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The Ubyssey Feb 21, 1984

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 37
Vancouver, B.C.Tuesday, February21,1984
:vi>i.h 48
228-2301
Restraint budget tramples education
Gov't
abolishes
B.C. grants
The Social Credit government
singlehandedly abolished grants for
B.C. students Monday and decreased its contribution to Canada's student aid program by a whopping 83
per cent.
A mere $2.5 million was set aside
for the revised program, down from
last year's budgeted $14.6 million.
And student leaders are upset and
angry as a result of the swift decisions unveiled with the budget.
"The Socreds made no financial
commitment what-so-ever. It is a
student aid program in name only,
and will not provide access to post-
secondary education for students
without money," said Lisa Hebert,
outgoing Alma Mater Society external affairs coordinator.
Hebert charged the government is
denying students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds the right to
attend higher education. The decisions reflect a "fundamental
philosophical change" within the
Social Credit caucus, she added.
Stephen Learey, Canadian
Federation of Students' — Pacific
region outgoing chair, said the
move to abolish grants will create
massive debt loads for students
needing assistance.
"I think this is the greatest attack
on post secondary education in
B.C. ever," he said.
An average student in B.C. will
amass a $20,800 debt over four
years, according to a recent CFS
study. If a student repays the debt
over a period of 10 years with a 10
per cent interest rate, he or she will
face a bill of more than $34,000.
"People will be forced to decide
between getting an education or
buying a house," said Learey.
UBC financial aid director Byron
Hender said the changes violate an
agreement reached between the provincial and federal governments last
June. The agreement stated the
federal government would increase
loan money if the provinces promised not to decrease their contributions.
"B.C. is decreasing its support,
contrary to the spirit of ths agreement," he said.
Hender said students who must
move away from home to attend
university or college will especially
encounter difficulty collecting
enough money for an education.
"Our student aid program is out
of line. B.C. is the only province in
the country expecting students to
carry such a high debt load."
He added the changes will
decrease support for the Social
Credit party in the interior because
students there will be affected the
most. The interior usually strongly
supports the Socreds, he said.
Both Learey and Hender charged
that the government refused to consult either students or student aid
officers about impending changes
or alternative programs.
The government also refuses to
release information on the number
and economic backgrounds of
students applying for aid in an effort to thwart CFS's attempts to
confront the government about its
policies, added Learey.
"If we don't have information,
we are shooting in the dark."
Government officials were
unavailable   for   comment.
iW-^^*<^
CABINET .
unleashes more restraint
Job scheme to encourage debt
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
The provincial government
unveiled a new employment scheme
Monday supplying students with
loans to create summer businesses,
but critics say the project will only
push students further into debt.
"It's loony. Who's going to take
a loan when they're a student and
only have four months to work?"
asked Tami Roberts, incoming
chair of the Canadian Federation of
Students — Pacific region.
Students receiving the provincial
loans must repay the money in the
fall and will be able to pocket any
profit. The government failed to
announce the amount of money
which the labor ministry will provide under the summer scheme, and
officials were unavailable for comment.
Roberts said she suspects the
government is diverting money
from other student programs for
the project.
"It's not new dollars," she said,
adding the funds might be taken
from the provincial student grant
program abolished the same day the
scheme was announced.
But the funds will not come from
the Youth Employment Program,
which was allocated $10 million —
the same amount as last year. The
NDP government allocated $26
million for the YEP in 1974.
With the national unemployment
rate for 15 to 24 year olds looming
around 20 per cent this year,
Stephen Learey, outgoing CFS —
Pacific region chair, said the
government is failing to address the
problem adequately.
Learey predicted the unemployment situation in B.C. this summer
for students will be even less promising than last year because the
government's elimination of several
social service jobs has flooded the
job market with highly qualified
people. Almost one out of every
four young people was unemployed
last summer, an increase of 123 per
cent from two years ago, according
to Statistics Canada.
The scheme, called the student
venture capital program, will not
benefit many B.C. students because
few will risk the investment, he
said. "If the business goes belly up,
it may mean the end of the student's
education."
NDP caucus researcher Chris Eve
said students participating in the
program and surviving on student
aid must now go into debt for both
summer and winter living expenses.
He called the program a little "better than a kick in the teeth" for
students who formerly received provincial grant money.
But the federal government is attempting to provide more money
for beleaguered unemployed young
people. Federal finance minister
Marc Lalonde recently announced
an extra $150 million will be kicked
in the $1 billion Youth Opportunity
Fund, another job creation program.
Although Learey said the extra
money is largely an "elections
ploy" designed to garner the youth
vote, he added the fund will help
alleviate the worsening situation.
"The $150 million doesn't break
down to much between 10 provinces, but it's better than
nothing."
Funding
pegged at
five per cent
By CHRIS WONG
After much deliberation, the provincial government finally decided
Monday to decrease university funding by five per cent — one per cent
less than the anticipated amount.
But student leaders and university administrators are not satisfied
with the government's long awaited
decision and apparent change in
commitment to B.C.'s post secondary education.
"I wouldn't call it any sort of victory," said Stephen Learey, outgoing Canadian Federation of
Students - Pacific Region chair.
Learey said the one per cent difference does not significantly improve the university's critical financial situation. UBC will save about
$1.8 million by receiving only a five
per cent decrease, he added.
In the budget speech delivered
Monday, finance minister Hugh
Curtis said universities should use
the savings to lower tuition fee increases.
"I would expect the universities
to use the extra funding to restrain
the increases in tuition that have
been announced," he said.
Learey said he doubts the universities will take Curtis' advice,
although he acknowledged the
recently announced tuition increases were based on a six per cent
cut in funding.
"The tuition fee increases are
directly proportional to the cutbacks in education," Learey said.
Administration president George
Pedersen said the administration
implemented tuition increases to bring fees paid by B.C. students in
line with much higher amounts paid
in other provinces.
Pedersen said the government is
now contradicting itself by asking
universities to lower the increases.
"That's like saying: 'do you want
to be drawn or quartered?' The fact
is we have a huge deficit we have to
deal with."
But UBC might reconsider its
decision to increase fees, he said.
"We"' have a look at it but at the
moment I wouldn't be too optimistic."
The administration is currently
looking at other areas in UBC's
operating budget that might benefit
from the savings, and the Universities Council of B.C. must still
decide how remaining funds will be
distributed among the universities.
UBC secretary Lee Southern said
the council meets Feb. 27 to decide
on funding allocation totalling
$285,943,000 — five per cent less
than last year's $300,993,000.
Southern said the funding cut
might not equal exactly five per cent
for each university. "We haven't
determined exactly how much it will
equal. The council wants to see it all
on paper before it makes a
decision."
Universities minister Pat McGeer
might ask UBC to "give consideration" to certain areas, he added.
"He may well do that. It's certainly
in his perogative," Southern said.
Meanwhile, the University of Victoria's faculty association president
says investment in post-secondary
education generates more revenue
See page 2: AWARENESS Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1984
Cuppies back DTUC paper
Delegates to the Canadian
University Press Western Region's
spring conference voted
unanimously last weekend to exchange news stories between
member papers and the Exit in
Nelson, B.C., David Thompson
University Centre's fledgling student newspaper.
"The decision by the members to
send their newspapers to DTUC is a
clear motion of solidarity," said
Gordon Clark, WRCUP presidentelect and Ubyssey staff member.
The Exit, which began publishing
December 1983, sent representatives to the WRCUP conference
to gain support in their fight for
survival. The provincial government decided Jan. 4 DTUC will
close at the end of this spring
term. Students, faculty and administration of the institution are
committed to keeping DTUC open.
Representatives of 13 papers
came from Winnipeg to Victoria to
the conference site at mystical
Evans Lake, B.C., and decided to
send   letters   of   support   to   the
Reflector, the student newspaper of
Mount Royal College in Calgary.
The Reflector is opposing editorial
control and censorship by the college administration of Journal
3009, Mount Royal's journalism
school newspaper.
The conference also saw the election of WRCUP's 1984-85 executive and staff. Along with Clark,
two other B.C. writers were elected
to staff positions.
Erin Mullen of the Martlet, the
University of Victoria student
newspaper, will be next year's B.C.
Bureau Chief, and Dale Jack of the
Peak at Simon Fraser University
will be moving to Winnipeg as the
incoming Prairie Bureau Chief.
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From page 1
than expenses for provincial coffers.
But Gordon Shrimpton says governments in B.C. have decreased
education funding to 3.5 per cent of
the total budget from six per cent a
decade ago.
Universities have been under
siege for more than 10 years, long
before the current recession,
Shrimpton told a recent forum on
the future of UVic.
He said universities' reputations
ALL STUDENTS WELCOME!
The Annual General
Meeting of the
Alma Mater Society
of the U.B.C.
will be held
Wednesday,
February 22, 1984
12:30 p.m., Rm. 206 (Council Chambers)
of the Student Union Building
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sank because the institutions and
faculty members have failed to educate the public on what a university
is.
"People cannot understand it unless they have been a part of it. People outside see it as fancy buildings,
piles of equipment, books and supplies," he said.
"But it is more. (Universities are
where) people learn and practice independence of thought. It is perhaps the only institution in society
with this goal."
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ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
6138 S.U.B. Boulevard Tuesday, February 21,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Environment 2000 creates jobs
By ROSS PINK
Students interested in forestry
and the environment can take advantage of the federal government's
new Environment 2000 job creation
program.
Environment 2000 information of
ficer Sheila Ritchie estimated the
program will create 564 to 1,410
new jobs lasting 10 to 20 weeks.
B.C. will receive $3.7 million in project money.
The program's aim is forestry
conservation, with more than half
the money, $2.4 million, devoted to
Demo will protest
Kissinger speech
Protesters waving placards and
handing out literature will confront
diners entering the plush Hyatt
Regency hotel Wednesday for a
$150 a plate meal featuring Henry
Kissinger.
Pat Hercus from the coalition
against the Kissinger visit said she
anticipates up to 800 people will
protest the former U.S. Secretary of
State's Vancouver speaking engagement.
"Basically we're a<ming to make
it clear to Kissinger that there's a
large number of people in Vancouver who are opposed to his peddling of militaristic policies," she
s.aid.
Hercus criticized the recommendations Kissinger brought forward
while chairing the Reagan administration's   special  commission
on Central America.
Reagan accepted all the commission's recommendations including
an increase of $8 billion in aid to the
El Salvadorean and Guatemalan
governments.
"The Reagan administration and
Kissinger are ignoring (peace) proposals and going for a militarv solution."
She added Kissinger was involved
with the CIA backed coup which
overthrew Chilean president
Salvadore Allende in 1973 and
helped formulate U.S. policies during the Viet nam war. "We feel that
he is very dangerous to world
peace."
The picket line will start at 6 p.m.
with a rally-following at 7:30 p.m.,
Hercus said, adding that music will
be interspersed throughout.
forestry related projects. The remaining $1.3 million will go to environmental projects.
The program will include such
projects as tree clearing, thinning
and planting, trail clearing, cleaning
rivers and increasing community
awareness of conservation.
The jobs are open to people between the ages of 18 and 24 and over
50. Preference will be given to
women, native Indians and the
disabled, said Ritchie. She added
the government is trying to balance
the program geographically to
avoid placing all the projects in one
area.
Peter Saunders, UBC research
forest director for Maple Ridge,
said the employment projects will
benefit forestry students in particular because they will be able to
collect data and work experience.
But he said some projects such as
river cleaning might be useless.
"After spending 20 weeks on clearing a river, the entire project could
be neutralized in 15 minutes" by a
sudden deluge of debris, he said.
Brush control, tree spacing and
pruning will be important projects
in an effort to protect the environ
ment, Saunders added. These projects will prevent forest fires by
removing excess debris, he said.
Environment 2000 will consider
project applications submitted by
communities, non-profit organizations, businesses and individuals.
The deadline for applications is
Feb. 22.
Students interested in applying
should contact local Canadian
employment centres. Work projects
will start as early as April and must
be completed by March 1985. Successful applicants will be paid at
least minimum wage.
Council may get f reebies
Council Card. Don't leave home
without it.
Next year's council members may
receive a council card which will
give them free admission to Alma
Mater Society Events.
"It sounds like patronage to
me," said incumbent student
senator Marvin Friesen.
The card could attract better
council members said student
senator Brad Waugh, adding that
they might feel compelled to work
harder.
"Primarily its a perk but council
members need perks," he said.
The cards would not apply to
constituency organizations' events
he said.
Ticket sales losses resulting from
Wit
the card would be made up in
alcohol profits "because council
members are raving alcoholics," he
said.
»    *    *
Student council appointed a committee Wednesday to help raise
$10,000 in donations for the Crane
library to produce more talking
books for blind students.
Waugh said the money would pay
for recording about 160 new books
at $500 to $1000 each.
Lisa Hebert, AMS external affairs coordinator, said the plan
might backfire because it could
harm the efforts to persuade the
provincial government to increase
their share of funding for the
library.
"THAT NOSE — I'd know it anywhere. Haven't we met before?" asks Robert Redford lookalike
to be a lot larger until I had a nose job," retorts very miffed Groucha Mark (no relation to Karl)
both agreed to get together again sometime for coffee.
— stuart dee photo
on left. "It used
lookalike. They
Police kidnap and interrogate Vancouver activist
A supporter of the Vancouver
Five charged Wednesday that Vancouver police kidnapped, interrogated, robbed and physically intimidated her.
Geri Ferguson alleged police
grabbed her from a downtown
street corner, held her without
charge for nine hours and intermittently beat and interrogated her
Feb. 6.
A member of Women Against
Prisons for the past four years,
Ferguson told 50 UBC sociology
students in Anso 207 that police
questioned her about her work
with the five people currently on
trial in New Westminster. She said
police also asked her about political
mailing lists and publication of certain political literature.
She said she considered herself
fortunate because people publically
supported her at a Feb. 13
demonstration outside the Vancouver police station. More than
100 demonstrators protested in
Ferguson's favor and against police
harassment of political activists.
"The authorities feel threatened
by political activity toward alternative ways of living," she said.
Ferguson said she was a victim of
^ffig^yg""^^
— geri farguson graphic
extreme brutality while staying at
Oakalla prison from 1979 to 1980.
During a 28 day stint in solitary
confinement, she claims a group of
seven male guards beat her and
deprived her of food, clothing,
medical and legal assistance.
She laid criminal charges against
the prison guards but her testimony
was discounted because of racial
bias — Ferguson is a Metis Indian
— and because only one female
guard corrobated her testimony,
she said. Prison officials later fired
the guard for "having told the
truth," she said.
One crime and society sociology
student said Ferguson's recent experiences at the hands of Vancouver
police were similar to that of her
sister, also a native Indian, who was
abducted by the police from a
downtown bar last year and held
without charge for several hours.
Last December, another Indian
woman also experienced severe
police harassment. Veronica Bulter,
known for her work against the
Lone Star hotel bar's racist practices, was allegedly beaten by Vancouver police on the eve of a
meeting she helped organize in support of U.S. political prisoner
Leonard Peltier.
**. .^^ *
»; Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1984
Administration squelches newspaper freedom
CALGARY (CUP) — Mount
Royal College administrators
dislike faculty members who complain and the newspapers that print
such complaints.
The college board of governors
investigated five instructors who
criticized president Don Baker in
Journal 3009, a journalism school
newspaper,   Dec.   12.   The  three-
week investigation ended Feb. 8,
but results have not been released.
The instructors blamed Baker's
authoritarian management style for
the high level of administration-
faculty friction since his appointment two years ago.
The board funds Journal 3009
and Dave Thomas, business studies
and    applied   arts   dean,    now
Council protests elitism
HAMILTON, Ont. (CUP) —
McMaster University's student
council denounced the administration policy of preferential admission to campus residences for,
"model" students, even though it
benefits from the practice.
The policy, adopted two years
ago, offers students who are
valuable athletes, club presidents or
participants in student government,
a place in residence before other applicants. The policy is designed so
"model" students may have a
"positive impact" on other
students.
Student union president Terry
Fallis began the campaign to have
the policy changed because he
believes it is elitist.
"I don't think a student who has
neither the inclination nor the time
for such (student) activities should
be displaced in favor of one who
does," Fallis said. Many students,
especially those in professional
faculties, have no time for activities
other than study, he said.
McMaster also gives residence
preference to students with high
marks. The student union has not
objected to this policy, but some
council members said it is
hypocritical to oppose preference
for "model" students while condoning it for those with high marks.
Residence council representative
Adelle Tennier said many residence
students are opposed to the
discriminatory policy.
Upon passage of the motion,
Fallis said he will take the matter up
with the university senate committee on student affairs.
previews articles. There are no
criteria for acceptable articles, but
Thomas has already changed a Feb.
1 story on the investigation.
Vice president Tom Woods headed the investigation into whether it
was appropriate for instructors to
criticize the administration and
board in a college funded
newspaper.
The investigation raises issues of
academic freedom and freedom of
the press, said Barry Pashak, Alberta Association of College Faculties
vice president.
Faculty are angry with Baker's
apparent lack of concern for staff
relations in his "obsession" with a
$60 million expansion project, and
his "political, manipulative" style
that has eliminated any faculty role
in the budgetary process, critics in
the Dec. 12 article say.
Mount Royal's faculty signed a
contract in December after a bitter
11-month struggle. The previous
contract included a 15 per cent increase in work load, which was implemented immediately. Faculty
said they felt the abrupt change was
unfair.
"When we dig in our heels and
stick to our demands, we are called
'unreasonable bastards' by the ad-
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ministration; when we give in to the
board's demands,  we are called
'suckers'," said one instructor in
Journal 3009.
Dean Thomas said major changes
at the college, including the president's personality, hard economic
times and increased student enrolment are the real sources of increased tension.
Hate graffiti escalates
MONTREAL — (CUP) —
Words of hate are mushrooming at
McGill University as anti-gay, anti-
lesbian, anti-semitic graffiti become
commonplace in university washrooms.
Although graffiti is "not as scary
as more subtle forms of abuse," it
is still abuse, says Nigel Crowhall,
member of McGill's gays and lesbians.
The writing on the walls sport
everything from the standard fear
of gays to death threats.
While graffiti is a growing trend,
anti-gay jokes have always been
found in the engineering student
paper, The Plumber's Pot.
Despite attempts by some
students to clean up the engineering
papers, anonymous authors continue to publish hate literature.
Jewish students have also complained over the past year about increasing anti-semitic. graffiti.
"I think it represents a general
tendency toward adoption of
repressive values within society
right now," says Sybil Plank of the
McGill Women's Union.
"Being homosexual, lesbian or
Jewish has never been popular."
Plank attributes the increase in
such graffiti to a "society growing
more conservative."
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
By CATHY McDONALD
Canadian University Press
Celine Hervieux-Payette radiates optimism. She talks in a rambling fashion
about problems youth face today, such
as the culture gap between generations,
and the "misunderstandings" that stop
employers from hiring youth.
But Hervieux-Payette talks with
assurance about her plans to tackle
youth unemployment with initiative
and innovation.
Former fitness and amateur sports
minister, she is now minister of state
for youth, and a willing contributor to
the Liberal government's department
shuffle to let youth know their concerns are also the government's.
Defining Hervieux-Payette's new
role is difficult, especially since she
hasn't been given any new funds. Her
Jan. 10 appointment gave her responsibility for three youth programs moved from other portfolios, but her main
task is to evaluate and coordinate programs in other ministries that concern
youth.
And some day she may be in a position to recommend new programs.
I'm willing to experiment with
some pilot projects — to do anything
... the problem is huge."
The Canadian Federation of
Students has been favourable to the
creation of a youth ministry, but still
questions its significance.
"They say they want to 'focus'
youth programs," said CFS chair
Graham Dowdell. "What does it
mean?"
Hervieux-Payette has no new friends
to play with, but was given responsibility for the $170 million summer
employment program, the international youth exchange, the $90 milion
International Year of Youth purse,
proclaimed for 1985 by the United Nations.
Along with the new youth ministry,
the Dec. 7 throne speech announced a
$1 billion Youth Opportunities Fund.
But the Liberal's image of the youth
fund as a major new program were
quickly dismissed by opposition
members in the House of Commons.
The $1 billion had been previously announced for 1983-84 youth programs.
It represented an increase over the $750
million announced last April, but the
new fund represents no change for
1984-85, although it groups programs
together and gives them a new name.
Dowdell says the youth ministry is
representative of the throne speech. It
is an attempt to turn around the
Liberal party's fortunes by giving the
impression it is doing something for
youth without making any new policy
decisions.
Hervieux-Payette rejects the charge
The ministry
of high hopes
her ministry is a political ploy, and
defends the need for a youth advocate
in government.
"There was no particular person
responsible for identifying problems of
youth and having clout. Labor and
commerce (interests) all have people
representing their views (to government)."
"My view is I have this portfolio and
I am going to do something more than
just PR ... if we have to reorganize
work so people will gain respect, feel
fulfilled, find a place in society."
Hervieux-Payette, a mother of three,
claims she is aware of the problems
young people face trying to break into
the labor market.
And the unemployment statistics for
youth are bleak.
December's unemployment rate for
Canadians 15 to 24 years old was 18.7
per cent. For 15 to 19 year olds, more
than one in five were out of work in
1983, with an unemployed average of
22.3 per cent.
High youth unemployment will be a
fact of life for the foreseeable future.
The Conference Board of Canada, a
private economic forecasting agency,
predicts almost 20 per cent unemployment throughout 1985, with that figure:
remaining high until the year 1990,
even if the economy strengthens.
After knocking on too many closed
doors, thousands of youth are flocking
to colleges and universities to upgrade
skills and wait for a better break. Bui:
that option is also being restricted.
Enrolment quotas are fast being implemented to stop the influx of
students, as institutions cannot handle
annual enrolment hikes with stagnant
or diminishing government funding.
Also, student aid programs in two pro
vinces, Nova Scotia and B.C., have
been restricted.
The Quebec caucus of the Liberal
Party recognized the extend of frustration among youth, and this was one of
its main reasons for plugging the creation of a youth ministry.
In a confidential paper, Senator Jacques Hebert outlined how unemployment leads to drug abuse and increased
suicides. He described a youth department's role as drawing attention to
already existing programs to let youth
know their government is concerned.
"In spite of all its efforts, in the
short term the Canadian government
cannot solve the youth unemployment
problem. What it can do, however,
what it must do for moral as well as
political reasons, is restore hope to
young people . . . and a simple and inexpensive way of achieving this objective is to create a federal department of
youth as soon as possible," his report
says.
If the youth ministry's objective is to
restore hope, Graham Dowdell said he
feels the government is on the wrong
track.
"The thing that's going to restore
hope to young people is jobs. They
don't give a damn about the ministry
. . . if the ministry will help to provide
those it will provide hope, nothing
else."
While Hebert said she sees the youth
department's role as creating a new impression among youths, Hervieux-
Payette distanced herself from that
viewpoint.
"If I were pessimistic enough to say
we're doing it just to appease, I'm not
sure I would have taken the job."
But Hervieux-Payette tells youth to
be realistic and not expect jobs handed
out on a platter. She doesn't believe in
relying on job creation projects, the
traditional response to unemployment.
"If I was a conformist person, I probably wouldn't be here."
The youth ministry will encourage
youth initiative at creating their own
opportunities.
"You (youth) know very well the
jobs are there."
Hervieux-Payette said youth need to
be more innovative and show more initiative.
"If you increase productivity and increase a company's profits, you increase the number of jobs."
And Hervieux-Payette will be
pushing for youth's interests in cabinet
and to unions and business, breaking
down some of the misunderstandings
and prejudices caused by the culture
gap, she said.
"I think I can do something. I think
I'm not the only one. There's a will in
society to do it," she said. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1984
Magazines avoid
the real world
News item: Henry Kissinger comes to town.
Beyond restraint
A wise person once wrote that education is the cornerstone of a progressive society. Unfortunately, this
view is not shared by the Socred government.
Under the guise of restraint, the government tabled
a very conservative budget Monday. Among other
things, the budget is notable for cutbacks in education.
The budget calls for a five per cent reduction in
education funding. Ironically, spending on private
schools will increase by 10 per cent.
The government is abolishing its grant program to
university and college students. General funding for
student aid has been slashed by 83 per cent. While
$14.5 million was earmarked for student aid in 1983,
this figure will shrink to $2.5 million in 1984.
In addition, the government is not increasing Youth
Employment Program funding which means it will be
more difficult for students to finance their educations
through summer and part-time work.
Few citizens are opposed to restraint in a time of
deep recession. When provincial revenues are sharply
reduced by recession — it is generally expected the
government must reduce its spending.
But the government's latest budget caps a long and
severe assault on education in this province. They go
far beyond the required limitations of restraint. The
current cutbacks in education reflect a philosophy
rather than a budgetary necessity.
By limiting education opportunities and services,
the government is lowering the standard of education
in B.C. If these actions continue, efforts to avoid
future shortages of skilled and professional people will
be severely handicapped.
Education in one of the means by which a society
prepares for the future. By increasing opportunities for
education we increase our opportunities for the future.
It is noteworthy that one prominent UBC official has
recently stated that in five years we will face serious
shortages of skilled people in this province.
Education should not be judged solely on the basis
of cost. Cost does not become a consideration when
we provide pensions for the aged or health care for the
destitute. Education is a service of tremendous value
to society.
For this reason, the Socred government should
commit itself to the task of preserving and promoting
education in this province.
Letters
Ubyssey scribe called 'homophobic'
for report on gay seminar
Muriel Draaisma's article The
love that dare not speak its name
(Feb. 14) is a fine example of inaccurate reporting and bias. As a lesbian poet and short story writer, I
attended the workshop in question
Feb. 11. First of all any persons attending an event for coverage in a
paper should state clearly they are
there as a representative of the
press. It is only fair and ethical to
let this be known. The reporter did
not do this.
My main criticism is the following: Benson didn't say "I write
stories about ageing dykes . . .
stories." Making this appear to be
Benson's own words by adding
quotation marks is a misrepresentation. Rather it seemed clear
throughout the discussion that Benson wanted to write such stories but
suspected the rest of the lesbian
community would be upset. I don't
find it funny or entertaining to
repeatedly come across such words
as "giggle," "quietly laughed,"
"her hair softly draping her face."
In fact, I'm angered, especially
when reading: "suddenly assuming
a masculine, matter of fact voice."
How ridiculous and off the wall!
My immediate reaction was to con
clude the reporter most likely is not
a dyke herself. What kind of images
do these descriptions give of Benson
and in fact of any women? If I
didn't know any better I would
think she was another dumb blond
as women are so often portrayed,
who "would dearly love to get a
piece of tail but can't," as the
reporter tries to assure us. This
feeds directly into the false ideas
people have about lesbians and
Benson seemed aware of the
dangers of stereotyping. Once and
for all: lesbians aren't lesbians
because we can't get a man. We are
because we love women and want to
express and live that love.
We also want our human rights
and the longer people insist on making up stories about us, the harder it
will be for us to achieve them. Conferences of this kind are important
because they bring us together to
discuss aspects of our lives and
things we wish to do, particularly to
being gay in a world which consistently ignores us, and at the same
time they decrease our invisibility to
the world. They deserve thorough
and correct coverage: not tolerance
and not ignorance and not condens-
cion. So next time you want a gay
event covered, I suggest you either
send someone who is gay or a
straight person who's looked at the
homophobic — fear of lesbians and
gays — bias they bring with them.
Joanna Coosemans
science 2
Staff Note: The Ubyssey staffer
in question identified herself as a
reporter at the seminar's beginning
when everyone in the room introduced her or himself. She said
she was covering the event for The
Ubyssey, and was wearing a press
sticker which clearly indicated she
was a reporter.
Have you got something that
really pisses you off? Well, vent
your spleen by writing a letter to
The Ubyssey and give 15,000 people
the privilege of reading your turgid
prose. Make sure it's typed, triple
spaced, with 70 characters to a line.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
fold, spindle, mutilate, or otherwise
chop up your chef d'oeuvre for
length, sexism, racism, and libel.
Just send your letter along with a
fifty dollar bill and a bottle of any
fine wine to Room 241K, Students'
Union Building.
By ROBERT BEYNON
"This generation has no discer-
nable social concern," a rock
magazine publisher said recently.
His Seattle publication, The
Rocket, grew to a circulation of
65,000 in three years by offering an
alternative to "liberal orthodoxy."
It included an article praising
handguns.
If magazines are a sign of the
times, modern society is one which
rejects personal relationships,
glorifies violence, and believes rich
is right — but these views must
change.
(freestyle)
The solutions many of today's
publications offer for human problems do not deal adequately with
our complex social life. Take
Playboy, which purports to explain
sexuality to men.
The glossy porn magazine portrays a world in which friendship
and relationships between men and
women are secondary to sex. For
example, on Playboy's March
cover, now on magazine racks, a
young nude woman, blonde, obviously posed for the male viewer,
looks available for sex witn any
magazine purchaser.
Headlines in gold capital letters
on either side of her head read:
"Pre-Med Student Porn Star,
She'll give you Fever" and "Big
Women (Beautiful Too) an Abundant Pictorial."
Playboy's central articles are
glossy pictorials of nude women,
displayed like cars in a brochure.
The magazine presents women as
being available to men as cigarettes
are available to a smoker.
Few people would argue sexual
meetings without emotions are
desirable. But in Playboy this type
of relationship is glorified.
The best selling women's
magazine Vogue also displays a cold
individualistic world, but the emphasis is different. Wealth, beauty
and style are glorified by Vogue's
advertisements, which comprise 66
per cent of the 426 portfolio pages
in Vogue's February issue.
The advertisements depict slight
women clothed in bright expensive
high fashions, make up and matching accessories, posing in exotic
or rich surroundings.
Whereas Playboy included
numerous ads depicting couples,
Vogue has few. The ideal woman
here is seductive, cold, wealthy, and
harshly beautiful.
The magazine's sections are
divided into fashion, beauty and
health, and what people are talking
about.  There is no discussion of
politics, occupations, relationships,
or other mundane subjects.
Neither Vogue nor Playboy deal
with the real world.
Besides these literary offerings,
there are new magazines which
glorify violence, like Heavy Metal
or Soldier of Fortune. Heavy Metal
displays a future degenerated earth
whose technology has destroyed its
environment and culture. In this
sci-fi future, physical violence rules
and people fight with battle axes
and magic.
Women's bodies are dressed in
loin-cloths, G-strings or nothing at
all, while their male counterparts
dress in jackets, pants, t-shirts and
boots.
Characters are brutal. In one
strip, an android thrusts a man's
hand into a whirring fan blade,
crushes a monkey with its foot, and
competes in a competition to the
death in which it kills numerous
people.
Heavy Metal's viewpoint is
cynical — the future will be violent.
Mob rule and survival of the
ruthless will be the order of the day,
and strong men will have control
over weaker women.
Heavy Metal's
viewpoint is cynical
— the future
will be violent.
Throughout these magazines,
wealth is implicitly the greatest of
ideals. The rich will get the best,
and will be able to get away with
violent, ruthless acts. This generation idolizes the cold, rich individual.
Fashion, style, money, sex . . .
you cannot build a society on these
foundations. People require complex social interactions to remain
happy, and many of today's
magazines reject these necessary
"human" elements in our lives.
A generation with no social concerns . . . impossible. It would be
like a person who claims life is
pointless, yet continues to live.
What advice can you give such a
person? Commit suicide or start
trying to improve life.
Freestyle is a column open to
Ubyssey staffers to display their in-
cisve and original analysis of the no
future generation. Robert Beynon is
an arts student and Ubyssey
reporter dedicated to removing
society's evils.
THE UBYSSEY
February 21, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
From tha mysterious orient came Stewart Dee and Chrit Wong, from bitter Winnipeg liana
Simon, Dale Jack and Kevin Russell, undeterred by the hilly terrain and curvy roads, from
under Saskatoon Brian Receuver ventured forth and from the east rode Andrea Bekker,
Harry Hertscheg, Alar Olljum, Peter Kurtenberg and Albert Nurenberg, drawn, they said, by
the light of a star. Cathy McDonald sacrificed snug Ottawa to be there and Gordon Clark.
Monte Stewart and Robert Beynon offered their morbid celtlc brooding, all they had. 'tch bin
ein Londoner' said Peter Berlin but that did not alter the fact that he and Muriel Double
Dutch Draaisma had come a long way. Lornna Olson came hot foot from California and Ross
Pink from Tlmbuctoo. Where others like Karen Barstow cams from none knew. Some like
Rory Allen and Stephen Wisenthal arranged to be born in Vancouver just to have a head
start. But in the end they were ell in the Ubyssey mesthead end they all agreed it was worth it
because it was the best student newspaper in the whole wide world, and if you don't believe
us, then you don't know how lucky you are. Tuesday, February 21, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC daycare praised for superb quality
I was astonished that a reputable
newspaper like The Ubyssey would
publish an opinion piece on UBC
Day Care (Jan. 10) that contained
such abusive statements about a day
care I happen to be familiar with. I
have been doing parent duty weekly
at Unit 11 for approximately a year
and have been amazed at the tranquility, patience and security maintained with under three children.
I have recently retired from
teaching at a college and had been
closely associated with the early
childhood education program, even
doing some short courses with that
group of students. My colleagues in
early childhood education at the
college have been impressed with
the quality of care exhibited at Unit
11. Students in the program are
anxious to have their practicum at
this centre. Two of the students
who gained experience at this centre
were so impressed that they are going on to take extra training to
qualify for employment in a day
care.
My own children did not have the
advantage of such a progressive
program given by qualified people.
I am anxious that my grandchildren
have the best available advantage to
develop   mentally,   physically,
Kissinger responsible
for Chilean coup
Alessandro Alarcon was a
metalworker, father of three and a
political activist who supported the
Allende government of Chile.
When the military coup of September 1973 destroyed that government, Alarcon went into hiding, but
in early 1974 he was captured by the
secret police. He was tortured most
brutally for two weeks, and finally
castrated and shot. His body was
left in the street as a warning to
others.
Henry Kissinger bears direct responsibility for the fate of Alessandro Alarcon. For three years, Kissinger worked in President Nixon's
"Forty Committee" to destabilize
the democratically-elected Allende
government. In early 1973, Kissin
ger initiated plans for a military
coup and set that coup in motion.
Thirty thousand people died as a result; 30,000 Alessandro Alarcons.
Kissinger will be speaking in Vancouver Feb. 22. Vancouverites will
spend their money to listen to a man
who has unleashed great suffering
on ordinary people.
It is our duty to oppose men like
Henry Kissinger. We cannot bring
back the dead and tortured; but we
can prevent Kissinger from killing
again, in Nicaragua and other Central American countries.
Come out to the demonstration
against   Kissinger   —   Wednesday,
Feb.  22 at 6 p.m.  at  the  Hyatt
Regency in downtown Vancouver.
Kevin Annett
law 1
Human rights demanded
Dear Bill Bennett:
The UBC campus community alliance wishes to express to you its
grave concern about the status of
human rights protection in this province, in this regard the worst in
Canada.
We feel that the only way to remedy this situation is for your government to enact the changes to the
human rights code recommended
by the B.C. human rights commission in its annual report of February 1983.
We also feel if your government
thinks these changes require consultation with members of the public
and human rights groups, it should
convert into action its apparent
commitment to the democratic process and ensure that such consultation is fully public.
Those who are concerned about
human rights in this province have
nothing to hide. Is or is not this true
of the government also?
John Black
acting chairperson
UBC campus community alliance
psychologically and socially. These
children received this at Unit 11.
The quality of staff and the program is superb. The early childhood
training, the licensing, the inspection, and the supervision provided
by the child care licensing department is superior to any child care
available when my children were
young. I have heard some of the
horror stories of unlicensed day
care programs and feel sick for the
poor children who are victims. Il is
the most impressionable time in the
life of a child, impressions that survive for a lifetime. The best of example and care should be given to
our precious children, our country's
most valuable resource. If you do
not have people adequately trained
and later adequately paid, you will
not attract quality personnel to provide quality care. 1 do not want my
grandchildren to be in an unlicensed
facility with people in charge who
have not had education in early
childhood development. I expect
that most parents feel the same.
There is no possible way I can
care for the grandchildren all day
every day and provide such a
stimulating environment and maintain the patience and insight into
child development that the staff at
Unit 11 provide.
I have raised three children and
now am helping with the next
generation, so experience is not the
key to success in this area. Unfortunately,    motherhood   does   not
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This event might be postponed. Please contact Bruce Paisley for details.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23
12:30 P.M.
SUB BALLROOM
come in with the milk. There are
many parents that I do not want my
grandchildren exposed to even for
short periods.
In the year associated with Unit
11,1. have never seen a child in any
way abused, left to cope, mourn or
feel unwanted. I observe and
wonder with amazement how the
staff can cope with the "terrible
two tantrums" continuously, yet
always with gentle persuasion and
enthusiasm, and thus develop
socially acceptable interaction.
Could you get 12 little dears to nap
peacefully in the same room daily
and wake up happy and wanting to
get at all those wonderful activities?
No mother I know could provide so
much.
I wish I had this advantage when
mine were young. I feel sure I
would have been a happier parent,
and thus my children would have
been happier. Perhaps I could have
been a better parent with this kind
of assistance to help promote the
development of self-worth and happiness.
I expect anyone that has children
and is a reasonable thinking parent,
would not believe the accusations
stated.
Margaret Ottem
adult education masters
grandmother
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itavWI Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1984
CFS fights for federal funds
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Federation of Students made
its "best presentation ever" last
week when it asked the House of
Commons finance committee to kill
a proposed $350 million decrease in
education funding.
Federation chair Graham
Dowdell says committee members
took an active interest when CFS
delegates argued Established Programs Financing should not be tied
to the six-and-five restraint program, especially since the government plans to soon phase out the
program.
Dowdell admits the government
will likely push through its plans to
amend the EPF act so education
transfers to the provinces are tied to
six-and-five, but says the Liberals
might agree to earmark funds for
education.
He says the provinces often
redirect funds that should go
toward post secondary education,
and earmarking would solve the
problem. "They listened, but I
don't think  we  should  hold our
Referendum held
on free zone
MONTREAL (CUP) — Students
will decide whether they want Concordia University to be a military-
free zone this March.
If students vote yes in the
student-initiated referendum, they
will send a clear message to administrators that military research is
not wanted.
The referendum results will not
be binding.
Vice rector John Daniels, responsible for university research, Said a
majority yes vote would not be sufficient to sway university research
policy. The final say on
Concordia's research is held by the
university's board of governors,
most of whom have not spoken out
on this issue.
INVESTIGATE!
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Dowdell said after the Feb. 14
presentation.
B.C. was one province which
redirected the federal government's
funds. The Social Credit government froze university funding
despite an eight per cent federal increase for post-secondary education.
The federal government announced its plans to tie EPF to six-
and-five in January. The complicated formula used to set transfer
payments make it difficult to assess
the'exact impact of the cutback, but
its about $350 million, according to
CFS.
More than $100 million of that
would come from this year's
budget.
The amendment to the EPF act
will not become law until the
finance committee completes its
review and brings the proposal back
to the House.
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Reports to the SPORT COORDINATOR. Main responsibility includes the assignment
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Previous experience not required.
TIME COMMITMENT: 6-8 hours per week.
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* PROGRAMMER
Reports to the SPORT COORDINATOR and is responsible to maintain proper
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MARKETING/SALES experience is required.
TIME COMMITMENT: 10-12 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: Available.
* SKI VACATION MANAGER
To act as a liaison between the campus community and the various ski resorts to
market various ski packages and opportnities now made available through the I.M. Program.
Previous PROMOTION experience is required.
TIME COMMITMENT: 10-12 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: Available.
* PUBLISHER/EDITOR
Responsible for the production of the I.M. Newsletter as well as portions of the
newspaper(s) and the Thunderbird Review.
Previous JOURNALISM experience is preferred.
TIME COMMITMENT: 10-12 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: Available.
* FEATURE EDITOR
Prepare feature articles and stories for the I.M. Newsletter, newspaper(s) and the
Thunderbird Review.
JOURNALISM background is preferred.
TIME COMMITMENT: 6-8 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: Available.
* LAYOUT DRAFTS PERSON
Responsible for the arrangement of material made available for each publication. The
presentation of both articles and pictures in an appealing format is the responsibility of
this person.
Previous experience is not essential.
TIME COMMITMENT: 4-6 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: None available.
* PHOTOGRAPHERS (2)
To record on film those features which are a part of the Intramural Sports Program including action shots, team photos,   personnel pictures, etc.
PHOTOGRAPHIC experience and EQUIPMENT is essential.
TIME COMMITMENT: 4-6 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: None Available.
* GRAPHIC ARTIST (1 or 2)
To prepare designs for use in brochures, flyers, advertisements, etc. Experience is
preferred - TALENT IS ESSENTIALI
TIME COMMITMENT: 4-6 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: Available on a contract basis.
* ADVERTISING MANAGER
Prepare means to publicise coming events and activities utilizing the media, posters,
banners, flyers, etc.
No experience is required.
TIME COMMITMENT: 6-8 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: Available.
* ADVERTISING PERSONNEL (10)
To assist in the preparation and distribution of advertising materials announcing coming events and programs. Media, posters, flyers, banners and other means are to be used.
Previous experience is not required.
TIME COMMITMENT: 4-6 hours per week.
HONORARIUM: Not Available. Tuesday, February 21, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
McGill profs caught in shady company scandal
Canadian University Press
By Karem Bastow, Peter Kuiten-
brouwer and Albert Nerenberg
Every seat in the Quebec Superior
Courtroom s filled, mostly by
members of the McGill
microbiology department. Professors and students have arrived
one by one, scattering around the
room for seats without acknowledging each other. At the back, a party
of well dressed McGill administrators sit straight, cocking
their heads in whispered conversation.
Except for a few lawyers and
journalists, every person is here
under subpoena. They are unwilling
participants in a far-flung controversy surrounding two
microbiology professors' elaborate
scheme to make a fortune with their
secret invention called MERLIN.
The courts are blowing open a
scandal that has thrown McGill into
the midst of international financial
speculation and put its board of
governors in a conflict of interest
situation. But more than McGill's
reputation is on the line as details of
the affair unravel — the whole
question of university research and
its relationship to the private sector
is under public scrutiny. And this is
a classic case of such a relationship
gone foul.
Sitting tight-lipped at the front of
the courtroom is microbiology
department chair Irving Devoe and
his colleague Bruce Holbein. Since
Jan. 1, 1983, the two professors
redirected thousands of government
research dollars, McGill
microbiology equipment, staff and
their own teaching time into
MERLIN's secret development.
Their company, Devoe-Holbein
Inc., has patented MERLIN in 15
countries, and watched its share
value jump from 50 cents to $14.45
in the past year.
Following an investigation by the
student newspaper, the McGill Daily, Devoe-Holbein put up $35,000
to apply for a court injunction
against their former employee Dr.
Chun Fia Yam and the McGill Daily, to prevent technical information
about the invention from leaking
out. Yam has filed a number of
counter-actions, including a half
million dollar suit against Devoe-
Holbein. Yam claims to be
MERLIN's real inventor, and says
the professors are trying to lock him
out of any recognition for his work.
Attorneys say the legal battles
will take two years to sort out, a
prospect that must make McGill administrators squirm. Such a controversy hardly helps McGill's $61
million fund raising campaign, the
largest ever in the history of Canadian universities.
The McGill Senate, the body
responsible for academic standards,
rejected a call for a public inquiry in
early December. Instead, McGill
principal David Johnston started an
independent, private inquiry into
the affair.
But despite his efforts, McGill's
dirty linen will still get washed in
public. The Jan. 23 hearing was
postponed until Feb. 6. Meanwhile,
the Quebec Securities Commission
is investigating a charge that Devoe
and Holbein illegally sold shares in
their offshore company Devoe-
Holbein International Inc., to
McGill professors and staff. The
Commission is also looking into
potential illegal stock deals surrounding Belgium Standard, the
company that will market MERLIN
in Canada, and has issued a cease-
trading order.
The financial mastermind of the
Devoe-Holbein financial empire is
Montreal stock promoter Irving
Kott. Kott has a reputation for promoting stock in fledgeling companies
to fantastic heights, and then Tuning off with the profits while the
stock crashes around the suckers
who bought it. He's stood trial
many times over the last ten years
for alleged illegal takeover bids, issuing false prospecti, and the like.
MERLIN's discovery and development took place under very
unusual circumstances for a university research project. In Jan. 1982,
Yam was ostensibly hired as the
microbiology department's chief
chemist. However, he had signed a
confidentiality agreement with
Devoe and Holbein, and was spen-
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ding all his time developing another
of the professors' ideas — a
biological process that removed
iron from liquids, stopping
bacterial growth. It's commercial
potential lay in its ability to preserve
food.
Three months later, Yam's work
took a dramatic turn. "I
discovered," Yam said in an interview, "looking at the compound's
structure, that you could do it much
simpler. There are readily available
organic chemicals which we could
buy quite cheaply, which imitate the
actions of the microbe."
the legal
battles will
take two
years to
sort out...
Devoe and Holbein were ecstatic
at the find, and named the process
MERLIN, Metallic Extraction for
Removal of Liquids fom Industries.
The two professors quickly incorporated Devoe-Holbein Inc., and
proceeded to patent MERLIN
When Yam found his name was not
included in the patent application
he resigned in protest.
MERLIN's development look
place behind locked doors in rented
space in the microbiology building,
and the professors began to show a
growing disrespect for academic
policies and standards.
Devoe's obsession with secrecy
led him to hire people for loyalty,
not   competence.   Former   micro
biology graduate students were
hired to work in pure chemistry.
Their inexperience with lab techniques resulted in several dangerous
spills of radioactive isotopes.
More and more of the department's resources were sucked into
the project. Supplies disappeared
from other labs, including a $20,000
centrifuge, chemicals and several
fraction collectors. Devoe's discretionary slush fund which he controlled as department chair was used to buy supplies for the private
lab. The department's three
secretaries and a technician spent
most of their time on Devoe-
Holbein work, and even the professors' government research
money — $83,000 for research into
bacterial cell division and $45,000
for meningitis research — found its
way into the MERLIN project.
Professors and students complained they could not get Devoe's
or Holbein's attention. "You'd go
in to talk about your data and your
research and he'd be telling you
about how he was going to earn a
million dollars," said one graduate
student.
While the professors were busy
making use of the department's
resources, Devoe and Holbein were
also arranging interesting financial
deals with the university.
McGill's patent policy requires
that professors contribute 20 per
cent of profits earned to the university from inventions made while
working at school. Instead, Devoe
and Holbein gave McGill 20 per
cent of their shares.
Three months later, elaborate
financial sleight of hand ensured
McGill would get far less than its 20
percent. In February, 1983, Devoe-
Holbein International was incorporated offshore in the Dutch Antilles. This is where the real money
would be made.
Unwittingly, McGill may have
found itself in a stock fraud, since it
is a conflict of interest to own
shares in a compay while employing
the people who run it. To avoid this
situation the board of governors
sent their Devoe-Holbein shares to
an independent trust company. But
the board is still in a pickle,
especially because incoming
chancellor A. Jean Grandpre, who
assumes his post in April, also has
connections to the invention.
Grandpre is a director of Stelco
Inc., which owns Torcan Inc., the
Toronto-based corporation with a
contract to build MERLIN's first
prototype.
One or more people in the McGill
administration must have been conscious of the corporate stampede
through the university and allowed
it to develop, but it's unlikely principal Johnson's inquiry will be
made public to shed light on the affair.
Two other committees are considering the broader issues of the
university's corporate involvements, and appropriate relationships between professors who
are major stockholders and the
university they work for.
Many large American universities
already have policies that would
prevent a Devoe-Holbein affair
from ever taking place. At Harvard, for example, Nobell prize-
winning professor Walter Gilbert
was kicked out of the university
after he formed Biogen, a
biotechnical firm, and became its
chief executive officer. Commenting on a similar situation at Yale,
president Bartlett Giamatti said
"when a faculty member becomes
substantially involved in a company, the conflict in norms governing the dissemination of knowledge
becomes very difficult to reconcile.
The burden is more than even the
most responsible faculty member
can be expected to shoulder."
While committees ponder all the
sordid details, the future of
MERLIN is another question mark.
McGill professors, stockholders
and the executive of MERLIN's
marketing firm, are suspicious of
the invention's scientific worth and
certainly the stock.
MERLIN, according to the Arthurian legend, appears mysteriously, performs magical tricks and
vanishes forever.
Berol
EMPHASIS
Berol  EMPHASIS
FLUORESCENT
1
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Non Repro Blue — won't reproduce
when photocopied
NOW,
AN EXCITING NEW WAY
TO PUT LEAD
IN YOUR PENCIL
Berol introduces Cassette.
Unique cartridge refil system
Clean fingers, never touch leads
Available everywhere on campus. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21,1984
TUESDAY
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
ISPC-INTERNAT10NAL HOUSE
Film series. People and Cultures of Canada:
Europeans, The Jews of Winnipeg, Kasuby,
Spirits of an Amber Past, 7:30 p.m , Gate4 International House.
OVERSEAS ANONYMOUS
Regular meeting, newcomers welcome, 12 p.m.,
conference room, Lutheran Campus Centre.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Nominations for elections, all week, very important to show up, SUB 228.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Videotape showing, A. J. Ayer on logical
positivism, noon, Buch. B228.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on plastic surgery given by Dr. A. O.
Courtmanche, noon, IRC 1.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Videotape   and   informational   meeting   about
WUSC overseas posts, noon,. Buch A20.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings, 7:30 p.m., for info, call
228-8664 or 228-4663.
Greg Anthony - visiting evangelist, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 125.
HILLEL
Free hunch sponsored by the B'nai B'rith women,
noon, Hillel House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
All classes in session, evenings, SUB Ballroom.
WEDNESDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, 11-2 p.m., SUB concourse.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
International seminar, speaker Alicia Barsallo,
noon. Garden room. Graduate Student Centre.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT COMPOSITION
GROUP
Mammoth booksale and raffle for a variety of
prizes (draw at 3:30), 9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.,
Buchanan Tower, ground floor lobby.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Annual    general    meeting,    noon.    Council
chambers SUB.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Greg Anthony - visiting evangelist, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 125.
Singing and testimonies, bible study discussion,
topic: Abortion, A Christian Perspective, noon,
SUB 213.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Guest lecturer: Ken Walters "Self-expression,"
noon, Buch. D327.
ISRAEL INFORMATION TABLE
Information on Israel, 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m., SUB
Main mall.
HILLEL
Rap with the Rabbi, noon, Hillel House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Remember practice times are available noon
hours and weekends, SUB partyroom.
THURSDAY
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, name suggestions, social and
religious events, election nomination, noon,
SUB 111 cafeteria.
CUSO-UBC
1984 Development education series - "Native
People - North American Indians and Cultural
Awareness" - Admission free, 7:30 p.m., International House.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Issues   committee   meeting,   6:30   p.m.,
230B.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony  meeting,  all welcome,
p.m., SUB 215.
DIETETICS STUDENTS
Tahitian meal, 4:30-6:30 p.m., Subway
Cafeteria.
UBC FLYING CLUB
Free ground school: ADF approaches guest
flight instructor, everybody welcome, noon,
Hennings 302.
ANARCHIST CLUB
"What is Anarchism"
Buch D 352.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Come and listen to pastor Peter Hsieh speaking
on the topic of pain and suffering, noon, Scarfe
206.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Discussion evening, this week: Meateating and
Animal rights, 7 p.m.. International House, cof-
feeplace.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Economic effects of the amis race, a lecture by
E. Bjarnason, Trade Union Research Bureau,
noon, Hebb Theatre.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, all are welcome, 1:30
p.m., SUB 215.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT IN
SCRIPTURE
Discussion: a christian perspective of other
religions, part 2, noon, Scarfe 204.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture, Dr. T. Gould talks on periodontics, people interested in next years executive positions
may contact John or Leslie at this time, noon,
IRC 1.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film showing - "A Question of Balance"
(Religion in China), BBC production; pan 2 in a
series on world religions shown on Thursdays,
admission free, noon, Asian Centre Aduitorium.
JEWISH STUDENTS NETWORK
Network seminar, noon, Hillel House.
FRIDAY
UBC DANCE CLUB
The Masquerade party, 7:30 p.m., UBC Grad
Centre.
SOCIAL WORK DEPARTMENT
Feminism and Family Therapy, symposium, cost
$75, students $37.50, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m..
Health Sciences, Psychiatry.
PAULA ROSS DANCE STUDIO
Dance performance, free admission, noon, SUB
auditorium.
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Bzzr garden, 4 p.m. to midnight, SUB 205.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Reception for senator Richard Stanbury, president of the Liberal Party of Canada (1968-1973),
free admission, 8 p.m., 1984 W. Broadway.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Gym night, badminton, basketball and volleyball,
8-11 p.m., Osborne Sports Centre.
THUNDERBALL VOLLEYBALL
Men play University of Victoria, cheering con-
teat, win $100 for best cheering group, 8:00
p.m.. War Memorial.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Last two games in Canada West vs Saskatchewan Huskies, 8 p.m.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Pizza and Video night: all you can eat, $3
members, $4 non-members, 5-8 p.m.. Sub 111
cafeteria.
tfofFIaJtef
FORMER   U.S.   SECRETARY
of State Henry Kissinger will speak
at a $150 a plate fundraiser for the
Vancouver Junior League this
Wednesday at the Hyatt Regency.
Kissinger, chair of a Reagan Administration committee on U.S.
foreign policy in Central America,
was a key organizer in the 1973
Chilean revolution, the U.S. invasion of Cambodia, and the Indonesian invasion of East Timor.
Opponents of Kissinger's visit
will demonstrate outside the Hyatt
Regency starting 6 p.m. Wednesday, during the dinner.
THIS WEEK
A T HILLEL
Tuesday, Feb.21
FREE LUNCH - sponsored by B'nai B'rith Women -
12:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 22
"Rap with the Rabbi"-12:30 p.m. Lunch Available.
Thursday, Feb. 23
Network Seminar — 12:30 p.m. —Lunch Available.
2517 Alma Street, at Broadway 228-1478
SUB
1:30
a discussion, noon.
Plug yourself into the Westsides largest selection
of V.H.S. Video Tapes. We specialize in foreign,
concert, classic and all the new releases.
2 Movies and a Machine
ONLY $11.00
Monday to Thursday
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days. $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is i0:30 a. m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2Ab
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.        ^ffifrl
ONE
FREE
PSYCHOLOGY AND THE BIBLE
LECTURE SERIES
Training in ... .
• Understanding the Bible in the light of modern psychology
and how to become more Christ-centered in your life.
• How to practice Christian meditation and answer occultism
• How to experience healing and relieve tension and anxiety
• Insights into creativity, dreams, intuition, visualization and
healing
THE SEMINAR LEADER IS         The Rt. Rev. Stephen Barham, Ph.D
Dr. Stephen Barham, a Christian psychologist and vice-president of the International Institute of Integral Human Sciences at Concordia University in Montreal. Dr. Barham has taught at major universities in Canada and United States.
He graduated from Central Bible College and has travelled around the world
ministering in historic churches and college campuses.
LOCATION: Feb. 28, 29, March 1, 2 at 12:30 in Buch D238
Also March 5 at 7:30 Buch A100
Topic — Is Bible relevant in the light of psychology today
SPONSORED BY: Charismatic Christian Fellowship
Maranatha Christian Club Box 62
5 - COMING EVENTS
11 - FOR SALE - Private
15 - FOUND
20 - HOUSING
VACANCIES IN STUDENT RESIDENCES
for Ladies.  Room & Board. Come to the
Housing Office or call 228-2811.
POSITIVE PERSON WANTED to share
house with 3 others. Main & 20th area.
$155/month & util. Call David or Debbie to
arrange a visit. 879-5054.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT. GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written; grammar composition,
spelling, punctuation. 682-1043.
ARE YOU HAVING PROBLEMS writing
correctly? Are you losing marks because of
your English? Get your papers checked and
corrected. Phone Evenings: 6-9 p.m.
531-8157.
85 - TYPING
30 - JOBS
WANTED: Students to sell cosmetics for
B.C. based company. Earn 30-50%. No kit
purchase required. Call 888-9505 or
584-0417 between 6-7:30 p.m.
WANTED: Childcare for 2 yr. old, two or
three afternoons a wk. at my house.
228-6285 or 224-0289.
35 - LOST
GOLD RING with 7 bands. Lost Feb. 9
around 5 p.m. beside Memorial Gym.
Reward. 228-3350 (days) or 263-7135
(eves.)
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
U—TYPE Micom word processor available
for rent @ $5/hr. Jeeva @ 876-5333.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS.   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1206.
WORD PROCESSINGIMicom.) student
rates for theses typing $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Jeeva 876-5333
EXCELLENT TYPIST. IBM, AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING. Essays, Theses,
Resumes, Etc. by professional typist. Ask
for our student rate. Ellen, 271-6924.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING:
reasonable.  25 yrs.  exp.
271-6755.
all phases, fast
Electronic  type
40 - MESSAGES
65 - SCANDALS
THE U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD SHOP can
print ANYTHING you want to say on a personalized bumper sticker - One Day Service.
LONG TIME ADMIRER. Which Psych 200?
I need more cluesl ARYAN
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST.  For accurate
professional result call Audrey. 228-0378.
TYPING essays, etc. $1.25/hr d.s. page;
Resumes $10. Phone 736-1494 days,
876-8638 evenings.
QUALITY TYPING on short notice. Reports,
essays, resumes, etc. Reasonable rates.
688-5884.
90 - WANTED
70 - SERVICES
EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
224-6518.
WANTED: Men 18-25 yrs. old, interested in
a video taping for a screen test of a new
Stanley Kubric film. For info, call 942-5785
after 6 p.m. Tuesday, February 21,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
'Birds finish perfect league season
By PETER BERLIN
Everything that has happened so
far is irrelevant. The UBC men's
team has completed its regular season schedule in faultless fashion.
Among their victims as they garnered 15 straight wins were the University of Victoria, three times.
But all that matters now is the
best of three playoffs at UBC on
Volleyball
team wins
For an apparently meaningless
game, Friday's women's volleyball
match carried a lot of emotional
weight.
The final league standings had
already been determined when the
University of Saskatchewan
women's volleyball team came to
UBC. The U of S had won its first
thirteen league games and secured
first place and, with it, home advantage in the divisional playoffs.
The 'Birds were guaranteed second
place and knew they would be
travelling to Saskatoon the next
week. But, a win would mean they
could take that trip with much more
confidence.
And it was a win they got. The
first game was the key. Down 14-10
the 'Birds, in the words of coach
Kim Harris, "showed a lot of poise
in making the decision not to lose
the game." They came back to seize
it, and with it the initiative, 17-15.
"After that," said Harris, "the
team felt they couldn't lose." They
went on to win the next two games
15-7 and 15-13.
The next night UBC defeated the
weaker Alberta team in three
games. Harris made his team carry
out their U of S gameplan against
the Albertans.
The coach said Saskatchewan's
strengths are their steady play, their
serving and serve receiving. "If we
serve receive well, and eliminate unforced errors, our offence is strong
enough to beat them," said Harris.
The teams play their best of three
series this weekend in Saskatoon.
Friday, Saturday and, if necessary,
Sunday.
The Vikings are the reigning
western champions. Last year they
upset UBC in the playoffs two
weeks before the 'Birds, qualifying
as hosts, won the national championships.
UBC coach Dale Ohman says this
will provide stimulus for his team.
UVic for their part will take heart
from their thrilling fifth game victory against playoff rivals the University of Saskatchewan on Saturday.
The Vikings finally clinched the
match 17-15 in the deciding game to
advance.
"We've played them so often we
know who to work on," Ohrnan
4t   **
'tV^Sf^t^O''
■ rory alien photo
HE STOOPS TO CONQUER . . . Chris Frehlick of UBC in action as the
'Birds cruise to yet another victory in Canada West action. Bob Brett,
meanwhile, keeps his eye on the ball and contemplates this weekends do
or die playoff series at UBC.
THE DINER
Serving UBC   and West Point Grey
for the last 24 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Homo Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices - including
Roast Be«f and Yorkshire Pudding     I
Open Monday to Saturday ■
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m I
Closed Sundays 6/ Public Holidays     I
For the early ones,   we start serving '
breakfast from 8:00 a.m. I
4556 W. 10th Ave.  - 224 19121
We j(.cept Charyex r
I
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 20% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 AT THE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
MOtl.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
YES, YOU CAN LEARN
HOW TO LEAD
Attend this successful seminar and learn how to
lead others far more effectively
WHO SHOULD ATTEND? Any student involved in leadership, or aspiring to leadership.
SEMINAR LEADER: Your seminar will be personally conducted by Peter Lowe, recognized
successful president of Lifemasters Training Co., training leaders across Canada. Former UBC
student and member of the International Platform Association.
WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? The Precision Model for effective leadership . . . The single
greatest key to all leadership . . . How to persuade others to follow you . . . How to set goals
. . . How to be a goal-achiever instead of a tension-reliever . . . How to conquer fear of failure
and rejection . . . Break crippling attitude habits that hold you back as a leader . . . Gain self-
confidence and overcome feelings of inferiority . . . Learn the mental secrets that give you
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SEMINAR FEE: Special fee of $15.00 for UBC students (All others only $30.00) which includes
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^\
said. "Even though they are very
young they'll come over here with
lots of discipline. We'll have to
keep them quiet; they play on emotion," Ohman added.
Ohman said he hopes there will
be a. big turnout to support the
'Birds and help them gain the emotional edge. "UVic will bring a lot
of good support with them."
The athletics department have arranged a cheering contest to encourage support and will award fairly
substantial prizes. On the other
hand there will be an entry charge
for UBC students; this is apparently
a Canadian Intervarsity Athletic
Union rule. Cable 10 TV will also
be there to film the games.
Cable 10 were in attendance at
Friday's game when UBC defeated
the University of Saskatchewan
three   games   to   none.
The next night UBC beat the
weaker University of Alberta team,
against without dropping a game,
15-8, 15-7 15-13.
"This weekend was excellent,"
Ohman said. "Paul Thiessen had a
slight shoulder injury and sat out
and the other players took a bit of
the load."
Ohman said he was particularly
pleased with two players who
haven't played much, defensive specialist Peter Butterworth made his
first appearance against Saskatchewan and rookie Colin Young also
played well.
W L GW GL Pts
UBC 15   0   45      9   25
Victoria 11    4   34   21    18
Saskatchewan     9   6   34   27   16
Calgary 7   8   29   28    11
Lethbridge 2 13    16   41      3
Alberta 1 14    12    44      2
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1984
'Birds loss ends hope for playoffs
By MONTE STEWART
The men's basketball team might
as well take a cruise. They have already said bon voyage to the playoffs.
The 'Birds' league record fell to a
preposterous 2-7 last weekend when
they received a cold welcome on the
prairies. Saturday, the 'Birds lost
79-68 to Alberta Golden Bears in
Edmonton. Friday, Saskatchewan
Huskies whipped the 'Birds 86-66 in
Saskatoon. It was the first victory
of the season for the hapless Huskies.
Ken Klassen, the second highest
scorer in the Canada West Conference behind Karl Tilleman of Calgary, scored 25 points to pace the
'Birds against Alberta. UBC trailed
by 18 points at half-time but closed
to seven late in the game.
UBC coach Bill Edwards felt that
the officiating was probably the difference between victory and defeat
for the 'Birds against the Golden
Bears. "The officials were very
much a part of the final outcome,"
said Edwards. "We'd get close and
all of a sudden there were a couple
of dubious calls."
The 'Birds' mentor did not offer
any excuses for Friday's performance. "We just played very
poorly," he said. "We were not
prepared to play and we did everything that we could do to self-destruct."
The Huskies limited Klassen to
only 14 points while Steve Glover
also contributed 14 and Pat West
added 12 points. Paul
Humbert, who hit on 100 per ^
cent of his free throws, led the f
Huskies with 17 points. I
With   the   two   losses,   the
hoopsters virtually bid adieu to
post-season chances. The 'Birds still
have one game remaining in their
10-game Canada West schedule and
are still in mathematical contention
for the playoffs. UBC is only one
game behind fourth-place Lethbridge. Calgary defeated the Pronghorns 82-72 Saturday. However,
the odds for a UBC playoff berth
are really insurmountable. The
team's final game of the regular season is this Thursday in Victoria
against the reigning champions.
Edwards regards the final game
of the year as an opportunity for his
team to salvage some pride. The
Vikings, undefeated in 55 games
* & versus Canada West compe-
\ tition, are four-time de-
~  *■ I   fending Canadian champions
"*L\ "I have no lllu-
,. '       sions about going
over there and making the surprise
of the year by beating Victoria."
The 'Birds close out their 1984
season with an exhibition contest in
Bellingham against Western Washington University on Friday.
Edwards took time out to analyze
his team's overall performance this
season. "I'm very disappointed
with the season. I think that if you
look at the season as a whole, we've
played fairly good basketball. We
surprised a few people by winning
some games that most people didn't
think we would win." UBC captured the Buchanan Classic series
with Simon Fraser University earlier
this season.
"I don't think we, as a team,
played up to the standard that we're
capable of. Most of the other teams
have more talent than us but I think
if we'd played together as a team
HEAD AND SHOULDERS above the rest, Thunderbird Matt Kokkan over 4,000 football starved spectators. 'Which one is Warren Moon' one
grabs more clean possession against the University of California at Californian asked afterwards. Next month Berkeley comes up to UBC to
Berkeley Golden Bears. The 'Birds whipped the Pac 10 power house before  show off their tans and compete for the, ahem, 'Rugby World Cup,'
Rugby team triumphs on road trip
By LORN NA OLSON
' The UBC rugby team returned
Sunday from their successful International West Coast League tour
with a perfect 3-0 record.
The   Thunderbirds   began   their
sweep by stunning the American
champions, the University of Berkeley Golden Bears by a score of
34-0. Fullback Geoff Kendall led
the team with two superb tries while
brother Adam Kendall added 10
points in penalty kicks and conversions.
Playoff hope clashed
By ANDREA BARKER
One basket. That was the difference between the playoffs and
heartbreak for the UBC women's
basketball team in Edmonton on
Saturday night. They lost to the
University of Alberta by two points
69-67, and missed the playoffs.
A win would have allowed them
to edge their opponents out and
participate in post-season play for
the first time since women's basketball resumed at UBC.
The crushing defeat to the number four ranked team in the country
followed a 69-48 victory over the
winless University of Saskatchewan.
Friday night's was an effortless
win over an injury-laden team. Forward Linda Edwards led the 'Birds
with 16 points, followed by graduating Cathy Bultitude who notched
14. For Saskatchewan, Jay Korst
and B. Mercier both hooped 12
points.
Saturday night saw exciting action against Alberta. Unfortunately
for the Thunderbirds, it was their
large number of personal fouls that
caused them to lose out. Of the 22
times they were at the foul line, only
13 throws were completed. Alberta
hooped 21 of their 25 chances.
■ Overall, "the Thunderbirds put
up strong competition against a top-
ranked team," commented coach
Jack Pomfret. UBC shot 44 per
cent from the field while Alberta
completed 41 per cent of their tries.
And leading the team in points were
veterans Edwards and Bultitude
who scored 25 and 17 respectively.
National team member Toni Kordic
posted 26 points for the hosts.
In spite of the defeat the season
has been an encouraging one for
UBC.
The 'Birds have come a long way
in this, one of the most successful
years. They are part of the tough
Canada West conference, four of
which teams are in the top ten, and
finished the season in fifth place
with a four wins, six losses record.
Coach Pomfret has some important
off-season recruiting to do if he is
to replace the departing Bultitude
and improve on this season's overall record of 13-16, but most of his
squad are young and the basis of a
winning team is there.
At Palo Alto the 'Birds came
from a 12-point deficit at the half to
defeat Stanford University 13-12.
Led by a try from winger John Devlin and three penalty kicks from
Stephen Rowell, the 'Birds kept
their composure and gained victory
over the hard-hitting Cardinals.
Coach Donn Spence said his pack
started flat in the first half but their
effort in the second half was well
worth a win.
The 'Birds travelled down the
coast to the University of Santa
Barbara. There they racked up a
score of 42-6 over the disappointing
Gauchos, thanks to three tries from
winger Pat Palmer and 14 points
from Stephen Rowell.
Coach Spence said he was extremely pleased with the tour victories, especially since the team suffered from flu and unexpected injuries while on the road.
"Those shuffled lineups are very
hard on the pack, but the boys pulled through," Spence said.
The 'Birds now look forward to
several important contests.
Women win on weekend
GP    W
L   PTS
Calgary             10     8
2      16
Lethbridge        10     7
3      14
Alberta              10     6
4      12
♦Victoria             10     5
5      10
UBC                  10     4
6       8
Saskatchewan   10     0
10       0
* Victoria     makes
playoffs
automatically as host.
When all the points were totalled
up UBC had second overall in the
swimming and diving competitions
at the Canada West championships
over the weekend.
But the totals concealed some
outstanding performances.
Especially from the women's swim
team who won their half of the
match by a wide margin, they
scored 513 points, Alberta who
were second scored 434.
The mighty Calgary men's team
however, won their side of the contest by even more. Their total of 657
was more than the next two teams,
UBC and Alberta scored together.
The top women's swimmer was
UBC's Rhonda Thommason who
won the 100m freestyle, the 100m
butterfly and the 200m individual
medley. Anne Martin of UBC won
the 50m free' and the 100m
breaststroke, both in Canada West
record times.
The best performance on the
men's team was by Dave Young
who was second in the 1500m.
In the diving Nancy Bonham and
Steve Church were second in the
one metre competition and third off
the three metre board in the
women's and men's competitions
The results meant that 22 UBC
competitors, 12 women and 10
men, have qualified for the Canadian University Athletic Union
finals in Toronto in April.
. . . with more intensity . . . and
more pride, I think we probably
would have done better (in the regular season)," Edwards said.
The UBC coach also confirmed
that he will return as coach next season. "I've been offered the position
for next year." The decision to retain Edwards will provide some
stability and continuity in a rather
unstable men's basketball program
of recent years. The team had gone
through three different coaches in
successive years.
GP
W
L   PTS
Victoria
9
9
0      18
Calgary
8
6
2      12
Alberta
8
4
4        8
Lethbridge
8
3
5        8
UBC
9
2
7        4
Saskatchewan
8
1
7        2
Lethbridge
mal
kes
playoffs
automatically as host.
Hopes iced
for playoffs
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
All playoff hopes ended for UBC
Thunderbirds men's hockey team in
the weekend's Canada West hockey
action.
Rick Swann scored three goals
Friday and another two goals Saturday to pace the conference leading
Alberta Golden Bears to a two
game sweep over the 'Birds. The
Bears showed why they are one of
the two best university hockey
teams in Canada as they convincingly beat UBC 8-4 on Friday, and
8-1 Saturday.
Mike Coflin scored one goal in
each game for the 'Birds while Rick
Amann, Renzo Berra and Bill
Trenaman added singles in Friday's
contest. The 'Birds never had much
of a chance as the powerful Bears
opened up a 4-1 first period lead in
both games.
UBC's disappointing results this
past weekend were academic to
their play-off hopes as the defending national champion Saskatchewan Huskies captured the second and final play-off berth on
their own with a two game sweep
over the lowly Calgary Dinosaurs.
The Huskies won the national title last year with coach Dave King
who was behind the bench for Team
Canada's fourth place finish at the
recently completed Winter Olympics at Sarajevo, Yugoslavia.
The 'Birds close out their regular
season this coming weekend when
they entertain the Huskies at the
Thunderbird Arena Friday and
Saturday night.
Saskatchewan will face number
two ranked Alberta for the conference championship the following
weekend.
Toronto Blues are currently ranked number one in the country.
GP W L PTS
Alberta                22 18 4 36
Saskatchewan     22 14 8 28
UBC                    22 9 13 18
Calgarv                22 3 19 6
Ryfoachuk and Kitchen gone in draft
The Thunderbird football club
was upstaged by the Simon Fraser
University Clansmen in this year's
Canadian Football League draft —
in Clansmen's eyes only.
There were only two 'Birds selected this time round compared to
10 last year. Five Clansmen were
picked, including running back
Robert Reid in the first round. He
went to Saskatchewan Roughriders.
Offensive lineman Jim Rybachuk
and linebacker Greg Kitchen were
the only 'Birds selected among a
limited number of players available.
Ironically,  they went  right  after
each other in the seventh round.
Rybachuk, a player who sets an example both on and off the field,
went to Winnipeg Blue Bombers.
Kitchen, a consistent performer all
season long for the 'Birds, will join
his friend Laurent DesLauriers with
the B.C. Lions.
Rybachuk has not played the
necessary four years at UBC. He
earned selection because the CFL is
permitted to draft players 23 and
over. Rybachuk is 23. Kitchen has
played four years for the Thunderbirds. Both players will still be eligible to play for UBC next season if
they want to.
Xui

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