!" Gosh! So if any of
those loony-lefties come to
your door peddling Chile or
Nicaragua, you just tell "em
to high-tail it back to Havana 'cause you read The
Economist!
Tsk, tsk, tsk. That
"frothing", "loony", "Mc-
Carthyist" Left. Right.
Peter Halewood
Law
First-aid for
everyone
I am disappointed that my
letter ("Student asks why",
Oct.30),  intended  only  to
question the financial policies of UBC's Athletics
Commission, was misinterpreted as a slanderous assault on the programs operating out of the Varsity
Training Room. It is too bad
that any form of student
criticism of administration
policies continues to be
greeted by knee-jerk reactions from people who were
not even the focus of the
original complaint.
I realize some of the
misunderstanding may be
due to the editing of my letter which removed a paragraph in which I directed my
questions to the Athletic
Commission, so I hope I can
make my point a little
clearer.
At no time did I ever
mention Georgina Mattison
or the job she does, nor did I
ever try to imply that we at
Intramurals deserve access
to the Varsity training
room. Instead, I only meant
to question the
administration's decision to
only provide items, such as
first aid kits, to the Varsity/
Junior Varsity teams. Since
the administration funds
both the Athletics Department and the Intramurals
Program, I feel it is unfair
that first-aid kits are not
made available to both parties since part of the budget
of the Athletics Commission
comes from student fees,
and all students should be
provided access to necessities such as first-aid kits.
We at Intramurals,
myself included, consider
Georgina and her staff of
student trainers as our
friends and allies. They
provide us with a vital service we cannot do without. I
only hope that in the future
the administration decides
to give all student athletes,
regardless of ability, access
to the same equipment and
facilities.
Bruce Anderson
Science 4
Intramurals
debate
continues
In the last two issues of
the Ubyssey, the topic of
athletic fees and the use of
the resources of the athletic
department, have come in to
question. Also, I'd like to
question some of the antagonisms made by Georgina
Mattison.
First of all, the general
operating budget for the
intramural department was
cut back by several thou- i
sand dollars, whereas there
was an athletic fee increase j
of $5.50. This seems ironic I
to me, since the intramural
department provides athletic and recreational activities for the students, the
faculty and staff, and the
intramural department receives no direct benefit from
participating in athletic activities and using the athletic facilities rather than
supporting or watching varsity athletics. From this
assumption, I am not suggesting that all intramural
events be given priority over
varsity athletics because
intramurals benefit the students moreso than varsity
athletics; Rather,   I'm
trying to point out the unfair
and misappropriate allocation of funds and facility use
by the athletic department.
Surely, Canada's largest
and most successful program of intramurals deserves more just treatment
that which is accorded by
the athletic department.
Georgina Mattison suggested that Bruce Anderson
attend the "Open Forum on
Athletics and Sport Services". Had I been aware of it,
I might have, but I'd like to
ask you Georgina, if you
have ever heard of the
phrase "the game of politics"? This "game" is played
in many different aspects of
society such as governments, corporations and
yes, Georgina, in the athletic department as well.
The athletic department is
not going to simply allocate
funds and the use of facilities in favour of students
because a few hundred or a
few thousand students desire it so. And then again,
how could the athletic department function if its policies were, to a great extent,
determined by a few thousand students who showed
up at these forums? The
athletic department needs
some autonomy to function. ,
Unfortunately this autonomy has been abused (in my
view) in favour of old, outdated habits of resource allocation. If only the administrators wouldchange their
adamant policies to reflect
the growth and the success ,
of the intramural department and varsity athletics, i
as a whole.
In addition to what Mr.
Anderson said about the use
of soccer fields, I would hope
that the existing practice of
containing intramural
sports to sub-standard
fields will diminish. After
all, I'm sure that the robins
and other birds would not
mind if intramurals kicked
them off of the fields and
used these fields for themselves.
Lastly, I don't think Mr.
Anderson honestly attempted to criticize the Athletic Department or Varsity
athletics, because the facility duty supervisors and the
Athletic Training Department have both been very
helpful to the Intramural
Department. Instead, I
think he attempted to invoke a response from the
administrators of the Athletic Department, to give
their rationale for the allocation of facilities and funds
within the department. At
least, this is what I am attempting to do. Paul Bains
Arts 4
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
November 6,1987 Quebec giant dies
I never thought that when
Rene Levesque died I would be
advocating what he stood for.
When Levesque took office in
1976, I was in High School - an
anglophone high school. Amidst
the wave of panic which soon
settled in amongst those of us who
lived in Westmount, The Town of
Mount Royal, Hampstead, and the
other bastions of anglo supremacy
and colonialism, Levesque was
painted as the destroyer of us all.
My friends soon left for
Toronto as the head offices of
SunLife, the Bank of Montreal,
and IBM moved westward. "My
dad got transferred" was the recurring phrase as my best friends
left me alone in an empty English
castle. Everywhere the fleur de lys
would appear on someone else's
house; the neighbourhood was
changing.
Then strange things
began to happen.
Anglophones began to
learn about the culture which surrounded them.
Not long after the election, Bill 101
came in to breathe that last gasp of
fire on Saint George's head; we
were doomed to perish on Summit
Circle, alas, could no one hear our
cries for help? Little old ladies
could no longer ask for their meat
in English, we might actually have
to watch French television, or, God
forbid, not be able to see first run
American films.
An economic crisis soon had
those Pepsis by the throat, now
they would have to give in. But
they didn't. The city had stopped
growing, the anglophone population lost what little culture it had,
but life went on. There were no
tanks in the street as there were in
October of 1970, and strangely
enough, people seemed relatively
content outside the fortifications
of Greene Avenue and The Boulevard.
Perspective
Then strange things began to
happen. Anglophones began to
learn about the culture which
surrounded them. Heck! Charles
Bronfman was even rumoured to
have a Louise Forrestier album in
hispossesssion. The Molsons read
Anne Hebert between board room
meetings and brunch at the Montreal Badminton and Squash
Club. Some of the clique remained
indignant and took off on the 401,
but the rest of the survivors
started on the road to assimilation.
For the first time, the anglophone youth of Quebec realized
that maybe something was wrong
with ninety-four percent of the
province's wealth beingheld in the
hands of an anglo minority. Besides, the tight-assed waspy
Westmounters were boring at
parties.
It might not have happened
all that smoothly, but at the end of
Levesque's time in office, a new
Quebec emerged. Francophones
now held the positions of real
power, not in the Legislature, but
in the board rooms and on the
stock exchange; French-Canadians now had economic security.
The fiddling habitant became a
trite tradition in view of the erection of new corperate monoliths,
such as Pierre Desmarais' Power
Corp. Why bother with independence when you've already got every thingyou needin confederation?
Contrary to a lot of western-
anglo paranoia, Quebecers do not
hate the West, nor do they hate the
English, as long as you make the
effort to speak French. For in
trying, it shows respect for the
culture, something which American tourists have yet to learn.
For all of Rene Levesque's
fire-breathing nationalism, he
ironically brought Canada closer
together, by making French Canada self-confident enough to
mingle with the rest of the insecure and pimply-faced provinces.
At the high school dance of world
politics, Quebec is no longer the
wall-flower afraid of its funny
accent, but La Belle Province is
turning into the belle of the ball.
Whenever a political personality dies, the world often forgets
the platform on which that person
stood. The passing of Rene
Levesque should not, and cannot
be described as the end of an era,
for he stood for the recognition of
Quebec as a separate and unique
element of Canada, a goal which
has just started on the road to
realisation. Nous vous manquer-
ons, mais "a la prochaine".
Attention regular and potential
entertainment writers: Come to
an entertainment meeting Monday November 9,12:30 p.m. SUB
241K to discuss direction of the
entertainment section, special
issues, layout and your ideas.
See entertainment editor
Laura Busheikin for more info.
Katherine Monk is a former Montreal resident now suffering from a
cultural identity crisis
(liiclicc I-Vofessional
Thoaf re? Company
Presents
Intimate
Invasion
Thurs. Fri. Sat.
Nov. 19, 20, 21 8 pm.
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY
IN FRENCH SAT. NOV. 21,2 PM.
UBC - SUB AUDITORIUM
Advance Tickets at VTC/CBO outlets
and AMS Box Office
Something 9(ezu is
happening at Zl'BC
A NEW TOUCHTONE PHONE SYSTEM which is being installed in stages
from Sept. to Dec. 18th 1987. The new phone system is a state of the art
touchtone direct dial system (SL-1) which is replacing the old, out-of-date,
rotary, Centrex system.
HOW IT WILL AFFECT YOU:
TEMPORARY DIALING PLAN:  Effective: September 19th, 1987.
Centrex phone calling SL-1 phone or
SL-1 phone calling Centrex phone
Dial 82 = 4 digit local or
Dial 9 = 22X-XXXX
There is a limited number of 82 - tie trunks available
If you are in doubt when calling someone, dial 9 + 7 digits.
December 19th, 1987, the dialing will revert to 4 digit locals.
On
Some buildings have already been changed over to the new system.
Some are in the process of change. Here is a list of the change-overs in
November:
Nov. 6
Nov. 11
Nov. 13
Botany
Oceanography
Zoology
Dean of Science
Sports Medical Clinic
Food Services
Student Housing and Conferences
Law Faculty
Law Library
Computing Centre
Computer Science Dept.
BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND
Bring this ad for a deal!
KEEP YOUR
YEAR GOING
WITH A
CARBO
LOAD!
Fettuccine Alfredo, Caesar Salad,
Coffee, Tea or Small Soft Drink
Just $3.95
(A $3.65 Saving!)
ONLY WITH THIS AD.
NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER.
Broadway at Balaclava
(Two Blocks West of Macdonald)
OFFER EXPIRES DEC. 15/1987
November 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 NEW DANCE
By Martin Dawes
Five young composers, plus
five young choreographers,
equals five new works! a few of
these are clunkers, but works
like Karen Jamieson and Kirk
Elliot's Drive are simply not to
be missed.
Drive is a study of energy.
Six dancers, dressed in black
shorts, tank tops, and knee-pads
clutch the floor like crabs, then
DANCE
New Music/New Dance
November 4th to 7th
8:00 p.m.
Arcadia Hall
jerk into electric motion to
Elliot's throbbing music. They
are convulsed with spasms, they
slam-dance, they run and jump
for joy; their faces are flushed,
exultant. The room was sweating.
Only something like Drive
could have aroused the audience
after works like Khoros and At
The Round Earth's Imagined
Corners.
KAREN JAMIESON DANCERS .. .a six-pack of energy       st9Ve chan photo
the intermission we were treated
to some happy and percussive
Balinese/Javanese-influenced
music by Kenneth Newby. Two
women in glittering yellow silk
enact Rites, Release, Reunion,
symbolizing the two complementary aspects of the soul, dancing
a lovely contrapuntal duet
created by Lorraine Thomson.
But the real shocker of the
evening was the concluding
work, Dis/0 To The Power,
created by Barbara Bourget and
composer Robert Rosen. This is
really new.
Four beings slowly emerge
from a pool of slime. Smoke
rises; cello, violin and percussion
create the sounds of chaos; the
beings awake! Clothed only in
the essentials,
with orange
light shining
on coats of
mud, they
struggle to
exist, to
multiply.
This was a
riveting and
memorable experience and,
along with
Drive, more
than enough
reason to catch
New Music/
New Dance
while there's
still time.
Khoros seemed like a
fascinating concept. A number of
small balls hang from the ceiling,
producing electronic sounds
when touched. Composer Martin
Gotsrid also performs in the
work, with his outfit similarly
rigged for sound. This was
indeed interesting, but Maureen
McKellar's choreography failed
to impart any meaning to all this
technology.
At The Round Earth's
Imagined Corners featured
dancer Anne Harvie, a very tall,
striking and expressive woman.
Unfortunately, Janet Danielson's
music was none of these things.
The generally vague
quality of this work
is perhaps rooted in
its concept: "...a title
appeared which
seemed to fit
what the
DIS/O TO THE POWER ... riveting
steve chan photo
The Ubyssey \
needs       J
Writers      i
■
Photographers:
A Fridge     :
Typists       :
Layout People ]
Graphic Artists:
■
■
Volunteer i
Now :
Come to :
SUB 241k :
AN OPEN INVITATION
TO 4th YEAR
ACCOUNTING
STUDENTS
The partners and staff of Peat Marwick's
Richmond office invite all students interested in 1988 articling positions with our
office to join us for:
:
EVENT:
DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:
R.S.V.P.:
Open House
Tuesday, November 10,1987
7:00 p.m.
PEAT MARWICK
#212-4800 No. 3 Road,
Richmond, B.C.
Phone 273-0011
mms.
lamsi     APPLICATIONS
NOW AVAILABLE
for
THREE STUDENT-AT-LARGE
POSITIONS
on the
UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC
COUNCIL
APPLICATIONS DEADLINE
4 P.M. FRIDAY
NOVEMBER 20
FORMS
AVAILABLE
SUB 238
£Z£C-HU0tf
SAU-IGN OtttEMWU
ONBROADW
705 West Broadway at Heather
DID  YOUR
PARTY  SING
OH HOLY NIGHT
WHEN  THE  BILL
FOR  LAST YEAR'S
ANNUAL  CHRISTMAS
PARTY  ARRIVED?  THIS
FESTIVE SEASON WHY NOT
DECK THE HAUS AT FOGG !.' SUDS.
WE CAN ACCOMMODATE FROM
10-150 AND  GUARANTEE
DANCING  RESERVATIONS AT YOUR
FAVORITE NIGHT CLUB SO YOU CAN
ROCK AROUND THE CHRISTMAS TREE. SO
HAVE YOURSELF A MERRY LITTLE CHRISTMAS
BILL THIS YEAR WITH THE BEST VALUE SOUTH
OF THE NORTH  POLE.  ENJOY THE SPIRITS OF
CHRISTMAS AT ANY OF OUR THREE CONVENIENT
LOCATIONS: KITSILANO 732-3377; BROADWAY & CAMBIE
872-3377; ENGLISH BAY 683-2337. THE MANAGEMENT AND
STAFF WISH
YOU AND YOURS THE
SEASONS EATING &
AULD LAING  DINE
FROM FOGG N' SUDS
RESTAURANTS.
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
November 6,1987

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