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The Ubyssey Oct 29, 1982

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 14
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 29,1982
228-2301
HALLOWE'EN EDITION
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-craig yuill photo Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 29,1982
Quiet crowd
gets Byrnes
By SCOTT PITTENDRIGH
When most of the louder Vancouver crowds were miles away in
Seattle enjoying the Who concert, a
quieter crowd took in an evening of
solo blues performed by Jim Byrnes
at Trimbles on Tenth Avenue.
Byrnes, a well known rhythm and
blues artist, performed without his
band, to a small crowd at the coffee
house Oct. 20 and 21. The solo performance by Byrnes was different
from the one he usually gives. He
mainly played blues and seemed to
keep away from his recorded
material like You Don't Know or.
Hands of Time (both from his
album, Burning) and he seemed
to be having a lot of fun doing renditions of classic blues songs like
Robert Johnson's Walkin Blues,
Sweet Home Chicago, Willie Dixon's Little Red Rooster or Louis
Armstrong's Bad Boy, while
demonstrating his talent on electric
slide guitar and keeping a steady
rhythm.
In the second set of the Thursday
night show, however, Byrnes did
receive some accompaniment from
members of Trimble's house band,
the Acousticats (a folk duo), on
bass and rhythm guitars. A drummer and a harmonica player were
also added to form a tight blues
quintet that enabled Byrnes to be
freer at playing the lead,
demonstrating his uniqueness as an
artist. Vancouver is fortunate to
have such talent, as were the people
in Trimbles who took in the two
shows.
CITR & THE PIT
Present
THE
HOT
AIR
SHOW
TEX SET
DRESDEN
Mon., Nov. 1, 1982
9:30 p.m.
- NO COVER -
fmlOfl
lARTS EDITOR
Requirements:
* insane sense of
humour
* can write
* can spell
If you are an Arts
student and are interested in the position, please apply at
BUCH 107 or phone
228-4403.
FREE
MOVIE
TICKETS
to EATING RAOUL
at the Vancouver Centre Theatre
The Ubyssey, in cooperation with 20th Century Fox and
Famous Players, is giving away limited double passes to see this
movie.
Find the term "Raoul" somewhere in an article in this issue
(advertising and review excluded). The term is in normal size
type and is not unduly hidden.
Ubyssey staff members. Alma Mater Society employees,
student council and SAC members, and employees of College
Printers are ineligible.
FIND "RAOUL" AND WIN MOVIE TICKETS!
To claim your double pass (only one per person), bring your
AMS student card, together with the phrase Raoul circled to The
Ubyssey office, SUB 241 k. Passes will be given away only till they
last.
Passes are good Monday to Thursday only.
FIND "RAOUL" AND WIN MOVIE TICKETS!
located in the /tudent union bldg
in the heart of the ubc compu/
CECHE
be/t joxx in town
oct. 57-30
JCRRV lAVTOfl
your favorite/
nov. 1,2
coun IAZARIM
TRIO
nov. J-6
AO COVER CHARGE
open monday thru /aturday
noon to 14: JO
33Hd
#v
EATING RAOUL'is One Of The
Freshest, Funniest Comedies In Years...
Impudent, outrageous and murderously madcap like 'Arsenic and Old Lace'."
— Bruce Williamson, Playboy
'Outrageous.u.Wickedfy Funny.'EATING RAOUL' is almost
certain to be the up-from-undergrquncl movie of the year."
/■Eii. Y\m. J   if ^ t'iHB1! —Jack Kroll, Newsweek
20th CENTURY-FOX INTERNATIONAL CLASSICS in association with QUARTER FILMS, INCORPORATED presents
MARY WORONOV • PAUL BARTEL and introducing ROBERT BELTRAN in EATING RAOUL
also starring ED BEGLEY, JR. • BUCK HENRY • SUSAN SAIGER   Screenplay by RICHARD BLACKBURN and PAUL BARTEL
Original music by ARLONOBER   Produced by ANNE KIMMEL   Directed by PAUL BARTEL      /%&
FAMOUS
PLAYERS
THEATRES,
STARTS
TODAY
(^■Fi Quartet/FilmsIncorporated
©1982
International
CLASSICS
O IM* TWENTIETH CENTURY-fOX
- VANCOUVER CENTRE-
GRANVILLE &GEOPCA 6694442
DAILY - 2:30, 4:15, 6:05
8:05, 10:00
WARNING      -      Some
violence,    frequent    suggestive scenes.
— B.C. Director.      CZ&E&S? Friday, October 29,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tarot cards have been a pervasive part of
our culture since (and this is a point of contention among occult historians) the fifteenth
century. Led Zeppelin used the trump major
card, the hermit, for the cover design of Zeppelin IV, the diabolic Stairway to Heaven
album. James Bond consulted the tarot in
Thunderball. Roger Zelazney based a nine-
book fantasy series on the oracular cards.
William Butler Yeats used Tarot imagery in
his mystical poetry.
Of course, the cards are so laced with symbols from every mythology our culture springs from; it's no wonder they're used as all
encompassing images by artists.
Take the Magician, the first card in the set
of 78, for example: All fairy tales, from the
Brothers Grimm to Japanese teaching fables,
have magicians. He has the appearance of the
Greek god Apollo,,according to a guide to
the cards. He also has the horizontal eight
over his head, the Christian symbol of the
Holy Spirit. Around his waist is the serpent
linked mouth to tail, the Nordic image of infinity. On the table beside him is the pentagram, which is drawn both for the evocation of white magic in the Hebraic magic of
the Kabala, and for the calling of demons in
satanic magic. The magician is knee deep in
roses and lilies, medieval symbols of the unity of spirit and flesh. The list goes on and on.
The cards are a quintuple threat. They go
for the collective memory, the spiritus mun-
di, of the individuals who try to read them.
They reek of power and mystery.
Court de Geblin, a French occultist of the
late eighteenth century, insisted that the
cards came originally from Egypt, and had
been used by the Pharoah's seers to plumb
the divine mysteries. They had been hopelessly bastardized by Christian barbarians, he
said.
But this rumour was emphatically denied
100 years later by Eliphas Levis, scholar and
historian of magic, cult figure, and all
around wizard. He traced the cards' origin to
the wisdom of the Hebrew mages, while
others said they came from the astrologists of
the ancient Chinese emperors.
Okay now ... a specific problem, and Tm a
dark-haired woman with grey eyes — choose
something from the swords. Not a court card,
i'm not feeling too flush. Nine of swords. Hell no,
ifs not as bad as all that. Eight of swords then.
What crosses me? Queen of pentacles. Positive?,
powerful, contemplative, a picture of inner
strength. The cross wont be a heavy one.
I can take care of it...
QUEEN oSPENTACUE
By KELLEY JO BURKE
The cards are shuffled after the significator
is placed down. Nine cards are laid around
the significator, the first crossing her. Not to
go into too much detail, the inner four, placed in a square around the significator deal
with immediate problems and eventualities,
while the outer four, which line vertically to
the right of the querent's card, point to the
future.
The alternative method involves many
dealings and stackings and re-dealings. It's
best for parties, when you're trying to wow
the crowd with your gypsy heritage. If that
sort of thing appeals, get your own book,
and figure it out.
If when you first lay hands on the Trump
Major, spiritual lightening doesn't go zapping through your finger tips, don't despair.
Therapeutic value can be the Tarot's
greatest asset. You sit reading for somebody
and you say: "The Queen of swords crosses
you. A grim, stern woman who is not unfamiliar with pain is your obstacle."
"My god, my mother."
"The Nine of wands is under you. A young
expectant person, prepared for battle. This is
a decision you've already made, that supports you. You're prepared to be a formidi-
ble adversary."
The querent beams, you beam. The cards
are like enchanted Rorscharch blots, they tell
people what they already know. But they
aren't really admitting them. The cards are
responsible.
But be careful. Once, I did a reading for a
friend, while another sat by watching. I
didn't realize how superstitious the second
was until I began the interpretation. The
cards were coming up very bad indeed, for
someone close to the querent. Waxing in my
role as magus, I began to expand on the horrors awaiting this third party, when the
superstitious one, jumped up and ran from
the room, yelling, "Stop it ! It's me!"
"Damn it," I yelled back at her, "They're
just cards." She turned and stared at me,
ashen and shaken. "I wonder," she said.
Regardless, the first cards to in any way
resemble modern Tarot appeared in fifteenth
century Italy. Occultists seem to prefer to
leave the cards' beginnings mysterious.
They agree on one thing, though they are
not to be confused with plain old, beer and
poker chip cards. In the lower trump or arcana, there is a four suit division, as with
their plebian cousins; but they are sets of 14,
not 13.
The other major difference is the presence
of the Trump Major, the cards of the Veil.
The 22 cards are not a suit, but single
representations of the most basic magical
figures: the Magician, the Fool, Death, the
Lovers, the Hermit, and the Hanged Man.
Modern spiritualist Arthur Waite insists —
supported by the works of Levis — that there
are "elements of the Divine Immanence in
the Trumps Major."
Arthur says it is only in the reading of the
higher arcana that the Tarot transcends
vulgar fortune-telling, entering the realm of
communication with the spiritual actuality,
behind   the   :c'-\  o~ the  deceptive  physical
any simple Tarot key leaves you only more
confused, to try laying your hands on the
card in question. If you're at all adept, the
clear meaning of the card's presence in the:
fortune should sing out to your soul. It's
kind of like direct dialing.
On to vulgar fortune-telling.
The lower arcana follows the same format
as playing cards; king, queen, knave, on
down to the ace. The additional card is the
page, who enters the sequence between the;
knave and the ten.
The four suits are the wands, cups, swords,
and pentacles. While each card has its own
specific meaning, which can be learned, or
just plain read from the key, the suits have
unifying qualities. The wands tend to express
the influence of natural, enduring influences,
the cups immediate and sensual ones, swords
rapid, and possibly violent changes in the
temporal world, and pentacles slow and pensive alterations in the intellectual or spiritual
There are two basic methods of reading the
cards. The Celtic, which Arthur maintains is,
the best and purest, is done by choosing ore
•card     from    rhe    ! ■■■.::•■    .iracana    a-    *'.
:-:r*i^t-r3S^ Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 29,1382
c
»¥*•
Birdwatch
j
ROWING
UBC's outstanding single sculler
Lisa Roy came tenth in the
prestigious Women's championship
singles in Boston last weekend.
Only the cream of North
America's rowers were invited to
take part in the event which is part
of the annual Head of the Charles
regatta.
WOMEN'S SOCCER
Another sport on campus this
weekend, but one strictly for the
early birds, is Women's Soccer. The
UBC team entertains Western
Washington University on Wolfson
field at 11 a.m. Saturday. Last week
the teams met in Seattle where UBC
lost 4-0 after a disappointing performance. This game then is a
revenge match. The game is also of
interest because the two teams are
main movers behind an attempt to
set up an inter-collegiate league in
the Washington/B.C. area.
MEN'S SOCCER
Last Saturday the men's soccer
team travelled to Victoria to play
the University team which had
already clinched Canada West.
They went down 1-0 — the only
goal being scored after 32 minutes.
The two teams meet again on
Wolfson field at 2 p.m. Saturday.
"For the first half an hour we
were probably playing our best all
season," said coach Joe Johnson.
But then left-back Eric Jones aggravated an ankle injury and had to
be carried off. In the confusion
following the reorganization of the
defense Victoria scored.
After that UBC pressed, but all in
vain, they had shots cleared off the
line and on other occasions missed
the target by inches. At the end of
the 90 minutes however they had
nothing to show.
"I was very pleased with the effort" Johnson said. "We know the
Victoria boys can be beaten."
The only thing that worried
Johnson about next Saturday's
match is that he is again down to
just 12 fit outfield players. Still, he
said, "We'll be going all the time
and it should be an excellent game.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
UBC takes on its arch rival, the
Simon Fraser University Drips Sunday at the Aquatic centre.
With a perfect record so far this
season, team captain Horacio de la
Cueva expressed optimism. "Last
GRAD'S
Phone   now   for   complimentary portrait sitting.
RESUME PHOTOS
AS LOW AS 75c
IN COLOUR.
iflmagraph*
Shidios Ltd.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
year we lost 10-0 to SFU, it can only
get better."
The game starts at 10 p.m. Admission is free, since you can't see
much anyways.
Both UBC and SFU compete in
the B division of the B.C. Underwater Hockey Association League.
the Northwest tournament.
Their defence was considerably
better than in the previous tournament, they did not concede more
than eight goals in any one game.
That, however was the only bright
spot. They lost all four of their
games.
The opposition had worked out
UBC's stereotyped offensive
strategy and had identified Larry
Ellenwood and Dave Zants as the
danger men. With their chief play
makers double-checked UBC were
unable to put the ball into the net.
They suffered especially when they
had power-play advantage only succeeding in turning 20 per cent of
them into goals.
They lost to Washington State
University 7-4, South Oregon State
College also 7-4, undefeated
Oregon State 8-1 and finally the
University of Washington 7-1.
ALICE MUNRO
Will be at the UBC BOOKSTORE
TODAY, 12 noon to 1:30 p.m.
To Autograph Copies of
Her New Book
"The Moons Of Jupiter"
$17.95   BACH
Reserve Your Copy Call
UBC BOOKSTORE
- 228-4741 -
— rick Katz photo
FOOTBALL player ... and I
don't like your mother either
WATER POLO
The UBC water polo team went
down to the US for the second time
last weekend for the second part of
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Horse Shoes. Friday, October 29,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
"I have ESP!" exclaims clairvoyant
"Unless you believe charlatans
and liars, no one can claim
parapyschology is a consistent
phenomenon, UBC associate
psychology professor Raymond
Corteen charges.
But others think differently.
"Extrasensory perception is an
ability I have," psychic Maureen
McGuire says. "It's like singing or
dancing well."
"They call me a clairvoyant,"
McGuire says. She says she knows
and sees things other people cannot
by the use of ESP.
McGuire has worked for the
police, locating lost planes and people, and seeking clues in murder
cases, she says. She has a 50 per
cent success rate in locating downed
aircraft.
"Any aircraft I did not locate
was never located."
When a plane crashes McGuire
has a premonition previous to being
contacted about it.
"When the phone call comes I go
into an altered state and become the
lost person," she says. "If he's
cold, I'm cold." McGuire says she
can then tell the caller the lost
person's situation and location.
Corteen says if a psychic is successful, it is chance. "If you tell me
a plane's flight path I can make a
general statement about its position, but it will be wrong nine times
out of ten."
But there are those who believe in
McGuire's visions. "Businessmen
ask me to read their business'
outlook," she says. A reading is a
vision of the future or a vision of
something current that other people
cannot see.
She often lectures at universities
and high schools on parapsychology. "Public opinion is
favourable to parapsychology."
McGuire says she was born with
her gift. "I've had ESP all my life. I
predicted my father's death at the
age of ten," McGuire says. Ten
years ago she studied a course at
Douglas College on self-hypnosis.
She then began to take ESP seriously.
Corteen is not impressed by
McGuire's work record. "If people
use useless processes it does not
make them accurate," Corteen
says.
Experts numb as mind manifests
phenomenal parapsychic mysteries!
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Corteen says the police use
psychics at the insistence of
relatives.
RCMP staff sergeant Nylund
says the RCMP sometimes contact
psychics themselves, "But the majority of times police use a psychic,
the family requests it or a psychic
offers free assistance."
Psychic David Young offered
assistance in the recent Clearwater
murder case, Nylund says, the
police have limited success with
psychics. "I've never been on a
case with a pyschic that was successful," Nylund says.
"If they (psychics) work without
disrupting us or costing up money,
I'd appreciate their help," Nylund
says.
McGuire says she is never paid
for working on police cases.
Nylund adds that psychic information is often so vague it is
useless. "In one case a psychic said
the victim was in trees by a stream.
You cannot use such general information."
The president of Psychic Systems
Research says authorities' use of
psychics is proof of the existence of
ESP.
But the views of Larry DeFehr's
and Maureen McGuire's vary considerably.
DeFehr says ghosts do not exist
and if tarot card readers are accurate they are using psi (ESP)
energy. He says ESP is a mind
energy. "I think it is possible Moses
used this energy to part the Red
Sea," he says.
But McGuire believes ESP is a
gift from God. While she dislikes
witchcraft she believes in spirits,
tarot cards and astrology. "I've
been in haunted Lower Mainland
houses," she says.
Defehr, and others, including
Simon Fraser University faculty
member Robert Harper, are experimenting with parapsychology at
SFU.
In one test, the subject must identify one of two possible numbers
generated by the tester. If a person
can consistently identify the
number, the person must have psi
energy, DeFehr says.
Corteen says these experiments
are invalid because they cannot be
properly controlled.
"Experiments are controlled. I
don't think lab control is an issue,"
DeFehr said.
DeFehr says the statistical models
that parapsychologists use are as
valid as statisticians can make them.
There has been a great deal of
parapsychological research in the
U.S. and Europe. Doctorates in
parapsychology are available at
other universities, such as J.F. Kennedy in San Francisco. DeFehr says
within ten years SFU or UBC will
offer a degree in parapsychology.
Corteen is less encouraging to
potential students of parapsychology. "It's absolutely impossible at UBC," he says.
Corteen says all experiments confirming psychic power's reality are
fraudulent (this includes the famous
Rhine experiments performed at
Duke University). "They are possible, but could be fraudulent and
you must prove an experiment's
validity beyond a reasonable
doubt."
McGuire says "some psychologists have fixed ideas, and
without examining the data they
make pronouncements."
Corteen was involved in parapsychological experimentation in
Scotland and Vancouver. All his
results were negative.
But he says experimentation
should continue. If verifiable
evidence was produced he could
believe in ESP.
Corteen adds, "the best person
to test a psychic is a first class magician." A really good magician can
fake most things psychics say they
can really do.
McGuire asks if a magician can
give information over a phone. She
has also done readings for three
magicians.
Corteen says people believe in
ESP because they very much want
to.
1 McGuire says she never wanted
ESP. She initially felt guilt for
predicting the deaths of her father
and other relatives but learned to
live with her prophetic abilities.
Corteen and DeFehr recognize
the grey areas in their debate. The
first says there is no solid evidence
against ESP, and the second that
there is no positive evidence yet.
Sergeant Nylund is probably correct when he says, "If others can
show they can help by strange
means or powers, we'll go along."
"You cannot explain some
things."
Who asked for Hallowe en IH ?
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
"Pray   that   there   isn't   a
Hallowe'en III"
— Hallowe'en II review,
Nov. 20, 1981 Ubyssey
Someone out there asked for
more of the Night  He Came
Home?
Well, too bad. You won't get
it.
Instead, the magnanimous
John Carpenter — perpetrator
of Hallowe'en II — is offering
you The Night No One Came
Home.
The Thing, the Shape, the
Reincarnation of Pure Evil is
gone, toasted to a fine crisp at
the end of Hallowe'en II. Not
that such an occurrence would
DAN O'HERLIHY
evil toymaker with nasty mash
stop a master like John
Carpenter from resurrecting the
Shape once more for a sequel.
Also absent from the ranks of
Hallowe'en III is Jamie Lee Curtis, who managed to survive the
Shape's vendetta in parts I and
II.
Hallowe'en III
Directed by Tommy Lee Wallace
Playing at Odeon
So what happens on the Night
No One Came Home?
Not much, because the movie
is about the week before the
Night No One Came Home.
Watch the absurd computer
graphics at the beginning of
Hallowe'en III make up the title
credits: Hallowe'en III: Season
of the Witch.
Try and comprehend why the
movie is called Season of the
Witch when there isn't a single
witch in the whole movie.
See an evil toymaker unleash
terrible powers of Stonehenge on
American children.
Just try to feel suspense as
those powers are included in
every Hallowe'en mask sold by
the evil toymaker's company.
TOM ATKINS
and friend try to rescue world
See an army of robots silencing everyone who comes to know
the secret before Hallowe'en
Night.
Cringe in disgust as Carpenter
and director Tommy Lee
Wallace  fail to realize all the
possibilities inherent in their new
Hallowe'en scenario.
Wonder if Carpenter and
Wallace are aware of modern
horror mythology.
Pray there isn't a Hallowe'en
IV. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 29, 1982
VOLLEYBALL
Women's volleyball start their
competitive season in Burnaby this
weekend when they compete in the
Simon Fraser University Invitational tournament.
The following weekend, Nov. 5
and 6, both men's and women's
teams visit the throbbing heart of
prairie sport when they play their
first Canada west tournament in
Lethbridge, Alberta.
I thought men's volleyball looked
pretty   sharp   when   I   was   lucky
enough   to   catch   an   exhibition
match earlier this month. However,
after they were the only men's varsity team to manage to complete the
Arts '20 behind our Ubyssey team,
I'm not so sure . . .
RUGBY
UBC plays host to the University
of Victoria this Saturday. The game
kicks off at 2:30 p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium.
Victoria has had a very good
season so far and last week tied the
1981-82 provincial champions.
It should be a very tight game,
said UBC coach Donn Spence.
"We know each other very well and
have very similar teams, young and
fast."
UBC are coming off a 28-0 victory against Capilanos on campus
last weekend which keeps them
undefeated in the league. The team
has four games to go this half, two
of them against very strong opposition. So by Christmas, when
they've made up their backlog of
games they should have a clear idea
of their chances.
Saturday's victory was down to
another   good   team   performance
said Spence.
Traditional theory holds that as
IWEMfflU
the going becomes heavier later in
the year the heavier older teams
should do better. But Spence said
he believes that his lighter team will
benefit. "I tell them they will be
able to skip across the water," said
Spence.
HOCKEY
The UBC ice hockey team continues its pre-season warm up
games in Calgary this weekend
when it competes in the annual Empress cup. Competition will be supplied by the Universities of Regina,
Alberta nd the hosts Calgary.
On Tuesday Nov. 2 UBC plays
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host to the Chinese National Team
for the first game of their Canadian
tour. The game starts at 7 p.m. in
the winter sports arena.
BASKETBALL
The men's basketball team is also
toning up for the coming season
and they will be playing a couple of
exhibition games at UBC this
weekend.
Exhibit 'A' on Friday will be the
Vancouver Melanomas in the War
Memorial Gym, starting at 8:30
p.m.
Exhibit
and jump
Saturday.
Let's hope they don't make exhibitions of themselves.
The hand of power. . . as its name suggests, there is little a welt-practised witcn cannot
do with such a toot. To obtain one was such a test of dedication and ingenuity that few ever
realized such awesome strength.
To create a hand of power, the witch must creep bv the fight of the thinnest of sickle
moons, to a crossroads where a person has just been hung. To left hand must be severed,
wrapped in raw black silk, and carried back to the witch's abode. Then a flesh-colored candle,
preferably consisting of tallow rendered from a dead child's fat, should burn in the hand until
it gutters out and sings the rigid flesh. The incantation that accompanies this is a silent and
personal one, an evocation of everything deadly, unholy, and powerful. A lighted candle
placed in the hand of power during any spell-casting will increase its efficiency a thousand
fold.
'B' will be the Slammers
off will be at 8:30 on
BOWLING & PIZZA NIGHT
FRIDAY, NOV. 12    0^>-^/
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Tempest 'deliberately camp'
By PETER BERLIN
Vancouver may seem like a
cultural backwater at times but for
a movie to take years to arrive here
despite an enthusiastic critical
reception in London is unusual.
The delay should not discourage
anybody from going to see Derek
Jarman's fascinating interpretation
of Shakespeare's Tempest. But a
word of warning: Jarman's
Tempest is certainly an off-beat version. Those who expect to see
Olivier, Scoefield, Gielgud and
other of the big English theatre
names in another filmed version of
some traditional West End production are in for a surprise. Jarman
has no background in classical
theatre; he is first and foremost a
self-consciously avant-garde filmmaker.
He is also deliberately and proudly, camp.
If you look down the cast list for
familiar names you won't find any.
Prospero is played by Heathcote
Williams, an actor who has divided
his life between fringe acting and
magic. Also in the cast are Jack
Birkett as Caliban, pop singer
Toyah Willcox as a very knowing
Miranda and Karl Johnson as Ariel,
very much the fairy.
The location is also quite unlike
the mock Tudor setting traditionally used in Shakespeare adaptations
(Polanski excepted). The exteriors
are shot on the bleak Northumberland coast and the interiors
in a crumbling English mansion fill
ed with props and costumes
representing all eras to "emphasize
the timelessness of the play," according to production notes.
The iconoclasm of the production is emphasized by its grand
finale when Elizabeth Welch, a '30s
black blues singer, as the Goddess,
belts out Stormy Weather, accompanied by a ship load of sailors at
what appears to be a party. Okay,
so it's not in the original play but I
thought it was great. It brings the
movie to a fitting end. Here, and
throughout the film, Jarman breaks
away from tradition while remaining true to Shakespeare.
He ignores theatrical convention
but is always theatrical. Most of all
he succeeds in creating a sense of atmosphere by keeping a crazy logic
consistent throughout.
It's cultural escapism offering a
plausible world worth entering.
The Tempest
Directed by Derek Jarman
Playing   at   National   film   board
theatre, 1155 W. Georgia, on Oct.
31 at 7:30 p.m.
So, why did it take years to reach
Vancouver, especially after the
British press had given it such
double-plus-good reviews? The
London Times said it was "a rich,
imaginative, poetic and above all
Shakesperian interpretation of the
play, with inventive designs, extraordinary images and excellent
performances."
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Within two months if reached
New York and the critic gagged. In
the newspaper that counts, the New
York Times, Vincent Canby said
'Derek Jarman's screen version of
"The Tempest. . . would be funny
if it weren't very nearly unbearable
. . . watching is like driving a car
whose windscreen has shattered but
not broken. You can barely see
through the production to
Shakespeare, so you must rely on
memory.
"This Tempest is a movie of
drastically cut text and a lot of mixed metaphors, something like a
chichi window display in which
white mannequins, sprayed with
black paint, show off couture ball
gowns against a photo-mural of
concentration-camp scenes.
"The actors might be good, its
impossible to tell."
And finally, "there are (sic) no
poetry, no ideas, no characterizations, no narrative, no fun."
New Yorkers incapable of forming their own opinions accepted
Canby's self-glorifying assault and
stayed away, as they say, in droves.
The movie closed.
And that explains why it has
taken such a criminally long time
for The Tempest to reach Vancouver. If you must take a critic's
opinion seriously then listen to me
and take a chance on The Tempest.
It may not take itself seriously but
it's still worthwhile.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October:
Batten's cases variable
By VICTOR WONG
How many people like to read
books about lawyers besides law
students and lawyers?
Your decision to read them may
depend on what you expect from a
book about lawyers. If you are expecting elaboration on court cases
from the lawyer's point of view,
then here's a book that won't disappoint you.
In Court
By Jack Batten
Macmillan
$17.95
In Court is a book about lawyers,
many of them working as criminal
lawyers and advisors on lawsuits.
Jack Batten profiles ten Canadian
lawyers, each discussing his or her
own favorite cases. Each lawyer —
from Caroline Lindberg, a
newcomer who talks about her first
murder case, to John Robinette,
who Batten calls "a household
name" — is examined and profiled
differently.
There are two cases which might
be of special interest to UBC
students, since they both took place
in Vancouver. One concerns the
Penthouse Cabaret closing in 1976,
when the city of Vancouver accused
Joe Philliponi of living on prostitutes' earnings garnered from the
club. Lawyer Tom Braidwood successfully appealed the case, and the
details are discussed here.
The second is about Mike
Robataille's negligence suit against
the   Vancouver   Canucks.   Justice
William Essen awarded the crippled
hockey player $348,000 — the first
such settlement in Canadian sports
history.
Batten certainly cannot be
faulted for bad writing; in many of
the chapters he can hold the reader
spellbound. Unfortunately, not all
the chapters are like that; a few are
comprised of interviews which seem
tedious to a layman.
Also, each chapter is written in a
different manner — some are about
lawyers, some about cases, and a
few mix both up. There is no sense
of unity between the chapters, other
than the fact that there are lawyers
involved. This isn't necessarily a
bad thing, but Batten could at least
try to be consistent in his style.
Perhaps one of the book's biggest
problems is the way it is being
publicized. We are led to believe
that each chapter contains a sense
of drama; in reality, only a few
cases hold that sense of drama, and
in smaller quantities than we are led
to expect. As a profile on lawyers,
the book does an admirable job, if
you are expecting Perry Mason-type
cases, be prepared to be disappointed.
Rhythm triumphs
By RENE SALOMON
A crowd of 250 was treated to
another in the successful weekly
rock 'n roll series at John Barleys
on Cordova Monday night. The
centre of attention was local fine
young upstarts, otherwise known as
Rhythm Mission. The talented band
performed two strong sets, which
made this $3 show a bargain.
The group played in direct competition with the packed Simple
Minds show at the Commodore on
the same night. Comparing the two
events provides a great contrast.
Simple Minds, which belted out a
steady beat of electro-pop should
have been re-labelled the Luv-a-
Fairs because they fit so well into
the pseudo-progressive fashion set.
Rhythm Mission, on the other
Nothing's grand, Jack
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
Going Grand, Jack MacLeod's
second novel, is somewhat reminiscent of a first-year university
economics text.
There are two such books in wide
use at Canadian universities: one is
referred to as Samuleson and Scott,
and the other, Lipsey, Sparks and
Steiner, after their authors. Both re
excellent sedatives.
Going Grand
By Jack MacLeod
McClelland and Stewart
$16.95
So it is with Going Grand. The
book is intended to be a satire of
universities and university life. The
main character is J.T. McLaughlin,
an economics professor at Chiliast
University.The university, located
at Yorkville and Bloor, "north and
west . . . from the bank towers and
gilded temples of Bay Street . . .,"
is familiarly modeled after the
University of Toronto,
whereMcLeod is a political science
professor). However, instead of being satirical, the book and its main
characters are just like the real
thing. Dull. Nonfiction.
As satire it fails. As John K.
Galbraith and Milton Friedman
know, if there is anything that is
needed in these hard economic
times, it is good satire. The purpose
of satire is to mock at and jest
about circumstances which are being taken all too seriously for the'
gravity of the situation.
Instead, J.T. McLaughlin stands
as a symbol of the average Canadian. He over-consumes, he is in
debt, he wants more and he is uptight about getting it. The book
itself portrays all too familiar
stereotypes of men and women, of
universities, and of Canadian life in
general. It is too bad; the subject-
matter is ripe for satirization, but
McLeod fails to take advantage of
it.
What little humor there is in the
book comes across in episodes in
hallways at Chiliast University at
special ceremonies, and is too much
like Three's Company or Happy
Days. In fact, the novel's greatest
potential for success probably lies
in some CBC producer buying the
rights and turning it into a serial.
Or, since at times the prose reads
like it was written for n much
younger audience maybe Going
Grand could be released under a
new title, Going to University, and
placed in junior secondary schools
across the country as a manual.
It is dangerous to advocate burning books. But here is one more
suggestion for Going Grand. Take
it on your next camping trip. If you
run out of firewood, toss it on the
fire, the hard-back version is at
least as useful as a dead tree.
hand, unleashed a wide range of
musical machinations stretching
from funk-jazz to things beyond
esoteric. It is a band dedicated to
different beats, while Simple Minds
offer only one relentless mood.
Rhythm Mission's front is Dennis, who played tasteful sax lines
which gave the band the high end it
sometimes lacked. Guitarist Scott
Harding and keyboard man Lee
Kelsey meshed perfectly with Harding's slashing Gang of Four style.
Where else would the obvious
stars of a group called Rhythm Mission come from except through the
tremendously strong rhythm combo
of bass and drums? Band leader
Warren Hunter played frenzied
bass lines and jousted with drummer Warren Ash all night.
The surprisingly tight Rhythm
Mission unit has played only a few
scattered dates around town. They
do have a solid background since
each member has worked with other
groups. The band's strength obviously lies in it's undeniably individual stance. Each member plays
in his own form bringing together
pillars of strength from all corners.
Reasons why Rhythm Mission
will be around for a time to come
include tunes like Stick it Out, a
jolting number which most inexperienced bands would have a great
deal of trouble writing, and New
York Johnny, an uplifting sax run.
The crowd was thoroughly entertained by the show which lasted well
past midnight and was superbly
topped off by,a jam in which all
band members went wild. By then I
suppose all the crowd were back
from their Commodore show, ex-
halting the masterful simplicity of
their minds.
Raoul worth eating
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Mary:  This world is overflowing
with millions of sexual
perverts.
Paul:   I'm  glad   we found each
other.
Consider Paul and Mary Bland
your average California — nay,
American-couple. Like any other
middle-class, bourgeois pairing,
Paul and Mary desperately want to
satisfy their craving for the
American dream.
Paul and Mary are being stifled
by high rents, low-paying jobs and
desire to own a restaurant in Valencia, California. They plant to name
it Chez Bland. Or at least Paul and
Mary's Country Kitchen.
What's an average couple to do
in these dire times?
Eating Raoul
Directed by Paul Bartel
Opening today at Vancouver Centre
Coming right centre from a conservative closet, Paul (Paul Bartel)
and Mary (Mary Woronov),
disgusted with swingers next door
and people who constantly rip them
off, embark on a scheme to earn
money for down payment on Chez
Bland.
What better idea than to invite
swingers home under the pretence
of satisfying their basest desires, kill
them, and rob them? Everyone else
seems to be doing it, figuratively
speaking, why not Paul and Mary?
Indeed, why not? "People are
pigs," says wine connoisseur Paul.
And pigs crave brutal, unfeeling
treatment. When a Latino thief,
Raoul (Robert Bertran), barges into
their apartment, they are all too
eager to have him help them. Of
course, once Raoul outlives his
usefulness, there is no need for him.
(One guess as to what they do with
Raoul.)
Read what you will into Paul
Bartel and Richard Blackburn's
John Waters-type scenario. A couple of white, middle-class stuckups
taking advantage of anyone possible? Survival of the fittest in
America of the '80s? A lesson in
modern-day cannibalism in which a
metaphorical piece of human meat
becomes a real one?
Above all, Eating Raoul is the
best piece of satire to emerge this
year since Richard Brook's Wrong
is Right. This low budget film,
directed by Paul Bartel, is nothing
less than a gem — and one of the
year's funniest films.
Alison
Hoens
photo
essay THE   UBYSSEY
Page 9
Good grief, ifs Snoopy!
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Lucy:   (talking   about   Snoopy).
He's   not   even   human.
Snoopy:       (to       audience):
That's   a   point   in   my
favor.
On stage is a giant playground of
the mind where fantastical recollections of childhood come to life. The
set is full of bright reds, yellows,
and oranges. As the lights dim, it is
filled with characters one usually
knows as two-dimensional creations
depicted in a daily cartoon strip.
These are no ordinary creations.
They are adult characters in the
guise of children, trying to discover,
at the heart of their numerous
escapades, the meaning of life. And
the meaning of life, as one
character says, frequently means
going "back to sleep and (hoping)
tomorrow is a better day."
The intuitive words of wisdom
are from Charlie Brown. And at
North Vancouver's Presentation
House, Charlie Brown (James
Cronk) and the rest of the Peanuts
gang, including Snoopy, have been
brought to life in a bright, energetic
musical that is first-rate entertainment.
Snoopy Book
By Charles M. Schulz
Directed by Shel Piercy
Choreographed by
Madddalena Acconci
At Presentation House,
333 Chesterfield, North Vancouver,
until Nov. 7
The Peanuts gang is portrayed
not by child actors, but adult actors
who have their characters' traits
and gestures down pat. All the cartoon characters' quirks have been
retained   for   this   musical.   Lucy
(Gabrielle Jones) is as mean-spirited
(unbearable) as ever, Linus
(Stephen Salvatti) is still the burning intellect with a fetish for his
blue security blanket, and
Woodstock (Margo Northey) still
follows Snoopy like a groupie.
But the focus of Woodstock's admiration — and this musical — is
no ordinary beagle. He is the ir-
represable Snoopy, who is not so
much a rock star to Woodstock's
groupie role as a toe-tapping Fred
Astaire of the dog set. Combine
Astaire's musical agility with Errol
Flynn's swashbuckling bravado,
and you have Philip Eckman's
brilliant Snoopy. Snoopy has multiple personalities, including head
beagle, would-be writer with
countless rejection slips and WW 1
Hying ace.
As the Peanuts' gang engages in
what are essentially skits that
highlight each character, what
emerges from Vancouver Musical
Theatre's production is a show
whose ensemble of talented actors
make their performances seem effortless.
This is no easy task, especially in
a musical which has a cast of
characters mostly known as cartoon
figures. What is so good about this
musical, even considering the actors' perfect character renditions, is
that it works like a cartoon strip.
The four-frame strip is now a short
skit; and the rhythm of the printed
cartoon is now the tempo of the
stage.
Snoopy is an impressive follow-
up to the successful Vancouver
Musical Theatre production of
Rocky Horror in July. The timing,
and almost flawless production
qualities and attention to detail are
as evident in Snoopy as they were in
Rocky Horror.
And when there are actors like
Eckman and Stephen Salvatti on
stage, there is very little that can go
wrong. In this production, no
musical note is off the mark, and
nothing detracts from the show's
appeal.
Rosen unbalanced
By KERRY REGIER
Charles Rosen's piano performance for the Recital Society on
Sunday night displayed some of the
qualities of a performance by a
thoughtful, serious, rather conventional, and very talented amateur.
Now amateur is a highly personal
term, and must not be thought of as
necessarily pejorative. Rosen is a
professional, and also something of
a polymath with a French literature
doctorate, three interesting books
on  music  history (no mean  feat,
Politics mar stardom
By PETER BERLIN
At the Commodore ballroom
Tuesday night Gill Scott Heron
demonstrated that he's got all it
takes to be successful in contemporary music. He's got a fine voice,
he writes excellent songs, and he's
got a very good back up band, the
Amresia Express, his music is easy-
flowing jazz that is so popular
nowadays.
Heron's got a tremendous stage
presence and best of all he's got a
sense of humour. So why isn't he a
star? Perhaps because he's had a
bad dose of politics for the 17 years
he's been performing and shows no
signs of having sought a cure.
Right from the start of the three
hour show, Heron demonstrated his
political wit with From Shogun to
Raygun, in which he explained how
26 per cent of the US voters constituted a landslide in 1980 and
what he thought of the current
president of that great country. He
called the now "Hollyweird".
The next object of Heron's acute
scruting The Gun involved Mayor
Rizzo of Philadelphia and his attempt to persuade the populace to
give up their handguns by putting
them into special boxes in fire stations; only one gun was ever given
up. As Heron said, "Why should
we give up our guns when the police
don't. It makes for an unfair
fight." Heron's inability to take
Rizzo and his notorious cops
seriously demonstrates where he
differs from normal political
songwriters.
There is a distinct absence of
anger. In its place — whether he's
singing about the sle of baby formulas to the Third World (Save the
Children), nuclear power stations
(he's been anti nuclear for ten years
but has yet to be seen at big rallies),
persecuted illegal aliens or white
suppression of Blacks (Washington
D.C. and Johannesburg) — he is
always humorous and optimistic.
He has seen Angola, Mozambique
and Zimbabwe gain independence,
and for him, it's only a question of
time before Namibia and Azania
join them. As he says on Alien, if
you don't have hope you don't have
anything at all.
He is quick to irony of the poverty in which 60 per cent of
Washington's population — the
Blacks who live just miles away
from the White House — find
themselves.
The civilized, upbeat and laughing way in which Heron cooly
details one human outrage after
another is mirrored in the type of
music the band plays. It's
sophisticated and pleasant to listen
to.
On the closing number, Johannesburg, while Heron was explaining the great irony of apartheid
("L.A. like Johannesburg, New
York like Johannesburg"), the
band was pumping out the most
joyous jazz-rock and the audience
was dancing and having a good
time. Even the singer himself,
Heron, was smiling.
My only qualm about Heron rests
now, as it always has, on the way
he choses to present his ideas.
When it works, the cool approach
to outrageous subjects in cool jazz
music is fine; it may not be what we
expect but that gives it strength.
But, without anger to propel it, his
music is always dangerously close
to sounding bland, especially as
Heron relies on others to write his
melodies for him. And on Tuesday
night there were, between the gems,
examples of songs which were instantly forgettable. Richie Havens'
passionate Klan showed that much
of Heron's music is lifeless.
In the end, though, its good to
know that Heron is out there
somewhere keeping his torch burning and viewing the horrors of our
world with his such an acute eye.
Book now for 1984 and avoid
dissapointment.
that) and several recordings of Bach
and Beethoven to his credit.
The word amateur must here be
taken to mean, very precisely, a
kind of approach to the music.
Rosen began and ended his recital
with two rarely heard works, the
Schumann Dichtungen or Poems,
and the Beethoven Sonata Op. 2
No. 2. In between was the extremely
familiar Moonlight Sonata of
Beethoven. It is in this polarity, between the well-known and the
obscure, that lies the
"amateurishness."
With unfamiliar music, the
amateur will be working hard to get
the piece right, concentrating, and
not leaving much room for feeling.
But in a piece the amateur knows
well, the situation changes, for the
performer persumably knows the
way around the notes and can now
relax and play with the piece, or
give it some play in the Barthesian
sense.
What happened Sunday night
was Op. 2 No. 2 and the Schumann
were played in that dry, "practising" style characteristic of the
unadventurous amateur. The
Moonlight, on the other hand,
received very powerful, old high
romantic style performance.
Rosen played the first movement
of the Moonlight sonata with many
rolled chords, sounding the lower
notes first, something rarely done
today. In the minuet and the
violent finale Rosen, in the manner
of Schnabel or Lhevinne, made very
liberal use of rubato, altered dotted
rhythms to become more flexible,
rushed home to the ends of certain
very exciting phrases, and hammered out the big moments of the
last movement with a completely
un-modern furious abandon.
To be sure, Rosen made a lot of
mistakes, especially in the
Moonlight where he at one point
clearly mouthed a vigorous
"Damn!" But people are not
bloody machines, getting
everything perfect every time.
While Rosen got the notes much
more precisely in the other two
works, which were unbearably and
offensively dull, the Moonlight had
a real, human feeling.
Rosen played the inaugural
recital of the Recital Society's new
Hamburg Steinway, donated by Dr.
Eva Bene in memory of her mother.
Speaking wit the president of the
Recital Society, Rosen said the
piano was one of the finest he had
ever played, though it is still new
and stiff. Fine news for the Recital
Society which has been having problems with pianos from the very
beginning. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 29,1982
Self-righteous
in-di-pumpkin
And you thought life was a bowl of pumpkins.
Just because it's Hallowe'en doesn't mean you can mask your problems.
The big, bad real world is still out there with it's many tricks and few treats.
Just ask Bill Bennett. He's probably got lots of tricks in store for
students, as well as a lot of other people.
And what about Messrs. Pat McGeer and Bill Vander Zalm? Will their
recently bestowed treats prove to be sweet enough?
Then there is P.E. Trudeau and his crew of clowns. One can only guess
at the eery spells they are concocting for the future of post secondary
education.
And as the little kiddies wander the darkened streets on Oct. 31, will the
Canadian Federation of Students also dress up once more and knock
meekly at the door of government?
But let's look on the bright side. Maybe there will be enough ghosts,
goblins and witches creeping about to scare some life into students.
Perhaps, oh if only it could happen, we'll all transform into vampires and
spill some of the government's blood for once, instead of the other way
around.
Students are more like ghosts, though — rarely seen, seldom heard, and
usually fading away.
This Hallowe'en can be different.
After the costumes are put away, let's not revert to our old selves. Let's
show the public we're not just overgrown kiddies always trying to get a
bigger piece of candy.
Let's demand that the goodies society has to offer be shared equally by
all. Especially university. Demand free access, and reject the elitism that
university breeds. Refuse to be trained to take over the reigns of society.
Like Hallowe'en, it is all a state of mind.
Pick the scariest costume
^2-^_
Pro-Lifers threaten basic freedoms with stance
By SHERI DEKOVEN
The freedom to choose or the
morality of Pro-Life? Instead of
clouding the issue of the right to
abortion with emotional slogans it
is time to examine the beliefs that
such organizations as Pro-Life
hold, and their implications in our
society.
Pro-Life, an organization supposedly solely dedicated to the protection of the unborn child, is alive
on campus. Through their persistent efforts they aim to halt the
availability of abortion in Canada.
However, the organization is not
merely debating an issue of moral
justice. The implications contain
more disturbing aspects which in-
perspectives
elude the basic  far-right doctrine
from which they operate.
Pro-Life is only the educational
branch of a much larger organization which encompasses Birthright,
a group of volunteers who provide
counselling to expectant mothers,
and the B.C. Coalition for Life, a
political faction. These groups form
the British Columbian section
under the general direction of
Canada-wide Allieance for Life and
Coalition for Life.
after twenty weeks of pregnancy
unless the woman's life is in danger.
During the stage of pregnancy when
abortions are allowed, the medical
term, embryo, is used for this
potential life.
Neither the medical nor the
theological professions have
managed to come to a consensus on
when the fetus should be considered
a human life. Even biological data
is interpreted according to the
morality of the interpreter. It must
be recognized that this issue,
thought by some to be the deciding
factor in the question of the legality
of abortion, is a question of personal faith and values. It must be
decided individually and not
through legislation, especially when
no consensus can be reached.
Still, anti-abortionists continue
to argue that a fetus has no say and
therefore must be protected. What
they seem to ignore is that by making abortion illegal, they will, in effect, be taking away the individual
right of every woman to make this
moral decision herself.
A pregnancy is not merely nine
months of a woman's life, and a
baby, carried to full term, is not
just given up for adoption without
any effect on the woman, as these
Pro-Life groups suggest. For the
full term of pregnancy, the fetus is
The strategy of such groups — in
effort to erase any loopholes in the
present criminal code dealing with
abortion — is to approach the issue
on emotional grounds. They attempt to influence a person's sense
of injustice with pictures of fully
formed fetuses, babies dumped in
garbage cans and literature relating
the ordeals of aborting a "human
life", which, they claim, leads to
the antagonizing guilt feelings akin
to murder.
In order to make full impact,
these misleading photographs, obviously of fetuses past the first
trimester, are chosen for their shock
value. In Canada and the United
States, abortions are not performed
completely dependent on the
female's life support system. They
are inextricably connected by the
placenta and umbilical cord and no
amount of morality can ignore the
obvious physical and emotional affects of pregnancy on the woman.
Too often, in the search of a
moral stand, the respect for the
quality of hyman life is put aside,
ignored as the selfish preoccupation
of our society with the "easy life."
Making abortion illegal places the
importance of an unborn child over
that of an already productive
human being and refuses to allow
for the emotional and physical well
being of every fertile female. We, as
women, must pay the price of any
sexual irresponsibility, in a time
where birth control is neither safe
nor even uniformly available and
never 100 per cent effective.
The demand for abortion has
been present throughout history
and it's demand will continue,
despite Pro-Lifers. Without the
availability of legal abortion
however, women are forced to
resort to dangerous self-induced
methods or medical procedures carried out in improper conditions.
Those who are rich enough will
always be able to afford decent
medical attention, even if it means
having to leave the country for an
operation. It is the poor who suffer,
who are forced to back-street abortionists or even attempt to induce
abortions themselves. In Mexico,
where legal abortions are difficult
to obtain, four out of five beds at
the Woman's Hospital in Mexico
City are filled with women suffering
complications as a result of illegal
abortions (according to Time, April
6, 1981). Restrictive abortion laws
are discriminatory against fertile
women in general and against the
poor in particular.
These issues, however, are clouded over by the emotional stance of
too many organizations. Individuals become involved with
Pro-Life groups as a result of a
strong sense of morality, but they
tend to overlook the basic doctrines
of such groups. They are spurred on
by the idea of moral justice to the
unborn and dismiss the implications
that these beliefs hold for the
already born.
We are facing the underlying
danger with right-to-life groups,
both in the United States and in
Canada, for in both countries the
political connections are similar.
That is, their association with our
society's right-wing fringe of our
society. Ultra-right political groups
in the U.S., such as those advocating capital punishment and
legalized discrimination against
homosexuals, are dependent on
members of these right-to-life
groups for fund-raising and campaign support. In return, politicians
promise the total abolition of existing abortion laws and other fundamental changes in constitutional
freedom. In effect, these political
parties are manipulating single issue
voters in order to gain support.
In Canada this rightist faction is
represented by several groups under
the Pro-family Coalition, including
Campaign Life, Positive parents
and Canadians for Family and
Freedom. These groups were
especially active last year in attempting to get God and fetal rights included in the new constitution, forcing   their   personal   moral   and
religious values on the population.
Presently, legal action is being
taken in Ottawa that could lead to
declaring invalid the existing law
concerning abortion. If successful,
even the limited availability of abortion in Canada will become illegal
unless the actual life of the mother
is endangered. No other circumstances will be considered adequate reason for the operation.
Such organizations as Pro-Life
are not merely concerned with the
protection of the unborn, for they
are politically involved in the denial
of   a   woman's   right   to   proper
medical care. As a potentially
strong politcal base for the extreme-
right, they threaten the freedom of
all Canadians who do not hold
similar moral principles.
It is time that we realize the implications underlying the abortion
question and recognize the beliefs
of such groups for what they really
stand for, that is, the belief in the
undemocratic and dictatorial control of over half the population.
Perspectives is a column of opinion open to the university student,
faculty and staff. Sheri Dekoven is
an Arts 3 student.
Letters
'Really great trek, Cliff9
It was my privilege as chair of the
Fairview committee of the university Alumni Association to serve as
guest M.C. at the founder's dinner
held as a tribute to the classes of
1916-29 by the Alma Mater Society
on Friday, Oct. 22.
It was an unforgetable evening.
More than 100 students and faculty
of the Fairview years recalled the
memories of old friendships and
conveyed to their undergraduate
hosts a sense of the spirit of '22
which has given the university its
true meaning.
The founders enjoyed the address
by Pierre Berton, distinguished
author and broadcaster, graduate
of '41 and Tuesday editor of The
Ubyssey 1940-41, and by the
chancellor, the Honorable J. V.
Clyne, a member of the Great Trek
campaign committee.
The presentation of the Great
Trekker award by Alma Mater
Society president Dave Frank, to
Nestor Korchinsky was to the
founders a highlight of the evening.
It kindled within the reflections of
the abiding loyalty among faculty
and students from sixty years ago in
their undergraduate days.
Those who attended the dinner
have asked that I convey to the
AMS and undergraduate body their
deep sense of gratitude for the
many courtesies extended to them
on this occasion.
I should also like to convey my
personal thanks to Cliff Stewart,
and to commend his Trek committee for its energy and initiative in
planning and organizing Trek '82."
Blythe Eagles
Fairview committee chair
UBC alumni association
r
THE UBYSSEY
October 29, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office next door.
Craig Brooks is taller than Kelley Jo Burke who has longer hair than Arnold Hestrom who is a
quicker typist than Scott Pittendrigh. Peter Berlin talks more than Allen Main who is stronger
than Muriel Draaisma who attends more classes than Brian Jones. Shaffin Shariff is younger
than Rene Saloman who has has bigger feet than Rick Katz who runs faster than Kerry
Regier. Alison Hoehns has more sarcastic eyes than Victor Wong who talks slower then Neil
Lucente who combs his hair better than Robert Beynon who drives more safely than Lisa
Morry. As for Craig Yuill. he left last year. But in the gret Ubyssey collective all of them are
equal. Friday, October 29,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Letters
'Watch out for sitting Rodin's history lesson'
When someone offers you a
"history lesson" on the modern
Middle East, watch out! Cary
Rodin's letter (Oct. 15) is untrustworthy in several respects, and
I hope your readers will treat it with
caution. Let me give one example of
its many distortions.
were told to leave by other Arab nations ..." This claim, as old as the
state of Israel, has been challenged,
however. Independent investigators
such as British journalist Erskine
Childers have found no record of
any such radio broadcasts from
Arab capitals (see The Other Ex-
ne matm * mum
»itwwr-*»iLy''<)rHj
ISKML1 TUUJOUT'
Rodin, seconded by Heather
Glassman, denies that the Palestinians were "kicked out of their own
country": Glassman adds, "They
odus in Spectator, May 12, 1961),
although there is some evidence of
Arabic language signals to that effect emanating from Tel Aviv.
Why, then, did they leave? A
considerable body of opinion, even
within Zionist circles, holds that
they were expelled. Menachem
Begin himself defends the massacre
of 250 Palestinians at Deir Yassir
by his troops during the 1947-48
fighting on the grounds that it terrorized the Arab civilian population
into leaving: "The massacre was
not only justified, but there would
not have been a state of Israel
without the victory (sic) at Deir
Yassin" (The Revolt). And Jewish
Newsletter of New York how "we,
Jews, forced the Arabs to leave
cities and villages . . .some of them
were driven out by force of arms;
others were made to leave by deceit,
lying, and false promises" (Feb. 9,
1959). People who choose not to
believe Childers (The Road To
Suez, p. 94n.) or Anthony Nutting
(The Arabs, p. 336) on this point
cannot so easily discount Zionist
witnesses.
I have also heard Palestinians
testify that British sound trucks
came through Arab villages warning
that there would be fighting, and
urging civilians to leave until it was
over. It is difficult for outsiders to
know how much credence to give to
each of these scenarios, of course;
the point is that Rodin and
Glassman are oversimplifying a
problematical piece of history by
repeating old propaganda. And
what if the Palestinians did leave of
their own accord? Article 13-2 of
the Universal Dealaration of
Human    Rights    states    that
"Everyone has the right to leave
any country, including his own, and
to return to his country."
"Their  own  country,"   by  the
way, the one they left, is not Jordan, but the occupied West Bank.
Dick Bevis
english dept.
Tieleperson's reply as
distorted as Tyrant's
Physicians in bed with peaceniks
I wish to correct any misapprehensions your readers may have
gained from Jim Christian's letter
(Protestors lose sight of goals, Oct.
22).
Christian criticizes Physicians for
Social Responsibility for "class
snobbery" and would have it that
we "edged out" student and other
groups from participation in a
seminar on disarmament in
February.
Fortunately, nothing could be
further from the truth. Indeed, our
organization is cooperating with
UBC Student for Peace and Mutual
Disarmament, Science for Peace,
and Educators for Nuclear Disar
mament in preparation for an open
symposium on nuclear disarmament to be held at UBC in the IRC
on March 5-6, 1983. At the planning stage, we enjoyed particularly
close liason with the student group,
and we expect to continue to work
closely as the symposium approaches.
PSR is neither wealthy, powerful,
nor elitist. In B.C., we number
about 200 doctors and others trying
to use our special professional
credibility to help spread the facts
about nuclear warfare to the public,
government, anyone who will
listen. Our general meetings are
open to the public — the next one in
November will feature the referendum on disarmament.
We welcome help in preparing
for the March symposium. Anyone
wishing to learn more about Physicians for Social Responsibility may
write to us at P.O. Box 35426, Station E, Vancouver, B.C., V6M
4G8.
T. L. Perry Jr.
B.Sc. 1973
health sciences centre hospital
Being a regular reader of The
Ubyssey, I do not feel that the letter
written by Bill Tieleman (Rag is
Radical, Sort of, Oct. 22) should
pass without comment. Being
neither a Liberal, nor an acquaintance of Brent Tynan, I think that
the view of an outsider might prove
useful.
Firstly upon reading Mr.
Tieleman's letter, I could not help
but notice that he resorts to the
same kind of distortion he accuses
Mr. Tynan of engaging in. Rather
than provide an objective critique
of Brent Tynan's words, Bill
Tieleman resorts to name calling
and political labelling — both of
•which had nothing to do with the
letter written by Brent — in an attempt to cloak the words of Mr.
Tynan in the stigma attached to the
Liberal Party. "As for "hurling
stones and screaming abuse at the
system," I'm sure that Brent Tynan
meant for the sentence to be taken
figuratively and not literally. After
all, how will any sort of protest or
plea for funds associated with the
Great Trek, bearing in mind media
attention and our provice's present
economic situation, be viewed in
the eyes of the general public? How
would such a protest be viewed in
the    eyes    of
unemployed?
the    growing
As for the burning question of
"trendy radicalism," I suggest that
Ubyssey take a random sample of
all students and ask them: 1. Do
you agree with the general content
of editorials of The Ubyssey? 2. If
not, would you place yourself to the
political right or left of The
Ubyssey? I'm sure the results of
such a survey would prove interesting to students of all political
stripes.
Finally, I personally believe that
the Great Trek is an opportunity for
the students of UBC to express our
thanks to the public of B.C. for the
fine, world class institution we do
have. We should take pride in the
fact that in regards to the combination of offered programs, academic
freedom, accessibility and incredible beauty, I doubt that UBC has a
parallel on the face of this planet.
The Trek is a celebration of the
wealth with which we are so
forunately endowed. It is for this
reason that instead of clamouring
for more, once, just once, let's be
thankful.
John O'Fee
commerce 2
Original corrective not irregular
Working in libraries
Your article on employment prospects for graduates (Friday Oct.
15) contained a story about
Beverley Scott, a librarian who
because she was unable to find
work in a library in Vancouver has
established herself as a free-lance
provider of information. Your
readers may be interested to know
the actual situation of the graduates
of the UBC school of librarianship.
Fifty out of 60 of the spring 1982
graduates are employed at the present time. Of the remaining 10, four
are not actively looking for work at
the moment. This is not to say that
the employed 50 are all working at
full-time permament jobs in the
locations or the libraries of their
choice. However, that so many are
working at all is impressive, considering the current state of the
economy, which has had a heavy
impact on public services of all
kinds.
Anyone who attempts to find
work as a librarian in Vancouver
right now will encounter difficulty,
but I suspect the same is true for individuals in many other professions, such as engineering, architecture and social work.
Basil Stuart-Stubbs
school of librarianship director
Move over Maranatha
I think it important to bring to
the attention of the student body
the impending danger of an insidious cult.
Posing as an "alternative" to
more orthodox religion and
philosophical cultdom, the Anus
Mundi Society is in fact no more
than a scurrilous mockery of faith,
morality and honesty. It bases
itself, as a dogma, upon contradictions and dirty words, the majority
of this cult's maxims are phrased in
such a gutter fashion that I dare not
disgrace this letter with them.
The point of this warning is simply to cut the threat at the root. All
too soon the press agents of Anus
Mundi will sweep this campus with
their posters and their preaching.
But take heed, students; it is a
fraud. As well as utter corruption,
these people are after money. Indeed, they believe that a cult professing a corruptive morality will
breed dollars like rabbits.
It is no accident that the initials
of this cult are AMS, for by this
means the agents of Anus Mundi
may pass themselves off as
members of our own Alma Mater
Society.
It is enough to beware; this is no
cult, it is a rip-off. Students may be
corrupt enough to enjoy the
hedonism of this cult, but they
should be smart enough not to
allow its organizers to walk away
with student monies.
Michael Kernaghan
arts 2
In response to the letter sent tc
The Ubyssey last Friday by Steven
Harris, the poll supervisor foi
voting stations in SUB and
Sedgewick, my letter of Tuesday,
October 19 contained no errors.
Poll clerks did campaign while on
duty at polling stations.
This has been confirmed by SAC
Okay, okay
That article Real Who-down
(Oct. 22) showed to me once again
that your music articles are a real
weakness. It really bugs me when
you go around spewing off at the
mouth about how The Who did a
"fantastic version of the Beatles'
Twist and Shout". This sloppy
reporting makes me sick, for any
idiot past the age of four knows
that Twist and Shout is not a
Beatles song. It is pretty common
knowledge that Twist and Shout
was written by the Isley Bros and
was originally recorded by the
Isley Bros. Although the Beatles
did cut this song (in an inferior
version), the Isley Bros, should
still get the credit for it.
I would also like to say that the
Beatles recorded one of the worst
versions of it. Let's fact it, the
Astronauts of Boulder, Colorado,
did a way raunchier and superior
version of this song. (I guess I will
get to the point of this letter). I
think that if your music writers
cannot even get facts straight
about what group did what hit
record first, how can anyone trust
or value their opinions about any
musical commentary?
Benj Harrison
arts 3
and Student's Council as exemplified in the Council Briefs section of The Ubyssey (Oct. 22) in
which your letter appeared. It states
that "poll clerks . . . campaigned
. . .". It is irrelevant who the campaigning was for because such actions hurt all candidates if the election has to be rerun. My letter's
purpose was not to criticize an election for the director of administration, how a group supported a candidate, or the candidates
themsleves; it's sole purpose was to
impress on all students the great
responsibility and effect poll clerks
can have on the outcome of an election.
Yes, I recognize that a great
number of other irregularities occured during this past election (and
these are presently before student's
court), but none of these should
cloud the fact that electioneering
Raygun response
I was singularly disturbed by the
lack of balance in your disarmament coverage (Oct. 26).
As free thinking people everywhere, but mostly in the West
know, a rational, cool approach to
nuclear weapons is always desirable
to the kind of emotional horror
stories depicted in your special edition Tuesday.
To all British Columbians and
Canadians, I offer this rueful bit of
American common sense advice;
Take the cruise, or I'll dump acid
rain all over you.
With honest intentions, your
American friend.
Ronald Reagan
U.S. president
(with help from Caspar)
was indeed carried on by poll
clerks. The particular confirmed occasions brought to my own attention involved clerks at SUB,
Sedgewick, and Totem Park.
They are confirmed. Mr. Harris,
if you were really "very surprised"
to learn that some of your clerks
electioneered, all that I can say is,
why didn't you know this?
Neil Smith
AMS elections committee
Pit protest
Open letter to AMS president
Dave Frank:
We vehemently protest the
recent Pit policy of forcing
students to pay a cover charge
of approximately $3.00 on
Thursday and Friday nights for
the "privilege" of quaffing
cool ones in "our" student
funded pub. We draw your attention to the word "student"
in student pub. We can see any
of these bands downtown at a
commercial venue, so why
should we be forced to pay a
cover to drink at our Pit?
Thus,   we  strongly  suggest
you immediately change this
inane  policy.   We  are  being
screwed as it is in the beer price
department since you persist in
serving that Cheap Old Fort
shit so we hope you take the
time to bring this matter up
with the appropriate people.
Karen Perry
chemical engineering 4
and 25 others Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 29,1982
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Gov't shuns health grants
By LISA MORRY
The Health Ministry is unsympathetic to the needs of students
and won't make more funds
available for the health science bursary program, a UBC health science
director charged Thursday.
Christopher Lovelace, health
ministry director for policy, planning, and legislation told health
science officials there are no more
funds, said Dr. Gordon Page.
"There was no notice of this
shortfall. Students were caught off
guard," said Page, "Lovelace was
quite unsympathetic to the
student's needs."
UBC received about $250,000 but
needs that much again to adequately fund the program which experienced a surge in applications
this fall. About 90 students applied
for funds at UBC.
But the funding shortage isn't
restricted to UBC. At the B.C. Institute of Technology 60 students
are affected. B.C.I.T. needed
$110,000 and received only $60,000.
The health ministry funds the
program but the ministry of education distributes the funds.
In past years all the money wasn't
used up. This year the government
increased funds but not enough to
meet student applications. The
money ran out early leaving those
who applied last without aid.
Health ministry official Paul
Pallan, working under Lovelace
said "there is a problem because
there are more students due to the
recession."
NDP MLA Gary Lauk, said the
government was warned.
"We told them about more
students, they were warned — a
recession tends to bring about an increase in post secondary enrollment," Lauk said.
"The alternatives are hospital
beds   and   heart   operations   or
— charltts Campbell photo
UBC STARTLED architectural and psychological world by becoming first schitzophrenic pdst-second institution in Western Canada. Not to be outdone by McGill, which has simple split personality, UBC has fractured into
multiple personas. Arts faculty is now circulating petition to have name of the school changed from UBC to
Sybil.
Education minister ignores issues
By ARNOLD HESTROM
Canada's education ministers
sponsored a conference to discuss
education issues in the '80s with
students, faculty, and administrators Oct. 18.
But delegates from B.C. say the
conference structure and lack of
particiption by education ministers
suppressed communication rather
than improve it.
Alma Mater Society delegate
Margaret Copping said the only-
education minister to participate in
discussions was Saskatchewan's.
"For one working day, McGeer
(B.C.'s universities minister) was
out of the hotel" said Copping. "I
tried to get a hold of him at his
room but the hotel said he could
not be reached."
The conference, organized by the
Council of Education Ministers,
Canada, held for five days in
Toronto, brought delegates from
across the country to discuss institute governance, accessibility, the
relationship between higher education and working life, financing nd
"redeployment of resources."
The CEMC modelled the conference after a similar Organization
for Economic Development and
Cooperation conference held in
Paris.
"I'm not really sure why they
organized the conference," said
Canadian Federation of Students —
Pacific chair Donna Morgan. "It
seems they did not want student and
faculty involvement."
The conference was divided into
specific sessions where panelists
were questioned by reactors.
Morgan said one reactor represen
ting students wasn't even a student.
Robin Williams, former B.C. Institute of Technology student executive, is now a special assistant in
B.C. premier Bill Bennett's office,
said Morgan.
"What is really depressing, is he
(Williams) got his way to the conference payed by the government.
The real representatives had to pay
for themselves. They payed for a
non-student to go and represent
students," said Morgan.
Throughout the conference
delegates complained about
manipulation by the organizers said
Morgan.
Ontario education ministry officials removed a CFS leaflet which
criticized the conference from
chairs before the final banquet
guests arrived, Morgan said.
Also at the final banquet speaker
Roger Gaudry spoke in favor of
closing universities, attacked
democracy in Quebec universities,
and called for the abolition of
tenure and made other controversial propositions. No time was
allocated for rebuttal.
Seventy people walked out in
protest during the speech Morgan
said.
CFS held alternative discussions
and press conferences during the
conference and established contacts
with faculty and professional
associations said Morgan.
In her closing remarks, Ontario
education minister Betty Stevenson
ignored education issues and said if
universities weren't responsible,
they would be made to be, said
Copping.
AMS referendum called
By CRAIG BROOKS
Students will vote in November
on increasing their Alma Mater
Society fees $20 per year.
Student council unanimously approved Wednesday sending a
building arid operating fund increase referendum to students Nov.
15 to 19.
Council Briefs
Vice president Cliff Stewart told
council he received a petition signed
by more than 1,000 students calling
for the question to be put to
referendum. Under AMS by-laws, a
petition of 500 or more students requires council to hold a referendum
on the issue requested.
The question asks students to
allocate money for three areas:
• A three dollar increase to the
current $1.50 intramural support
fee;
• An increase in the current
$10.50 AMS operating fee of $2.50
per year. Funds will be used for
club grants, student council, media,
and the expansion of services;
• Fifteen dollars per year for
specific capital purchases or construction. Included is the development of 16,000 sq. ft. in SUB, purchase of the land under the society's
Whistler cabin, saving the horse
barn in B-lot by converting it to a
large bookable area, athletic
facilities, a parkade opposite SUB,
See page 15; SUB
students," said Josie Bergman,
Health ministry research officer.
"At this point all the budgeted
money has been used up, there is no
more money now," said Pallan,
we have no authority to put money
in."
"That's no way to run a grant
program. The government's attitude to post secondary education
is Calvinistic and narrow minded,"
Lauk said. Dan Worsley UBC
Awards office, assistant director
said "I'm wondering if there is
much hope. The awards office has
done ail it can."
"So far we've had no luck," said
Worsley. "We wrote and received
the reply — there is no more funding. Our second letter, in stronger
language, received no reply."
Page said "all we can do is try
and pressure them. Within the
ministry of health $250,000 is not
much, they're budgeted in the
billions."
Students who applied for the
health science grant should have
received letters, which were sent
four weeks ago, advising whether
the grants will be received.
The grants were allocated on a
first come, first served basis. As a
result late applications or those processed slowly won't get funds.
The deadline for grant applications is 10 weeks before the end of
classes, about Feb. 20. There is a
pro-rated assessment for applications received after Thanksgiving.
Union ratifies
new contract
By NEIL LUCENTE
The Association of University
and College Employees union voted
in favor of ratifying its contract
with the university the union said
Thursday.
But the union membership
ratified the contract despite a
recommendation from the
negotiating team that it be rejected.
"It's certainly no surprise that
the contract was ratified but there
are some serious problems" said
negotiating committee member
Nancy Weiggs. The new job
descriptions will take away some
seniority benefits, and allow less
leave of absence time, she said.
The new contract, approved by
secret ballot, restructured the current job calssification system, and
did not include the 12 month leave
of absence clause which the union
was negotiating for. Instead the
union accepted the university's proposal for a six month leave period.
The contract gives the union an
average wage increase of 8.1 per
cent.
The negotiating committee
recommended rejection because the
settlement eroded benefits.
The unions has been without a
contract since March 1982.
University   employee   relations
director Bob Grant said, "We're
very pleased because we gave as
much as we could considering the
economic situation."
Under the new contract the
university gained control of leave of
absence which will save training
cost and time for faculties, Grant
said.
Final approval for the 8.1 percent
average wage increase will be forwarded to Compensation Staboliza-
tion Program commissioner Ed
Peck.
"The CSP will buy it," said
Grant.
The CSP has so far approved
wage increases for educational institutes ranging from 7.94 percent
to 11.81 percent. Camosun College
support staff received 7.94 and the
College's faculty received approval
for a 12 per cent increase.
Jo-Anne Chilton, field development secretary in the faculty of
education, voted no on the university's contract package because the
new job classifications are unfair
for some occupations.
"Job classification should be
looked into more specifically. I did
not like the wage settlement because
other unions are doing better and I
think that we should be on par with
what the other unions on campus
received," Chilton said.
Called to account
By BRIAN JONES
Elespite having laid off articling students, Vancouver accounting
firms are still recruiting UBC accounting students, but Canada
Employment Centre staff workers are not divulging this information,
mation.
The CEC simply "facilitates recruitment," CEC counsellor Pat
Brand said Thursday.
"They (students) really don't need us as forecasters of the
economy. Everybody knows what it's like," Brand said. "It's not a
question that we ask students, or that they ask us."
"We're not here to investigate every firm to find out what their
hiring practices are."
"It is safe to say that the accounting firms did tell us that the
number (of accounting students) they'd hire would be down from
last year," Brand said.
The number of students hired would probably decrease by 50 per
cent relative to last year, he said.
Peter Norwood, Deloitte Haskins & Sell's manager, said last week
his firm has interviewed 80 UBC accounting students.
"We have determined that our needs for the year are 10 to 14 new
students, which is the same number we looked for last year," he said.
Only one of the people laid off was in first year of the two year articling program, said Norwood. "I think there would be an inconsistency if we were laying off first year people," he said.
"All those people who we laid off had completed their term of service, so they are still eligible to write their exams."
In addition to the first year student, six other articling students
have been laid off by Deloitte Haskins. The first has a total staff of
140, including 50 articling students.
"If the economy had been better the layoffs might not have been
triggered at all," he said.
"There was one that was a competency problem. The others had
academic problems," said Norwood. Page 14
Hutu.
UBC Wind Symphony: classical, 8 p.m.,
Oct. 29, Old Auditorium.
Wednesday noon-hour concert, 12:30 p.m.,
Nov. 3, Recital Hall.
UBC Contemporary Players,  12:30 p.m.,
Nov. 4, Recital Hall.
UBC Wind Chamber Ensembles, 8 p.m.,
Nov. 4, Recital Hall.
UBC Chamber singers: 12:30 and 8 p.m.,
Nov. 5, Recital Hall.
Slim Whitman: country /western, 8 p.m.,
Nov. 3, Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
I&I: reggae, 7 and 10 p.m., Oct. 30, Soft
Rock Cafe. Tickets: $7 advance, $8 at door.
The B-sides: Halloween, Oct. 31. Tickets $6
advance.
Valdy: rock, 7 and 10 p.m., Nov. 5, Soft
Rock Cafe. Tickets $6 advance, $7 door.
Innocent  Bystander and Thunder:  rock,
Backstage, to Oct. 30.
Bowser Moon: rock,  special  guests The
Vacationers. To Oct. 30, at Gators.
English and Natvig: experimental, 8 p.m.,
Nov. 4, SFU Theatre.
HpVl£6
A Film Tribute to Steve Podborksi: 7 and
9:30 p.m., Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Nov. 1.
Towne Cinema (919 Granville, 681-1372):
Australian film series: Oct. 29-31: Breaker
Morant; Nov. 1-2: My Brilliant Career; Nov.
3-4: The Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith. All
shows 7:15, 9:30 p.m. $3.50 with AMS card.
Cinema 16: Man of Iron. 6, 9 p.m. Nov. 1
SUB auditorium.
Pacific Cinematheque: The Tempest. Oct.
31, 7:30 and 9:30. Tickets $3.
SUB Films: Oct. 30-31: Ghost Story, 7 and
9:30 p.m. Nov. 4-7: Serial, 7:00 p.m., S.O.B.,
9:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th & Arbutus, 738-6311):
Diner plus American Graffiti, Oct. 29-30 at 7
and 9 p.m., Oct. 31-Nov. 4 at 7:30 and 9:30
p.m. Tickets $4 adults.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th & Commercial, 253-5455): Roman Polanski triple bill,
Oct. 29-31 starts 7 p.m. Luchino Visconti
tribute: Nov. 1-7 at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (3321 Main, 872-2124); Andy
Warhol's Frankenstein, Oct. 29-31 at 7:30 and
9:30; Absence of Malice Nov. 1-2 at 7:30; The
Stunt Man Nov. 1-2 at 9:45; Peppermint Soda
Nov. 3-4 at 7:30; Cocktail Molotov Nov. 3-4
at 9:15.
White Boys, contemporary comedy of manners, opens Nov. 5, Vancouver Playhouse, 8
p.m. Tickets at VTC and Info Centres.
Joey: a look at the last Father of Confederation, Joey Smallwood. To Oct. 30 at the
Vancouver East Cultural Centre at 8:30.
Let My People Come, a sexual musical at
the Century Plaza Hotel Cabaret, 1015 Burrard, at 8 & 10:30 tonight. Tickets at VTC
outlets.
Crimes of the Heart, 1981 Pulitzer prize winner, a Broadway Comedy, at the Arts Club
Theatre, Granville Island, at 8:30 tonight.
Talking Dirty, another sexual satire, at the
Arts Club, Seymour St., 8:30 tonight; tickets
at VTC, Eaton's and Woodward's.
A Theatre Sports Hamlet, self explanatory
title, at City Stage, 751 Thurlow St., at 8:30.
Snoopy, a Peanuts Gang Broadway
musical, at Presentation House, North Van,
at 8:00 tonight.
The Wolf Boy, at Firehall Theatre, 280 E.
Cordova, at 8:30.
A Murder Is Announced, Agatha Christy
Mystery, at the Metro Theatre, 1370 S.W.
Marine, at 8:30 tonight.
*■— —m
CKUVTV
Hallowe'en costume contest with first prize trip
for two to Reno, 6:45 p.m. Call for reservations
876-1344 local 241, 180 West Second.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Pumpkin chase auto rally, 6:30 p.m., SUB loop.
Prizes: dash plaques, trophies, Keg dinner for
first prize. Costume for car and driver encouraged.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion, noon, International House, main
lounge.
HOME ECONOMICS WEEK
Masquerade ball, 8 p.m., SUB ballroom.
HOME ECONOMICS WEEK
Pumpkin carving contest and cookie sale, noon,
SUB plaza.
STUDENT FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Disarmament Week 1982: Jim and Shelley
Douglas, founders of Ground Zero Center for
Non-Violent Action and leaders of Anti-Trident
protest, noon, Angus 104.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Disarmament Week 1982: Multi media display on
Cruise  missile and  Bomb  Shelter Vigil,   all day.
- SJB Piaza
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's music room.
BIOCHEMISTRY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, discussion on seminars and
past exams, new members welcome, noon, IRC
G53
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
CSA gym night, badminton, basketball and
volleyball, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Osborne gym B.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Hallowe'en party, licensed, music, prize for
best costume, admission free, 8 p.m.. International House.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, new club members welcome,
noon, SUB 216G.
DRAL ROB: ARTS OF THE
THEATRE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Informal gathering of oral readings: poem, play,
prose, essay or class presentation. Everyone
welcome, noon. Brock 302.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men vs. Meralomas, 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial
gym.
CANADIANS AGAINST THE CRUISE
Disarmament workshop and film series, 7 p.m.,
Robson Square cinema.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Octoberfest/costume ball, 8 p.m., Lutheran
Campus centre. Happy hour, cheap
refreshments, 4:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, 2:30 p.m., SUB 224.
STAGE EIREANN
Many Young Men of Twenty by John B. Keane,
8:30 p.m., James Cowan theatre, 6460 Gilpin
St., Burnaby.
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
General meeting, 4:30 p.m., SUB 206.
SATURDAY
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
B.C. Safety Council novice motorcycle training
course, 8 a.m., SUB 206. Call 946-1161 to register.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Hallowe'en boogie, tickets available at CBP, 8
p.m., St. Marie's partyroom.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Masquerade ball, 8 p.m.. Hotel Georgia.
ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY/
AMS PROGRAMS
Hallowe'en ball, featuring B-sides and David Raven and the Escorts, 8 p.m., Armories. Prizes for
best costumes. Tickets at AMS box office.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men vs. Stammers, 8 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Men vs league leading Victoria Vikings, 2 p.m.,
Wolfson field. Women vs. Western Washington,
11 a.m., Wolfson field.
UBC SKI CLUB
Hallowe'en party and apple bobbing, 8 p.m.,
Whistler cabin. Dancing on the mantlepiece,
sign up at ski club office for a bunk.
UBYSSEY
Two hallowe'en parties in one night. See office
board for details.
SUNDAY
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Ride to Mt. Baker, Washington, 10:30 a.m.,
meet in SUB cafeteria.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Game against Simon Fraser University, 10 p.m..
Aquatic centre.
CYCLING CLUB
Hallowe'en ride, bring a costume, 9 a.m., between SUB and Aquatic centre.
MONDAY
UKRAINIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
General meeting, new members welcome, SUB
119.
ECUMENICAL WOMEN'S RESOURCE CENTRE
(VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY)
Service honoring women saints, 8 p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
Mayor Mike Harcourt speaks, noon, SUB 212.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Choir practice. 8:30 p.m.. International House.
Chinese painting class, 3:30-5:30 p.m. SUB 211.
Mandarin class, noon-1:30 p.m., SUB 111.
NOON CLUB
Meeting to discuss why noon is really 12:30 at
UBC, noon, SUB 256.
UBYSSEY
Would our long-lost staff please show up and
help put out this paper, noon, SUB 241k.
TUESDAY
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC vs Chinese national team in battle of the
decade, 7 p.m., Thunderbird arena. The teams
last met in 1973 when UBC went to China.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Ordinary people, 7 p.m., SUB auditorium. $1
AMS, $3 general.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon-2 p.m., SUB 111.
PRACTICAL WRITING LECTURE SERIES
M. Bernadet Ratsoy, vice-president of St. Paul's
hospital nursing speaks on Writing for Goal
Achievement, noon. Computer Science 201.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Associate medicine dean Alexander Boggie
speaks on med school admission requirements.
Bring membership cards, noon, IRC 6. Note
room change.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB .
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Darn fine Eucharist with darn fine preacher
George Hermanson, noon, Lutheran Campus
centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner program, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
WEDNESDAY
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Vs. B.C. Olympics, 8 p.m., War Memorial gym.
COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Dinner  followed  by  The  Meaning  of   Pacifism
with William Klassen, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus
centre
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meet'-g    rocn, SUB  V7
THURSDAY
Friday, October 29, 1982
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Tour of cancer research institute. Meet by 12:30
at IRC GX. All members signed up welcome.
THEATRE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Free   noon-hour   discussion   on   B.C.   film
classification and censorship with guest speaker
Mary    Lou    McCausland,    noon,    Dorothy
Somorset studio (behind Freddy Wood).
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
General meeting, Skagit Valley controversy and
slide show with Tom Perry, noon, Angus 225.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
TROTSKYIST CLUB
Literature table, drop by for Marxist literature
discussion, noon, SUB.
Imperialism and the current theory of permanent
revolution, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
MATH CLUB
Recreational ma thematic, 1:30 p.m., Math 102.
All interested welcome.
TWEEN CLASSES
Reminder that deadline is 12:45 p.m. the day
before publication.
It's one of those years for people
who like Hallowe'en parties.
Because the bewitched day falls on a
Sunday this year, parties and events
are being held all weekend.
On Friday, CKVU is holding a
costume contest at 180 West Second,
while the sports car club hold a pumpkin chase auto rally at SUB loop at
6:30 p.m. The Home Wreckers have a
masquerade ball in SUB ballroom at 8
p.m., at the same time as International
house holds theirs.
For those athletically inclined, the
pumpkin fun run happens Friday at
noon, the Lutherans have an Octoberfest and costume ball, an ail in one
October party package at 8 p.m. in the
Lutheran centre.
Saturday sees the Newmans
(Catholics) have their party, while the
Chinese Varsity club gets the Hotel
Georgia for theirs. Perhaps the biggest
party of the weekend will be in the UBC
armouries, where the engineers and
AMS combine for a rally good time.
David Raven and the B-Sides will be
there to show you their magic.
But even better is The Ubyssey parties Saturday night. Always believers in
doing things right, the paper's staff
scheduled two parties for the same
night.
And on Sunday, there's a costumed
bicycle ride. Sunday night is free for
trick or treating around campus. Don't
take any extra-strength Tylenol capsules. ^
The British Columbia Film Industry Association will be continuing
its Screen Performer series at the Varsity theatre on Saturday at 1 p.m., with
Gordon Pinsent speaking on Versatility:
the Actor's Key to Success. Tickets:
$12 for individual seminars every Saturday, or $60 for a series pass. Tickets are
available from Vancouver Ticket Centre
outlets and at the door. Next week's
seminar will be on A Close-up on Stardom, with Guest Margot Kidder (Sup-
perman I and II). Series continues to
Nov. 27.
FM 101.9 on air, 100.1 on cable
Playlist Show
Saturdays at 3:30 p.m. (news time)
Noel Baker counts down CITR's top 40
records, including the latest from
Grandmaster Flash, The Pretenders,
The Psychedelic Furs, Images in Vogue,
Kate Bush, Romeo Void, Trio, Iggy
Pop, The Gun Club and Peter Gabriel.
Mini Concerts
Music from past and present with
commentary on one band for about 30
minutes. Monday through Saturday, 12
and 8 p.m.
Final Vinyl
An album played in its entirety. Monday — Jazz, Tuesday and Wednesday
— new album, Thursday — import
album, Friday — neglected album,
Saturday — classic album, Sunday,
CITR News Menu
Every weekday .  . .
8 a.m. Wake-Up Report; 9 a.m.
Breakfast Report; 1 p.m. Lunch Report;
Afternoon Breaks with News at 3:30
p.m. and Sports at 4:30 p.m.; 6 p.m.
Dinner Report — including the'follow-
ing After Dinner Portions: Birds' Eye
View (reviews past weekend's UBC
sports actio on Monday; InSight
(analysis and editorials) on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday; UBC Capsule (reviews the week's UBC news
events) and 'Birds Eye View (previews
the weekend's UBC sports action) on
Friday.
All reports come complete with news
and sports portions (covering both campus and real world items), along with
the weather forecast.
Doug Richards Magazine every Sunday at 6 p.m.
Sports
Live play-by-play broadcasts . . .
WIFL bowl: UBC Thunderbirds vs
Manitoba Bisons in the league championship at Thunderbird stadium on Friday Nov. 5. Pre-game warm-up at 7:45
p.m., play-by-play at 8 p.m. Bring your
radio to the game.
Other shows . . .
Sports Unlimited: every Wednesday
at 10:30 a.m.
At UBC
Everyday . . .
UBC announcements at 8:40 a.m.,
12:40 p.m., 4:00 p.m. and 8:40 p.m.
UBC On Tap
Dispensing information and
knowledge tapped from UBC for community consumption, every Tuesday at
10:30 a.m. Nov. 2 the topic will be the
Pill
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:       AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c.
Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vancouver, B.C.   V6T 2A5
5 — Coming Events
BAHA'I FAITH — Informal discussion.
This week's topic: "The Names of God."
This Friday, 8 p.m., 5529 Univ. Blvd. Tel:
224-3596 Refreshments. All welcome.
FEMALE STUDENTS - Take a break. Ruby
Tuesday invites you to save 20% on fall
clothes till Halloween. Bring your card.
4476 West 10th Ave.
For SALE: Return ticket to Calgary.
Depart Dec. 15th, Return Jan. 2nd. $140
OBO before Nov. 10th, 263-3562.
70 FORD MAVERICK, red, 6 cyl., 2
door, 120 HP, one owner, city tested,
snows, runs well $1,545. lan 321-5138.
66 — Scandals
HURRY, hurry, hurry tonight's
your last chance to catch "THE SHINING,"
in SUB Aud. at 7:00 and 9:30. "GHOST
STORY" will be shown on Saturday & Sunday.
15 — Found
CUSO INFORMATION
SESSION
Tuesday, November 9, 1982
7:30 p.m.
in the Lower Lounge at
International House
Marlene    Green,    CUSO'S
Regional    Representative   in
Grenada    will    discuss    CUSO
postings in the Caribbean and
other regions. Slide-tape show:
CUSO in the Caribbean.
Everyone is welcome.
Further information:
228-4886
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
DEAN PETER BURNS
LAW — University of B.C.
THE STATE OF
PRIVACY IN CANADA:
WAS ORWELL RIGHT?
Dean Burns is an expert in criminal
law and the law of privacy.
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING,
SATURDAY. OCT. 30
at 8:15 P.M.
FOUND: At Arts 20 relay, 16th
and Pine. Red Burnaby Central Track and
Field jacket, 224-6792.
70 — Services
20 — Housing
SUITE FOR RENT. One bedroom
suitable for two students, $400/mo., util. &
cable incl., near VGH, 876-1445.
KITS BSMT. SUITE for rent. 3rd
& Collingwood, $550 per month. Phil,
669-2200 or Bob 731-2774.
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD-
beat the res blues at 224-9620.
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
STUDENT SERVICE. Research work done.
Ph. 685-1693.
70 — Services
80 — Tutoring
25 — Instruction
85 — Typing
30 — Jobs
35 — Lost
IF ANYONE FINDS a blue & beige
knapsack 87 or contents: text & exercise
books & beige Anarac jacket, please contact Susan 224-1470, reward.
$200 REWARD: Lost on Oct. 4. Two red/
brown and white Brittany Spaniels. 1
female. 1 male (needs special diet and
medicationl. lan or Joan Todd, 733-5385.
LOST, STOLEN or kidnapped: wallet.
Please return or send ransom note. Glenn,
224-4493.
40 — Messages
11 — For Sale — Private
1976 TR6, mint cond., stored winters, rust-
oroofed, 34 000 mi., w'extras. $7000
'3&4-6S94.
REWARD: Would person who witnessed
car with license #KDG 525 hit my 1973
white V.W. bug and left a note on my windshield on Oct. 18 in B-lot please contact
Dave at 222-2735.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1206. Word Processing Specialists for Theses, Term
Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING. 41st and Marine Dr. 266-5053.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING. Theses,
term papers, etc. $10 hr. Jeeva 876-5333.
TYPING. Special student rates. Filtness &
Cameron, public stenographers. 5670 Yew
(Kerrisdale). Ph. 266-6814
QUALITY TYPING - Excellent English
Usage, Prompt Service Reas. Rates.
Theses, Essays, Resumes, etc. 734-5874
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing, theses and
essays,   from   leqible  work.   738-6829  ten
a.m   to 9 d "'
$REWARD$
.id
anyone Friday, October 29,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
'U.S. lying' says ex-general
By BRIAN JONES
The American government is lying to the public about the relative
military strengths of the two superpowers, an ex-NATO general said
Thursday.
"The number of strategic
warheads of the U.S. has always
been considerably greater than the
number of strategic warheads of the
U.S.S.R.,"  Nino  Pasti told   100
people in Angus 104.
The U.S. government also
misleads people about the relative
amounts of funds spent on the
military, said Pasti. "The West
spends far more money on military
forces than the East. NATO has
always outspent the Warsaw Pact,"
he said.
"What is possible is that NATO,
and not the Warsaw Pact, may start
a conventional war," he said.
Pasti said he has been accused of
spreading Soviet propaganda, but
added his information comes from
U.S. government publications.
"You can't say that official
American sources support Soviet
propaganda," he said. "We are, in
Myths block women
By ANNE SHIELDS
Special to The Ubyssey
Social myths and patriarchy
hinder women's progress in the
business world, a Vancouver
clinical psychologist said Tuesday.
Dr. Naida Hyde told two dozen
women at a seminar on women in
managerial and professional careers
at Robson Square that many
women   feel   uncomfortable   with
Two bombed
Two UBC students spent 72
hours in a "bomb shelter" ihis
week to draw attention to the
dangers of nuclear buildup and
raise money for peace.
"The vigil was staged to tell people of the dangers of nuclear war
and that bomb shelters will not save
you in the event of nuclear
holocaust," said Evelyn Tischer,
grad studies 1, one of the shelter inhabitants.
Monday at 2 p.m., Tischer and
Jan Regan, arts 3, moved into the
eight by eight wooden box used to
symbolize the shelter. They emerged Thursday pleased with the
response their marathon drew.
"While we were in there we had a
lot of people come up and ask us
questions," said Regan.
People pledged about $200 to the
participants which will be used by
the UBC students for peace and
mututal disarmament to sponsor
films, speakers, and distribute information on the world arms race.
After the 72 hours, Regan and
Tischer emerged to flowers, champagne, and a beer garden sponsored
by the peace club. Surrounding the
beer garden outside SUB cafeteria
were walls with posters illustrating
the reality of the nuclear age.
SUB gets store
From page 13
and development of student housing.
While voting students will
"rank" the capital funds according
to preference, council decided. The
ranking won't be binding, AMS
president Dave Frank said. "It
would be pure political suicide to go
with eight instead of number one."
Frank said the list gives future
Raoul councils the flexibility to
decide priorities, but binds them to
those specific areas in which to
spend the money.
Arts representative Margaret
Copping criticized the referendum
question, calling it vague. Copping
said many students she solicited for
the petition thought the wording
gave "carte blanche" to future
councils.
An optical store is coming to
SUB.
Frank told council an agreement
had been reached with an unnamed
firm to lease the space formerly occupied by the Lethe lounge behind
SUB's information desk.
An earlier decision to lease the
space to a video store fell through in
September, when the store decided
not to accept.
"coats of professionalism" without
realizing the reasons why.
As a result, many women blame
themselves for lack of success or
recognition in their jobs she said.
Women who are taught myths at
their mother's knee, are later
rewarded for following the rules
and punished for deviating she said.
"Women's feelings, thoughts
and perceptions are systematically
invalidated in our society.
Women are trained to feel guilt
when they cease being care-givers
and begin to assert their own needs
and with independence and self-
sufficiency women are often subjected to ridicule, name-calling,
threats of abandonment and accusations of lacking a sense of
humour, Hyde said.
Hyde   suggested   professional
women adopt "a new model of
achievement" that begins with
recognition that women are outsiders in society and as such are barred from power centres.
Women should begin to articulate the pain of being outsiders;
they should cease passively accepting what happens to them and
should become verbal and active
Hyde said.
Women should start to take
credit for their successes, stop permitting failure to affect confidence,
learn to recognize their own
abilities, and learn to understand
themselves, she added.
Hyde's lecture is part of a
workshop/seminar series sponsored
by the Women's Network which is
supported by UBC continuing
education.
UBC
TRIATHLON
MEETING FOR ALL
INTERESTED
PARTICIPANTS!
Wednesday, Nov. 3
12:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym, Room 211
Find Out What This Event
Is All About!!
FRIDAY
LONDON CONTEMPROARY
DANCE!!
HERE? ON CAMPUS? NO KIDDING?!
BELIEVE IT! Ballet UBC Jazz
is presenting a Special Demonstration/
Performance by the INTERNATIONALLY
FAMOUS group.
Nov. 6, 2:00 p.m.
SUB Ballroom
Tickets $2.00. Available at AMS
Box Office
ATTENTION
Only 5 positions are left for the
UBC Curling Club's
Weekly Wednesday
Night Draw
5:00-7:00 p.m.
PLUS   —   Anyone   interested   in
sparing on Wednesday or Thursday nights.
Please Contact
BOX 27, AMS OFFICE
First Come, First Serve
the   Western   World,   subject   to
Western propaganda," he added.
This is particularly true in regard
to American claims that the West is
behind in all aspects of the arms
race, said Pasti. "The West has
more nuclear weapons and conventional forces than the U.S.S.R.,"
he said.
» • *
But the American public does not
support its government's military
policies, charged Pasti.
"People desire to live to improve
their standard of living, not to
spend money for the possible
destruction of mankind," he said.
Pasti criticized the American
government's plan to base Cruise
missiles in Europe.
"If this weapon is deployed, there
will be no possibility of coming to
an agreement on limiting nuclear
weapons in Europe," he said. "If
the U.S. goes on with the production and deployment of this
weapon, in some time the U.S.S.R.
will do the same."
Cruise missiles will be stationed
in five European countries, including Italy, said Pasti, who is an
independent senator in the Italian
parliament.
But Italians do not want the
Cruise missile in their country, Pasti
said.
"We collected one million
signatures in Sicily against the
deployment of the Cruise missile,"
he said. "The population of Sicily is
four million. One out of four people signed the petition."
Applications for
SENATOR AT LARGE (2)
and
Men's Athletic Committee
and
Presidential Advisory
Committee on
• Accessability for the
Handicapped • Traffic and
Parking
and
Delegates to CFS Conference
A VAILABLE IN ROOM 238
Deadline, November 3, 12:30
EXPERT
SKI & TRAVEL
ADVICE
Visit Western Canada's Largest
Ski & Travel Show !
VANCOUVER
SKI,TRAVEL & RECREATION SHOW/82
Oct. 29-30-31
P.N.E. — VANCOUVER
MEET WORLD CHAMPION
Steve Podborski
And members of Canada's
National Ski Team
(Courtesy of Molson)
• 40% BIGGER.
• Enjoy the Ski  Fashion 83  Show by CFMI  &  SWISS
SPORTHAUS
• Save money and buy or sell your used ski equipment at Ski
Swap. Call 687-4084 ,;or information & special swap hours.
• Enter Ski Contests and maybe win over $5,000.00 worth of
prizes.
• Talk to travel consultants and recreation advisors.
• See the Free-Style Aerials and trampoline show.
• View the award winning film "CHALLENGE THE CANADIAN
ROCKIES" in the Carling O'Keefe - C.F.U.N. Theatre.
• Sunday visitors receive a FREE day pass compliments of
APEX ALPINE
• Browse through 150 exhibits and displays.
• Talk to Dave Irwin, our "Goodwill Ambassador" and get
some tips on skiing from a former world cup star.
SHOW HOURS
Friday, October 29       5 p.m. — 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, October 30       11 a.m. — 10:30 p.m.
Sunday,October 31     11 a.m. —   6:00 p.m.
ADMISSION
Adults (18 & over)  S4.00
Youths (13-17 yrs.)  $3.00
Children 12 & under (accompanied by an adult) ... FREE
INFORMATION: 684-3823 Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 29,1982
PRICES SO LOW
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NR320
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Relax during tense rush hour traffic with the KP2500 AM, FM
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and tone & balance controls.

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