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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1964

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 The Great
Pumpkin
THE UBYSSEY
is a
large Barry
VOL. XLVII, No.  19
VANCOUVER, B.C.,  FRIDAY,  OCTOBER 30,  1964
CA 4-3916
"V.,..
>**.
A*
—bert mackinnon photo
Engineer winds up to hurl smoke bomb at Sciencemen.
v^lV
—don hume photo
Pile-up in the backfield as Home Ec (light sweaters) mangle
Nurses in annual Tea-cup football game. (See stories Page 3)
Williston
in favor of
aid proposal
Lands and Forests Minister Ray Williston supports a proposal that the government provide money for out-of-town
UBC students.
In a telephone interview
Thursday, Williston said the
aid principle outlined in an
Alma Mater Society brief is
good and should be accepted.
"But how it is carried out is
another thing," he said, "and
would depend on the money
available."
AMS representatives presented the brief Wednesday to
a government cabinet committee in Victoria.
The brief says out-of-town
students have less money than
in-town students and should
have help in paying room,
board and travel expenses.
It suggests the provincial
government institute grants
covering out-of-town students'
travel expenses to university
and one or two month's room
and board.
"Being an out-of-towner myself, I can certainly feel the
force of the argument," Williston said.
(Williston is the MLA for
Fort George.)
He said the brief was well
received in Victoria.
"I commended the boys (the
AMS delegation) on the submission of their brief, as did
everyone on the floor (of the
Legisature).
"The statistical information
certainly helps press a good
case and gives it a good basis
for succes," Williston said.
He said the brief presents
conditions as they really exist.
"Anything to help the situa-
ion (of out-of-town students) is
a step in the right direction,"
he said.
Williston cited the example
set at Prince George's Secondary School dormitories where
room and board is provided at
reduced rates to out-of-town
students.
He said students living at
home in the area receive assistance in paying travel costs.
Frosh apathy
kills symposium
The Frosh Symposium
scheduled for Saturday has
been cancelled for lack of
Freshman support.
There were only 15 applicants for 150 positions available.
The symposium was to
deal with race, religion and
nationality in North
America. Speakers from the
sociology, law and political
science departments had
been scheduled.
AAC president Mike Coleman termed the cancellation
a shame.
SUB snag
gives cash
bonanza
By DON HULL
Money, money, money. Both
the Alma Mater Society and
the Administration are cashing
in.
The AMS has just received a
$5,000 windfall and the administration has announced plans
to buy a $1 million property
for $100,000.
The $5,000 for the AMS represents interest on the $234,-
000 collected this year from
the $15 levy for the Student
Union Building. The levy
comes out of the $29 annual
AMS fee.
• • •
Because of delays in completion of the architect competition, the AMS finds- it will not
need to make payments for
SUB as soon as expected, said
AMS treasurer Kyle Mitchell
Thursday.
SUB plans were delayed because of a death in planner
Porter Butts family.
The extra money has been
invested in short-term securities and the $5,000 is the interest on the investment.
The $5,000 windfall will be
added to general revenue and
will become part of a $20,000
safety margin.
Meanwhile, back at Point
Grey, the administration has
purchased Yorkeen, former
home of Senator S. S. McKeen,
for $100;000.
An administration spokesman admitted they will have a
problem raising the cash.
• •    •
"But the Board of Governors
decided to take advantage of
this unique opportunity to
purchase," he said.
The home has been valued at
up to $1 million.
An arrangement for financing will be worked on a self-
liquidating basis.
Together with the former
Graham estate donated to the
university last year, the Yorkeen grounds made up a 7-acre
tract of private land surrounded by campus.
"The purchase is a most
logical step," said UBC president John Macdonald.
"We are most fortunate in
being able to add to our campus a property of such unique
value to the university."
No definite use for the property has yet been decided
upon. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30,  1964
IDEAS
at
LARGE
By  LORRAINE  SHORE
Asst. City  Editor
We see in the latest Reader's Digest a letter written by
a godfather to his about-to-
be-married 19-year-old godson.
And said godfather is not
sure his little godson is ready
to put the gold ring on his
girl's left hand.
Darned right he's not. Not
at 19, by about 11 years.
At least that's the consensus among 8 men aged 16 to
38 I talked to.
Most of the males thought
30 was the ideal age for mat-
imony.
• •    •
We only found one fellow
willing to get married at 19
—right in The Ubyssey office
—and he said he couldn't afford it.
Maybe it's the females who
are pushing for marital bliss.
But not according to the
girls I asked—most thought
that the mid or late twenties
was the right age.
Why does 19-year-old leap-
er want to get married?
That's something the other
campus males could figure
out.
"I didn't want to get tied
down," said a 20-year-old,
who at 19 was all ready to tie
the knot.
Others had wavered and
eventually decided that if
they were not sure, they were
not  ready.
• •    •
One said: "A man is ready
to be married when he has
stopped falling in love—
whenever that it."
But   another   student
thought   he   should   never   get
married.
"The only reason to get
married is to have children,
and the world is already over-
populated."
"I would just live with a
woman."
Still another student said:
"A mistress is too expensive,
so I guess I'll have to get married."
•    •    •
But the 38-year-old (married) father of two said he
waited until 27 to plunge into
wedlock.
"I was travelling around a
lot, and I wasn't thinking
about it."
"Of course, it could have
been because I worked for a
gold-mining company in the
wilds of New Guinea for two
years and there were no
single women around."
Maybe that's the way to
stop The Ubyssey's 19-year-
old from getting married.
Ship him off to the wilds
of New Guinea.
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800 to get
degrees at
Congregation
More than 800 students will
receive degrees at the Fall
Congregation today.
The congregation starts at
2:15 p.m. in the Armory.
About 450 students will receive their degrees personally.
Others unable to be present
will receive degrees in absentia.
The ceremony begins with
the entry of the graduating
students followed by the chancellors, the faculty, the mace
bearer and dignitaries in the
platform party.
Lieut.-Gov. George Pearkes
will be in the platform party.
Honorary degrees will be
conferred on Dr. Hugh Trevor-
Roper of Oxford, who will
give the congregation address,
and Dr. Rocke Robertson, principal of McGill University.
Following the ceremony
which is expected to last about
two hours, there will be a reception at Brock Hall to enable
parents of graduating students
to meet faculty members.
Students who wish to see the
ceremony are advised to be at
the Armory early to get a seat.
Not radical
Women protest
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'Barry liberal - sort of
Barry Goldwater is really a
liberal—a 19th century liberal.
Dr. K. J. Holsti of the political scienpe department made
this remark in a speech on The
Radical Right at International
House Thursday.
Dr. Holsti said: "Goldwater
is not on the radical right, nor
a conservative. He is a 19th
century liberal."
•    •    •
The radical right, he said, is
upheld by the John Birch Society which is trying to reconstruct modern society in simple
terms. Members are submissive, hostile and intolerant.
There are 100,000 John
Birchers in the United States
today, Dr. Holsti said, and 40-
Lost cup returns,
mystery remains
The Hauser Cup will be
returned Friday or Saturday, said Inter Fraternity
Council president Dean
Paravantes  Thursday.
Paravantes told an IFC
meeting the cup will be returned with no questions asked, no names released and no
charges laid.
The cup, awarded annually to the top UBC fraternity,
disappeared more than a
week ago.
60 per cent of the American
people are considered to be
Communists by the society.
The main targets of the Society are liberals and intellectuals. It has claimed there are
communist conspiracies in the
American Union of Churches,
the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Americal Medical
Association. It has also denounced former presidents
Eisenhower, Truman and
Roosevelt, he said.
•    •    •
The Society rejects all social
welfare legislation and advocates foreign isolation. It lists
80 countries as communist
dominated, said Dr. Holsti.
He said Birchers are assigned to investigate all commun
ity      organizations      including
Parent-Teacher Associations.
Dr. Holsti suggested the
radical right has grown because of frustration between
American Mythology and American Reality in the 20th century.
•    •    •
He said: "People do not understand the complexity of
modern society. They do not
realize the Society is against
traditional American beliefs."
When asked if Goldwater
could win the election, Holsti
said: "Goldwater has a persuasive case on economic policy from a constitutional point
of view, but it is not probable
he will win."
UNION  CARBIDE
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Interviewing for 1965 Graduates
NOVEMBER 9, .10,  12 &  13
Complete Description of Positions at the
Placement Office
Our Representative: Gordon Hatfield
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Charge Accounts Accepted    -    Free Parking At Rear Friday, October 30, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Scholar reports
Hamburg
residence
Paradise
Mixed residences with no
locks, sirens, or buzzerboxes,
and a canteen serving liquor
downstairs?
They have them at University of Hamburg, reports World
University Services scholar
Harry Oussoren.
Oussoren, 20, spent the last
school year in Germany on a
WUS scholarship.
He lived in a residence with
25 women and 55 men.
"And there are no locks, sirens, or buzzers," he said. ~'Stu-
dents there are given a lot of
freedom and they handle it responsibly."
Oussoren said students operate a residence canteen selling
beer, liquor and items like
soap and toothpaste.
The canteen, an $800 a
month operation, is run on the
honor system. Oussoren said
the operation loses only about
$8 a month. "And this probably from beer bottles not returned," he said.
"You very seldom see anyone drunk there," he said,
"and then only after a big occasion, like a dance."
Oussoren is in fourth year
Arts. He said he plans to study
theology at the United
Church's Emmanuel College
in Toronto after graduation.
Duthie amazed
at complaints
W. J. Duthie, owner of a
down town book store, told a
Pre - Librarianship Society
meeting he was surprised that
students have been complaining about the prices in the University Book Store.
He said prices at his store
are usually slightly higher.
Two universities
PAKISTAN (UNS) — Two
new universities are being
built in East Pakistan. They
will bring the number of universities in the country to six.
Home Ec tops Nursing
Dirt flies high
in Redshirt win
By LORNE MALLIN
You know what flew when the Engineers ran the Science-
men into the ground in Thursday's chariot race?
Choking    orange    smoke | "
Pub drubbed
in boat race
SHAKEN HOMEWRECKER gets
loving care from two Nursing Panhandlers in Thursday's
Teacup football game. Home-
wrecker was only winded.
Skate theft
boosts total
over $600
The total value of articles
stolen on campus in the past
two weeks has climbed to more
than $600.
Thursday a pair of skates
valued at $65 was reported
missing from the Winter
Sports Centre and two tents
valued at $20O have been discovered missing from the Varsity Outdoor Club.
AMS second vice-president
Byron Hender said increased
precautions are being taken in
Brock and surrounding buildings.
"We are going to request increased security from the University Patrol," he said.
He said the AMS is going to
ask that a locked room be provided for coats and briefcases
in buildings where labs are in
progress.
In the meantime Hender
suggested students keep their
coats and briefcases with them
whenever possible.
orange smoke
flares, red dye horse water and
Aggie dirt.
Engineers cheered, screamed and pushed their chariot on
to victory during half-time at
the annual Teacup football
game.
Sciencemen at first couldn't
free their chariot from a squad
of Engineers which halted the
SUS vehicle near the starting
line.
• •    •
Other Sciencemen at the
North-east corner of the stadium field met the Engineers
chariot with nets, hoses and
the smoke bombs.
The victorious Red Horde
was pelted with lunch bags
and fruit by the capacity
crowd.
Main event of the afternoon's festivities saw a screeching, seething mass of Home
Economics Homewreckers
•blank a shaken collection of
Nursing Panhandlers,  13-0.
Commentator Tom Lar-
scheid, a former B.C. Lion,
said: "I'd given anything to be
called out there for illegal use
of hands."
• •    •
Also during half-time was a
cross-country race with Lome
Smiley, Science III, beating a
field of 100.
Donations for the Crippled
Children's Fund collected at
the gate totalled $1,654 an Engineering spokesman said. Engineers, besides winning, sponsor the annual show.
Last year $1,450 was collected.
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JUST  OUTSIDE   THE   GATES
The S.S. Pubster sank in yesterday's boat race.
Ubyssey pubsters Stubby
Hume, Smokey, Rat Burton
and Rube Parsons slopped,
gargled and swallowed their
foaming beers in a mad guzzle
to out-booze the engineers at
Thursday's Tea-Cup game.
Coached and managed by
Mike Horsey, Ubyssey Editor-
in-Chief, the Pubster team
strived valiantly, spurred on
by the thought of the two cases
of beer first prize.
Unfortunately, they lost.
Horsey, explaining the defeat, said:   .
"Our first man swallowed
the bottle. He was kind of
moked up."
The Redshirts won.
Contrite Science
seek muddy girl
Sciencemen goofed Thursday.
"On our way to the stadium we accidently sprayed
a co-ed with aggie dirt," an
SUS spokesman said.
He said after Science's defeat in the chariot race:
"We want to pay damages,
such as the cost of cleaning
her clothes. But we didn't
get her name."
The victim should contact
the SUS executive by leaving a note in their mailbox
in Brock.
Publicity Hounds
Want an event publicized
over C-FUN? Address particulars to Bill Thompson, AMS
Box 152 one week in advance.
ALL MALE
STUDENTS
Assigned To  Totem  Park
Residences
East Wing (Haida House)
MAY MOVE INTO THEIR
ACCOMMODATION
OCTOBER 31st
Careers
grow
on
trees.
at MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited
. . . the largest integrated forest products company in Canada. And right now our company is
developing long term expansions that offer exciting
career opportunities for graduates in many fields.
We have attractive openings for graduates in
ENGINEERING, FORESTRY, SCIENCE, ARTS AND COMMERCE
The positions offer careers with a good future. Pay
well from the start. Offer a challenge to your
talents. Provide the scope and training for rapid
advancement. . . and the chance to live in one of
the finest recreational areas in the world - beautiful British Columbia.
Interested? Let's get together and talk about your
future and ours.
Call at your Student Placement Office, pick up
more information about the positions that will be
available, make an appointment for an interview
with our representative on the Campus.
Interviewing dates:
engineering November 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
forestry     November 9, 10, 12, 13
science        November 9, 10, 12, 13
arts November 16, 17, 18, 19, 20
commerce    November 16, 17, 18, 19, 20
Make your appointment early!
macmiluvn, bloedel and powell river limited THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year bv the Alma Mater Society, fniversity of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Kditorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
boc. 26. Member Canadian I'niversity Press, Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
South Brock
By Jeff Wall
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30,  1964
,*^
Shell - outs
It's trick or treat time again.
Hallowe'en is an appropriate time of year for the
AMS to have presented a brief to the provincial government calling for a few shell-outs.
The brief, which contained initial results of the student means survey conducted last year, asks for a shell-
out to out-of-town students.
It compared expenses of the out-of-town student as
against those of the Greater Vancouver student.
Then, in a reasonably coherent fashion, the brief
asked for help.
It asked for help in the form of return fare travel
grants and Bving grants for students from outside the
Greater Vancouver area.
The brief didn't scream foul names at the government.
It didn't demand the government take immediate
action and it didn't threaten riots if its suggestions weren't
implemented.
It merely showed in clear figures why the student
from outside Vancouver must spend as much as $500
to $600 more than his Vancouver counterpart.
Let's hope the facts and figures derived from the
lives of 1,400 students questioned at UBC will form
the basis for government action.
Government ministers who discussed the brief and
its proposals with student representatives were reportedly impressed.   '
But before we get all smiles and laughs, remember
the brief cost students $3,000 to prepare. It could cost
the government between $500,000 and $1 million to
implement the proposals.
It will be entirely up to the government to actr-
when and if the Socreds feel such a plan is feasible and
politically advantageous.
The Socreds lent Quebec $100 million, but they are
also collecting a fat five per cent interest rate on that
deal.
If the Socreds follow through on the suggestions of
the AMS brief jthey will get no such interest return
immediately—perhaps a few thousand potential voters
but nothing as tangible as cash.
We said it two yeats ago and we say it again:
Premier Bennett is a big man.
He has a government.
His government has no debt
He must have lots of money.
We are a university.
Naturally we don't have very much
Trick or treat, Premier Bennett?
Carole's looking glass
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TfiB!
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Legal finks speak
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We see by Thursday's paper that the undergraduate
society presidents on student
council are revolting.
They are so revolting that
they revolt us. Since when
does a group with 20 votes
get "railroaded" by an executive with six votes, or a
president with one?
If this is indeed the case,
undergraduate society presidents must be a) lazy b)
weak-willed c) uninformed
and d) unable to control the
muscles  in  their  right  arms
when it comes to making decisions.
We understand a number
of undergrad society presidents displayed these exact
qualities at thei height of
Monday's  council "uprising".
When asked by AMS president McAfee how many of
them had voted on measures
about which they had inadequate information to make a
decision, a dozen councillors
raised their hands.
We think this display
squeaks for itself.
MIKE HUNTER
KEITH BHADBURY
Law I
By Carole AAunroe
Just one little cup of milk, huh?
Graeme Vance isn't the
only one who takes*a second
glass of milk from UBC's
dormitory food services without paying for it.
In spite of—or maybe to
spite—the large signs that
boldly proclaim the rules, and
the dining hall workers who
guard the counters to see they
are kept, something is clearly
evident:
Although students are only
allowed one portion* of certain parts of the meal, they
are quickly and furtively
helping themselves to extra.
Without paying.
But then not everyone is
quite so successful at this
food-stealing game.
Let's join the Lower Mall
dinner line.
First stop is at the cashier's
table where your meal pass is
punched   just   in   case    you,
would   DARE   to   try   to  go
through the line twice.
You pick up your dinner in
stages. The main plate holds
enough for coeds but leaves
most of the men highly unsatisfied.
So ... .
Ask for more and it shall
be given unto you. Potatoes
and vegetables, that it.
Not meat. That costs 25
cents extra.
Not dessert. That costs ten
cents extra.
Not butter. That costs two
cents extra.
And not (oh, that anyone
could be so greedy as to want
TWO) glasses of milk. They
cost five cents or one milk
ticket.
In the first place, why
should a man have to pay extra for enough food to keep
him from going hungry when
the dormitory fees are so
high?  One year's board  and
room in UBC's residence
halls costs between $500 and
$600, depending on where
you live and whether you
have a single or double room.
That's why we object to
paying five cents for an extra
glass of milk.
The result is a common one
in our society. Most people
can get away without paying,
so they do.
And the fellow who pays
gets a double penalty.
If the dining hall staff is so
insistent that we pay for what
they must consider "extra
food", they should control
these payments.
But better still, the extra
costs should be cut out entirely. The high cost of dorm living should pay for an extra
slice of meat or glass of milk
if anyone wants them—particularly the big men on campus.
Until these costs are cut out
I offer a partial solution to
the Problem of Desiring Extra Milk.
Each person who takes a
bag lunch instead of eating
in the dining hall at noon gets
a milk ticket. This is because
he would be drinking his
milk quota at lunch and he
can save it for the evening
meal.
Many of the girls who
take bag lunches daily are not
beset with the above-mentioned Problem.
Therefore they have a
growing supply of unused
milk tickets cluttering up
their rooms.
Anyone who suffers from
the said Problem is advised to
set up a contact with one of
these girls.
To date I have 23 tickets
which I shall gladly donate to
the cause.
A Case for the watusi
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
It is evident that the narrow-minded individual who
called down the modern
dance (especially the Watusi)
has no concept of what is accepted and expected in the
best of the nation's dance
halls.
Is it above the dignity of an
appalled artsman to watch
this symbol of expression
which makes him bewail, or
is it because he knows not
how to openly show emotion?
FRANCO DOMINELI
Science I
3f"      V      T*
Square segregation
Editor. The Ubyssey:
What kind of a square-head
is P. Shaw, Arts III? Obviously, the reason he didn't enjoy
the Homecoming dance was
because he was too busy acting old and sophisticated to
let his hair down and enjoy
himself. I agree with him,
however, that the dance
should be segregated. It
would be a terrific idea to put
all his type in one building
and let them stagnate together.
R. WARKENTIN
Commerce II
EDITOR: Mike Horsey
News    Tim Padmore
City _   Tom Wayman
Art   -  Don Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts
Asst. City     Lorraine Shore
Asst. News  Carole Munroe
Associate _  Mike Hunter
Associate _    Ron Riter
Magazine __ _  Dave Ablett
Managing _   Janet Matheson
Okay, okay, here's the crew that
watched the brew guzzle down the
gurgling throats of the finest pubster
group that ever lost a boat race:
Lome Mallin, Rick Blair, Bob Welser
(we may spell it wrong, but we know
how to pronounce it now), Bob Burton (housercuphunter), Art Casper-
son, Donna Plrrie, Robbi West, Al
Birnie, Corol Smith, Don Hull, Jock
McQuarrie, Carol Ann Baker, John
Dilday, Mona Helcermanas, Doug
Halvorson, Massino Verdicchlo, Mike
Bolton, Joan Godsell, and Ron Rltter TBE UBYSSEY
Page Friday
Barry and
Confucius
See Page 2
Also — Books
Music,Drama,
More — Inside ..If' .
' .OH tHe- CjOVEft: CoJot for
_>M^i|-.rrflM»i; Mr. K. for
"*■■ "j/^ut/ttUn; kutfev for
'who took *». pfctura
" :,'.:W»n Who ma«o
j5ft*d.',Maaka' Mada In
— no kidding.
COWWCIUS
HAVE ABLETT
Volar Pom
John  Kohay
Graham Olaay
ArtwarV      Joff Wall, Al Himtor,
;JrOno|HT"Wlteh else?
i"^tbtlIOwe*en and *11 that.
^s..; Vfcnenhle gentleman
^jriHW is -one Confiictas
l^wha/happcfas to figure, fii
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<^W«watef <th is'..patfei.
:£$&«. might say-P|it:.lontw
t-aftj'jptaqp   C    ASatocBc-
'"in." Goldwater In the
h.9H>U* House.
'.';-.-b» P«# 3 o£ PF. Su-
i Jirti Adams writes an un-
".' expected? topical bit on
■'.■Sir 'Any Welensky and
^fbofesign independence,
.'.an:.inue {hat this week
-" provided the fo t K g c s t
- cruris in the prime minis-
'tnteKip of Britain's Har-
'.Ola Wilson, the man we
.— all — excerted — last
.o|i the teme page, two
4»t|cteB disagreeing with
pieces- that have previously, appeared in W. It's
what, we like to aee.
JSlttitfaiase inside, Jim
Xtfti rt&en* Peace Shall
pestecff\i(faty (starts on
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mt..taibsw
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THE   US.
What would it be like with
Goldwater as president?
Four top U.S. political
scientists heave a
collective shudder
PF  Two
By RICHARD  SIMEON
MEW HAVEN — What
kind of a place would
the United States be if Barry
Goldwater becomes president?
A grim one, say four Yale
University political scientists.
They predict deadlock in
Congress, a spiralling arms
race, more and bloodier riots
in the streets and fear in
the classroom, a gradual
poisoning of American
minds as extremism and radical conservatism become
endowed with the respectability of the White House.
Even if Goldwater were
elected, said professor Robert A. Dahl, one of the country's most distinguished political scientists, he would
have a Democratic Congress.
"There would be complete
deadlock. Congress would
be unable to pass any new
legislation over his veto and
Congress would not pass any
of his program."
So efforts to solve the
major problems of the time
— poverty, civil rights, med-
i c a r e , unemployment —
would be adjourned for at
least four years. All would
get  worse.
And Goldwater, faced with
inability to solve the problems would turn more and
more to irrational solutions.
"He would search for scapegoats. Instead of coming to
grips with the problem, he
would emphasize morality,
sin, Communists and liberals who have brainwashed
the American people," said
Dahl.
The nation would become
more and more divided
against itself — and all this
during a period of international crisis.
"I cannot escape the conviction that here is a man
who has seen too many westerns on Friday nights. He
sees the world in the simple
morality of the western. The
clean-cut, square-jawed man
with two guns on his hip
goes bang, bang, and the
evil character is dead.
"He thinks that one day
there will be the great showdown, just like Friday
night."
All the professors emphasized the difficulty of trying to find out what Gold-
water really means.
"I feel a good deal of
sympathy with the weatherman trying to track a hurricane," said Dahl. "He does
not know where it is going
to hit, but he knows there's
going to be a hell of a mess
where it does."
In the international field,
Goldwater's presidency
would lead to a renewal of
the potentially disastrous
arms race and U.S. alienation from its allies, said foreign relations expert, H. B.
Westerfield.
And unlike his domestic
program, Goldwater would
have a relatively free hand
in carrying out his foreign
policy.
Goldwater would treat all
Communists, Russian, Chinese and Yugoslav alike, he
said. "His policy is that no
Communist is a good Communist and you cannot give
any kind of preference to
one or another."
The U.S. would pursue a
tougher propaganda line
against Communist countries
and further restrict trade.
He would cut off foreign
aid to all but our "friends."
The war in Viet Nam
would be extended.
But there was one note of
hope — Goldwater has lately slowed down his talk of
rolling back the iron curtain
and invading Cuba, said
Westerfield.
The potentially most dangerous   effect   of   Goldwater-
ism in the long run was outlined by Robert E. Lane,
who has conducted extensive
studies of the beliefs, attitudes and ideologies of the
common man.
Invested with the authority and prestige of the White
House, the senator's views
would be legitimized.
"People would begin to
think he is not so bad after
all."
The large number of persons who hold intolerant,
authoritarian views would
suddenly find themselves respectable.
Goldwater would appeal
to the people who think due
process of law is too slow,
who are afraid of freedom
because they are afraid of
their own impulses, who
want a simple, authoritative
shortcut because they are
frustrated at the talk in Congress, who want simplistic
answers because thought is
painful, he said.
"If you had a man in the
White House with this kind
of view of society, you
would licence a kind of illegitimate restriction o n
what civilization has been
trying to build up for so
long," Lane said.
"He has already had some
effect. His defeat will not
undo the damage already
done."
The search for scapegoats
and the attack on liberals
could well reach into the
college classroom in an attack on liberal intellectuals
which would exceed the effects of the McCarthy era
of the early fifties, said
Dahl.
THE WRITER
Richard Simeon is a former UBC student and former Ubyssey assistant city
editor.
He is now doing graduate
work in political science
at Yale on
a Woo drow
Wilson Fellowship.
Two of his
professors   —
-mm. and tw° .of
those he interviewed for this article—
are Robert A. Dahl and
Robert E. Lane, considered to be in the forefront
of current American political science.
Prof. Joseph Hamburger
did not paint quite so black
a picture — his was just
dark grey. "It would not be
a disaster — just highly unfortunate," he  said.
He termed Goldwater a
truly doctrinaire ideological
politician who sees the world
in moral terms with preconceived ideas of the good
guys and the bad guys. He
would be unable to adjust
his responses to actual,
changing   conditions.
And he would provoke an
equally ideological reaction from the left. Politics
would become more and
more bitter and the riots
would get bloodier.
(Continued on Page 8)
SEE:   MORE U.S.
Moral leadership at the top?
Mandarin Barry comes oh so
close to riding in on
the Confucian ticket
Barry say:
I, with my running mate,
will set an example at the
top.
—Speech   by   Sen.   Barry
Goldwater, West Orange,
N.J.. Oct. 9, 1964.
Confucius say:
When the ruler of a country leads the people by the
right example, who dares to
go astray?
—Confucius, The Analects.
By  PAT HORROBIN
It may come as a shock to
Republicans in the crowd,
but Barry Goldwater is this
close to coming out on the
Confucian ticket.
That's Mandarin Gold-
water, the chap on the
Right.
Goldwater has just
pledged to lift the moral
bootstraps of the United
States. President Goldwater
will put an end to civil disorder and fiscal hanky -
pank in high places, not to
mention topless bathing
suits and rowdy parties.
The personal example of
the man at the top will do
it, the Arizona senator modestly says. A moral man will
make a moral nation.
This was Confucius' line
and he would be proud of
Barry on more than one
count.
It might have been expected, especially with
Barry's chief strategist sending kudos in Mao Tse-tung's
direction for information on
how to best insinuate cell
movements into the body
politic. Hands across the
waters and that.
Mandarin Barry has the
rule-by-example field all to
himself. China is strictly out
of it — Chiang Kai-shek's
kith and kin mulcted the
treasury for instant investment in General Motors and
Coca Cola just before the
Communist takeover in
1949, blowing the -whistle
on mainland use of the
theory   for   a    while.    The
THE WRITER
Pat Horrobin is a third-
year arts student taking
Asian Studies.
In addition, she writes
part time for
the downtown press.
Her article
on Barry G.
and the Confucian Ticket
— not to be
confused with
the confusion
ticket — springs from her
studies in Chinese language.
Communists rule by other
means, including guile, force
and buying wheat on credit
to keep the masses fed.
But rule by example isn't
the only Goldwater-Confuc-
ius harmony. Barry and Confucius are both very interested in the status quo.
According to Confucius,
each man should know his
place, and the "superior"
kind of citizen is the one
who's happy with his poverty or wealth and doesn't
rock the boat.
Confucius even perfected
a system called li, in which
all the rules of relations between people were laid
down. Mummy didn't sass
daddy, sonny didn't sass the
cop on the block and daddy
didn't dream of sassing the
emperor, or anyone else
richer and more powerful.
According to Goldwater
. . . well, Goldwater for
Grand High Panjandorum
anybody? OVERSEAS
Sir Roy comes
back but his
threat to
Smith is gone
By SUSAN ADAMS
Sir Roy Welensky, formerly prime minister of the
now defunct Federation of
Rhodesia and Nyasaland, has
returned to the hectic arena
of  Rhodesian  politics.
On Dec. 31, 1963, the federation was buried by the
new anti-federation governments voted to power in the
three separate territories.
With typical courage Sir
Roy officiated at the burial
of his own creation and
helped the new governments
set off on their separate
ways, while he retired to
farm fruit and vegetables
on a small holding near
Salisbury.
Why did Welensky return
after nine months of freedom and what will his reappearance mean to Rhodesia?
Sir Roy returned at the
plea of the liberal white and
the moderate black forces
crying out in the wilderness
of barren Southern Rhodesian racial politics.
His main aims were: to
give stronger leadership to
the opposition party; to
check the growing grip of
Prime Minister Ian Smith,
leader of an ultra-conservative, all-white party tending
to follow the patterns of
South African apartheid;
and, finally, to prevent
Smith cutting the British
apron-strings by a unilateral
declaration of independence.
Success to date has not
been dazzlingly apparent.
Welensky was heavily defeated at a recent byelection
and thus has no seat in parliament.
The vote against him was
surprising, for Welensky always held a very special
place with Rhodesians and
particularly with the white
electorate.
Sir Roy did manage to
prevent Smith from making
an immediate declaration of
. independence, it is true. But
Welensky is reduced to a
defeated byelection candidate and the image of power
and popularity, which loomed as a constant threat to
Smith,  is gone.
The previously unsupported assumption that the
whites were steadily deserting the conservative liberalism of Welensky's earlier
reign is now stark truth.
Outside investors now know
that the whites will retreat
behind   the   racial   barriers
THE WRITER
Susan Adams, born and
raised in Rhodesia, is now
a second-year arts student at
UBC.
She received most of her
education in Rhodesia during Welensky's term.
Her father, a former adviser to Welensky and a political organizer, is head of
UBC resources committee.
and they will be wary of future strife.
During his short period of
political retirement Welensky, the father figure, was
becoming a rallying point
for all those who sought an
answer embracing one or
another form of racial cooperation.
Re was also in a position
to talk as man-to-man with
black nationalist leaders.
Now, back in the ring with
Smith, he must confine his
superb skill and vast experience to the narrowing interests of the white voters.
Another attempt at multi-
racialism in Africa has
failed.
DISSENT
Dentists pen
lashes Soma's
'24-hour view'
of Mexico
By DR. LEON KRAINTZ
Faculty of Dentistry
I would like to take exception to the article on Mexico
by Sonia Puchalski which
appeared in the Oct. 16 issue of Page Friday.
Her article is a good example of the pitfalls of syllogistic reasoning. The sordid
side of East Hastings Street
is obviously not a cross section of Vancouver.
It is not the nature of the
Mexican people to isolate or
hide their poverty. In Canada and the U.S.A., beggars
and indigents are arrested
for vagrancy or removed
from areas frequented by
the tourist. I, also, have visited Mexico but for longer
periods. With less obsession
over odors (not all unpleasant), and a willingness to
look deeper into the results
of the Mexican revolution,
it is apparent that modern
Mexico is a model of success underdeveloped nations
could follow.
Far from being an "ossified revolution", Mexico has
made immense progress in
the last 30 years. Infant mortality has been halved, literacy and life expectancy almost doubled.
All of this has been
achieved with political stability and without resorting
to police state methods. It
is true that poverty persists
in Mexico but the long range
effects of public housing,
education, and health services will do as much as
"instant revolution" in reducing this to a minimum.
Economic conditions i n
Cuba may well appear much
better under Castro but this
has been achieved with
enormous aid from the Soviet bloc. Mexico's economic
progress is not due to any
massive foreign aid.
Statistics from the Food
and Agriculture Organization of the UN do not support the statement by Miss
Puchalski that Cuba was
poorer than Mexico prior to
the Castro Revolution. In
1952; Cuba was cited as having an average per capita
caloric intake in excess of
2,700 calories as opposed to
Mexico which had a figure
under 2,200 calories. It is
indeed ironic that the Mexican government with its uniquely independent stand on
■JTT
"They     ha ve.
other
its diplomatic relations with
Cuba does not find it necessary to have a "Fair Play
for Mexico" committee to
give a more complete and
accurate picture of her revolution, one of the century's
greatest.
The American press has
been accused of not factually reporting conditions in
Cuba and their informants
are considered "anti-revolutionary worms". Could it be
that the readers of The
Ubyssey are being subjected
to an equally distorted version of Mexico's revolution
from a 24-hour "tourista"?
'Some questions'
to jar Jackie's
certainty about
banner value
By KEN FARIS
Ont envies Jackie Foord's
certainty in her reviews of
the current exhibition in the
UBC Gallery (Page Friday.
Oct. 23). Still, a few questions do come to mind.
The key criterion for an
achieved work of art that
Mrs. Foord appears to establish in her article is that it
should   be   "a   commentary
upon life . . . depicting experience", made up of "sensory, intellectual, emotional
stimulations" expressed in
an integrated whole.
Mrs. Foord does not follow
through, however, and show
in what respect Banners can-
n o t be considered an art
form. She feels they are
colourful and decorative but
neither of these are decisive
one way or the other.
Neither is she clear in relation to the collage exhibit—
is it only this exhibit which
is "decorative" or is this a
limitation inherent in all
collage?
There does not appear to
me to be any inherent quality in either of these forms
of expression that prevents
them from being legitimate
forms for the expression of
aesthetic values. It would be
interesting and perhaps
helpful, therefore, to know
how Mrs. Foord arrived at
her conclusions, in terms of
her stated criteria, on these
exhibits in particular and on
these two forms in general.
My personal reaction on
the whole is to reserve judgment on the current exhibits except in relation to
certain of the collages which
I felt did achieve high levels
of integration. However,
even if they were only decorative, as they may well
be, I still find it difficult to
accept the proposition that
all banners and all collage,
if this is in fact implied in
the review, are by their nature excluded from the category of valid art forms.
BOOKS
Down on the
farm novel
down to earth,
interesting
By JIM LOTZ
Two contemporary themes
are skilfully blended together in this powerful first
novel by a young Saskatchewan writer.
The struggle of certain religious and ethnic groups to
assert their identity and retain their way of life in face
of the pressures of the mo-
PEACE SHALL DESTROY
MANY. By Rudy Wiebe.
New Printing. Toronto.
McClelland  & Stewart  Ltd.
$4.95
dern world, and the search
by individuals for religious
enlightenment make this
novel a profoundly religious
book that portrays an unusual and little known sector
of Canadian society.
What could easily have
been dull drama down on the
farm becomes a significant
contribution to Canadian
literature, as the author depicts a young man's examination of his world, his
values and his conscience.
The novel tells of one year
((Continued on Page 4)
SEE: MORE BOOKS
KIM
STANLEY
RICHARD
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right on yourfilm ... automatic
volume control, for perfect
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everytime. Even your silent
movies are brighter with the
Mark S quartz-iodine projection lamp ... it gives you twice
the rated life of ordinary lamps
and doesn't dim with use.
Now Being
Demonstrated  at
Kerrisdale Cameras
2170 W. 41st At*. AM 6-2622
Open daily until 6 p.m.,
9 p.m. on Friday MORE BOOKS
(Continued from Page 3)
in the life of a number of
people in and around the
small Mennohite community
of Wapiti, in rural Saskatchewan; it describes minutely and accurately a vanishing way of life.
The Mennonites, building
their entire lives on the
Bible, forswearing involvement with anyone outside
their own church, might
seem like a strange atypical
group about which to write.
But Wiebe has made his
characters into universal
beings.
The Mennonites come
alive — grim, stark figures,
some of them, terrible in
their righteousness and their
lack of charity and understanding; work worn women
tired out by a life of hard
labor; exuberant children
who have yet to be told the
meaning of sin; frustrated
young girls driven to desperation.
Mr. Wiebe was brought up
in a Mennonite community,
and he describes his characters with sympathy and
understanding. But his writing cuts into them like a
knife. The main character, a
19-year-old youth called
Thorn Wiens, tires to puzzle
out the meaning of life, love
and Mennonite ethics as he
waits for his papers from the
Army; the year is 1944 and
the radio reports from the
war contrast strongly with
the placid peace of the farming community.
The action never moves
away from Wapiti. It centres
on the small community of
Mennonites. The half breed
families in the surrounding
area hang around the fringes
of the life of the community,
unwanted and misunderstood.
The day-to-day account of
farm life, the school picnic,
ploughing, harvesting, haying, doing chores, picking
berries, forms the frame
around which the emotions
of the people are analyzed
and examined. The very un-
eventfulness of life in the remote region builds up until
it finally comes to a crashing
climax at a school Christmas
party.
The love of the land and
the extreme conservatism of
the Mennonite farmers, the
unquestioning acceptance of
the Bible, the domination of
the spiritual over the secular,
the reliance on the guidance
and leadership of one strong
man, the sidestepping of the
dilemmas involved in the
dealings with the half breeds
who are held to be less than
human—Wiebe circles around
PF  Four
all this, probing the situation, showing the reactions
of individuals torn between
the old certainties and the
new possibilities.
In this novel, the truth
does not make people free.
It confuses them, baffles
them, destroys them, kills
them. Life is not simple in
this rural land; it holds a terrible complexity that, few of
the farm people can cope
with or comprehend.  »
This work has a certain
strange elemental power
about it; it is beautifully constructed and properly paced.
Tension builds up slowly,
like a thunderhead forming
above a placid summer scene.
Wiebe choses his words carefully; his prose has a clean,
spare look about it, and his
characters talk the way real
people do.
The writer has skill with
words and a literate intelligence. Let's hope that he can
follow this first novel based
on personal experience, with
something equally significant.
The pleasing design of the
book, with its clear, legible
type, deserves extra praise;
the quality of its production
matches the quality of the
writing.
MUSIC
Soviet pianist
no Red square
— lie deserves
his reputation
By JEAN ETHRIDGE
Sviatoslav Richter, famed
Soviet pianist, had a prodigious reputation to live up
to and last Sunday at the
QE, he succeeded. The audience clamored for more and
honoured him with a standing ovation.
The large introduction of
the Sonata in D minor, Op.
31 No. 2 by Beethoven,
which Richter played extremely softly with rubato,
would have have more effective if it had not been
marred by an exceptional
amount of coughing in the
audience.
The second movement,
Adagio, he played eloquently, with profound feeling and
articulate phrasing. Richter
captured well the gay, humorous mood of the Allegro
in the Beethoven Op. 31 No.
3 Sonata in E flat. In the
Trio he left the audience
breathless with his sudden
rebounds from forte to
piano. The Presto con fuoco
was truly "fast with fire",
for the tempo he chose was
astoundingly rapid, but effective.
The subtle, almost delicate
artistry which Richter displayed in the Beethoven
group contrasted with the
more overpowering grandeur and total richness of
Mendelssohn's V a r i a tions
Serieuses.
A group of six Brahms
pieces displayed Richter's
gift for creating tonal contrasts, and projected his
sincere musicianship. His
electrifying rendition of his
fifth encore, a work by Prokofiev, was the perfect culmination of a perfect evening.
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O'Hegarty
from  Ye  Olde  London  Towne
"The Tang of Ale and the
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—Raymond Hull
Ellen Baskett
UBC's finest folksongstress
Direct from "The Mews"
in Phoenix, Arizona
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(One Block East of Alma)
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BOOKS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED
AFTER THIS DATE
UBC BOOKSTORE Wilson slips,
recovers and
then unwinds
with Brahms
By WARREN BELL
Eugene Wilson, cello, and
Kathryn Compton, piano,
gave a recital Tuesday last
in Bu. 106 under the auspices of the University Department of Music. I shall
deal first with the actual
performance of the artists.
Mr. Wilson made a few
intonation slips at the beginning of the first work, a
set of variations by Beethoven. He became more assured,
however, as the work progressed. Not until the next
piece, a Brahms Sonata in
F, did he completely unwind. Consequently, his interpretation of the Beethoven was a trifle stiff, and his
tone occasionally forced. In
the Brahms and particularly
in a contemporary sonata by
Elliott Carter, he played
with great sensitivity and interpretive feeling.
Miss Compton was generally competent, producing a
firm, intelligent, and well-
controlled accompaniment.
Her ornaments in the Beethoven were clear, and her
rhythmic treatment in general was good. She did have a
few lapses in the solo passages of the fourth movement of the Brahms.
And now to the program
material. It was short, lasting only about an hour and
half, but it was as well balanced as any musical program I have heard in several years.
The Beethoven variations
were simple and structurally
pure. The rhythms were
straightforward, the modulations predictable—charming,
and ever beautiful, but
scarcely demanding to a
modern ear.
The Brahms selection was
a representative Romantic
piece; more harmonically
and rhythmically, and more
impassioned than the Beethoven. The harmonic progressions were less predictable,
and the chord structure
thicker and heavier.
The last, and most interesting — certainly the most
challenging — work of the
evening was Elliott Cartier's
Sonata. The rhythms of this
piece were intriguing, different and striking; occasional
effective use was made of
jazz rhythms. The harmonic
structure was different from
the preceding, but the stimulation produced on the listener by the atonal concept of
the piece more than balanced the moments of inscrutability. This modern
composition was more lucid
in chord structure than the
Brahms — a partial reversion to the classical purity
of Beethoven.
To sum up, I enjoyed both
the performance and the
program, but the latter appealed most to me. If the
concerts which the Music
Faculty has in store are as
interesting as this one, they
will be well worth attending.
BISTROS
Here's tree
wax gleaned
irom Parkin's
Peter's Ear
David Parkin is the proprietor of Peter's Ear coffee
house and the Flat 5 jazz
club. He is a 23-year-old
sometime student of fine arts
and creative writing. He describes himself as a poet and
bistro owner.
Peter's Ear and the Flat 5
are at 3623 W. Broadway.
Here, Parkin talks to critics editor John Kelsey about
his coffee house, club and
all manner of other things.
Q: The name Peter's Ear
—it connotes nothing in particular to me — just vague
ideas. What does it mean?
A: It says a lot of what I
want to say about the place.
Seems to me it might connote things on profound levels, because the name is really a complete abstraction.
People interpret it as they
will.
Q: But do people really
get a mysterious image from
this, or do they just ask you
what it means?
A: Oh, everybody asks me
what it means. If I feel so
inclined, I give them a little
story.
Q: Why do you want to
own a coffee house?
A: I want to provide a
fertile atmosphere for—well
things. Look, you go to
drink coffee somewhere, and
the place is or isn't conducive to thought or talk.
I've a thing against arbor-
ite and bright lights — red,
white and green decor. That
sort of cafe insults my intelligence.
Q: So you've tried to open
a different kind of place, one
that doesn't insult you?
A: Yeah!
Q: Is jazz going to be the
sole diet in the Flat 5?
A: Oh, no. Peter's Ear will
sponsor all sorts of things
in the Five all the time. Like
our present Wednesday
night poetry readings. The
weekends will be all jazz,
and there'll probably be a
late-night jam session every
night in the club. I want to
have films, plays, talks —
everything.
Q: You've been hanging
paintings 'in there too, is
this to be sort of a gallery?
A: I want to hang local
artists and change them
every two or three weeks.
I think this is very worthwhile.
Q: Why?
A: Well, I 'm trying to expose people to my beliefs—
things important to me.
Peter's Ear is an extension of
myself, very much so. I have
to believe that certain things
I believe in have value to
other people.
Q: You think your values
and beliefs should spread to
others?
A: I think exposing things
to people will enlarge the
people . . . that's a bad term.
I want to bring people out of
themselves, I guess.
Q: What are you putting
on the coffee house menu?
A: All sorts of coffee and
drinking tea, halvah, pastries, Brio Chinotto — that's
Italy's answer to coca cola,
philosoppic soup, crazy
things.
Q: What soup?
A: Soup I'm famous for—
you can eat it with a fork.
It's wild to keep a big pot of
it simmering continually,
and you keep adding to it.
For years and years. It's
terrific.
Q: Sounds to me like
you're playing good games.
A: I've a thing about
people taking themselves
too seriously.
Q: And this is what you're
doing about it?
A: Yeah, Peter's Ear.
Poole performs
swimmingly —
but the rest
is Cuckoo
By DENA  BALVA
About Vancouver Little
Theatre Association's production of The Time of ihe
Cuckoo by Arthur Laurents,
one can say only—"Go and
see it!"
One says this, not, heaven
forbid, because it is a great
play, but because it displays,
in true vehicular fashion,
the acting genius of Miss
Ellen Poole.
Her performance makes
the distinction between amateur and professional not
only unnecessary but unimportant.
The role of Leona Samish,
an American spinster in Europe desperately waiting for
a "wonderful magical mystical miracle" (Arthur is
sweet, isn't he?) is a deceiving one.
It is easy to lapse into relying, as Katharine Hepburn
did in the film version, on
increasingly stronger tugs at
the audience's heartstrings.
Miss Poole and her director,
Dorothy Goldrick, sensibly
avoided creating a study in
pathos. This Leona Samish
was confident, clever, dense,
insecure, sardonic and path-
(Continued on Page 7)
f»F  Five
WEST POINT GREY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Eleventh Avenue at Sasamat
Rev. A. J. Hadley
9:45 a.m.—Elective Study
Courses
11:00 a.m.—"Re-Affirma-\
tion"
7:30 p.m.—"Nonconformists"
3:45 p.m.—Young People's
Fellowship
The Power
Women
Have Over Men.
Is it simply the power to say
"NO!"—as one man claims?
Is giving praise the secret of
women's power?...Or is it
solely a matter of sex? Here's
a symposium of letters from
Digest readers, provoked by
a previous article which considered "The Power MEN
Have Over Women". Don't
miss the November issue of
Reader's Difast.
ARMCHAIR
CHRISTIANITY?
unsatisfying & frustrating
BE AN ACTIVE DISCIPLE
Worship at
ST. TIMOTHY
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Every Sunday at 11:00 a.m.
(Hut L4 - East Mall)
This Weekend
Glen McDonald Trio
from 9:30 p.m.
STUDENT  PRICES
MADE TO
FIT
the Student Body
That's DON PARKER
"TRAD" SLACKS
ithe style-
leaders setting the
trend everywhere,
on and off campus.
You'll recognize
the distinctive style
and immaculate
finish of TRADS
immediately. TRADS
by DON PARKER,
now available in
stretch materials for
a full measure of
superb comfort.
If your young man's
shop does not stock
DON PARKER
SLACKS write to:
PARKER
SPORTSWEAR
CO. LTD.
10355 - 105 Street,
EDMONTON, Alberta
mmmmmfr ART
Jackie stresses
the concrete
features of
architecture
By JACKIE FOORD
Architecture is the most
unequivocally functional of
all arts.
This presents certain problems to the architect, for he
must strive to find a com-
promise between what is
purely functional and what
is purely artistic. In other
words, he must integrate the
utile et -decorum.
The architect finds other
limits placed on his creativity. For example, he must
decide how his building is
going to relate to its surroundings.
Ideally, a building should
harmonize with the environment, yet still survive as a
creative entity. Also, the
architect must continually
meet the requirements of a
budget.
With these preliminary
comments in mind, it will
now be possible to examine
one of the most successful
buildings in Vancouver, the
newly-constructed East Asiatic building on the corner
of Pender and Bute.
In this structure, many of
the basic problems of architectural aesthetics are admirably solved. The architect has succeeded in creating a beautiful office building, a rare accomplishment
in an age where the adage
"form follows function" has
frequently decreed that commercial structures be sterile,
severe and impersonal.
A building "works" on the
basis of several principles,
two of these being; light and
movement.-
By the application of these
separate principles, the architect creates not only a structure but total effect.
In East Asiatic House,
this total effect is procured
primarily through the use
of precast concrete.
This material has the
triple advantage of being
strong, light and ornate.
Consequently, it eliminates
the necessity of adding decoration to the completed
structure.
By virtue of its texture,
precast concrete provides a
means for the control and
diffusion of natural light
and shadow. This material,
with its strength and mass,
allows the architect to create
movement through the counter balance of two opposing
forces: that of thrust and
that of gravity.
No architect wants a static
building and in a structure
such as East Asiatic House,
the airiness, yet apparent
strength of the material allows the building to soar,
yet still look stable.
The beauty of the East
Asiatic building is remarkably obvious. For an uncomplicated and genuine
aesthetic experience, take a
look at it.
PF  Six
"Touch of Brass". Sunday, 7:30 p.m.
GRAHAM   "Jerusalem". Tuesday, 7:45 pm.
Feature      "Africa on the Bridge". Wed. 7:45 p.m.
Films
"Fire on the Heather". Thurs. 7.45 p.m.
Dunbar Heights Baptist Church
West 17th Ave. at Crown
WARD   MUSIC   LTD.
We carry a complete stock of
SHEET MUSIC, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
RECORDS, RECORD PLAYERS,
TEACHER'S SUPPLIES
MAIL ORDERS OUR SPECIALTY
412 WEST HASTINGS STREET
MUtual 2-5288 - VANCOUVER, B.C.
Last Chance to See
LARRY    KENT'S
SWEET SUBSTITUTE
A story of the driving sexual
urges of an adolescent
TOMORROW
Saturday Oct. 31 at 8 p.m.
UBC  AUDITORIUM
»
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offsudnq jccUuuiAA  in
Petroleum Exploration
will conduct campus interviews on
November 4, 5, and 6
Post  Graduates — Graduates
Undergraduates
in
HONORS GEOLOGY — Permanent and summer employment in Geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING (Options 1, 2, 3) —
Permanent and summer employment in Geology
and/or Geophysics.
PHYSIC and GEOLOGY — Permanent and summer
employment in Geology and/or Geophysics.
MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS—Permanent and summer employment in Geophysics.
HONORS PHYSICS—Permanent and summer employment in Geophysics.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS—Permanent and summer
employment in Geophysics.
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
MAY BE MADE THROUGH
THE UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
PURITAN
>yjay-be
Murran Goldman
•Up half a block from Birk'a Clock" MORE DRAMA
(Continued   from   Page   5)
etic. This person we watched
on stage wa s—lo—even
as you and I.
We spilled the surreptitious tear for our own
bungled opportunities. Miss
Poole's performance was, in
every respect, flawless; an
entirely beautiful work of
art.
However, the reviewer
softly sobs, the supporting
cast was about as much support as a broken crutch. Les
Poskitt as Renato Di Rossi
had as much Italian charm
as the about-to-retire janitor
in a rural Idaho vocational
school.
One dreaded the moment
when he would toe the
ground, saying "Aw Shucks,
Ma'am". He didn't, but one
feared it just the same.
Poskitt delivered lines
such as "You will never find
romance by being romantic"
with something close to embarrassment. Not that one
blames him.
Barbara Cosgrove, on the
other hand, as Signora Fior-
ia, expressed the Italian elements in the piece very convincingly.
Marlene Hoefling and William Mitchell were adequate
as June and Eddie Yeager,
though one found it hard to
believe Eddie could possibly
be a painter.
Elivira Quarin did a nice
job of Geovanna, the maid,
but she ought to have been
more sluttish.
Winston Rekert was too
old to play 10-year-old Mar-
iro, but was charming, all
the same.
The lighting was very
smooth and interesting but
Lex Leighton's sets were
sort of blah. Background was
provided in the form of Italian Muzak, and during scene
changes a poker-faced lad
moved about the audience
strumming "Arrivederci
Roma". The play is set in
Venice.
Small details, all too common in amateur productions,
annoyed. Gray-haired characters in the play seemed to
be wearing wigs made of reversed aluminum foil.
"Grazie" was pronounced
by Italians and others as
"grazzy".
Dorothy Goldrick's direction was fluid and well-
paced.
But go and see Ellen
Poole.
CINEMA
Its Setters'
market at
the films
these days
By PHIL SURGUY
The cameras and moonlight reveal the corridors
and rooms of one side of
George Sanders' mansion.
Everyone is creeping about,
carrying glasses and bottles,
obviously ready for bed, and
meeting people they should
not be meeting.
All  trysts appear   ade
quately trysted when four
shots are heard and the credits come on. That done, we
are on our way with Inspector  Clouseau,  terror  of the
Suerte, to find out whodunnit.
• •    •
A Shot In The Dark is
Peter Sellers' film. He is the
same Clouseau who fumbled
his way through the Pink
Panther, and in this, his
last picture before a heart
attack, he is as inept as
ever. Clouseau cannot move
five feet without falling into
a pond, running into someone, knocking something
over or generally laying
waste to anything which
happens  to  be near  him.
The detective is relentless
in his search for the mur-
derer(s), overlooking nothing but the obvious. Elke
Sommer is obviously innocent even if she has been
found standing over two
corpses with the murder
weapons in her hand.
• •   •
Sellers has a firm grasp
on his role as a minor
French official, cocksure of
his position and authority.
He won't let Hercule, his
assistant, use his official pis-
tol-picking-up pen. Hercule
can get his own. At one point
he assembles all the bearing of his position and power to assert that Sanders
murdered one of the victims
in a "rit of fealous jage".
Throughout the picture, as
in the many excellent parts
he has previously filled, he
brings to his character all
the mannerisms and movements which make Clouseau
a real and distinct person.
Yet the character by itself
begins to get tiring.
• •   •
Trouble with  the  picture
is that there is no one for
him to act with. The rest of
the characters are merely
bad background. They are
simply there and anyone
else could have been there
and would have had to work
to affect the story in any
way. George Sanders gives
the impression that he was
in the house when they decided to make the movie
and hung around to watch.
• •    •
Herbert Lorn does the best
he can with the stock role
of a boss going insane as a
reaction to the blunders of
a subordinate. The best minor part threaded through
the script is that of Clou-
seau's Japanese servant who,
to keep him in shape karate-
wise, attacks his master suddenly, anywhere — in the
bath, by the nearest fountain, in bed with or without
Miss Sommer, etc.
The function of the script,
like that of the characters,
seems only to move Sellers
about to the end and there
is no real interest in the
solution of what could have
been a good comedy-mystery.
It is, however, decent,
often hilarious slapstick, but
I hope it is the last of the
Clouseau pictures.
PF  Seven
10 days in the
bear pit just
too much for
eyesore Ed
By ED  HUTCHINGS
It wasn't a bad festival
all in all. There were enough
good films to make it worthwhile to go every day, and
if there were no startlingly
new trends in sight, I expect this is more the state of
the business at the moment
than the fault of the VIFF.
This was the year that
Britain finally figured out
how to make those rough-
edged 'slice of life' movies
they have been turning out
for years. The Girl With
the Green Eyes is an impeccable example of a kind
of film, (in the extreme
case it's called Kitchen Sink
Realism), which I have previously found very unrewarding. British 'Kitchen
Sinks' are pretty contrived,
even at their most 'documentary', and to me this
makes consecutive fifths
with the (just as deliberately) rough camera work. But
Girl With the Green Eyes is
good ... I'd say the best
feature in the Festival.
The lack of novelty was a
bit disappointing, but there
were compensations. There
are signs of the emergence
of directors on the international scene who, if they
have nothing startlingly original to say, have at least
taken the trouble to study
their profession thoroughly.
The Eastern block films
Krik and Current showed
inexperience but not poor
preparation. The Mexican
Tiburenos was a minor film,
but really well done. Mr.
Killian, a forty-minute film,
is an avant-garde work with
a solid formal treatment; in
North America this would
be a contradiction in terms.
It was symbolic of the
state of Canadian film that
of three Canadian films entered, only one showed up.
This was Nobody Waved
Goodbye, a film which bears
comparison with Sweet Substitute, and in fact the very
first thing that I noticed was
the camera work in Sweet
Substitute is unquestionably
better.
The cinematography in
Nobody Waved Goodbye
seemed to me to be a masterpiece of misplaced self-confidence. In general I thought
the situation in NWG was
less promising than the one
Kent used, and there was
one of those sappy delinquent vs probation officer
scenes descended from the
ghastly horde of Pysch 100
movies and YMCA epics.
At the same time there
was at least some thought on
the director's part about the
films as a whole, and some
careful control of scenes
which need to be placed exactly in the dramatic form.
Unlike Kent, this director
can manage, if not write,
obligatory scenes, and he
ends his film on the right
note at the right time.
In short I think Sweet
Substitute is the more promising film, but the director
of NWG has done his homework. Kent, in spite of being in a Theatre course,
simply hasn't.
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the exciting voice of
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BUT     WE DO HAVE MORE TITLES THAN
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So for paperbacks
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UNIVERSITY BRANCH — 4560 WEST 10th
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(Continued from Page 2)
The professors saw little
chance that Goldwater will
modify his views if he wins.
"The election campaign has
shown he is not sensitive to
his environment," said Lane.
"He has not learned, and it
is unlikely the presidency
would make him a better
man."
•    •    •
They saw; a bleak future
for the Republican party
whatever the outcome on
Nov. 3. If he is narrowly
defeated, Goldwater supporters will be able to remain in positions of power
in the party and their man
will probably be renominated in 1968.
If he is soundly trounced,
it would puncture the myth
of a large reservoir of con
servative voters and thus
set the stage for the liberals
to regain control.
But the job would not be
easy because if the margin
is large, many of the liberal
Republicans, like New
York's senator Kenneth
Keating, would go down, too,
unless there is an unprecedented amount of vote-splitting on election day.
Right now it looks as if
the professors' gloomy predictions will never be tested.
Latest polls show Johnson
pulling ahead.
On the conduct of the
campaign, now coming down
to the final wire, Dahl said
this is one of the worst in
history.
"There has not been a
more non-intellectual campaign I can remember, nor
one so full of irrelvancies.
"We used to say years ago
that the politician who has
nothing else to say is against
sin. Now I find that is true."
CALENDAR
Hogarth Week. Nov. 2-6.
Monday Dr. Norris speaks
on "Politics and Society in
Hogarth's London"; Tuesday,
Martin Wedgwood on ceramic design; Wednesday, Bill
Hart analyzes Hogarth's analysis of beauty; Thursday,
Stanley Read describes the
London of William Hogarth.
Friday, Collegium Musicum.
All events in Freddy Lassere
at noon.
Exhibition of works of
William Hogarth. UBC Fine
Arts Gallery, Nov. 4-21.
Time of the Cuckoo, directed by Dorothy Goldrick,
Vancouver Little Theatre.
Oct. 30-31 at Metro Theatre,
1370 SW. Marine.
Land of the Pharaohs, film
by Wilmer H. Gold. QE Playhouse, Nov. 3.
Desire Under the Elms by
the Playhouse Theatre Company. Nov. 1-7 at the QE
Playhouse.
Don Cossack Chorus. Vancouver East Lions Club, Nov.
1 at 8:30.
Russia and Its People, film
lecture by Raphael Greene.
Noon today. Auditorium.
Beyond the Flringe, satirical revue. Tonight and Oct.
31 at QE.
Flat Five reopens today,
after remodelling, with the
Glen McDonald Trio. Broadway and Dunbar near the
Ark and Peter's Ear.
Ark. W e suspect that
Charles O'Hegarty is singing
this week.
PF   Eight
A
R
G
H
UNHAPPINESS
IS AN INSINCERE
PUMPKIN PATCH
"a lane production"
You Always Go . . .
First Class
WITH
RICHARDS & FARISH
Next to the Royal Bank — Robson at Granville
786 GRANVILLE STREET
Noted For Their College Collection Of Fine Clothes Friday, October 30, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  13
DON LITTLE
. . . chained
Apathy jibe
brings quick
retribution
Last week, Education newsletter editor Don Little blasted
Sandra Snider's stunt committee for inaction.
Little's editorial called the
Education stunt committee a
"Stunned Committee" and rapped it for the lack of publicity
stunts.
Wednesday, Sandra's Stunt-
ers kidnapped Little from a
news-letter meeting and chained him to an education building pillar.
They dressed him in baby
doll pyjamas, red-gartered nylons, rouge and lipstick.
Stunt leader Sandra was irked at Little's description of the
stunters as a "motely crew".
"My crew is NOT motely,"
Sandra snapped.
An indignant Little promised to continue the feud.
"I'm sure he'll write something derogatory," Sandra
said. "If he does, he'll definitely have something to write
about the next week."
High cost
The average cost of a pint of
blood in the U.S.A. is $40.00
and does run as high as $100.
Fly To
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For AH Your
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The Store with the Technical
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Free Parking at Rear
Graduates
We've got what
industry needs'
Canadian industry desperately needs new graduates and
it's up to UBC to supply them, says Dr. Ian McTaggart-
Cowan, dean of Graduate Studies.
7      "The
Aimless BA
is  jobless
By TIM ROBERTS
All that stops a BA from
getting a job is his aimless attitude, claims student placement officer M. E. Hacking.
Too many graduating Arts
students are asking: "Where do
I fit in?", instead of having a
goal, Hacking said in an interview.
But he emphasized the BA
has a good education.
"Employers are often seeking Arts graduates for management training, government
offices and sales careers," he
said.
The placement officer said
the Arts faculty is difficult to
give placement information to
because there are so many
Artsmen in so many places.
He said while it is not essential for graduates to consult
the placement service, interviews there give students valuable experience in job application.
university has a responsibility to Canada and to
the province to train more
people," he said in an interview.
"If we don't, we will hold
back development of Canada's
industry."
"There is a desperate shortage of graduate students at
UBC," he said.
The shortage was once met
by imports from the United
States and Britain, but today
those nations are absorbing
their own graduates."
He said UBC's graduate
school is already on 12-month
schedule.
He emphasized the need for
more professors: "Except in
physics and chemistry, the ratio of profs to grads is far too
low, especially in • the social
sciences."
More scholarships are imperative because many students get married and cannot
afford to continue, he said.
The president's committee
report on academic goals last
week recommended a four-fold
increase in the size of UBC's
graduate school in the next 10
years.
Old school bib gets axe
from Ivy League Council
The old school tie is going ivy league.
Student council is having the blue and gold tie redesigned and is planning a contest for a new design.
"The old tie is a bib affair," said AMS president Roger
McAfee. He suggested something a little narrower.
Also under consideration are designs for scarfs, hats,
ear-muffs and gloves.
ITS A GREAT NEW WORLD
WHEN YOU CAN BUY HIGH
FASHIONS AT LOW PRICES
The   Clothes   Horse
DESIGNERS SAMPLES
AT WHOLESALE OR LESS
4353 W. 10th Ave. 1560 Marine Dr.
Vancouver, B.C. West Vancouver
Near Varisty Theatre Opp. Odeon Theatre
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
NEWS
Hallowe'en Dance - Friday, 30th Oct. - Prize for the Best
Costume; Games, Dances. All welcome. Members 25c;
others 35c.
International House General Meeting
Nov. 1st at 6:30 p.m. at the House - Dinner, entertainment,
panel discussion, business meeting. Members are requested to attend. If you are not a member, become one before
it is too late—Hurry.
Mobil
One of Canada's leading producers of oil and gas offers careers to graduates
who can respond to challenging situations, who want maximum opportunity to
demonstrate their abilities, who are interested in continuing their personal development, who believe in reward based on individual achievement.
Openings exist for graduates of engineering,  geology,   physics,   mathematics,
commerce, economics, and arts courses.
Company  recruiters  will   hold   interviews on the campus November 4 and 5.
Appointments can be made at the student placement office.
' Socony Mobil Oil of Canada is part of a family of companies which have made the Mobil name
and Flying Red Horse symbol familiar in nearly every country of the world. The company is one of
the three largest oil producers in Canada and has large and rapidly expanding gas operations. It
is active in all the western provinces and in the Yukon, Arctic Islands and off the east coast.
SOCONY   MOBIL OIL OF CANADA, LTD.
BOX 800, CALGARY, ALBERTA Page  14
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30,  1964
FOB THE BIRDS
By BRUCE KIDD
The torch has been extinguished—the Olympics have
ended. After two weeks of hectic competition, the 8,000
athletes reassembled in the main stadium last Saturday
to bid their sayonaras to the Emperor and people of Japan,
and to each other.
They were the same athletes who had gathered in the
stadium 14 days earlier, but yet they were different;
some were flushed with victory, others melancholy with
disappointment. But to a man they were glad the Games
were over.
Although this closing ceremony provided a fitting finale
to the XVIII Olympiad, it lacked the emotional poignancy
which so overpowered the scheduled program of the closing
ceremonies in Melbourne, Cardiff, Rome and Perth. Undoubtedly the military precision of the Japanese programming
did much to prevent a spontaneous outburst of emotion; but
in addition the athletes' marchpast came very late in the
program, so we stood outside for most of the ceremony.
•        •        •
By contrast, in Perth at the last British Empire Games
the pent-up tensions of the athletes suddenly exploded in the
final ceremony and both officials and spectators were swept
along with the athletes' hi-jinks; there wasn't a dry eye in
the stadium.
So the real sayonaras waited until the huge garden party
which  immediately followed  the ceremony.   There  athletes
FOR CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
AND BY SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT WITH
THE ONTARIO-QUEBEC ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
washed down Japanese food with quarts of saki punch, and
traded uniforms, addresses and farewells.
It was interesting to note the post-competitive diets of
some of the Iron Curtain athletes. Generally they gorged
themselves on cake, ice cream and soft drinks.
For example, one Russian—probably a weight-conscious
wrestler—would start off the day on four slices of fruit cake
and six cups of ice cream, then go directly to the recreation
centre and there continue on ice cream in front of a television set.
I wonder if this phenomenon is related to the fall of
Nikita.
• •        •
In the last analysis, the Olympics stage competitions
between individuals—as a runner toes the starting line,
thoughts of country are farthest from his mind.
Yet the sporting environment of any country has a
definite influence on the performance of its athletes.
Collectively, Canadians performed very well at the
Tokyo Games, giving Canada its best showing since the
War. But it would be a tragic mistake to interpret this
as a vote of confidence for the bodies which administer
amateur sport in Canada.
Pierre de Coubertin saw sport as "an order of chivalry,
combining honor and a code of ethics and aesthetics, recruiting its members from all classes and all peoples, mingling
them in concord and friendship throughout the length of the
entire world."
He saw it as education and culture.
Education "because only by patient study and self-revelation can a sportsman go from strength to strength."
Culture "because the transient movements it traces in
time and space—for nothing but the sheer pleasure of doing
so, as Plato has it—illuminate with dramatic meaning the
essential and therefore the deepest and widest values of different people and the human race itself.
• •        •
Win, lose, or draw, the Olympic experience cements
one's faith in the de Coubertin ideals.
This religious fervor can be read in the watering eyes
of the champion on the podium, on Ihe intent features of
the Japanese schoolboy, standing in a downpour outside
the Olympic Village, waiting for autographs.
Yet today very few Canadians are even aware of the
Olympic ideals, and still fewer ever get the opportunity to
try for a trip to the Olympics.
The Canadian Olympic Association and the other bodies
in the amateur sports field are in desperate need of reform
and until this reform occurs, only a small proportion of Canadians will ever be associated with the Olympic experience.
MAKE YOUR
WEEKEND
RESERVATION
EARLY
Type of Car
Overnight
24 Hour Day
Weekends
Vauxhall
Volkswagen
$1.95+5c
$3.95+5c
$10.00+5c
Acadian
Chevy II
Valiant
Falcon
$3.00+5c
$5.00+5c
$12.00+5c
Parisienne
Galaxy
Impala
Mustang
$5.00+5c
$8.00+5c
$16.00+5c
A-CAR
Phone 685-0536
BUDGET RENT
1021   W. Georgia
OPEN    7:30  a.m. -  7:00  p.m.  Monday  -  Friday
8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
Try a 1965 Mustang this weekend.
—fred ogden photo
BIRD'S GOALIE GEORGE HRENNICOFF makes desperation
snare of ball in UBC workout. The Birds are going all out
to prepare for game Saturday with Firefighters in Varsity
Stadium at 2:00 p.m.
Rugby plays
UBC's rugby teams are all
active again this weekend
with four teams playing.
The first division Braves
are at home playing the Trojans Saturday at 2:30 p.m. as
are the second division Totems who take on Trojans II
at 1:30.
The away games at North
Van Kinsmen Park find the
Thunderbirds playing the All
Black first team.
Duffle Coats by
CROYDON
• Showerproof
• Full  Plaid Wool Lining
• Detachable Hood
• Leather Buttons
• Style Leader
• Finest Quality
Come in and see our new stock.
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville    MU  1-4649
Open Friday 'til 9
tl Friday, October 30, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
^w%.
jt>: aAt*n~«& .   „
—don hume photo
FRANK GNUP MAKES A HIT in the annual teacup charity game played yesterday noon
at varsity stadium. After sorting through various reports and rumours The Ubyssey finally
found out the Home'Ec coeds downed the Nurses 13-0 with Gnup lending his assorted
talents to the cause acting as referee.
Sports roundup
Braves beat army in debut
The UBC Braves won their
home debat in the newly
formed Pacific Coast Junior
Hockey League Wednesday
downing the Chilliwack Army
entry 4-3 at the Winter
Sports centre.
Goal scorers for the Braves
were Jim O'Dourghty and
Wayne Desharnais with two
apiece.
Braves are coached by Ray
Gould.
The newly formed Junior 'A'
league also includes teams
from Vancouver (Grandview)
and New Westminster.
• • •
Thunderbird puck coach
Dr. Robert Hindmarch, who
was instrumental in forming
the foundling league, intends
to use the Braves as a farm
club for the Birds.
He feels the presence of a
Junior 'A' league in the lower
mainland will help him greatly in developing UBC's hockey
program.
Such a league has long been
needed in this area where
forty per cent of the hockey
players in B.C. are to be
found, according to Jerry
Thomson, Representative of
the" British Columbia Amateur
Hockey Association.
The Braves' next game is
against the Vancouver Juniors
this Saturday at 5:-30 p.m. in
the Winter Sports Centre.
• •    •
Thunderbird      forward
Bruce Kitsch will be out
from four to six weeks with
a shoulder separation suffered in last Sunday's contest in which the UBC defeated the Grads by 9-3.
Offsetting this loss somewhat is the return of Bob Parker who was the Bird's top
goal scorer last season.
Parker, who started working out last week, is taking
post graduate studies and did
not feel he would have enough
time for hockey this year but
said he just couldn't keep
away.
• •    •
The UBC field hockey teams
have five games lined up this
weekend. Saturday the Varsity club is in North Van. to
take on North Shore 'A' at 1:15
p.m.
Also on the North Shore the
same day are the Blues who
play North Shore 'B' at 2:45
p.m. Another game Saturday
finds the Golds challenging the
Grasshoppers at 2:45 p.m. on
Spencer field.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Aton
presents
"RUSSIA AND ITS PEOPLE"
by Raphael Green
This uncensored film has been" acclaimed around the world
MONDAY, NOV. 2 at noon in the AUDITORIUM
THURSDAY, NOV. 5 — GYMNASIUM
The Return Performance of the
FABULOUS FOUR PREPS
The Braille aports car Rally
will not be held until November 14, NOT October 31st, as
previously announced.
SPOBTS
In football
Birds fly south
play army giants
By JACK McQUARRIE
One axiom is uppermost in Thunderbird football minds
this week—"the bigger they ate the harder they fall."
The footballers can be heard
mumbling this little gem to
themselves, between wind-
sprints, while prepping for
this Saturday's game against
the Fort Lewis Rangers at
Fort Lewis.
The Rangers, an Army base
team comprised of many former college stars, lay claim to
a defensive team that averages 240 pounds.
UBC line coach Lome Davies registers a suspicion that
somebody is attempting to
"psych out" somebody else
when he says "the Fort Lewis
defensive line probably averages closer to 250 pounds."
PROFESSIONALS
If the dimensions resemble
professional standards it is no
coincidence. Many of the players have professional experience, notably quarterback Don
Kasso and end Alden Kim-
brough.
Kasso was a teammate of
Nub Beamer's at Oregon State,
where he performed admirably at the tailback post in
Tommy Proho's single wing.
Kimbrough was a 1957 Rose
Bowl star with Oregon.
Other ex-college stars are:
Otis Lincoln (Grambling College), Charlie Malone (Prairie
View Texas), Bill Hooton (Texas A&M), Paul Franklin (U.
of Nevada).
The Rangers play in the
newly   formed   Pacific   North
west League with Edmonds,
Seattle Ramblers (a dirty word
in T'Bird football circles in
previous years), Portland and
BC Millionaires, who made
themselves popular in Fort
Lewis a week ago with a 52-0
loss to the Rangers.
BIRDS HEALTHY
The Birds go into the game
healthy, which is nice considering how they may come out of
it, but will take fullback Aldo
Vanier and Rob Gillingham
fro mthe JV's as insurance.
Elsewhere in football . . .
The University of Alberta
Golden Bears kept 1500 fans
on the edge of their seats (attempting to stay awake) with
a 71-0 slaughter of The University of Alberta Dinosaurs.
Total offence for the Bears
was 626 yards.
Bears have now won four
straight games and are on top
of the Western Intercollegiate
Conference.
Follow the U.S. election with
a
6  TRANSISTOR  RADIO
complete with earphone case
and battery for only
$9.95
ARNOLDS
PAWN SHOP
986 Granville MU 5-7517
The best-tasting filter cigarette Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 30,  1964
'tween classes
£f2cckif dances slated
Two Halloween dances will
be held this weekend, the first
at International House tonight
at 8:30 p.m. and the Dance
club's Black Mask Ball in tne
Dance Club lounge Saturday
8:00 -12 ip.m.
Admission to the Saturday
dance is 25 cents; refreshments served.
• •    •
VCF
VCF presents The Dope Addict is a Person by Joy Ver-
don, former parole officer, Bu.
106, noon today.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Outstanding color films on
France by Varda, Enrico and
Ruspoli noon today in Bu. 205.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Film The Street will be
shown Monday noon in Bu.
202. Non-members 10c. Oakalla volunteer workers meet
Tuesday noon in Bu. 202 with
Mr. Watt.
• *    *
SPECIAL EVENTS
Raphael Green's film Russia
and its People will be shown
in the auditorium Monday
noon.
• •    •
GERMAN CLUB
Prize-winning sports film
noon today in Bu. 203.
Starting Monday, 64 recordings of German literary pieces
will be played in Rm. 359
Brock Extension on Mondays,
Wednesdays, and Thursdays.
HAMSOC
Radio theory classes will be
held Monday and Wednesday
in the clubroom beginning
next week.
• •    •
General meeting at IH Sunday at 5 p.m. Election of new
board of directors.
• •    •
BODY BUILDING CLUB
Important meeting noon today in Stadium. New members
can sign up.
• •    •
BIOLOGY CLUB
Two films, Between the
Tides and Life in the Woodlot
noon today in Wes. 100.
• •   •
UN CLUB
Father L. N. Kelly of St.
Mark's College speaks on The
Catholic Attitude w Birth Control, Monday noon at International House.
• •    •
UCC
General meeting Monday
noon in Bu. 100. All clubs
must be represented.
• •    •
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Society's Pragmatic View of
Religion or Is Religion Just a
Social Cement. A lecture by
Rev. C. R. Pearson, Monday
noon, in Bu. 102.
• •    •
QUAKERS
Service for worship in Buchanan Penthouse at 11:00 a.m.
Sundays.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST—Green ski jacket last Thursday, Forestry Geology Bldg. Phone
946-2493.	
LOST or taken by mistake, black
rain coat, red lining, College Library Tuesday. Phone Larry at
WA 2-0855.     __
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1959 ALFA Romeo coupe. Engine rebuilt recently. New silver gray
paint. New tires, $2000. MU 3-1891.
'58    METEOR.    Excellent    condition.
Phone  Sharon,  AM  1-8247 after  6.
'57 DODGE H.T. V-8. Full power
equip. Must be seen. Asking $895.
1375 Renfrew. Phone 255-2272.
TAKEN — BRIEFCASE from CHEM
472 Lab Thursday, 22nd, 2:30-2:45
p.m. Reward for books, slide-rule
and briefcase notes. Urgently requested. Bob, AM! 6-0610.
LOST — Black lady's purse, identification inside, on UBC bus Wednesday. Phon 224-9033, E. Inglis.
LOST—Gold purse; also lost, 1 white
bead purse, Armouries, Homecoming. Please contact Forest Club,
F.G.   Bldg.	
FOUND—Man's wrist watch. Phone
Ted,   733-3795.	
FOUND—Reeds for clarinet instrument in front of Ed. Bldg. Publications Office.
FOUND—Black diamond ring. Phone
Dorothy,  FA 5-6103.
Special Notices
13
WHERE   ARE   the   Inn   people   on
Campus ?         	
Transportation 14
RIDERS WANTEDrT:30~ lectures—
Mon. to Sat., 4th Ave. between
Yew and Alma.   Call Jim, 733-9388.
RIDE WANTED from 3878 West
Broadway for 9:30 lectures. Phone
224-9473.
RIDE WANTED from West End
MWF.   Phone   evenings,   685-6616.
RIDERS wanted vicinity of 4th and
Dunbar, Mon.-Sat.. Graduate parking facilities.   Call Janet,  733-2687.
RIDE WANTED from Seymour
Creek or North Vancouver for 8:30
lectures.  Phone YU 7-2362.	
URGENT! Ride needed from vicinity
5400 block Marine Drive, West
Vancouver for 8:30 classes. Phone
WA 1-7911.
WANT TO JOIN carpool vicinity
21st, West Van. Small car. Phone
WA  2-4406.
Wanted
15
CHEM 205 lecture and/or Lab notes
wanted.  Call 224-6707 after 6 p.m.
WANTED—All  unwanted  Apollo  or
'  other   art   magazines.    Telephone
596-5039.
•57'   MORRIS    convert.    New paint.
Sprite   engine.   Dual   carbs. Good
top.  Radio  Trans.,  $595,   or offer.
WA 2-5901.
'56 MG. Rebuilt motor. R & H. Tested. Convert. Good rubber, $625
firm.  Call Jim at CA 8-8926.
FOR   SALE—Austin,   1952.   Sunshine
roof,  $35.  Phone WA 2-1-676.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
EFFICIENT typing service, reasonable rates. Will pick up and deliver,   277-4747.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
2 LITTLE BOYS need baby sitter
Mon. - Wed. - Thurs. Mother at
Univ. Deliver at your home 8 a.m.
on or near campus. Phone 921-7160.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available now. Limited
number.    Get yours  now.
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now   at   the
AMS office.
PETER'S EAR  Is open  (Monday)—
TJioocTy well  about  time.
RENTALS   &   REAL   ESTATE
Rooms
81
SHARING room for male student.
Private entrance, bathroom and
phone. Near UBC gates, reasonable. CA 4-3648 after 5.
COMFORTABLE room, sharing, $25
month—single, $40 month, board
optional.   RE  3-7369.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
KENTSVILLE
Saturday is definitely the
last performance of Sweet Substitute. Performance at 8:00
p.m.   No  performance tonight.
• •    •
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Gary Mullins will speak on
his trip to Africa with slides
Sunday at 8:00 p.m.
• •    •
WUS
A workshop on World University Service at International House Saturday 2-5:30 p.m.
History and aims of WUS
will be discussed. All welcome.
Bev Bie and Sheila Dyer
will report on the WUSC Seminar held this summer in Algeria Saturday noon in Bu.
203.
• •    •
FINE ARTS
Monday noon Dr. John M.
Norris, Department of History
speaks on Politics and Society
in Hogarth's London in La.
104.
G. S. A
GENERAL
MEETING
FRIDAY NOV. 6
AT  4  P.M
ALL GRADUATE
STUDENTS ELIGIBLE
SENIOR FEMALE STUDENT desired to share suite with same
English Bay view; transportation
included. Phone after 6 p.m., 684-
9687 for Mildred.
You'll dote on the newest colour partners . . .
Ink and Pink . . . created for Young Moderns
by PRETTY TALK FASHIONS! It's the fresh-
est, most sophisticated combination for miles
around. . . Winter navy,, tickled pink ... in
fashions of soft diagonal wool. Make yours the
little slip of a dress with Chelsea collar or the
lace-appliqued pretty on the same wave length.
Both in sizes 5 -13. Each 29.95
Lively fashions for young moderns from
The  Bay Collegienne  Shop,  third  floor.
INCORPORATED  Z<!1   MAY   WTO.
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE

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